Mergi la conţinut
  • https://www.AUTOdoc24.RO

Toata activitatea

Se afișează tot conținutul adăugat în ultimele 365 zile.

Tip de Conținut


Fluxul se actualizează automat     

  1. Ieri
  2. They were lined up outside a motorcycle dealership in Southern California, hundreds of them before dawn on the day after Thanksgiving. Not Black Friday shoppers trying to get door buster deals on electronics; these were hard-core dirt riders looking to make it from Los Angeles through Barstow and on to Vegas the hard way. Sleepy eyed enthusiasts were waiting to pass tech inspection and then collect their roll chart for navigating the roughly 400 miles of dirt standing between them and bragging rights on the Las Vegas strip. For the most part, it looked like a KTM/Husqvarna ad but all major brands were represented, including a large number of vintage machines and of course a small army of XR650’s. A fresh set of Continental TKC80 knobbies were spooned on for the deep sand. We rode light carrying just tools and camera gear in GIVI soft bags. District 37 carries the rest of your gear to the hotel. One thing was clear; out of the approximately 600 entrants we were definitely in the minority riding a KTM 1090 and Honda Africa Twin. While both of these bikes are very capable off-road they still tip the scale north of 500 pounds and all that weight can be a handful in deep sand. In fact, sand was the name of the game on this ride and I for one was not looking forward to piloting my Africa Twin through long deep washes but what was my choice? How could we know how difficult the “hard” routes were until we attempted them on these giants? As soon as we said goodbye to pavement in Palmdale, it became clear that this was not a scenic dual sport ride. The LA Barstow to Vegas is a desert race thinly veiled as a non-competitive event for obvious liability reasons. You can hardly fault District 37, I can’t think of any organization capable of corralling hundreds of dust crazed maniacs hell bent on making it to Vegas without touching Interstate 15. Stuck in a Cloud of Dust I felt like I had taken a shot of speed that morning with a steady flow of adrenalin pumping through my veins. There is nothing like the blind hubris of dirt bikes plowing into dust clouds with no end in sight. Riders tore along all around me in zero visibility with little regard for life or limb. The route itself was not entirely treacherous but with no way to see where you were going 75% of the time, it’s a wonder more people weren’t injured. In later days, stories surfaced of broken wrists, legs and floating collarbones. With harsh desert conditions reeking havoc on man and machine, nearly one in six did not make it to the bright lights of Vegas. After about 20 miles the route split and we committed to the first hard section, which turned out to be a seemingly never-ending sand wash. It felt like I was piloting an unruly jet ski in choppy surf as I awkwardly tried to stay afloat. By the time I had made it a few miles in, I was frustrated enough with my slow progress to resort to uncomfortable speeds and the reality that I could crash at any moment. Someone once told me “The faster you go, the faster things happen.” I was keenly aware of this but it wouldn’t save me from a painful reminder in my near future. Things Get a Little Hazy Around 85 miles into the day, my LAB2V experience changed drastically. Earlier I had been tossed from my bike in a sandy corner and tried to become one with some shrubbery but since then things had been looking up. I finally felt I was getting used to sand (we don’t get a lot of sand in the Pacific North West) when I unceremoniously lost the front end of my Africa Twin at speed. Bracing for impact with my shoulder left me unprepared for the whiplash that propelled my head into the ground. I grunted as my shoulder hit and then saw black as the right side of my head bounced off what I hoped would be a much more forgiving surface. After that there’s a flash of someone asking if I was alright and next thing I knew I was riding alone through the desert. It felt like someone had flipped a light switch in my mind but I couldn’t quite put my finger on why. I was separated from my group and unanswered questions started accumulating in my helmet: How long had I been riding? What did I have for lunch? Wait, did I stop for lunch? What really tipped me off that I had sustained a head injury was my inner addict telling me not to forget cigarettes at the next stop even though I haven’t smoked in years. An Early End to My Ride By the time I made it back to pavement outside Helendale for our lunch stop, I wasn’t sure of much except that I had a concussion and I probably shouldn’t be operating a motorcycle. I had ridden the last 15 or so miles in a quizzical state wondering why I could no longer keep up with my group. When I finally caught up with my patiently waiting friends, my first comment was “I fell somewhere back there but I don’t remember doing it.” Big eyes in my buddy’s helmet indicated that this statement coupled with my strange behavior was cause for concern. I also learned that I knocked off the Sena Prism camera attached to my helmet during the fall and apparently called one of my friends asking him to look for it, but this was all news to me. Soon after, a group of District 37 EMT sweep riders stopped to see if everything was copacetic and after a short Q and A urged my compatriots to not let me ride because another blow to the head could have much worse ramifications. Thankfully, we had a support vehicle nearby and my AT was loaded on the trailer and I in the passenger seat within 30 minutes. The other riders in our group carried on while we went ahead to meet them in Barstow. Senior Editor Rob Dabney pushing the KTM 1090 Adventure R through the deep sand. Hunkered down in Barstow for the night, most riders opted for matinee dinners and early dates with motel beds. Some of the more grizzled entrants opted for strong drinks and entertainment on what is probably the wildest night this desert outpost sees all year. Rouge dirt bikes could be heard tearing through the streets and small work parties could be found in any hotel parking lot. Jaywalking across historic route 66 with my head still reeling, I tried to process the days events and make sense of the sheer magnitude of this event and what I would be missing the following day. Ride too slow on a big bike in the soft sand of the LAB2V and this can happen. Free couch anyone? Unfortunately you always have to keep an eye out for garbage dumped on the trail, especially with limited visibility in the dust. Saturday morning the metallic clatter of dirt bike engines before first light made for frantic energy in the air. Knobby tires slapped pavement as riders clamored to get back on dirt. Everyone was moving with purpose because they knew they had a long day ahead. I too was in a bit of a hurry as I had resolved to be a spectator of the highest caliber in lieu of riding. I spent the day chasing dust clouds in the desert intersecting the routes wherever possible. Aside from the head trauma this was a great way to experience the event, I got to see it from both sides as a rider and spectator. Watching dirt bikes move like desert dogs through the terrain in small packs but endless streams made me feel small. I realized that this many people wouldn’t be out here Thanksgiving weekend for 34 years running if the juice wasn’t worth the squeeze. Finish Line on the Vegas Strip! That day Red Rock Canyon just outside Vegas, was easily the highlight with amazing colors and rock formations (and no more sand!). The technical riding that was within the canyon was a highlight for many of the riders as well. I greeted participants exiting the last section of dirt as they did wheelies and snapped their throttles in celebration. Next stop was the big show and everyone bounded for the Orleans Casino and finish line on their knobby tires. Chaos reigned as riders trickled in with different degrees of shell shock on their dust-covered faces. Bikes piled up in the loud smoky parking garage of the Orleans Hotel as motorcycles were abandoned in favor of slot machines and cocktails. Santa and one of his showgirls strolled by as someone kick started a stubborn XR650. At this point it was hard to tell if it was the excessive amounts of exhaust smoke or post concussive side effects that were bending my reality. The Orleans seemed like a fitting location for this ride to culminate. With its off the strip attitude, cheap buffet and low rent entertainment, most of these savages felt right at home. The LA Barstow to Vegas crowd blended seamlessly into the dark, tawdry façade of the casino. Later that night, I was off to McCarran Airport and soon Vegas was just a hazy memory. As we gained elevation, I could see traffic stretching all the way to Los Angeles as holiday travelers tried to make it home in gridlock. I got all warm and fuzzy thinking about things to be thankful for this Thanksgiving: That I got to participate in this fabled dirt circus known as LA Barstow to Vegas, that I didn’t get hurt worse and most importantly that I wouldn’t have to eat that much dust until I was back for redemption next year. Photo Gallery . About the Author: Spencer Hill “The Gear Dude” has been fueling his motorcycle addiction with adventure since first swinging his leg over a bike in 2010. Whether he’s exploring his own backyard in the Pacific Northwest or crisscrossing the United States, Spencer is always in search of scenic off road routes, epic camping locations and the best gear possible. He began writing shortly after taking up two-wheel travel to share his experiences and offer insight with his extensive backpacking, camping and overland background. Photos by Spencer Hill
  3. Ce urmează la Trans-Provence în 2018?

    Ce înseamnă să organizezi un concurs? Ce înseamnă să găsești poteci noi? Ce înseamnă să nu mai ai voie cu bicicleta pe unele poteci? Află ce înseamnă să organizezi cursa epică de enduro Trans-Provence. [embedded content] Sursa: Freerider
  4. Ce înseamnă să organizezi un concurs? Ce înseamnă să găsești poteci noi? Ce înseamnă să nu mai ai voie cu bicicleta pe unele poteci? Află ce înseamnă să organizezi cursa epică de enduro Trans-Provence. [embedded content] Sursa: Freerider
  5. Speculatii despre lansarea unei Yamaha YZ65 pe piaţă, în februarie 2018 Este limpede, Yamaha va lansa o nouă motocicletă pe piaţă, în februarie 2018, asta se poate confirma prin simpla urmărire a clipului de mai jos. Întrebarea este: despre ce motocicletă va fi vorba? Specialiştii din presa moto mizează pe YZ65 din cel puţin două motive. Chiar Yamaha a specificat că motocicleta este dedicată tinerilor rideri, şi apoi, există o discontinuitate între longeviva PW50, motocicleta cu care generaţii de copii au fost iniţiaţi în tainele motocrosului şi YZ85, o motocicletă de cross dedicată celor ajunşi la vârsta pubertăţii şi/sau adolescenţei. Vestea este grozavă, deoarece acum Yamaha vine cu o gamă completă de crossere, pentru toate vărstele şi, iată, nu renunţă la angajamentul făcut în direcţia dezvoltării de propulsoare în doi timpi. Din momentul în care cilindrea de 50 cmc e prea mică, părinţii micilor piloţi nu mai trebuie să caute modele în curtea altor producători, putând miza pe albastru, până când copiii lor devin campioni. Nu în ultimul rând, pentru cei care mai au dubii că e vorba de o YZ65, să ne uităm la plăcuţa de număr care e „pregătită” în acest clip, care aduce şi un nou slogan, foarte inspirat şi autentic pentru moştenirea Yamaha şi anume „victorYZone”. [embedded content]
  6. Test – antifurt electronic Linka 2017

    Linka este o mică și tânără firmă californiană, înființată în 2014. Mică și tânără însă compania s-a făcut repede remarcată, obținând premii la diferite evenimente, prezentă fiind inclusiv la Eurobike 2016. Azi, într-o lume în care aproape totul este digitalizat, nu este de mirat că și antifurturile au conexiune bluetooth cu telefonul smart. Linka este primul lacăt din lume care a avut curajul de digitalizeze un antifurt, controlat cu ajutorul unei aplicații instalate pe telefon. Linka Lock este practic un antifurt clasic care doar blochează roata spate a bicicletei. Așadar nu leagă bicicleta de ceva ci doar împiedică hoțul să pedaleze pe bicicleta. Dacă vrea să o fure va trebui să alerge cu ea în brațe. Antifurtul are o formă elegantă și discreta în ciuda greutății de 633 g. Este foarte robust mulțumită corpului metalic și inelului din oțel călit cu grosimea de 9 mm. Protecția la intemperii este IP56 – protecție bună la praf și protecție foarte bună la apă. Poate fi folosit fără probleme iarna până la -25 grade și vara până la +65!! Producătorii spun că este compatibil cu 85% din bicicletele de pe piață. Linka dispune de câteva găuri pentru a fi instalat în niște șuruburi care aparent există la unele biciclete, pe țevile seatstay. Însă la bicicletele normale, în șuruburile respective se fixează frânele spate v-brake. Așa că în majoritatea cazurilor vei instala lacătul Linka cu ajutorul bridelor de plastic incluse. Da, sună ciudat, însă robustețea și securitatea antifiurtului nu stă în acele bride. Recunosc că am fost reticent să folosesc “pe bune” acest antifurt în oraș, în viața reală. Când e vorba de treburi serioase nu prea te poți baza pe electronice. Nu ar fi fost plăcut ca la un moment dat să nu mai pot deschide sau închide antifurtul, undeva în mijlocul orașului. Asta întrucât controlul este digital și wireless. Nu ai niciun fel de cheie fizică cu care să încui sau descui lacătul. Pentru a-l încuia apeși de două ori pe butonul „pornit” al lacătului, iar pentru a-l descuia apeși de doua ori pe ecranul telefonului, pe aplicația dedicată Linka. Exista totuși soluții să-l descui „manual” dacă cumva ți-ai uitat telefonul sau a rămas fără baterie. Când instalezi pe telefon aplicația, ești rugat să alegi și un cod pin cu ajutorul căruia poți descuia lacătul direct din butonul pornit-oprit al său. Dacă însă lacătul rămâne fără curent nu ni se spune ce se întâmplă. Probabil trebuie să îl tai. Însă până să se întâmple lucrul ăsta, ai două stadii de alertă pe care le vei primi pe telefon înainte ca bateria să se descarce complet. Totuși acumulatorul lacătului durează extrem de mult, peste 1 an! Mai precis 16 luni în condiții ideale, potrivit producătorului. Aplicația de pe telefon te va avertiza când bateria a ajuns la 30% și încă o dată la 10%. Dacă nu încarci și tu lacătul la timp atunci asta e. Încărcarea se face prin mufă microUSB și durează între 2 și 3,5 ore. Acumulatorul este de tip LiION polimer. Nu există pericolul să strici vreo spiță în timpul procesului de încuiere. Dacă cumva inelul de securizare întâlnește o spiță în timp ce se închide, acesta se va retrage imediat, iar lacătul va scoate un sunet ca să te anunțe că încuierea nu s-a efectuat. Sensibilitatea la presiune este mare și chiar dacă inelul se lovește de o spiță, aceasta nu se va îndoi. Linka dispune de multe reglaje pe care le faci de pe telefon. Spre exemplu poți ajusta nivelul de sensibilitate. Dacă Linka este încuiată și bicicleta se mișcă, sirena de 110 dB a lacătului va suna. Există trei setări a sensibilității sau poți împiedica complet sirena să sune. De asemenea, dacă ești în raza de acțiune a Bluetooth-ului lacătului (120 m), atunci primești și pe telefon alertă de mișcare. O specificație interesantă este cea de „partajare” a bicicletei. Dacă ai prieteni cărora vrei să le împrumuți bicicleta, pot și ei să descuie lacătul cu condiția să aibă instalata aplicația pe telefonul lor, iar tu să le fi acordat accesul în prealabil. Linka este echipat și cu gps integrat. Această specificație putea fi foarte utilă dacă lacătul era echipat și cu cartele SIM GSM, cu ajutorul căreia aveai contact permanent între telefon și lacăt, acolo unde există semnal GSM. Altfel, totul se limitează la raza Bluetooth-ului de 120 m, care este mai mică dacă te afli într-o clădire. Însă funcția gps pe care o are Linka îți permite sa vezi pe telefon coordonatele GPS, câteodată chiar și adresa, locului unde ai lăsat bicicleta. Dacă ai fost la o petrecere și ai plecat cu prietenii de acolo mai amețit, a doua zi când revii să-ți iei bicicleta o vei putea localiza mai ușor dacă ai uitat unde ai lăsat-o. Funcția de auto-descuiere este utilă deși te poți speria puțin. Cum mi s-a întâmplat mie când, ieșind din magazin, am găsit lacătul descuiat. Pe moment nu realizasem că s-a auzit totuși beep-ul specific care anunță descuierea antifurtului. Această funcție o activezi/dezactivezi de pe telefon, iar lacătul se descuie singur când te întorci la bicicleta și ești la 3 metri de ea. Spuneam la început că am fost reticent să folosesc acest antifurt și recunosc că l-am încercat minuțios mai întâi în casă. Însă după ce l-am testat, nu mai am nicio teamă. În „natură” a funcționat ireproșabil. Per ansamblu sunt foarte mulțumit. Pe de altă parte prețul acestui antifurt îl cam încadreză la categoria “de lux”. Așadar alegerea de achiziție este întrutotul a ta. Din partea noastră tot ce putem spune este că lacătul funcționează așa cum promite. Greutate: 633 g Instalare: roata spate Comunicare telefon: BT4.0 Protecție intemperii: IP56 Autonomie acumulator: 16 luni Preț la data testului: 780 Lei Importator: Sport X Team Sursa: Freerider
  7. Pentru cei ce sunt cu adevărat fani împătimiți Cannondale, din 2018 va fi disponibil cadoul perfect pentru cei mici: bicicleta fără pedale Trail Balance 12, cu furcă… Lefty! Disponibilă în versiune pentru băieți și pentru fete, bicicleta beneficiază de furca rigidă Little Lefty, un cadru din aluminiu SmartForm C2 de calitate, cuveți FSA și un ghidon și pipă în stil BMX. Cadrul are o formă ce aduce aminte de modelele celor mari, cu chainstay-uri supradimensionate și tub hidroformat cu secțiune variabilă. Prețul anunțat pentru SUA este de 199 $ pe pagina Cannondale USA iar momentan bicicleta nu e disponibilă pe pagina internațională a producătorului sau a importatorului în România. Sperăm să apară cât de curând, între timp fiind disponibilă la magazinele online. Sursa: Freerider
  8. Pentru cei ce sunt cu adevărat fani împătimiți Cannondale, din 2018 va fi disponibil cadoul perfect pentru cei mici: bicicleta fără pedale Trail Balance 12, cu furcă… Lefty! Disponibilă în versiune pentru băieți și pentru fete, bicicleta beneficiază de furca rigidă Little Lefty, un cadru din aluminiu SmartForm C2 de calitate, cuveți FSA și un ghidon și pipă în stil BMX. Cadrul are o formă ce aduce aminte de modelele celor mari, cu chainstay-uri supradimensionate și tub hidroformat cu secțiune variabilă. Prețul anunțat pentru SUA este de 199 $ pe pagina Cannondale USA iar momentan bicicleta nu e disponibilă pe pagina internațională a producătorului sau a importatorului în România. Sperăm să apară cât de curând, între timp fiind disponibilă la magazinele online. Sursa: Freerider
  9. Preluând moda lansată de Harley-Davidson și Yamaha, firma Indian a organizat un concurs de personalizare al motocicletelor pentru dealerii rețelei internaționale. Inițiativa a demarat în 2016, concursul fiind rezervat rețelei de distribuție Indian, singura condiție de participare fiind prezentarea unei motociclete Indian Scout model 2016, pe care sa fie instalate cel puțin trei accesorii originale. În rest, participanții au avut ocazia să-și demonstreze măsura pasiunii pentru produsele producătorului pe care îl reprezintă, pentru istoria și tradiția firmei, modificând o motocicletă în cadrul competiției denumită Project Scout. Motocicleta câștigătoare a primului sezon a fost modelul numit Boardtracker, un omagiu adus motocicletelor folosite în cursele pe pistă de lemn ale anilor ‘20. Anvelopele albe instalate pe roți de 26 inch conferă acestei motociclete istorice un aspect retro, împreună cu tobele de eșapament și șaua care imită modelele din lemn folosite în perioada 1920-1927. Numele firmei Jack Daniel’s a fost folosit pentru a comemora cei 150 de ani de existență ai companiei și cea de-a 115-a aniversare a apariției firmei Indian. Câteva piese componente ale motocicletei au fost realizate din lemn de stejar alb: scărițele, suportul pentru numărul de înmatriculare și ghidonul. Cea de-a doua ediție a competiției de personalizare a fost câștigată de motocicleta modificată de dealerul Indian Motorcycle Charlotte, proiectul fiind numit Scout 101 Tribute. Pentru realizarea motocicletei, constructorul a împrumutat culorile și desenul utilizat la modelul original Scout 101, motocicleta folosită de Burt Munro în tentativele sale reușite de îmbunătățire a recordurilor de viteză pe pista de sare de la Bonneville. Multe dintre detaliile de finisaj ale proiectului recrează detalii ale acelei perioade, printre care eșapamentele negre, în anii începutului de secol XX nefiind utilizat cromul. Astfel au fost instalate niște eșapamente ceramice, scuturile de protecție au fost vopsite electrostatic, iar logo-ul companiei folosit în anii ‘20 a fost presat pe șaua din piele, imitând modelul șeii instalate pe Indian Scout 1929. Modelele de serie Indian Scout pot fi văzute la magazinul din București al importatorului autorizat ASP Group. Dacă vreți să aflați mai multe despre motocicletele Indian sau despre recordurile de viteză reușite de Burt Munro cu motocicleta sa Indian Scout, mai jos sunt articole cu aceste subiecte postate până acum. Dacă nu aţi văzut toate testele şi cursele moto postate până acum pe blogul POVEŞTI CU MOTOARE şi pe pagina de Facebook, sau dacă vreţi să urmăriţi materialele pe care le voi posta, calea cea mai sigură este să vă abonaţi la canalul YouTube. Vezi articolul integral
  10. 2018 Dakar Route

    2018 Dakar Route Posted in Racing, Riding Mountainous sand dunes. Extreme altitude. Unpredictable weather. Punishing distances. The 2018 Dakar route looks set to be the toughest ever. Sam Sunderland (GBR) KTM 450 RALLY Dakar 2017 © Marcin Kin In recent years the Rally Dakar has found its home in South America. But, as the name suggests, that’s not always been the case. The Rally Dakar was born in 1978, taking competitors from Paris, France over 10,000 km through the deserts of Africa to the finish at the famous Lac Rose near Dakar, Senegal. 182 vehicles set off from the French capital on that inaugural trip, 74 of them completed their journey. The event grew steadily through the 80s and 90s and in 2005 a record 688 competitors entered the rally. In 2008 the event was due to depart from Lisbon, as it had the previous two years. But a terrorist attack in Mauritania late in 2007, in which five French tourists were attacked, caused massive concerns for the organizers. As such the 2008 event was cancelled, creating doubts for the continuing future of the world’s toughest rally. All was not lost, obviously, with the countries of Chile and Argentina stepping forward to host the event in 2009. The Dakar name remained but the event has been held in South America ever since. KTM continued their winning streak, despite the change of venue, and as of the 2017 Dakar, their run of consecutive victories stands at 16. Matthias Walkner (AUT, #16), Sam Sunderland (GBR, #14) & Gerard Farres Guell (ESP, #8) KTM 450 RALLY Dakar 2017 © Rally Zone For 2018, the Dakar will cover the three countries of Peru, Bolivia and Argentina. Each country will offer competitors dramatically different terrain – from the sand dunes of Peru, over the mountains of Bolivia to the fast tracks and riverbeds in the heat of Argentina. Rally Dakar Route 2018 © www.dakar.com Peru After being included in the Rally Dakar for the first time in 2012, and then hosting the opening ceremony in 2013, Peru has been absent from the program ever since. The Peruvian government voiced their desire to be part of the rally again at the end of the 2017 event and after working closely with the organizers, ASO, they have made it happen. Peru will host the opening six stages, which throw competitors straight into the sand dunes of the Peruvian desert. It will be tough from the outset for the riders as the bikes are often first onto each stage. The difficulties of navigating the deep sand and tall dunes will only add to their fatigue. “I think a lot of the riders have missed the sand over the last couple of years, but after a week in Peru everyone will be sick of it again,” jokes Laia Sanz. Stage five, which travels from San Juan de Marcona to Arequipa, will really test the competitors’ stamina and navigation skills. The total stage distance is a grueling 770 km, 264 km of which is timed special stage. The bikes and quads will take a separate route to the cars and trucks. Starting at daybreak, the stage takes in 30 km of huge, mountainous dunes. Accurate navigation and the ability to read the terrain will be vital to not only getting a good result, but safely reaching the finish. On Thursday, January 11, stage six has competitors leave Arequipa in Peru and head to the world’s highest capital city of La Paz in Bolivia. The stage is another long one, covering a total of 758 km and will leave the desert before climbing to an altitude of 2,500 m at the Bolivian Altiplano. Laia Sanz (ESP) KTM 450 RALLY Dakar 2017 © Marcin Kin Bolivia The biggest challenge of racing in Bolivia is the altitude. The rest day on Friday, January 12, is held in the capital, La Paz, sitting at a staggering 3,640 m above sea level. Even after having a day off to rest and acclimatize to the conditions, travelling through Bolivia is going to be tough. Part of the challenge is overcoming the extra fatigue that is caused by racing at such high altitudes – the level of oxygen is less than that at a lower level. It’s because of this that riders like to train at altitude on the run up to the Dakar, many choosing to ski and exercise in the mountains of Europe before the final trip to South America in January. “Winter training is important because every rider needs to work on slightly different things. I like to get as much time on the bike as I can but often look at different techniques during the winter such as hiking at altitude, which is really good for fitness,” comments Matthias Walkner. Stage seven of the rally leaves La Paz and heads for the city of Uyuni. The first of the all-Bolivian stages will offer a new backdrop for the teams and is the first half of the initial marathon stage. Again, good navigation will be required but also vigilance on the difficult tracks leading to Uyuni. After a total of 726 km in the saddle, riders will reach the camp where they will stay for the night. All bike maintenance must be carried out by themselves – no team assistance is allowed. The second part of the marathon stage includes the longest special stage of the rally. A timed 498 km route faces the riders, which covers sand dunes at over 3,500 m above sea level. This stage will really set apart the strongest from the rest of the field before going into the final six days’ racing. If things weren’t tough enough already, one of the additional challenges of Bolivia is the weather. At such high altitudes changes in conditions can be dramatic and happen extremely quickly, adding to the difficulty faced by the now exhausted competitors. “When you add in factors like heat, cold, terrain and altitude it all becomes way harder. That is the toughest thing, the accumulation of days like that, it has a snowball effect and the stress builds on your body and mind,” explains Sam Sunderland. Matthias Walkner (AUT) KTM 450 RALLY Dakar 2017 © Marcin Kin Argentina The fast tracks and rivers of Argentina have become legendary since the Dakar crossed continents to South America. The treacherous terrain combined with unforgiving heat not only makes it tough for the competitors but also increases the chances of making a mistake. By this point in the rally, riders will have covered close to 5,000 km – their bodies will be tired, and so will their minds. One of the key factors in completing a successful Dakar is minimizing mistakes during the event. Faced with difficult terrain and tough navigation, those mistakes will become all too easy to make for even the most experienced of Dakar regulars. The bikes and quads will enjoy a second marathon stage in Argentina. Again, no assistance is allowed when the riders camp out after the 484 km, stage 11. Part of the skill when riding these marathon stages is not only conserving your energy but also conserving the bike. “… you have to ride a little more carefully so you don’t crash and damage the bike, because if you break something it could be the end of your race,” adds Laia Sanz. After returning from their second marathon stage, the competitors will only have the final two days left to ride. However, January’s stage 13 on Friday 19 will be one of the toughest of the event. Now completely exhausted, the riders will face a 904 km stage that includes 423 km of timed special. Covering the sand dunes of San Juan, the terrain will be incredibly energy sapping especially after nearly two weeks of riding. The leaders will be trying to make up good time here while still riding sensibly – a retirement this close to the finish would be soul-destroying. The final stage on the outskirts of Cordoba although short at 284 km will still be difficult with riders having to cross around 30 rivers on the way to the chequered flag. Competitors will have to stay focused right to the end in order to successfully complete the rally. “The Dakar is like no other race, so to get to the finish in itself is a massive achievement. This year I plan to do exactly what I did last year, stay consistent, fast and take each day as it comes. Hopefully it will reward myself and the team with another win,” offers 2017 Dakar winner Sam Sunderland. Sam Sunderland (GBR) KTM 450 RALLY Dakar 2017 © Marcin Kin The 2018 Dakar in numbers: 3 countries 14 stages 2 marathon stages for bikes and quads 5 days at altitudes of over 3,000 m Close to 9,000 km total distance, 4,500 of which are timed specials Photos: Marcin Kin | Rally Zone | www.dakar.com
  11. ktm 2018 Dakar Route

    2018 Dakar Route Posted in Racing, Riding Mountainous sand dunes. Extreme altitude. Unpredictable weather. Punishing distances. The 2018 Dakar route looks set to be the toughest ever. Sam Sunderland (GBR) KTM 450 RALLY Dakar 2017 © Marcin Kin In recent years the Rally Dakar has found its home in South America. But, as the name suggests, that’s not always been the case. The Rally Dakar was born in 1978, taking competitors from Paris, France over 10,000 km through the deserts of Africa to the finish at the famous Lac Rose near Dakar, Senegal. 182 vehicles set off from the French capital on that inaugural trip, 74 of them completed their journey. The event grew steadily through the 80s and 90s and in 2005 a record 688 competitors entered the rally. In 2008 the event was due to depart from Lisbon, as it had the previous two years. But a terrorist attack in Mauritania late in 2007, in which five French tourists were attacked, caused massive concerns for the organizers. As such the 2008 event was cancelled, creating doubts for the continuing future of the world’s toughest rally. All was not lost, obviously, with the countries of Chile and Argentina stepping forward to host the event in 2009. The Dakar name remained but the event has been held in South America ever since. KTM continued their winning streak, despite the change of venue, and as of the 2017 Dakar, their run of consecutive victories stands at 16. Matthias Walkner (AUT, #16), Sam Sunderland (GBR, #14) & Gerard Farres Guell (ESP, #8) KTM 450 RALLY Dakar 2017 © Rally Zone For 2018, the Dakar will cover the three countries of Peru, Bolivia and Argentina. Each country will offer competitors dramatically different terrain – from the sand dunes of Peru, over the mountains of Bolivia to the fast tracks and riverbeds in the heat of Argentina. Rally Dakar Route 2018 © www.dakar.com Peru After being included in the Rally Dakar for the first time in 2012, and then hosting the opening ceremony in 2013, Peru has been absent from the program ever since. The Peruvian government voiced their desire to be part of the rally again at the end of the 2017 event and after working closely with the organizers, ASO, they have made it happen. Peru will host the opening six stages, which throw competitors straight into the sand dunes of the Peruvian desert. It will be tough from the outset for the riders as the bikes are often first onto each stage. The difficulties of navigating the deep sand and tall dunes will only add to their fatigue. “I think a lot of the riders have missed the sand over the last couple of years, but after a week in Peru everyone will be sick of it again,” jokes Laia Sanz. Stage five, which travels from San Juan de Marcona to Arequipa, will really test the competitors’ stamina and navigation skills. The total stage distance is a grueling 770 km, 264 km of which is timed special stage. The bikes and quads will take a separate route to the cars and trucks. Starting at daybreak, the stage takes in 30 km of huge, mountainous dunes. Accurate navigation and the ability to read the terrain will be vital to not only getting a good result, but safely reaching the finish. On Thursday, January 11, stage six has competitors leave Arequipa in Peru and head to the world’s highest capital city of La Paz in Bolivia. The stage is another long one, covering a total of 758 km and will leave the desert before climbing to an altitude of 2,500 m at the Bolivian Altiplano. Laia Sanz (ESP) KTM 450 RALLY Dakar 2017 © Marcin Kin Bolivia The biggest challenge of racing in Bolivia is the altitude. The rest day on Friday, January 12, is held in the capital, La Paz, sitting at a staggering 3,640 m above sea level. Even after having a day off to rest and acclimatize to the conditions, travelling through Bolivia is going to be tough. Part of the challenge is overcoming the extra fatigue that is caused by racing at such high altitudes – the level of oxygen is less than that at a lower level. It’s because of this that riders like to train at altitude on the run up to the Dakar, many choosing to ski and exercise in the mountains of Europe before the final trip to South America in January. “Winter training is important because every rider needs to work on slightly different things. I like to get as much time on the bike as I can but often look at different techniques during the winter such as hiking at altitude, which is really good for fitness,” comments Matthias Walkner. Stage seven of the rally leaves La Paz and heads for the city of Uyuni. The first of the all-Bolivian stages will offer a new backdrop for the teams and is the first half of the initial marathon stage. Again, good navigation will be required but also vigilance on the difficult tracks leading to Uyuni. After a total of 726 km in the saddle, riders will reach the camp where they will stay for the night. All bike maintenance must be carried out by themselves – no team assistance is allowed. The second part of the marathon stage includes the longest special stage of the rally. A timed 498 km route faces the riders, which covers sand dunes at over 3,500 m above sea level. This stage will really set apart the strongest from the rest of the field before going into the final six days’ racing. If things weren’t tough enough already, one of the additional challenges of Bolivia is the weather. At such high altitudes changes in conditions can be dramatic and happen extremely quickly, adding to the difficulty faced by the now exhausted competitors. “When you add in factors like heat, cold, terrain and altitude it all becomes way harder. That is the toughest thing, the accumulation of days like that, it has a snowball effect and the stress builds on your body and mind,” explains Sam Sunderland. Matthias Walkner (AUT) KTM 450 RALLY Dakar 2017 © Marcin Kin Argentina The fast tracks and rivers of Argentina have become legendary since the Dakar crossed continents to South America. The treacherous terrain combined with unforgiving heat not only makes it tough for the competitors but also increases the chances of making a mistake. By this point in the rally, riders will have covered close to 5,000 km – their bodies will be tired, and so will their minds. One of the key factors in completing a successful Dakar is minimizing mistakes during the event. Faced with difficult terrain and tough navigation, those mistakes will become all too easy to make for even the most experienced of Dakar regulars. The bikes and quads will enjoy a second marathon stage in Argentina. Again, no assistance is allowed when the riders camp out after the 484 km, stage 11. Part of the skill when riding these marathon stages is not only conserving your energy but also conserving the bike. “… you have to ride a little more carefully so you don’t crash and damage the bike, because if you break something it could be the end of your race,” adds Laia Sanz. After returning from their second marathon stage, the competitors will only have the final two days left to ride. However, January’s stage 13 on Friday 19 will be one of the toughest of the event. Now completely exhausted, the riders will face a 904 km stage that includes 423 km of timed special. Covering the sand dunes of San Juan, the terrain will be incredibly energy sapping especially after nearly two weeks of riding. The leaders will be trying to make up good time here while still riding sensibly – a retirement this close to the finish would be soul-destroying. The final stage on the outskirts of Cordoba although short at 284 km will still be difficult with riders having to cross around 30 rivers on the way to the chequered flag. Competitors will have to stay focused right to the end in order to successfully complete the rally. “The Dakar is like no other race, so to get to the finish in itself is a massive achievement. This year I plan to do exactly what I did last year, stay consistent, fast and take each day as it comes. Hopefully it will reward myself and the team with another win,” offers 2017 Dakar winner Sam Sunderland. Sam Sunderland (GBR) KTM 450 RALLY Dakar 2017 © Marcin Kin The 2018 Dakar in numbers: 3 countries 14 stages 2 marathon stages for bikes and quads 5 days at altitudes of over 3,000 m Close to 9,000 km total distance, 4,500 of which are timed specials Photos: Marcin Kin | Rally Zone | www.dakar.com
  12. Triumph’s was something of an anomaly for the brand. Like its popular base platform, it blended a smooth and powerful engine with timeless styling, but it also sold quicker than anything else in Triumph’s 115-year model history, ever. If this doesn’t make a case for its merit, then I don’t know what does. Still, it had its shortcomings, but now has added the new “darker, meaner” Bobber Black. Continuing to draw inspiration from the original post-war bobber movement, this new steed is equal parts accommodating and aggressively defiant—and won’t let you forget it. Triumph’s Bobber Black has a new 47mm cartridge fork from Showa and dual front disc brakes for extra stopping power. The Specs The Bobber Black has a lot in common with the previous Bobber—from the triangular faux-rigid frame, to the brutish 1,200cc, eight-valve SOHC twin engine, to the ubiquitous tractor-style solo seat. Still, there are some important differences to note. First, the Bobber Black now boasts a larger, 47mm cartridge Showa fork, up in size from the previous Bobber’s 41mm KYB fork. Black bar-end mirrors help rear visibility and are right in line with the rest of the bike’s styling. The front end also sees a revamp in the brakes department, with the addition of a second twin-pot, sliding axial caliper, as well as a second 310mm disc. The rear single-piston Nissin caliper and single 225mm disc remain unchanged. Neither the front or rear suspension is adjustable for compression or rebound damping, with rear preload being the only thing you’re able to change. Once the rain cleared up in Spain, it was smooth sailing on the Bobber Black, thanks to the easy-to-use cruise control. The Bobber black now comes with a full-LED headlight (that has the option to be turned off completely) as well as a useful built-in daytime running light. Triumph also kitted out the Bobber Black with an easy-to-use, single-button cruise control that is standard. In terms of rider ergonomics, the Bobber Black offers two separate seat position settings, one that places the rider farther up on the frame triangle, and a second that shifts the seat lower and farther back. The foot controls are still in the same mid-mount configuration, however Triumph states that forward controls will be included in the extensive 150-item accessory list. Short, stocky and aggressive—that’s the direction Triumph was aiming with its Bobber Black. Aside from the changes to the fork and front brake system, you’ll also find a new 16-inch front wheel (down in size from the 19-inch wheel found on the Bobber) that’s wider as well. Triumph worked with Avon on an exclusive set of Cobra tires for the Bobber Black. Aesthetically, Triumph has taken a cue from a popular Rolling Stones song, as the rest of the bike’s hardware (including but not limited to: shift linkage, levers, bars, seat pan, mirrors, risers, cam and sprocket covers, headlight rim, and exhausts) has all been—you guessed it—painted black. The Ride I awoke early and ahead of schedule in Málaga, Spain, to find it pouring rain. As the forecast showed dry weather for the rest of the week, I chuckled at the idea that the British bike couldn’t bear to be away from the wet weather it must be so attuned to. Regardless, this heavy downpour still stalled the test ride itself, and we were forced to take refuge in the lobby of the hotel. A simple gauge cluster with an adjustable mount displays all the information in a nice, concise package. After we finished lunch, the rain had finally let up, so we fired up the bikes and departed from the hotel. The 1,200cc, British-built twin engine has a 270-degree crank firing order, and paired with the minimalist slash-cut exhausts, sounded eerily similar to vintage Triumph twins. This exhaust note is by far one of the best I’ve heard on a new bike in a long time. One button is all it takes to enable and set the included cruise control. Once I set the adjustable clutch and brake levers, I pulled away and began down the freeway, which was relatively clear. One of the most notable Bobber traits is its drag-style handlebar, which placed me in a squat and “over-the-bars” stance. Splitting lanes was easy, so long as I kept the bar-end mirrors in mind. The Bobber features two riding modes, one for dry conditions and one for wet. After discussing with the Triumph reps, I learned that both modes offer the same power, the difference being the way the power is delivered. The mode button toggles between Rain and Road throttle maps. To say the Bobber Black stops better than the previous Bobber is an understatement—and with double the clamping power in the front, why wouldn’t it? Unfortunately, those who own the Bobber will not be able to swap their single rotor and caliper system to this new, updated style, due to the complexity of the rider aids. Black hardware adorns the Bobber Black, as one would expect from the name. The low, 27.2-inch seat h made the Bobber Black’s claimed 429-pound heft (up 21 pounds from the previous Bobber) easy to manage at low speeds. The mighty 1,200cc engine’s claimed 77 hp—when paired with the Bobber Black’s tuned-for-torque throttle map—made for some lively pulls on the throttle. The engine itself is smooth, and continues to pull hard across the entirety of the rev range. The cruise control is also a breeze to use, with one press of the button enabling it, and a second press setting the speed. A touch on either of the brakes—or a shift in throttle position—will immediately cancel it. The addition of a second front rotor and caliper drastically improve the bike’s stopping power. As we followed the wet and winding roads through the hills of Spain, it was common to have the pegs scraping through the corners. This bike isn’t really meant for aggressive canyon riding, but that didn’t keep me from trying. While feel from the front end was loads better than the previous Bobber, the rear end was still upset by larger imperfections in the road’s surface, a good few of which were transferred to my lower back. I’m sure this could be rectified by a better shock (Triumph will offer a Fox shock as a dealer-supported aftermarket accessory). The headlight bucket now includes a daytime running light, as well as the standard beam headlight. All the exterior lighting on the Bobber Black has been shifted to LEDs. The Verdict Triumph hit the nail on the head with the Bobber Black—in most respects, anyway. It rides better than I expected it to, looks incredible, and has just the right amount of attitude. It stops far better than the previous Bobber, and the front-end feel is decisively better as well. Unfortunately, there’s no getting around the fact that the Bobber Black’s $13,150 price tag is higher than both its American competitors, Harley-Davidson’s Sportster Forty-Eight and Indian’s Scout Bobber. It’s worth mentioning, however, that Triumph’s Bobber Black brings ABS and dual front disc brakes to the table as a factory standard option. It also has the lightest dry weight at 524 pounds, compared to the Sportster Forty-Eight’s 545 pounds and the Scout Bobber’s 533. The Bobber Black has a real sense of refinement, something that always puts a smile on my face. I can really feel the level of scrutiny this bike went through in the design phase. The 1,200cc Bonneville engine is a real winner, delivering smooth power and one heck of a sweet exhaust note. It’s simple, and I like that. There’s not a lot to wrap your head around when it comes to the controls, and you can tell a lot of time went into the bike from a design standpoint. It’s the most expensive bobber on the market, but if you’re after Triumph’s latest 1,200cc engine in a traditional bobber frame, then it’ll be hard to beat. Yes, it’s expensive in comparison to the other bobbers on the market—you won’t get away from that. It’ll be great to get the Bobber Black together with the and Forty-Eight, as well as ’s Star Bolt and ’s V9 Bobber for an ultimate shootout. If you’re already a fan of Triumph’s strong twin and the bobber aesthetic is what you’re after, then the Bobber Black is a sure bet. TECH PRICE $13,150 ($250 extra for Matte Black) ENGINE 1200cc liquid-cooled parallel twin TRANSMISSION/FINAL DRIVE 6-speed/chain CLAIMED HORSEPOWER 77.0 hp @ 6100 rpm CLAIMED TORQUE 78.2 lb.-ft. @ 4000 rpm FRAME Tubular-steel double-cradle FRONT SUSPENSION Showa 47mm fork; 3.5 in. travel REAR SUSPENSION KYB shock; 3.0 in. travel FRONT BRAKE Twin Brembo two-piston calipers, twin 310mm disc with ABS REAR BRAKE Nissin one-piston caliper, 255mm disc with ABS RAKE/TRAIL 25.8°/3.5 in. WHEELBASE 59.4 in. SEAT HEIGHT 27.2 in. FUEL CAPACITY 2.4 gal. CLAIMED WEIGHT 524 lb. dry AVAILABLE February 2018 CONTACT 2018 Triumph Bonneville Bobber Black Brody’s gear: Helmet: Jacket: Gloves: Pants: Boots: Sursa
  13. ICE RACING IN 1935

    In the 1930s, Husqvarna dominated the Swedish ice-racing scene. Riders such as Ragnar Sunnqvist, Ivar Skeppstedt and Martin Strömberg took to the frozen lakes on Husky 350cc and 500cc machines equipped with lethal-looking spiked tyres. To the cheers of thousands of spectators these men were the gladiators of their time, racing hard in some of the toughest conditions. Ice racing on studded tyres has always been popular in Sweden. It started in the twenties and there were already many famous events to choose from. In the mid-thirties, Husqvarna played a major role in races on the slippery frozen surface. The leading man in the festivities was Ragnar Sunnqvist, he rode for his private Husqvarna team as the factory had stopped supporting their riders at the time, but races were still won on the successful brand. Vallentuna, outside Stockholm, was the initial event for a new private team, Scuderia Husqvarna. The factory had withdrawn their official racing support, so Husqvarna’s new fate was established through private interests. It was February, it was cold and the lake had been frozen for quite a while when riders gathered to race in two classes. On February 17th in 1935, the event set off in super-windy conditions at a temperature of minus 15 degrees Celsius. Despite the temperature some 15,000 spectators came to watch, hardened people who didn't mind getting cold during the day. The track consisted of many curves with one long straight, this was odd for an ice race. The start time was set at one o'clock, and the first heat was ready to get away with riders at the start line, engines running. Husqvarna entered with several machines, all on studded tyres with centimetre-long spikes moulded into the rubber. In order to race on the slippery surface, there had to be lots of spikes in each tire. In fact, there were more than six Husky bikes on the starting line which consisted of motorcycles from two separate classes; the 500cc C-class and the 350 cc B-class. Most Huskys were twin-cylinder, but there was also a single-cylinder 350cc ridden by ace Rolf Gülich. The twin-cylinders were a bit rough at the start as they were manufactured to be bump-started - turning the engine to fire up. That meant the first gear was very high, which made the Husqvarnas slow to get away when the flag was dropped. Dancing on the ice began with riders charging hard from the start. One of the competitors, the legendary Ivar Skeppstedt, missed the second corner and rode straight into the snow-wall. He did recover, but was a bit behind, pushing hard to make up lost time. The race was over 10 laps and the length of the track was four kilometres long. The track was covered in snow, which whirled in the wind, making visibility non-existent. The studded tires bit into the ice, blasting clouds of tiny frozen drops in the air. This was not only a rider problem, as the crowd also had trouble seeing much of the action. However, with 20 riders active on the circuit the battle went on, regardless of each individual’s impression. At least, nobody was in the need of a Sherpa showing the way. As had happened many times before, Ragnar Sunnqvist took the lead of the field, having no problems whatsoever seeing where he was heading. Husky rider Skeppstedt was soon on Sunnqvist's heels despite his previous mistake and in third spot lay Arnold Linder, also Husqvarna-mounted. Then Sunnqvist had to make a stop to clean his wires and spark-plugs, due to them being clogged with snow. A new rider by the name of Larsson now took the lead, but he took a shortcut due to bad visibility and was consequently disqualified from the race. Then something happened, the wind dropped and all the riders suddenly had a clear view of the track. In the big C-class Skeppstedt managed to pass his fellow Husqvarna competitor, Sunnqvist - the latter suffering with a misfiring engine. This made the ace-rider lose more and more ground to the leader which couldn’t be recovered. Instead, Ivar Skeppstedt took his Husqvarna to the overall victory, five seconds ahead of team-mate Arnold Linder. Husqvarna's third man over the finish line was Ragnar Sunnqvist, almost a minute behind the winner. Husqvarna took all three places on the podium and received all the accolades from a cheering crowd. In the B-class, Husqvarna also managed a triple podium. First to take the flag was Martin Strömberg, while Arthur Olsson and Carl Bagenholm followed in pursuit, around half a minute behind the first man. It was a remarkable day, with chilly weather and hot, hot races – perfect for the ultrafast and reliable Husqvarna machines!
  14. Dinamo BikeXpert Racing Team la final de sezon 2017

    Sezonul competițional 2017 s-a încheiat, iar echipele își numără reușitele. Dinamo BikeXpert Racing Team ne-a trimis un comunicat de presă cu privire la acest subiect. Însă înainte de detaliile respective, Cătălin Sprînceană – team managerul echipei, ne povestește despre Vlad Dascălu, un ciclist cu potențial enorm, despre care am povestit și în 2016 când s-a alăturat echipei. În 2016 Răzvan Jugănaru – antrenorul echipei, însoțește lotul național la mondialele de XCO de la Nove Mesto unde îl cunoaște pe Vlad. Ma suna imediat de acolo si imi spune ca vede in el un mare potential si o personalitate deosebita, marcata de bun simt, principii si responsabilitate. Apoi, la Campionatele Nationale de la Deva il cunosc si eu si mi se confirma cele spuse de Razvan. Cred ca echipa noastra l-a si ajutat sa faca o pana in penultima tura. Trec lunile si ma tot gandesc, perpelindu-ma noaptea la Vlad, ca o posibila varianta pentru Dinamo-BikeXpert Racing Team, dar totusi imi dau seama ca va fi greu financiar, pentru ca el locuieste in Spania, iar drumurile si calendarul sau diferit, ne-ar costa o avere pe care nu o avem. Incerc sa nu-mi pun bariere in minte si prin decembrie, discut cu Mircea Florescu – finantatorul echipei, si il conving sa-l sustina cu 2 biciclete, asumandu-mi riscul financiar de al coopta in echipa. Imediat Vlad imi raspunde bucuros la invitatie, mai ales ca nu avea alte oferte In restul lunii decembrie si in ianuarie am turat motoarele pentru a suplimenta bugetul echipei, fiind constient ca aducerea lui Vlad nu va fi ieftina. Motivati, reusim sa conturam pentru 2017, un buget cu cca. 30% mai mare decat cel din 2016 si in Februarie il aducem pe Vlad in Turcia pentru a face cunostinta cu echipa. De atunci ne-am planificat calendarul pentru 2017 si in scurt timp, cu beneficiile unui relax financiar si tehnic, Vlad incepe sa confirme, in Spania. A doua provocare a venit dupa primul sau loc 5 in Cupa Mondiala, in Andora cand, in cateva ore a trebuit sa gasim solutii sa plece la urmatoarea etapa din Elvetia, deplasare neprogramata in calendarul nostru. Vlad trebuia sa aiba continuitate. Asadar ne agitam din nou pentru bani, dar reusim sa-i platim etapa din Elvetia si o parte pentru etapa din Italia, o mai mare parte fiind suportata de FRC, ca si in cazul Campionatului Mondial din Australia. Gasisem resurse si pentru etapa din Canada, dar din pacate a fost prea din scurt pentru obtinerea vizei. Odata cu toate rezultatele lui Vlad, ne-am dat seama ca vor veni si ofertele de la echipe mari, asa ca din luna August m-am resemnat si mi-am asumat ca va trebui sa-i permitem lui Vlad trasferul la o echipa mare, chiar daca nu-mi pica bine. Recunosc ca l-am mai vazut pe Vlad alaturi de noi inca un an. Ma bucur nespus ca l-am avut pe Vlad Dascalu alaturi de echipa noastra si ca a reusit sa stea in preajma riderilor nostri pe care sigur i-a inspirat. Sunt convins ca il vom mai avea la start in Romania sub tricoul echipei nationale, pentru ca cel putin colaborarea mea cu el ramane in cadrul FRC. Revenind la rezultatele importante ale echipei din acest sezon: 4 titluri de Campion National; 7 titluri de Vicecampion National; De 3 ori locul 5 in Cupa Mondiala; Locul 9 la Campionatul European; 3 cupe nationale castigate (Ede Molnar la XCO, U23, Karina Bonta la XCM, Elite F si Attila Madaras la CX, Elite). 3 concursuri de ciclism organizate (Maratonul Vinului – Urlati; BikeXpert Alpine Challenge – Pucioasa si Bucuresti MTB Race); 123 de competitii la care am luat startul, in toate colturile tarii, de multe ori si in 3 zone geografice in acelasi week end; Peste 400 de podiumuri. De asemenea, ne bucuram ca prin concursurile organizate am reusit sa ne implicam social cu donatii catre MagiCamp – tabara pentru copii cu afectiuni oncologice, de langa Pucioasa) si Fundatia Bucuria Ajutorului – centrul de zi de la Urlati, pentru copii care provin din familii aflate in dificultate). Sursa: Freerider
  15. Ultima săptămână
  16. If you were going to rob a bank on a motorcycle, what would you choose? It needs to be fast, like any good getaway vehicle, and agile enough to evade Johnny Law. There might as well be comfort and amenities too, right? Bluetooth connectivity to contact your crew on the burner phone, plus cruise control so you maintain an inconspicuous speed while you make the call. Plus electronically adjustable suspension and ride modes for city, freeway, and back roads. You’re a bank robber, not an animal! And of course, you’ll need space for the stacks of money. Allow me to suggest a Multistrada. It’s fast, comfortable, dripping with technology, and there are approximately 10,000 new ones on the road each year, so you won’t stand out in the wrong way. Since you’ll be wealthy from your bold raid of First Merchants you might as well spring for the swankiest one to date: the 2018 Ducati Multistrada 1260 S Touring. Yes, I know, $22,395 is a pretty penny to spend—and we’ll talk about why you might as well splurge on the S version rather than $18,695 for the base model—but you get an awful lot of motorcycle for the money. The Tech, And What’s New You might be thinking that the new Multi 1260 looks a lot like the bike that debuted in 2010 with the 1,198cc 11° engine, and you’d be right. Aesthetics withstanding, since then the bike has been updated with and Desmodromic Variable Timing (2015) as well as many other small upgrades over the years—saddlebag latches, a color dash unit, and the like. The meaningful moves for the 2018 model involve inheriting the ’s 1,262cc engine, a longer wheelbase, and updates to the color dash. The 2018 Ducati Multistrada 1260 in white. First, the powerplant, which caused a bit of a stir around here when it debuted the . Genius as it is, , but in XDiavel form the engine grew to be monstrously torquey (thanks to 1.6mm of stroke added) and smoothed out considerably with evolution of the tuning. Ducati claim 18 percent more torque at 5,500 rpm, patching the dip in torque that plagued the Multi 1200 DVT mill. This is Ducati’s provided dyno chart for the 1260 torque curve versus the 1200 engine—if nothing else, an admission that there was a massive hole in the torque on the first DVT engine. The chassis updates involved lengthening the swingarm by 1.9 inches and adding a degree of rake (and 0.2 inch of trail), which adds up to a wheelbase that’s 2.2 inches longer—that’s a lot. The frame was also updated to hold the XDiavel powerplant, and while the Sachs fork and shock use the same external hardware, they are adjusted differently for the new setup. I asked why the wheelbase and rake stretch and what I heard was, “stability.” Apparently, Ducati felt it could make a bike just as agile but more stable when ridden fast with a passenger and full luggage. More on that later. The 2018 Ducati Multistrada 1260 in profile. My, what a long wheelbase you have! Beefy M50 brakes from Brembo are high-end binders and they feel like it. Good stuff. The dash is the same size but has a higher-resolution TFT screen and updated software to navigate the galaxy of options within—that includes everything from damping characteristics in the suspension to adjusting each of the electronic rider aids individually. Basically, instead of only offering a spread of settings from which to choose (1 through 8 for traction control, for example), there is guidance built in—select TC Level 2 and the bike tells you that’s best for performance on dry roads, where TC Level 7 is best for performance on wet roads. It’s all a little arbitrary, and dependent on rider skill, of course, but it’s a step toward people learning how the system is meant to operate. (For an example of how the menus look and work, see the video embedded below.) Other changes and updates slung around the Multi 1260 include new heated grips, a “more reliable” keyless ignition (evidently the previous one was finicky), an up/down quickshifter option (standard on the S), and a tire-pressure monitoring system option. There’s also the Ducati Link App, which will allow owners to adjust settings from their phone, link with social media, track and share rides, win badges and points for logging miles, and keep track of service intervals—18,000 miles between valve adjustments, by the way, and 9,000 for basic service. The app is available starting in February of 2018. How It Feels To Ride Enough with the specs! You want to know how fast this sucker can get you away from the vault and into the hills—hypothetically, of course. The short answer is, quickly and splendidly. So much of what has made the Multistrada a popular machine since 2010 is captured wholly in the new 1260. The engine is the biggest improvement. Ducati claim 6 additional ponies over the 1200, but it doesn’t really feel faster. The longer wheelbase makes it less prone to wheelie, I’m sure—mostly it’s how linear the power delivery is that made me smile. It’s happy to lug around town,and has a fat midrange that won’t disappoint. Dual fenders keep the Multi’s tail clean. Note that the left bag is larger because of the exhaust on the right side. Luggage is standard on the Touring models, an upgrade on everything else. Wheels are updated on the 2018 Multistrada 1260, and Ducati claims they are 300 grams lighter. Plus they’re gold! (Unless you get the bike in red, then they’re black.) The chassis updates didn’t do it for me. In adding rake and trail and wheelbase I think they’ve dulled one of my favorite parts of the Multistrada blade—only a little, but it’s noticeable. It just doesn’t feel as light and direct to steer as it has in the past. The old bike is , and I love that about it. Ducati staff say the more relaxed geometry helps direct more feedback to the rider, but I’m not sure I felt it. If it’s for the sake of safety and stability, then I can’t argue—that should always be a priority in motorcycle design. Even if it felt less excitable, I dragged my toes all day and never broke a sweat. The 1260 is fully capable of slaying a twisty road. More to the point of a getaway vehicle, the Multistrada’s ride modes are still some of my favorite of any bike. Trundling through small towns on the test ride, I flicked the 1260 into Urban mode. The preload in the shock automatically decreases, making the ride h lower (nice for stoplights) and the damping in the fork and shock loosens way up. Then there’s the engine, which mellows out in the Low power mode, making the bike easy to trot through suburban streets. Lastly, the dash reconfigures to show the clock and speedo nice and big, and forgoes the tachometer. Who cares about revs in the city? It’s excellent. At 6-foot-2 I thought the Multi 1260 offered excellent touring manners and all-day comfort. It’s a tall and heavy bike, and rewards experience. The 2018 Ducati Multistrada 1260 has an up/down quickshifter that works really nicely. You can turn it off if you hate it. Should your getaway cover be blown and you need to make haste, Sport mode awaits. The suspension tightens, dash displays a prominent tach, and all 158 claimed horses are on tap. Touring mode is somewhere in the middle, and Enduro mode is designed to help if your ride takes you off road. Lots of bikes have different power modes available, others have adjustable suspension, and some even do this same trick of tweaking everything at once. In my opinion, though, the Multistrada offers the most comprehensive and drastic available changes. The bike’s personality really does change, and it’s a fantastic option to have. Moreover, every parameter built in to the ride mode—traction control, wheelie control, ABS, throttle map, dash display, quickshifter, and suspension settings—are able to be tailored individually in the menu. That means each of the four ride modes becomes customizable to your preferred settings. Urban mode could be soft suspension for the cobblestone street approaching the bank, Touring mode could have full preload in the shock to account for the payload after the robbery. I’m just spitballing here. My preference for twisty roads was Sport mode, with the preload set a shade high, rear ABS and wheelie control off, and the throttle map set to Medium (that’s full power, but gentler delivery). One of my favorite things about the Multistrada is that if you ask it to be bad, it’s more than willing. How many 500-something-pound sport-touring bikes are comfortable when sideways? Not many, but the 2018 Multi 1260 is one of them. Switches on the 2018 Ducati Multistrada 1260 are largely the same as they were on the previous DVT model. The rim around the base of the switch glows, too, which is handy in the dark—though you still can’t see what the buttons do. You’ll have to learn that yourself. Aside from the nifty tricks that the Multi does, it delivers everything a sport-touring bike should. The weather protection is good, and easily adjustable via the pinch-’n’-slide windscreen. The mirrors are decent, the seat is nicely shaped, and the brakes are stellar. The seat is adjustable for h, if you please, and the saddlebags work nicely other than not being able to leave them unlocked. The quickshifter is great, and the LED headlights that come on the up-spec models also include cornering lights. The Bottom Line The Multistrada 1260 S Touring delivers everything it promises and, in my opinion, it damn well should. For a price tag north of $22,000 you, the consumer, should be getting everything you want in a motorcycle. Back to one of the first questions I posed: Why not get the base bike? For a “scant” $18,700 you can still have the new engine and new chassis so why not? The upsell is $2,300 to the S (in red), plus $1,400 for the Touring, and $200 for the gray paint on my testbike, which ends up at $22,595. That’s a no-joke, at nearly $4,000 more than the base bike, but I still say it’s worth it. If you want this burly beast of a sport-tourer, then you want the quickshifter, the color dash, LED headlight, luggage, centerstand, and the fancy suspension. You can think the Multistrada is ugly, or doesn’t sound good, or is too big. Opinions are good to have. As far as delivering an exciting and capable grand touring experience, the Multistrada 1260 succeeds in spades. It would probably be a perfect getaway vehicle, too, if you happen to be up to no good. TECH SPEC PRICE $22,395 (S model) ENGINE 1262cc liquid-cooled 90° V-twin TRANSMISSION/FINAL DRIVE 6-speed/chain CLAIMED HORSEPOWER 158.0 hp @ 9500 rpm CLAIMED TORQUE 95.1 lb.-ft. @ 7500 rpm FRAME Steel-tube trellis FRONT SUSPENSION Sachs 48mm fork with adjustable spring preload and semi-active compression and rebound damping; 6.7 in. travel REAR SUSPENSION Sach shock with adjustable spring preload and semi-active compression and rebound damping; 6.7 in. travel FRONT BRAKE Brembo M50 four-piston calipers (S), 330mm discs with ABS REAR BRAKE Brembo two-piston caliper with ABS RAKE/TRAIL 25°/4.4 in. WHEELBASE 62.4 in. SEAT HEIGHT 33.3/32.5 in. (845/825mm) FUEL CAPACITY 5.3 gal. (20L) CLAIMED WET WEIGHT 518 lb. (235kg) CONTACT The list of options and models in the 2018 Ducati Multistrada 1260 lineup. The MSRP on the Pikes Peak version is $24,995, and it comes with Öhlins suspension instead of the Sachs Skyhook kit, as well as a Termignoni pipe and a spicy livery. We won’t get the S D|air version (developed with Dainese airbag systems) in the US of A. 2018 Ducati Multistrada 1260 cockpit: ready for whatever sport tour you can handle. 2018 Ducati Multistrada 1260 bags are decent. You can also get the aluminum top-loading cases from the Enduro model if you like. 2018 Ducati Multistrada 1260 Sursa
  17. Speculatii despre lansarea unei Yamaha YZ65 pe piaţă, în februarie 2018 Este limpede, Yamaha va lansa o nouă motocicletă pe piaţă, în februarie 2018, asta se poate confirma prin simpla urmărire a clipului de mai jos. Întrebarea este: despre ce motocicletă va fi vorba? Specialiştii din presa moto mizează pe YZ65 din cel puţin două motive. Chiar Yamaha a specificat că motocicleta este dedicată tinerilor rideri, şi apoi, există o discontinuitate între longeviva PW50, motocicleta cu care generaţii de copii au fost iniţiaţi în tainele motocrosului şi YZ85, o motocicletă de cross dedicată celor ajunşi la vârsta pubertăţii şi/sau adolescenţei. Vestea este grozavă, deoarece acum Yamaha vine cu o gamă completă de crossere, pentru toate vărstele şi, iată, nu renunţă la angajamentul făcut în direcţia dezvoltării de propulsoare în doi timpi. Din momentul în care cilindrea de 50 cmc e prea mică, părinţii micilor piloţi nu mai trebuie să caute modele în curtea altor producători, putând miza pe albastru, până când copiii lor devin campioni. Nu în ultimul rând, pentru cei care mai au dubii că e vorba de o YZ65, să ne uităm la plăcuţa de număr care e „pregătită” în acest clip, care aduce şi un nou slogan, foarte inspirat şi autentic pentru moştenirea Yamaha şi anume „victorYZone”. [embedded content]
  18. Campionatul Național de Ciclocros 2017

    Duminică 10 decembrie a avut loc la Sibiu, Campionatul Național de Ciclocros 2017. Ciclocrosul este o disciplină de sine stătătoare a ciclismului ăi nouă în România. Există încă puțini practicanți ai acestui sport la noi, dar previziunile sunt optimiste, iar spectacolul este garantat la un astfel de concurs. Ciclocrosul a fost inventat drept un sport care ține în priză cicliștii și de-a lungul sezonului rece. Poți afla toate detaliile ciclocrosului din acest interviu cu Timotei Păcurar, administratorul platformei Cyclocrossnation.ro. Am fost și noi la fața locului, iar întreg evenimentul îl poți urmări în fotografii aici. Desigur, RECcreativ nu putea lipsi de la eveniment. Iată ce au filmat! [embedded content] Sursa: Freerider
  19. Duminică 10 decembrie a avut loc la Sibiu, Campionatul Național de Ciclocros 2017. Ciclocrosul este o disciplină de sine stătătoare a ciclismului ăi nouă în România. Există încă puțini practicanți ai acestui sport la noi, dar previziunile sunt optimiste, iar spectacolul este garantat la un astfel de concurs. Ciclocrosul a fost inventat drept un sport care ține în priză cicliștii și de-a lungul sezonului rece. Poți afla toate detaliile ciclocrosului din acest interviu cu Timotei Păcurar, administratorul platformei Cyclocrossnation.ro. Am fost și noi la fața locului, iar întreg evenimentul îl poți urmări în fotografii aici. Desigur, RECcreativ nu putea lipsi de la eveniment. Iată ce au filmat! [embedded content] Sursa: Freerider
  20. N S E W Moto, Accesorii Enduro Turing

    O serie noua de cricuri centrale pt Vstrom 1000 modelul nou. Doritorii ne pot contacta PM
  21. Turul Ciclist al României revine din 2018

    Recent, Federația Română de Ciclism a anunțat organizarea unei noi ediții a Turului României la șosea și reluarea tradiției întrerupte. Iată comunicatul de presă emis de autorități: Unul din proiectele Federației Române de Ciclism care nu și-a găsit concretizarea în ultimii ani este reînvierea Turului României, însă acest lucru e pe cale să se schimbe. Împreună cu Ministerul Tineretului și Sportului, pregătim revenirea Micii Bucle în calendarul național și internațional, iar anunțul a fost făcut chiar de către ministrul Marius Dunca. Turul Ciclist al României 2012 – foto Liliana Ianculescu – lilisor.net“Turul Ciclist al României este un proiect extraordinar la care ţin foarte mult, pentru că va îmbina sportul şi cultura în anul Centenarului. Va avea loc în luna septembrie şi am discutat deja cu cei de la televiziunea Eurosport pentru transmiterea în direct a celor 5 zile de competiţie. Sunt 100 de ani de la Marea Unire şi încercăm prin Turul Ciclist să unim regiunile României. Îmi doresc de asemenea ca la fiecare finiş al cicliştilor să organizăm şi un eveniment cultural. Vrem să implicăm Ministerul de Interne, administraţia locală, pentru că bugetul este unul foarte mare, la fel şi Ministerul Culturii, pentru că vorbim şi de evenimente culturale”, a spus Dunca pentru AGERPRES. Competiția va face parte din calendarul UCI, având clasa 2.2 și se va desfășura între 18 și 23 septembrie. Deși mai poate suferi minore modificări, traseul competiției va fi următorul: Etapa 1: Alba Iulia – Blaj – Sibiu Etapa 2: Sibiu – Făgăraş – Râşnov Etapa 3: Braşov – Târgu Secuiesc – Mărăşeşti – Focşani Etapa 4: Buzău – Ploieşti – Târgovişte Etapa 5: Circuit Bucureşti Originile Turului Romaniei se afla la inceputul secolului trecut, mai exact in august 1910. Inspirata de Turul Frantei, publicatia autohtona “Revista Automobila” a pus la cale Circuitul Munteniei la care au participat 18 concurenti. Traseul a fost pe ruta Bucuresti – Sinaia – Targoviste – Butimanu – Bucuresti. Odata cu venirea Primul Razboi Mondial s-a incheiat si povestea Circuitului Munteniei. Anii au trecut si, in 1934, ziarul “Sportul Zilnic” a organizat prima editie a Turul Ciclist al Romaniei. Tara noastra era a sasea din lume cu propriul tur national destinat sportivilor amatori. Din 1950 pana in 1974, Turul Romaniei a fost tinut cu regularitate, perioada urmata de o pauza pana in 1983. Din 1984 a fost din nou reluata organizarea. Inainte de 1989, victoriile romanesti se tineau in lant, rutierii autohtoni castigand 21 de editii. Dupa 1989 situatia s-a inversat, ciclistii romani fiind mai mereu invinsi, ei strangand 4 victorii pana in prezent. Cel mai recent câștigător al Turului al Romaniei a fost Andrei Nechita, pentru echipa națională, in 2011. Cea mai rapida etapa parcursa a fost in 1974 intre Pitesti si Bucuresti. Cei 109 kilometri au fost parcursi cu o medie de 52,516 km/h. Mircea Romascanu si Constantin Dumitrescu, doua legende ale ciclismului romanesc, au castigat fiecare de 3 ori Turul Romaniei, fiind cel mai mare numar de victorii individuale. Sursa: Freerider
  22. Recent, Federația Română de Ciclism a anunțat organizarea unei noi ediții a Turului României la șosea și reluarea tradiției întrerupte. Iată comunicatul de presă emis de autorități: Unul din proiectele Federației Române de Ciclism care nu și-a găsit concretizarea în ultimii ani este reînvierea Turului României, însă acest lucru e pe cale să se schimbe. Împreună cu Ministerul Tineretului și Sportului, pregătim revenirea Micii Bucle în calendarul național și internațional, iar anunțul a fost făcut chiar de către ministrul Marius Dunca. Turul Ciclist al României 2012 – foto Liliana Ianculescu – lilisor.net“Turul Ciclist al României este un proiect extraordinar la care ţin foarte mult, pentru că va îmbina sportul şi cultura în anul Centenarului. Va avea loc în luna septembrie şi am discutat deja cu cei de la televiziunea Eurosport pentru transmiterea în direct a celor 5 zile de competiţie. Sunt 100 de ani de la Marea Unire şi încercăm prin Turul Ciclist să unim regiunile României. Îmi doresc de asemenea ca la fiecare finiş al cicliştilor să organizăm şi un eveniment cultural. Vrem să implicăm Ministerul de Interne, administraţia locală, pentru că bugetul este unul foarte mare, la fel şi Ministerul Culturii, pentru că vorbim şi de evenimente culturale”, a spus Dunca pentru AGERPRES. Competiția va face parte din calendarul UCI, având clasa 2.2 și se va desfășura între 18 și 23 septembrie. Deși mai poate suferi minore modificări, traseul competiției va fi următorul: Etapa 1: Alba Iulia – Blaj – Sibiu Etapa 2: Sibiu – Făgăraş – Râşnov Etapa 3: Braşov – Târgu Secuiesc – Mărăşeşti – Focşani Etapa 4: Buzău – Ploieşti – Târgovişte Etapa 5: Circuit Bucureşti Originile Turului Romaniei se afla la inceputul secolului trecut, mai exact in august 1910. Inspirata de Turul Frantei, publicatia autohtona “Revista Automobila” a pus la cale Circuitul Munteniei la care au participat 18 concurenti. Traseul a fost pe ruta Bucuresti – Sinaia – Targoviste – Butimanu – Bucuresti. Odata cu venirea Primul Razboi Mondial s-a incheiat si povestea Circuitului Munteniei. Anii au trecut si, in 1934, ziarul “Sportul Zilnic” a organizat prima editie a Turul Ciclist al Romaniei. Tara noastra era a sasea din lume cu propriul tur national destinat sportivilor amatori. Din 1950 pana in 1974, Turul Romaniei a fost tinut cu regularitate, perioada urmata de o pauza pana in 1983. Din 1984 a fost din nou reluata organizarea. Inainte de 1989, victoriile romanesti se tineau in lant, rutierii autohtoni castigand 21 de editii. Dupa 1989 situatia s-a inversat, ciclistii romani fiind mai mereu invinsi, ei strangand 4 victorii pana in prezent. Cel mai recent câștigător al Turului al Romaniei a fost Andrei Nechita, pentru echipa națională, in 2011. Cea mai rapida etapa parcursa a fost in 1974 intre Pitesti si Bucuresti. Cei 109 kilometri au fost parcursi cu o medie de 52,516 km/h. Mircea Romascanu si Constantin Dumitrescu, doua legende ale ciclismului romanesc, au castigat fiecare de 3 ori Turul Romaniei, fiind cel mai mare numar de victorii individuale. Sursa: Freerider
  23. This article was originally published in the December-January 1999 issue of Cycle World's Big Twin magazine. You don’t normally think of a Big Twin as much of a corner-carver; but with its combination of Convertible chassis and Twin Cam 88 power, the FXDX Dyna Sport is a barrel of fun on a serpentine road. Steal just a quick glance of a , and you might miss the good stuff. Concealed under slath­erings of flat-black paint, its Twin Cam 88 engine looks much like an Evo. The distinctive timing cover fails to stand out without a polished finish, and the big cylinder fins are diminished by the darkness. It could be just another Dyna. Turn the key and ride off, though, and you’ll definitely know that you have entered a new world of Harley-Davidsons. The Sport pulls hard and smoothly from down low, getting no­ticeably stronger around 3500 rpm. It keeps pulling past 5000 rpm—where a stock Evos have long since begun wheezing—and keeps on going to the 5500-rpm redline and beyond. From the rumbles and shakes, you know you’re riding a Big Twin, but every moment on board tells you it’s not an Evo. The light-flywheeled Twin Cam has a revvy eagerness that is lacking in a stock Evo, and all its 88 cubic inches respond now when you twist the throttle open. At the same time, it really is mechanically quieter, with noticeably less clatter from its top end, all while running a little smoother than an Evo. Harley’s engineers deserve a cigar or six for this performance. Harley's engineers deserve a cigar for this performance. Almost as importantly, the Twin Cam engine has given the Dyna line something beyond improved ac­cel­eration, a higher degree of refinement and better roll-ons: a new direction. According to Al Wagner, Dyna Platform Manager, the FXDX is “taking the design into a sportier Big Twin.” Both Wagner and Motor Company Design Chief Louie Netz insist that Harley need­ed, in Netz’s words, “a model that would showcase the Twin Cam. The other models that the new engine came in weren’t changed cosmetically. We needed to showcase the motor someplace. And to match the engine performance, it had to be a sport/handling package.” That matched perfectly with Wag­ner’s own desire to take at least part of the Dyna lineup down a sportier path. Harley’s market researchers—not to mention the company’s European distributors—were telling him that people were eager for a stronger-performing, better-handling Big Twin. The con­tinuing strength of the FXR chassis among custom builders was reinforcing that message, as was the continuing trend for big-bore customs using forks and brakes that could have come from the VR1000 Superbike. Twin Cam 88 gives the Sport considerable punch in stock form. But engine performance can be significantly upgraded with a factory Stage 1 kit that won’t even void the warranty if installed by a Harley dealer. So, Twin Cam engine married Dyna chas­sis at an opportune time. But the decision to proceed with the sportier version was made late, in the autumn of 1997, less than a year from production. That meant the ’99 FXDX could only be the first step toward a more hot-rod production Big Twin, not the final statement. Fortunately, The Motor Company had a good place to start in the Dyna Convertible. That bike had long ago been given longer-travel suspension that made it the best-riding Big Twin, as well as the one that—because of its chassis h—could lean over farthest in a corner before hard parts be­gan dragging. It also had the sportiest Dyna frame, the one with a 28-degree steering-head angle to provide sharp, easy steering. And it was fitted with powerful, twin-disc front brakes in the bargain. Essentially, the Convertible contributed its chassis and suspension to the Dyna Sport. But the Sport got a new look, more contemporary and less fussy than that of the Convertible. The engine was blacked-out almost entirely, save for polished fin ends and a few bright spots of chrome. Black wrinkle paint also darkened the rear fender stays and air-cleaner housing. Fenders and gas tank were given a simple, monochromatic finish, either the black seen here, or an elegant pearl silver, or a competition-like orange. Instead of a com­pli­cated, nostalgic tank logo, the Sport only wears “” in simple type down the sides of its tank. The Twin Cam met the Dyna at an opportune time. Much like the Night Train Softail, the Sport gets a seat that emphasizes a streamlined appearance over passenger comfort. Fortunately, the passenger accommodations on the FXDX aren’t as sparse as those on the Night Train, with the rear of the seat wider and less crowned. The highly scalloped and far wider seat intended for the rider is more like it, and will keep your butt content through a tank of gas or two. When asked about the passenger seating, Netz says, “Our best selling accessory seats—at least for some models—are the least comfortable. That tells you a lot about priorities.” But perhaps the most significant dif­ference between the Sport and any other Dyna is its handlebar. According to Wagner, surveys conducted by Harley indicated that “buckhorns are out,” with that result supported by 80 out of 100 riders. Instead, the company reached deep into the parts bin and gave the Sport a bar identical in bend to that of the —though executed in black stainless rather than the carbon steel of the original. Similar to dirt-track bends, the 32-inch-wide handlebar stretches out and curves back gradually, placing you on the bike in a very slight rearward lean, your arms out naturally in front of you, elbows bent. It’s very much like the control-oriented riding position found on most dirtbikes. Compared either to drag bars on risers or buckhorns, the XR-style bar gives you more steering lever­age that makes the Sport seem lighter and more maneuverable. Overall, then, the quick-responding, hard-accelerating Twin Cam en­gine and the in-control riding position make the FXDX Sport feel, well, sport­ier. It’s a combination that makes you want to rev it through the gears, to toss it into a corner, and to brake harder and later than you might on any other Big Twin. Black-on-black paint treatment and lean, clean lines make the Big Twin FXDX look more like a slightly overgrown Sportster. But it’s not as though you’re sacrificing anything for that feeling, other than maybe a marginally greater seat h. The long-travel shocks in the rear ride over even substantial bumps without the harshness that comes with bottoming, and the riding position is comfortable over miles and miles of freeway travel. Yes, the shocks could use a little more damping, especially if you ride the FXDX hard enough to leave footpeg and exhaust-pipe dust on the asphalt; and the pulled-in steering head doesn’t cause the bike to lock in on straight-ahead the way a dowser’s stick goes toward water. On the other hand, the 28-degree head angle re­duces the effort required to lean the Sport over, and it eliminates the low-speed, falling-in sensation shared by most machines that have substantially greater rake and trail. Plus, the brakes are very powerful, but easily controllable. The Sport is simply a Big Twin that does about everything well. That also includes protecting your wallet. With solid paint, the Sport car­ries a list price of only $12,995 (pearl paint is another $240). Perhaps that reasonable price tag explains a phenomenon reported by Wagner: So far, Harley has shipped just about one 94-cubic-inch big-bore kit for every Sport sold. If fitted by a dealer, this Stage 1 factory big-bore kit boosts both power and torque by about 8 percent while allowing you to maintain the original new-vehicle warranty. That also fits into another tidbit of info from the Dyna’s Platform Manager: “This is just the start of the journey,” says Wagner. “The Dyna is going to evolve. It’s going to get sportier yet.” Based on what we’ve experienced with the FXDX, we can hardly wait. Sursa
  24. Evolio iSmart 360 [2017]

    De la Evolio România am primit la test camera de acțiune Evolio iSmart cu lentilă fish eye și filmare la 360 grade (în specificații se menționează 220˚). Este un action cam panoramic echipat cu senzor Sony IMX179 ce dispune de rezoluție reală de 3280 x 2464 pixeli, adică puțin peste 8,08 MP. Specificațiile oficiale ale camerei dau o rezoluție a clipului video de 2048×2048 (30fps); 1440×1440 (60/30fps) sau 1072×1072 (60/30fps) în funcție de modul ales. Pentru foto, rezoluțiile sunt 16mp, 12mp, 8mp și 5mp. Ca orice cameră video panoramică de acțiune din ziua de azi, lentila este foarte similară cu vizorul de la ușa apartamentului. Ați văzut cum se vede, deformat și aproape la 360 grade când privești prin el. Și această cameră filmează la fel însă în combinație cu aplicația specială pentru telefonul smart și în funcție de modul de filmare ales, imaginea este ajustată pentru a arăta normal. În cutie vei primi, în plus față de camera în sine, câteva accesorii care îți vor fi de folos: suportul pentru fixarea camerei pe ghidonul bicicletei, carcasa subacvatică sau de protecție, adaptor pentru a folosi camera fără carcasă, suport de plastic plus chingă pentru fixarea camerei pe cască, cablul usb, acumulatorul de 1050 mAh și un pătrățel mic textil din microfibră pentru ștergerea lentilei camerei sau a carcasei de protecție. Însă suporturile folosite la această cameră sunt compatibile GoPro așa că dacă ai nevoie de alte tipuri de prinderi, le vei găsi ușor pe piață. Spre deosebire de alte camere, GoPro sau Evolio, aceasta dispune de suport filetat pentru trepied. Așadar poți folosi camera și fără carcasa de protecție dacă, spre exemplu vrei s-o instalezi pe o platformă rotativa pentru a face un time-lapse. Poți în continuare, să folosești camera fără carcasa de protecție și pe ghidonul bicicletei, utilizând adaptorul inclus. Am remarcat cât de robust este de data asta suportul din plastic + metal de fixare a camerei pe ghidon. Pe de o parte partea din plastic este foarte groasă, iar pe de altă parte aceasta este întărită cu piesa metalică în formă de U, de care se înșurubează cele două piulițe. Așadar poți strânge cu mâna suportul cât de tare vrei, pentru a te asigura că nu se mișcă în timp ce mergi pe bicicletă. Însă pentru a beneficia de toate funcțiile camerei, este nevoie să instalezi pe telefon aplicația dedicată, disponibilă gratuit atât pentru Android cât și iOS. Doar din aplicație poți controla modul de filmare (Panoramic 360°, VR, Square, Round etc.), dar și celelalte funcții: comutare între filmare și fotografie, modul buclă de filmare, time-lapse, slow motion etc. Totuși multe funcții pot fi controlate direct de pe cameră, cu ajutorul ecranului TFT alb negru de 0,96 inch și celor patru butoane. Din păcate clipul meu de test este inutil pentru că aparent nu a fost filmat în modul corect deși eu am considerat că am ales VR. Pe ecranul telefonului puteam sa trag de imagine foarte frumos, în toate direcțiile, dar în realitate nu a fost așa. [embedded content] Practic însă, o filmarea VR îți permite să tragi de imagine cu mouse-ul și să te uiți în toate direcțiile: sus-jos, stânga-dreapta la 360. În mod normal, ce am filmat cu Evolio 360 ar trebui să arate similar cu filmul de mai jos. [embedded content] Pe de altă parte rezoluția este foarte bună, imaginea foarte clară, luminoasă și în culori bogate, cu condiția sa existe suficientă lumină afară. Un clip de 6 minute la rezoluția de 2448 x 2448 cu 29 fps iese la vreo 1,3 GB. Camera se livrează fără card microSD, care poate fi de maxim 64 GB. Carcasa subacvatică (sau de protecție) este utilă în majoritatea timpului. Deși de data asta camera poate fi folosită și fără ea, mulțumită suportului filetat pentru trepied, cel mai bine este să o utilizezi pentru a proteja camera. Pe bicicletă avem mult praf dacă suntem offroad, sau apă și noroi, când suntem pe ploaie. Dacă îți place prin apă atunci e bine de știut că iSmart 360 rezistă la o adâncime maximă de 30 m potrivit specificațiilor oficiale. Fiind un „action cam”, poți folosi noua Evolio iSmart 360 cam la orice sport de acțiune: hicking, ciclism, skateboarding, alergare, scuba diving etc. Camera face clipuri de câte 15 minute. După 15 minute nu se oprește ci continuă cu următorul clip. Asta înseamnă că dacă filmezi 45 minute continuu, vei avea la final 3 clipuri separate de câte 15 minute fiecare. Motivul este sistemul automat de protecție pentru cazul în care ai pe card o eroare de scriere. În loc sa pierzi tot clipul de 45 minute vei pierde doar unul de 15. În testele noastre am observat că pe un card de 16 gb intră aproximativ 49 minute de filmare la rezoluția de 2048 x 30 fps. Calitatea sunetului este acceptabilă, dar destul de slabă, iar dacă folosești camera în interiorul carcasei de protecție, atunci categoric înregistrarea sunetului este slabă. Personal nu mă voi baza pe sunetul înregistrat de camera, iar la editare voi folosi o melodie pentru coloana sonoră. Dacă vrei totuși să integrezi sunet în clip, ideal ar fi să o faci în paralel cu alt dispozitiv (spre exemplu reportofon cu microfon lavalieră) și apoi să-l integrezi în clip la post-producție. Cât privește dimensiunile fizice și greutatea, chiar dacă mai mare decât celelalte camere Evolio testate în trecut, sau decât GoPro, noua iSmart 360 are o greutate aproape identică. Cântărește 130 grame, în timp ce Evolio Ultra are 133 grame, iar GoPro 151 g. Concluzia acestui test este în mare parte pozitivă. Camere filmează bine, calitatea imaginii este bună. În schimb sunetul lasă de dorit. Accesoriile sunt suficiente, iar suportul de fixare pe ghidon este robust, de nota 10. Aplicația de telefon funcționează bine însă din păcate eu nu am reușit să filmez cum mi-am dorit. Dacă cineva a reușit să filmeze VR, să ne anunțe și pe noi. Rezoluție video: 2048×2048 (30fps); 1440×1440 (60/30fps); 1072×1072 (60/30fps) Rezoluție foto: 16M / 12M / 8M / 5M 8 moduri de filmare panoramică Unghi filmare: 220 grade Senzor video: Sony IMX179 Ecran: 0,96 inch, alb-negru, doar pentru setări Rezistență apă: 30 m Memorie: card extern microSD, maxim 64 GB Acumulator: 1050 mAh, detașabil Greutate: 130 g Preț: 699,90 Lei Producător: Evolio Sursa: Freerider
  25. Sportivii și evenimentele anului 2017

    Fiecare an aduce ceva special pe scena locală, iar oamenii care își dau interesul ca lucrurile să se miște în direcția potrivită sau cei ale căror performanțe ne lasă cu gura căscată, merită toată aprecierea noastră. Acesta este și scopul acestor mențiuni de final de an, iar pe lângă recunoașterea meritelor, poate să rămână o arhivă de consultat pe viitor, astfel încât să ne amintim cu ușurință peste ani, care au fost persoanele la care ne-am uitat cu admirație. Și 2017 a fost un an plin, așadar haideți să vedem în cele ce urmează cine considerăm noi că sunt cei care și-au făcut simțită prezența. Omul anului (2017) Vlad Dascălu la Carpathian MTB Epic. Când cineva trece razant peste pietrele alea fără ca măcar să auzi ceva, nu-ți mai rămâne decât să exclami: ninja style!Vlad Dascălu (sub tricoul Dinamo-BikeXpert) a reușit în 2017 ceva ce niciun alt sportiv român n-a realizat până acum: trei poziționări pe locul 5 în cadrul Cupei Mondiale de XCO U23, una în Andorra, alta în Italia și cealaltă la Lenzerheide, Elveția. Deși a avut mai multe participări, acestea trei ne-au lăsat cu gura cascată și ne-au produs o bucurie imensă, un sentiment cu care, sincer să fiu, nu suntem foarte familiarizați. În Cupa Spaniei, acesta a ocupat a 3a treaptă a podiumului. Cum performanțele lui sunt mai mult decât promițătoare, vă propun să-l urmărim cu interes în participările sale internaționale de anul viitor, cu convingerea că vom fi martorii câtorva surprize frumoase, indiferent de echipa pentru care va alerga. Îl felicităm pe această cale și pe Cătălin Sprînceană, maganer-ul echipei, pentru eforturile depuse în susținerea lui Vlad Dascălu în acest sezon. Sportivul anului 2017 (MTB) Deși puteam să aleg dintr-o mulțime de fotografii ale multitalentului Arpad Kelemen, am decis că aceasta este cea mai reprezentativă, acum, la final de sezon. Fotografie de la Carpathian MTB Epic, acolo unde Arpad s-a clasat pe locul 2 în prima etapă!Fără doar și poate, Árpád Kelemen (NoMad Merida-CST) nu este doar sportivul anului 2017, ci este cel care și-a dovedit măiestria în mai toate disciplinele: Campion Național la XCO, Campion Național la XCM, Vicecampion Național la Enduro (categoria seniori), Vicecampion Național la Ciclocross (categoria Elite)… Și sunt aproape convins că o participare constantă la Cupa Națională de Downhill i-ar fi adus de asemenea un titlu, cel puțin la categorie. Este clar că a muncit enorm demonstrând încă o dată ce înseamnă să fii un sportiv complet, care tace și face, cu o imensă modestie. Iar astfel merită premiul pentru Sportivul Anului 2017 și tot respectul nostru. Chapeau! Sportivul anului 2017 (șosea) În 2017 Edi Grosu este cel mai activ și de succes ciclist de șosea pe plan internațional. Totuși, dorim să oferim titlul lui Marius Petrache care pe lângă faptul că este Campion Național la proba de Fond, a participat la competițiile de criterium urban Red Hook Criterium și la competiții europene de velodrom unde ne-a ținut cu sufletul la gură alături de echipa condusă de antrenorul Georgiadis Georgios, cunoscut de prieteni ca Iorgo. Sportivul anului 2017 (Gravity) În caz că nu ești prea familiarizat cu Gravity-ul, uite, cam așa se dau băieții ăștia. Foto: hila.ro.Matei Moisil (Playbike) este un alt sportiv român care ne-a produs o mare surpriză în luna iunie a acestui an: locul 1 la Specialized Rookies Cup din Germania, categoria U17 și cum asta n-ar fi fost suficient, a bifat din nou prima treaptă a podiumului la IXS International Rookies Championships din Austria, categoria U17, în luna august. Pe lângă aceste rezultate, Matei a câștigat la categoria juniori, toate etapele din Cupa Națională de Downhill și așa cum era de așteptat și Campionatele Naționale de Downhill la Juniori. Mai aveți ceva de completat? Atleta anului 2017 (MTB) Determinare, forță, imagine: păi… 10 pe linie. Deci ce a câștigat Suzi anul acesta? Foto: Triada MTBSuzi Hilbert a câștigat în 2017 Campionatul Național de XCO de la Zărnești, categoria Elite, Campionatul Național de Maraton (XCM) la Geiger (Elite), iar în primăvară și-a adjudecat prima poziție a podiumului Primei Evadări, la categoria Elite, plus alte clasări importante. Pe scurt, una dintre cele mai de succes sportive pe plan local din România. Acestea fiind spuse, nu-mi rămâne decât să-i urez succes pentru anul viitor și să conchid cu: not the average girlfriend! Cei mai promițători rideri ai anului (2017) Greu de ales o poză cu Raul: să fie într-un table top? Să fie una de acțiune în off-road? Cred că asta este reușită, dar nu m-am decis prea ușor.Aceasta este o nouă categorie pe care am decis s-o folosesc ca paravan pentru a aduce de fapt în atenția voastră sportivi talentați, de care cu siguranță vom auzi mai des în viitorul apropiat. Poți să-l numești un prognostic sau un pariu personal, dar află că Raul Sînza (Carcover Racing Team) este unul dintre personajele în cauză. Poate că l-ai văzut la competițiile de șosea, poate pe poziția a 3a a podiumului de la Campionatele Balcanice de XCO de anul acesta sau poate că pur și simplu l-ai văzut pe alte podiumuri precum cel de la MoonTimeBike. Raul este un talent înnăscut, iar timpul va scoate asta la iveală. Stai așa că n-am terminat! Mai este pe listă băiețașul acesta: Eduard Kubat.Tot în această rubrică vreau să-l menționez și pe tânărul Eduard Kubat (Dinamo-BikeXpert), în vârstă de doar 14 ani, dar care promite mult. Trebuie doar să-l vezi în acțiune ca să înțelegi, iar eu am avut această ocazie, inclusiv în curtea FreeRider. Atât la Campionatul Național de XCO cât și în Cupă, a terminat pe locul 3, însă aceste performanțe se vor îmbunătăți cu siguranță pe viitor. Mai trebuie doar un pic de răbdare: the best is yet to come! Participări notabile la competiții internaționale Până la urmă cred că Tudor Oprea și Lucian Logigan au avut parte de o experiență pe cinste la Cape Epic.Echipa Scott-Geiger, prin Tudor Oprea și Lucian Logigan, a reprezentat România anul acesta la faimoasa competiție Cape Epic, desfășurată în Africa de Sud, o premieră pentru țara noastră. Cei doi au reușit să se claseze în primele 15% dintre echipe, mai precis pe locul 35. Aceștia au avut de parcurs 7 etape, plus prologul, cu o distanță totală de 651 de km, 14.450m diferență de nivel și o viteză medie de 20.71 km/h. De apreciat și live-urile de pe facebook pe care le-au organizat negreșit în fiecare seară, după fiecare etapă răspunzând întrebărilor fanilor, prietenilor sau pur și simplu celor curioși, reușind astfel să ne aducă mai aproape de acțiunea desfășurată pe bătrânul tărâm African. Competiția anului 2017 Genul de fotografie care dă naștere unor dorințe nebănuite…Carpathian MTB Epic nu trebuie văzută doar prin prisma faptului că a fost o adevărată desfășurare de forțe, dar și pentru că a reușit să promoveze România în afara granițelor. După cum menționam la acel moment, clip-ul de prezentare a bătut de departe orice încercare lamentabilă a Ministerului Turismului de a promova România. Participanții au fost mulțumiți de organizare, traseele au fost dificile – așa cum îi stă bine oricărei competiții pe etape, iar evenimentul a fost transmis live chiar și de la mare altitudine, un pas înainte important pentru scena locală. Pe lângă asta, nu-mi amintesc să fi avut vreodată la noi în țară un eveniment pe etape atât de bine planificat sau promovat. Concursul anului 2017 (șosea) Și în 2017 evenimentul principal de șosea pentru amatori a rămas Road Grand Tour care a inclus în calendar și cursa KOT – King of Transfăgărășan, incluzând astfel în program și a doua șosea montană înaltă a României alături de Transalpina, parte a traseului competiției Eroica (atunci când condițiile o permit). Concursul anului 2017 (Gravity) Sebi Grosu înainte de linia de finish.Ediția din 2017 a concursului de downhill organizat la Cheile Grădiștei mi s-a părut una dintre cele mai vii competiții la care am participat. Un rol important l-a jucat și publicul, însă organizarea a fost fără reproș, traseul bine pus la punct, iar spectacolul nu a contenit să lipsească. Toate aceste elemente combinate au făcut din prima etapă a Cupei Naționale de Downhill, una dintre cele mai frumoase curse ale anului. La fel ca sosirea lui Remus Bonta pe locul 2, pe o bicicletă de enduro. 🙂 Cicloturistul anului 2017 Radu Păltineanu își continuă expediția pe bicicletă prin cele două Americi, decizând în 2017 să lungească traseul astfel încât să treacă prin fiecare țară de pe continente, presărând expediția cu escaladarea câtorva vârfuri montane celebre. Nu doar expediția sa ci și modul decent și onorabil în care ne reprezintă țara cu mândrie prin locurile pe unde trece, alături de prezența permanentă pe Internet cu relatări constante și interesante dar și de atitudinea civică luată de la distanță în legătură cu evenimentele din țară ne fac să îi acordăm din nou acest titlu. Best come-back 2017 Vereștiuc, sare ca un pește pe uscat. Dar nu despre el este vorba. Foto: TimeStuffTare ca Piatra s-a reinventat anul acesta și cred că merită menționat acest lucru. Concurenții care s-au întrecut pe traseul de downhill refăcut din temelii au rămas cu impresii pozitive raportându-ne la edițiile anilor anteriori. Și era chiar păcat să nu fie astfel, căci viteza și distracția sunt cuvintele cheie pentru competiția de la Piatra Neamț, unul dintre cele mai accesibile concursuri de downhill din România. În plus, totul se întâmplă în cadrul unui festival, așadar în cele 3 zile pe care le petreci acolo, cu siguranță vei avea multe altele de făcut. Inițiativa anului 2017 Includerea evenimentelor de XCM și XCO sub o Cupă Națională este un pas înainte pentru competițiile din România, acestea urmând modelul Cupelor Naționale de Downhill și Enduro. Totodată, Cupa Națională de Ciclocross a luat naștere la inițiativa lui Timotei Păcurar și reprezintă un plus enorm pentru această disciplină prea puțin emdiatizată la noi în țară. Dezamăgirea anului 2017 Dragoș Mitroi, editor-in-chief FreeRider.ro (stânga), explicându-i fostului Campion Național la Maraton (dreapta), de ce s-a ajuns unde s-a ajuns… Foto: arhiva personalăLa propunerea și insistențele sale, alături de confirmarea și votul unanim al redacției, mai în glumă – mai în serios, Robert Dobai își adjudecă titlul la categoria “dezamăgirea anului 2017”. Îi vom înmâna titlul cu proximă ocazie, într-un cadru sobru-festiv. În loc de concluzie Am acordat toate aceste premii virtuale sportivilor sau organizatorilor a căror acțiune am urmărit-o îndeaproape în anul ce tocmai se încheie. Cu siguranță sunt mai mulți sportivi sau poate competiții cu care ne mândrim și care ne fac cinste, nouă, tuturor, însă cei menționați mai sus au avut reușite notabile, ținându-ne în priză pe tot parcursul sezonului. Iar cu această ocazie vreau să adresez felicitări tuturor celor implicați în fenomen, atât sportivilor cât și organizatorilor de competiții sau participanților în cadrul acestora, căci ei țin această scenă vie. Stimă și respect, Dragoș Mitroi editor-in-chief FreeRider.ro Sursa: Freerider
  26. Aşteptăm iarna, să scoatem fat-urile la zăpadă!

    Bicicletele fat au apărut recent în viaţa noastră. Deşi demult pe piaţa americană, în Europa au ajuns târziu. Şi mai târziu au ajuns în România unde, totuşi am început să le vedem din ce în ce mai des. Dacă vrei să afli mai multe despre subiect înscrie-te în Club Fat Bike România. [embedded content] Sursa: Freerider
  27. Bicicletele fat au apărut recent în viaţa noastră. Deşi demult pe piaţa americană, în Europa au ajuns târziu. Şi mai târziu au ajuns în România unde, totuşi am început să le vedem din ce în ce mai des. Dacă vrei să afli mai multe despre subiect înscrie-te în Club Fat Bike România. [embedded content] Sursa: Freerider
  1. Încarcă mai multă activitate
×