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  2. Our Himalayan project bike enters “Phase 2” with mods to improve performance, comfort and convenience.The Himalayan burst onto the scene as a unique offering compared to what Royal Enfield had traditionally built over the past many decades, and a unique bike for the adventure motorcycle segment in general. With a price point of $4,799, it leaves surplus funds for potential aftermarket upgrades to customize the bike to your aesthetic tastes, riding style and journeys as well. Previously, we put our Royal Enfield Himalayan project bike through its paces to suss out modifications and upgrades which would be considered “essential” for the bike, or at least highly recommended for anyone who spends much time off-road. Yet many more upgrade options for this interesting motorcycle are out there. In this next phase of building out our Himalayan, we focus on optional upgrades that improve performance, comfort and convenience. ADVERTISEMENT After a fair amount of trial and error, figuring out what works and what doesn’t, we came up with a list of 10 products to enhance the Himalayan’s capability. Ranking the following bits in terms of importance is left up to the individual rider’s preference and intended use for the motorcycle. Read on for a description of how these products can improve the Himalayan and, of course, you can pick and choose, mix and match, upgrades based on your own personal needs. For most off-road riders, one of the primary upgrades on an adventure bike is tires. Like many bikes in this class, the Himalayan ships with a street-biased dual sport tire, specifically the Pirelli MT60. Given the Himalayan is a smaller and lower horsepower motorcycle for the adventure bike class, Pirelli’s 70/30 (street/dirt) tire does the job in most situations riders will encounter aboard the little single. While grabbing a handful of throttle either on or off-road seldom results in the Himalayan’s back end breaking loose and the bike getting sideways, a set of knobby-style tires will still give the Himilayan more sure-footed grip and better cornering traction in loose terrain. Knobbies will always provide greater traction in the dirt, but the traction offered by a 50/50 dual sport tire seems to match the Himalayan’s character well. In spite of its comparatively lower power and price tag, the Enfield is a capable adventure bike. For a boost in off-road performance, we switched to Mitas’ E-07 50/50 dual sport tires (90/90-21; 120/90-17) to increase grip without sacrificing road-going performance. We noticed a significant improvement in loose terrain where the Mitas tires helped aid forward motion better than the stock stock Pirellis, and extra cornering grip helped us avoid front-end washouts in sandy turns. Good cornering on pavement and improved bite in the dirt are welcome characteristics which enhance the already impressive abilities of this understated motorcycle, but we also appreciated the longevity of the tires. After 3,500+ miles of testing on a range of terrain, the rear E-07 still has a healthy amount of tread left. Where tires are perhaps a “necessary” modification that’s obvious right away, some accessories fall into the category of “I didn’t realize how necessary this was until after using it.” Cyclops’ H4 LED headlight bulb arguably falls into this category. Royal Enfield’s history goes back to the 1950’s, and six-volt electrical systems. While the Himalayan has a modern 12-volt electrical system, the stock headlight’s somewhat anemic quality almost seems to borrow from the early low-power days. Maintaining the cool look of the round headlight, and still using the stock reflector and lens, simply swapping out the stock bulb for Cyclops’ H4 setup massively changes the riding experience at night. While drawing only 38 watts, the color, spread, and throw of light from the front of the motorcycle is drastically changed for the better. One could argue there’s a safety aspect to this modification during daylight hours as well, as rear-view-mirror visibility to other drivers on the road is increased. No modifications are required to the Himalayan’s headlight shroud to install the Cyclops H4, however space is tight, and cutting down the two retaining bolts (or replacing with shorter bolts) on each side of the housing make positioning the driver much easier. Going from a traditional 60-watt filament bulb to four XHP 50 emitters at over 2500 lumens is a worthwhile change. The reduced draw on the charging system (38 watts vs 60 watts) also makes room for adding additional electronic accessories like heated gear and auxiliary lights. Next on the list of “most obvious” changes, the thing you’re sitting on would be near the top of the list. Royal Enfield’s optional touring seat has both performance and aesthetic characteristics. Enfield’s “3D net” technology claims to distribute weight more evenly over the seat. We noticed right away a more contoured fit that seems to eliminate any pressure points. Choice of saddle is a highly personal thing, but most riders will likely find the Himalayan’s touring seat option more comfortable for long days on the bike. The durable non-slip cover featuring the Royal Enfield logo is a cool addition to an already cool looking bike. A matching passenger ‘touring’ seat is also available. The USB port offers ‘quick charge’ power directly from the battery, battery status lights and an on/off switch that shuts off power completely to avoid any parasitic draw. Cell phones and other small electronic devices are as much an appendage as accessory to humans in the modern era, and they require power (constantly it seems). Charging phones and other devices while riding has become commonplace over the past couple decades. The ubiquity of USB devices has led to a shift from old style “cigarette lighter” 12-volt power ports in vehicles to most now featuring more-convenient USB ports instead. While the Himalayan does not include power ports of any type, easy access to the bike’s battery under the seat makes installing one a snap. Motopower’s dual-port USB option provides five volts and 3.1 amps of power, which can quickly charge not only cell phones, but tablets, GPS units, camera batteries, or just about anything else that uses a USB port. Intelligent charging circuitry identifies devices to provide optimal power levels, and the Motopower uniquely features battery status lights and an on/off switch so the unit can shut off power either automatically or manually to prevent parasitic battery drain. It comes with an SAE-style cable that is wired directly to the battery, which makes it compatible with many battery charger plugs and with a direct source of power, you can charge devices overnight without leaving the ignition on. The Antigravity Li-ion battery saves 4.4 lbs and offers three times more cold cranking amps than stock. Its Re-Start technology can also jump-start the bike from a reserve charge.The stock Himalayan battery always felt a little weak to us, even when it was fully charged and load tested fine. If the bike was sitting for a month or so, it would sometimes go flat as well. So we decided it would be a good idea to replace it with something more powerful, like Antigravity’s ATZ10 Lithium-ion battery that provides three times more Cold Cranking Amps (360) than the stock Varta lead-acid battery. Other benefits associated with Lithium-ion batteries can be found in things like form factor and weight. In both cases, Antigravity’s ATZ10 earns big scores here. Most apparent, swapping out the Himalayan’s stock battery for the ATZ10 shaves over four pounds off the machine. Sounds like a small number until you’re holding both batteries at the same time and it quickly becomes apparent the Antigravity weighs less than half what the stock lead-acid power source does. Dual sets of terminals on both sides of the battery provide additional options for how and where wiring harnesses can be routed to the battery box – a convenient feature during install. The standout industry-only feature of the ATZ10 is its “RE-START” technology. Should a power drain for whatever reason render the battery flat, simply press the restart button, and the battery will jump-start itself from a reserve charge. Other advanced internal circuitry allows the ATZ10 to monitor its own status and protect from over-charging by entering a “sleep” mode when necessary. A reusable air filter simplifies maintenance on longer trips and the high-flow design helps the Himalayan’s engine breath better.Moving inside the bike, next in our upgrade list is K&N’s replacement air filter. Freer-flowing by a claimed 50%, the potential for horsepower gains are there. Given the Himalayan isn’t a fire-breathing race machine, power gains might be a secondary consideration here. However, the mellow character of the 410cc single can use any help it can get, and the K&N filter is a worthy upgrade that provides multiple benefits beyond claimed power increases. Durability and reusability are key aspects of what makes this filter an addition to consider. The fact the filter is washable makes for easy maintenance on long trips, and a cost savings over the life of the bike. A tight seal is provided by the clamp-on design, and installation is as easy as swapping out a stock filter. K&N also offers its own proprietary spray-on cleaning and oiling products that are designed to work with their air filters. Deciding on a luggage system to haul gear during your trips is a major consideration for any adventure rider. After testing several different systems on the Himalayan, we went with Wolfman’s next-gen waterproof Rolie soft bags and their Unrack System. The adaptable setup lets you strap different Rolie bags to a base harness in various ways, depending on your storage needs. And as the name suggests, it doesn’t require any luggage racks. Using the B-Base (for big bikes), we strapped two medium Rolie Bags on the sides and one large Rolie on top for 44 liters of capacity. Each Rolie bag is fully waterproof without liners and comes with straps and attachment points that make it easy to add more bags in a stackable configuration. For longer trips, we’d strap on a camp chair and additional small Rolie bag to add more capacity. We also added Wolfman’s Enduro Tank Bag, which offers an additional 4 liters of capacity. Given the Himalayan’s comparatively diminutive size, Wolfman’s minimalist Tank Bag fits the Royal Enfield perfectly. Yet it is still large enough to stash a full-size DSLR camera inside. It features a single heavy-duty zipper and four clips that allow you to quickly remove the bag, leaving the straps on the bike. Additional features include an internal lid pocket that doubles as a fanny pack, a detachable map pocket, and a waterproof shell that doesn’t need a liner. During our rides, we appreciated that the tank bag didn’t interfere with our riding position while standing on the pegs. The system as a whole was rock solid stable on the trail and the bags stayed clear of the exhaust. The carbon risers lift the fender just high enough to let sticky mud pass through, while maintaining the stock appearance.The unique high/low dual fender design on the Himalayan is just one of the quirky characteristics of the bike that give it a unique quality. However, that low fender can become a liability in muddy terrain. Sticky mud can build up on the tire until it begins to touch the fender, and eventually the wheel completely locks up. This can lead to either the front fender ripping off or being sent over the handlebars at an inopportune moment. To help avoid this type of situation, we added a fender riser kit from Enfield Accessories. The kit comes with a set of 15mm tall carbon fiber spacers and longer bolts that add more clearance between the tire and fender. Should you ride in a particularly muddy region, they also offer a 25mm kit to provide even more space for mud to accumulate. It’s an inexpensive upgrade that is easy to install and it can save you a lot of hassle on your next mud ride. The machined aluminum mount utilizes four stainless-steel wire ropes at its base to deaden vibration and reduce impacts.Charging a phone on the road is one thing, where to put it is another. The Perfect Squeeze offers an extremely robust and secure option for bar-mounting a phone, with little fear of an “unplanned” departure. A click wheel-style adjuster moves the rubberized jaws to the appropriate size, and while it takes a few turns to get it there, the grip offered by the Perfect Squeeze is among the most solid of any style mounts available. For off-road or single-cylinder bike riders, the Perfect Squeeze can be mounted to a Buzz-Kill vibration isolator. Where the stock low-profile mount would attach the phone holder directly to the bars, the Buzz-Kill uses a stainless-steel “wire rope” isolation design, mounted to aluminum backing plates. This design offers both vibration and impact resistance, and lack of any rubber parts bodes well for a long service life. PowerTRONIC’s programmable ECU device fits snugly under the seat and can be configured using their R-Tune software. You can use PowerTRONIC’s pre-installed fuel maps, configure your own or download additional ones from their website. Saving the most complex upgrade for last, PowerTRONIC makes a programmable ECU for the Himalayan, which allows you to get into the bike’s electronics and tinker with the fuel mapping. As mentioned earlier, the Himalayan isn’t a fire-breathing race machine, but while you’re not going to turn the docile 410cc single into an R1 by pushing some buttons, there are benefits to be found in changing the characteristics of the Himalayan’s fuel delivery. Plus for those who like to tinker, it’s fun to have this level of control over things. Speed run tests using the Himalayan-specific maps downloaded from the PowerTRONIC website did reveal consistently faster timed results climbing both steep and gentle grades, although by just a few seconds. More noticeable was the improved throttle response, particularly off-the-line “snap,” and a more purposeful feel on acceleration. Fuel Map 1 offers mid-range performance gains while Map 2 has mid and top-end performance gains. Both maps showed an improvement over stock in our speed run tests.The install procedure involves several steps, and initially appears complex, however it’s quite straightforward as you simply swap one connection at a time in the PowerTRONIC’s wiring harness. Once the harness is in place, you have a stock coupler which both verifies the system is installed correctly and serves as a way to quickly revert back to the bike’s factory stock fuel mapping. Once the Piggyback ECU is plugged in, the bike can take advantage of whatever map has been uploaded to the unit, or select between two separate maps via the optional handlebar map switch. Programming the unit is done via PowerTRONIC’s R-Tune software. While the ECU ships with dual pre-installed maps, other maps are downloadable from the PowerTRONIC website, and endless user-customization can be done to create one’s own maps. There’s even a “lock” feature in the software which can prevent a map from being copied from the ECU should you come up with a proprietary configuration you want to keep secret. Let the Himalayan track days begin! More Himalayan Mods To Come… Now going on its fourth year, the Himalayan has options available from numerous aftermarket companies spanning a wide range of forms and functions. Here at ADV Pulse, we’re still seeking out and finding interesting products to add to our Royal Enfield project bike. For the next phase, we’ll be focusing on additional off-road protection and maybe a little bling to give it a more custom look. Stay tuned, the little bike that could will likely see additional tweaks coming before long. Author: Jon Beck Jon Beck is fulfilling a dream of never figuring out what to be when he grows up. Racing mountain bikes, competitive surfing, and touring as a musician are somehow part of what led Jon to travel through over 40 countries so far as an adventure motorcycle photographer, journalist, and guide. From precision riding for cameras in Hollywood, to refilling a fountain pen for travel stories, Jon brings a rare blend of experience to the table. While he seems happiest when lost in a desert someplace, deadlines are met most of the time.
  3. Our Himalayan project bike enters “Phase 2” with mods to improve performance, comfort and convenience.The Himalayan burst onto the scene as a unique offering compared to what Royal Enfield had traditionally built over the past many decades, and a unique bike for the adventure motorcycle segment in general. With a price point of $4,799, it leaves surplus funds for potential aftermarket upgrades to customize the bike to your aesthetic tastes, riding style and journeys as well. Previously, we put our Royal Enfield Himalayan project bike through its paces to suss out modifications and upgrades which would be considered “essential” for the bike, or at least highly recommended for anyone who spends much time off-road. Yet many more upgrade options for this interesting motorcycle are out there. In this next phase of building out our Himalayan, we focus on optional upgrades that improve performance, comfort and convenience. ADVERTISEMENT After a fair amount of trial and error, figuring out what works and what doesn’t, we came up with a list of 10 products to enhance the Himalayan’s capability. Ranking the following bits in terms of importance is left up to the individual rider’s preference and intended use for the motorcycle. Read on for a description of how these products can improve the Himalayan and, of course, you can pick and choose, mix and match, upgrades based on your own personal needs. For most off-road riders, one of the primary upgrades on an adventure bike is tires. Like many bikes in this class, the Himalayan ships with a street-biased dual sport tire, specifically the Pirelli MT60. Given the Himalayan is a smaller and lower horsepower motorcycle for the adventure bike class, Pirelli’s 70/30 (street/dirt) tire does the job in most situations riders will encounter aboard the little single. While grabbing a handful of throttle either on or off-road seldom results in the Himalayan’s back end breaking loose and the bike getting sideways, a set of knobby-style tires will still give the Himilayan more sure-footed grip and better cornering traction in loose terrain. Knobbies will always provide greater traction in the dirt, but the traction offered by a 50/50 dual sport tire seems to match the Himalayan’s character well. In spite of its comparatively lower power and price tag, the Enfield is a capable adventure bike. For a boost in off-road performance, we switched to Mitas’ E-07 50/50 dual sport tires (90/90-21; 120/90-17) to increase grip without sacrificing road-going performance. We noticed a significant improvement in loose terrain where the Mitas tires helped aid forward motion better than the stock stock Pirellis, and extra cornering grip helped us avoid front-end washouts in sandy turns. Good cornering on pavement and improved bite in the dirt are welcome characteristics which enhance the already impressive abilities of this understated motorcycle, but we also appreciated the longevity of the tires. After 3,500+ miles of testing on a range of terrain, the rear E-07 still has a healthy amount of tread left. Where tires are perhaps a “necessary” modification that’s obvious right away, some accessories fall into the category of “I didn’t realize how necessary this was until after using it.” Cyclops’ H4 LED headlight bulb arguably falls into this category. Royal Enfield’s history goes back to the 1950’s, and six-volt electrical systems. While the Himalayan has a modern 12-volt electrical system, the stock headlight’s somewhat anemic quality almost seems to borrow from the early low-power days. Maintaining the cool look of the round headlight, and still using the stock reflector and lens, simply swapping out the stock bulb for Cyclops’ H4 setup massively changes the riding experience at night. While drawing only 38 watts, the color, spread, and throw of light from the front of the motorcycle is drastically changed for the better. One could argue there’s a safety aspect to this modification during daylight hours as well, as rear-view-mirror visibility to other drivers on the road is increased. No modifications are required to the Himalayan’s headlight shroud to install the Cyclops H4, however space is tight, and cutting down the two retaining bolts (or replacing with shorter bolts) on each side of the housing make positioning the driver much easier. Going from a traditional 60-watt filament bulb to four XHP 50 emitters at over 2500 lumens is a worthwhile change. The reduced draw on the charging system (38 watts vs 60 watts) also makes room for adding additional electronic accessories like heated gear and auxiliary lights. Next on the list of “most obvious” changes, the thing you’re sitting on would be near the top of the list. Royal Enfield’s optional touring seat has both performance and aesthetic characteristics. Enfield’s “3D net” technology claims to distribute weight more evenly over the seat. We noticed right away a more contoured fit that seems to eliminate any pressure points. Choice of saddle is a highly personal thing, but most riders will likely find the Himalayan’s touring seat option more comfortable for long days on the bike. The durable non-slip cover featuring the Royal Enfield logo is a cool addition to an already cool looking bike. A matching passenger ‘touring’ seat is also available. The USB port offers ‘quick charge’ power directly from the battery, battery status lights and an on/off switch that shuts off power completely to avoid any parasitic draw. Cell phones and other small electronic devices are as much an appendage as accessory to humans in the modern era, and they require power (constantly it seems). Charging phones and other devices while riding has become commonplace over the past couple decades. The ubiquity of USB devices has led to a shift from old style “cigarette lighter” 12-volt power ports in vehicles to most now featuring more-convenient USB ports instead. While the Himalayan does not include power ports of any type, easy access to the bike’s battery under the seat makes installing one a snap. Motopower’s dual-port USB option provides five volts and 3.1 amps of power, which can quickly charge not only cell phones, but tablets, GPS units, camera batteries, or just about anything else that uses a USB port. Intelligent charging circuitry identifies devices to provide optimal power levels, and the Motopower uniquely features battery status lights and an on/off switch so the unit can shut off power either automatically or manually to prevent parasitic battery drain. It comes with an SAE-style cable that is wired directly to the battery, which makes it compatible with many battery charger plugs and with a direct source of power, you can charge devices overnight without leaving the ignition on. The Antigravity Li-ion battery saves 4.4 lbs and offers three times more cold cranking amps than stock. Its Re-Start technology can also jump-start the bike from a reserve charge.The stock Himalayan battery always felt a little weak to us, even when it was fully charged and load tested fine. If the bike was sitting for a month or so, it would sometimes go flat as well. So we decided it would be a good idea to replace it with something more powerful, like Antigravity’s ATZ10 Lithium-ion battery that provides three times more Cold Cranking Amps (360) than the stock Varta lead-acid battery. Other benefits associated with Lithium-ion batteries can be found in things like form factor and weight. In both cases, Antigravity’s ATZ10 earns big scores here. Most apparent, swapping out the Himalayan’s stock battery for the ATZ10 shaves over four pounds off the machine. Sounds like a small number until you’re holding both batteries at the same time and it quickly becomes apparent the Antigravity weighs less than half what the stock lead-acid power source does. Dual sets of terminals on both sides of the battery provide additional options for how and where wiring harnesses can be routed to the battery box – a convenient feature during install. The standout industry-only feature of the ATZ10 is its “RE-START” technology. Should a power drain for whatever reason render the battery flat, simply press the restart button, and the battery will jump-start itself from a reserve charge. Other advanced internal circuitry allows the ATZ10 to monitor its own status and protect from over-charging by entering a “sleep” mode when necessary. A reusable air filter simplifies maintenance on longer trips and the high-flow design helps the Himalayan’s engine breath better.Moving inside the bike, next in our upgrade list is K&N’s replacement air filter. Freer-flowing by a claimed 50%, the potential for horsepower gains are there. Given the Himalayan isn’t a fire-breathing race machine, power gains might be a secondary consideration here. However, the mellow character of the 410cc single can use any help it can get, and the K&N filter is a worthy upgrade that provides multiple benefits beyond claimed power increases. Durability and reusability are key aspects of what makes this filter an addition to consider. The fact the filter is washable makes for easy maintenance on long trips, and a cost savings over the life of the bike. A tight seal is provided by the clamp-on design, and installation is as easy as swapping out a stock filter. K&N also offers its own proprietary spray-on cleaning and oiling products that are designed to work with their air filters. Deciding on a luggage system to haul gear during your trips is a major consideration for any adventure rider. After testing several different systems on the Himalayan, we went with Wolfman’s next-gen waterproof Rolie soft bags and their Unrack System. The adaptable setup lets you strap different Rolie bags to a base harness in various ways, depending on your storage needs. And as the name suggests, it doesn’t require any luggage racks. Using the B-Base (for big bikes), we strapped two medium Rolie Bags on the sides and one large Rolie on top for 44 liters of capacity. Each Rolie bag is fully waterproof without liners and comes with straps and attachment points that make it easy to add more bags in a stackable configuration. For longer trips, we’d strap on a camp chair and additional small Rolie bag to add more capacity. We also added Wolfman’s Enduro Tank Bag, which offers an additional 4 liters of capacity. Given the Himalayan’s comparatively diminutive size, Wolfman’s minimalist Tank Bag fits the Royal Enfield perfectly. Yet it is still large enough to stash a full-size DSLR camera inside. It features a single heavy-duty zipper and four clips that allow you to quickly remove the bag, leaving the straps on the bike. Additional features include an internal lid pocket that doubles as a fanny pack, a detachable map pocket, and a waterproof shell that doesn’t need a liner. During our rides, we appreciated that the tank bag didn’t interfere with our riding position while standing on the pegs. The system as a whole was rock solid stable on the trail and the bags stayed clear of the exhaust. The carbon risers lift the fender just high enough to let sticky mud pass through, while maintaining the stock appearance.The unique high/low dual fender design on the Himalayan is just one of the quirky characteristics of the bike that give it a unique quality. However, that low fender can become a liability in muddy terrain. Sticky mud can build up on the tire until it begins to touch the fender, and eventually the wheel completely locks up. This can lead to either the front fender ripping off or being sent over the handlebars at an inopportune moment. To help avoid this type of situation, we added a fender riser kit from Enfield Accessories. The kit comes with a set of 15mm tall carbon fiber spacers and longer bolts that add more clearance between the tire and fender. Should you ride in a particularly muddy region, they also offer a 25mm kit to provide even more space for mud to accumulate. It’s an inexpensive upgrade that is easy to install and it can save you a lot of hassle on your next mud ride. The machined aluminum mount utilizes four stainless-steel wire ropes at its base to deaden vibration and reduce impacts.Charging a phone on the road is one thing, where to put it is another. The Perfect Squeeze offers an extremely robust and secure option for bar-mounting a phone, with little fear of an “unplanned” departure. A click wheel-style adjuster moves the rubberized jaws to the appropriate size, and while it takes a few turns to get it there, the grip offered by the Perfect Squeeze is among the most solid of any style mounts available. For off-road or single-cylinder bike riders, the Perfect Squeeze can be mounted to a Buzz-Kill vibration isolator. Where the stock low-profile mount would attach the phone holder directly to the bars, the Buzz-Kill uses a stainless-steel “wire rope” isolation design, mounted to aluminum backing plates. This design offers both vibration and impact resistance, and lack of any rubber parts bodes well for a long service life. PowerTRONIC’s programmable ECU device fits snugly under the seat and can be configured using their R-Tune software. You can use PowerTRONIC’s pre-installed fuel maps, configure your own or download additional ones from their website. Saving the most complex upgrade for last, PowerTRONIC makes a programmable ECU for the Himalayan, which allows you to get into the bike’s electronics and tinker with the fuel mapping. As mentioned earlier, the Himalayan isn’t a fire-breathing race machine, but while you’re not going to turn the docile 410cc single into an R1 by pushing some buttons, there are benefits to be found in changing the characteristics of the Himalayan’s fuel delivery. Plus for those who like to tinker, it’s fun to have this level of control over things. Speed run tests using the Himalayan-specific maps downloaded from the PowerTRONIC website did reveal consistently faster timed results climbing both steep and gentle grades, although by just a few seconds. More noticeable was the improved throttle response, particularly off-the-line “snap,” and a more purposeful feel on acceleration. Fuel Map 1 offers mid-range performance gains while Map 2 has mid and top-end performance gains. Both maps showed an improvement over stock in our speed run tests.The install procedure involves several steps, and initially appears complex, however it’s quite straightforward as you simply swap one connection at a time in the PowerTRONIC’s wiring harness. Once the harness is in place, you have a stock coupler which both verifies the system is installed correctly and serves as a way to quickly revert back to the bike’s factory stock fuel mapping. Once the Piggyback ECU is plugged in, the bike can take advantage of whatever map has been uploaded to the unit, or select between two separate maps via the optional handlebar map switch. Programming the unit is done via PowerTRONIC’s R-Tune software. While the ECU ships with dual pre-installed maps, other maps are downloadable from the PowerTRONIC website, and endless user-customization can be done to create one’s own maps. There’s even a “lock” feature in the software which can prevent a map from being copied from the ECU should you come up with a proprietary configuration you want to keep secret. Let the Himalayan track days begin! More Himalayan Mods To Come… Now going on its fourth year, the Himalayan has options available from numerous aftermarket companies spanning a wide range of forms and functions. Here at ADV Pulse, we’re still seeking out and finding interesting products to add to our Royal Enfield project bike. For the next phase, we’ll be focusing on additional off-road protection and maybe a little bling to give it a more custom look. Stay tuned, the little bike that could will likely see additional tweaks coming before long. Author: Jon Beck Jon Beck is fulfilling a dream of never figuring out what to be when he grows up. Racing mountain bikes, competitive surfing, and touring as a musician are somehow part of what led Jon to travel through over 40 countries so far as an adventure motorcycle photographer, journalist, and guide. From precision riding for cameras in Hollywood, to refilling a fountain pen for travel stories, Jon brings a rare blend of experience to the table. While he seems happiest when lost in a desert someplace, deadlines are met most of the time.
  4. Our Himalayan project bike enters “Phase 2” with mods to improve performance, comfort and convenience.The Himalayan burst onto the scene as a unique offering compared to what Royal Enfield had traditionally built over the past many decades, and a unique bike for the adventure motorcycle segment in general. With a price point of $4,799, it leaves surplus funds for potential aftermarket upgrades to customize the bike to your aesthetic tastes, riding style and journeys as well. Previously, we put our Royal Enfield Himalayan project bike through its paces to suss out modifications and upgrades which would be considered “essential” for the bike, or at least highly recommended for anyone who spends much time off-road. Yet many more upgrade options for this interesting motorcycle are out there. In this next phase of building out our Himalayan, we focus on optional upgrades that improve performance, comfort and convenience. ADVERTISEMENT After a fair amount of trial and error, figuring out what works and what doesn’t, we came up with a list of 10 products to enhance the Himalayan’s capability. Ranking the following bits in terms of importance is left up to the individual rider’s preference and intended use for the motorcycle. Read on for a description of how these products can improve the Himalayan and, of course, you can pick and choose, mix and match, upgrades based on your own personal needs. For most off-road riders, one of the primary upgrades on an adventure bike is tires. Like many bikes in this class, the Himalayan ships with a street-biased dual sport tire, specifically the Pirelli MT60. Given the Himalayan is a smaller and lower horsepower motorcycle for the adventure bike class, Pirelli’s 70/30 (street/dirt) tire does the job in most situations riders will encounter aboard the little single. While grabbing a handful of throttle either on or off-road seldom results in the Himalayan’s back end breaking loose and the bike getting sideways, a set of knobby-style tires will still give the Himilayan more sure-footed grip and better cornering traction in loose terrain. Knobbies will always provide greater traction in the dirt, but the traction offered by a 50/50 dual sport tire seems to match the Himalayan’s character well. In spite of its comparatively lower power and price tag, the Enfield is a capable adventure bike. For a boost in off-road performance, we switched to Mitas’ E-07 50/50 dual sport tires (90/90-21; 120/90-17) to increase grip without sacrificing road-going performance. We noticed a significant improvement in loose terrain where the Mitas tires helped aid forward motion better than the stock stock Pirellis, and extra cornering grip helped us avoid front-end washouts in sandy turns. Good cornering on pavement and improved bite in the dirt are welcome characteristics which enhance the already impressive abilities of this understated motorcycle, but we also appreciated the longevity of the tires. After 3,500+ miles of testing on a range of terrain, the rear E-07 still has a healthy amount of tread left. Where tires are perhaps a “necessary” modification that’s obvious right away, some accessories fall into the category of “I didn’t realize how necessary this was until after using it.” Cyclops’ H4 LED headlight bulb arguably falls into this category. Royal Enfield’s history goes back to the 1950’s, and six-volt electrical systems. While the Himalayan has a modern 12-volt electrical system, the stock headlight’s somewhat anemic quality almost seems to borrow from the early low-power days. Maintaining the cool look of the round headlight, and still using the stock reflector and lens, simply swapping out the stock bulb for Cyclops’ H4 setup massively changes the riding experience at night. While drawing only 38 watts, the color, spread, and throw of light from the front of the motorcycle is drastically changed for the better. One could argue there’s a safety aspect to this modification during daylight hours as well, as rear-view-mirror visibility to other drivers on the road is increased. No modifications are required to the Himalayan’s headlight shroud to install the Cyclops H4, however space is tight, and cutting down the two retaining bolts (or replacing with shorter bolts) on each side of the housing make positioning the driver much easier. Going from a traditional 60-watt filament bulb to four XHP 50 emitters at over 2500 lumens is a worthwhile change. The reduced draw on the charging system (38 watts vs 60 watts) also makes room for adding additional electronic accessories like heated gear and auxiliary lights. Next on the list of “most obvious” changes, the thing you’re sitting on would be near the top of the list. Royal Enfield’s optional touring seat has both performance and aesthetic characteristics. Enfield’s “3D net” technology claims to distribute weight more evenly over the seat. We noticed right away a more contoured fit that seems to eliminate any pressure points. Choice of saddle is a highly personal thing, but most riders will likely find the Himalayan’s touring seat option more comfortable for long days on the bike. The durable non-slip cover featuring the Royal Enfield logo is a cool addition to an already cool looking bike. A matching passenger ‘touring’ seat is also available. The USB port offers ‘quick charge’ power directly from the battery, battery status lights and an on/off switch that shuts off power completely to avoid any parasitic draw. Cell phones and other small electronic devices are as much an appendage as accessory to humans in the modern era, and they require power (constantly it seems). Charging phones and other devices while riding has become commonplace over the past couple decades. The ubiquity of USB devices has led to a shift from old style “cigarette lighter” 12-volt power ports in vehicles to most now featuring more-convenient USB ports instead. While the Himalayan does not include power ports of any type, easy access to the bike’s battery under the seat makes installing one a snap. Motopower’s dual-port USB option provides five volts and 3.1 amps of power, which can quickly charge not only cell phones, but tablets, GPS units, camera batteries, or just about anything else that uses a USB port. Intelligent charging circuitry identifies devices to provide optimal power levels, and the Motopower uniquely features battery status lights and an on/off switch so the unit can shut off power either automatically or manually to prevent parasitic battery drain. It comes with an SAE-style cable that is wired directly to the battery, which makes it compatible with many battery charger plugs and with a direct source of power, you can charge devices overnight without leaving the ignition on. The Antigravity Li-ion battery saves 4.4 lbs and offers three times more cold cranking amps than stock. Its Re-Start technology can also jump-start the bike from a reserve charge.The stock Himalayan battery always felt a little weak to us, even when it was fully charged and load tested fine. If the bike was sitting for a month or so, it would sometimes go flat as well. So we decided it would be a good idea to replace it with something more powerful, like Antigravity’s ATZ10 Lithium-ion battery that provides three times more Cold Cranking Amps (360) than the stock Varta lead-acid battery. Other benefits associated with Lithium-ion batteries can be found in things like form factor and weight. In both cases, Antigravity’s ATZ10 earns big scores here. Most apparent, swapping out the Himalayan’s stock battery for the ATZ10 shaves over four pounds off the machine. Sounds like a small number until you’re holding both batteries at the same time and it quickly becomes apparent the Antigravity weighs less than half what the stock lead-acid power source does. Dual sets of terminals on both sides of the battery provide additional options for how and where wiring harnesses can be routed to the battery box – a convenient feature during install. The standout industry-only feature of the ATZ10 is its “RE-START” technology. Should a power drain for whatever reason render the battery flat, simply press the restart button, and the battery will jump-start itself from a reserve charge. Other advanced internal circuitry allows the ATZ10 to monitor its own status and protect from over-charging by entering a “sleep” mode when necessary. A reusable air filter simplifies maintenance on longer trips and the high-flow design helps the Himalayan’s engine breath better.Moving inside the bike, next in our upgrade list is K&N’s replacement air filter. Freer-flowing by a claimed 50%, the potential for horsepower gains are there. Given the Himalayan isn’t a fire-breathing race machine, power gains might be a secondary consideration here. However, the mellow character of the 410cc single can use any help it can get, and the K&N filter is a worthy upgrade that provides multiple benefits beyond claimed power increases. Durability and reusability are key aspects of what makes this filter an addition to consider. The fact the filter is washable makes for easy maintenance on long trips, and a cost savings over the life of the bike. A tight seal is provided by the clamp-on design, and installation is as easy as swapping out a stock filter. K&N also offers its own proprietary spray-on cleaning and oiling products that are designed to work with their air filters. Deciding on a luggage system to haul gear during your trips is a major consideration for any adventure rider. After testing several different systems on the Himalayan, we went with Wolfman’s next-gen waterproof Rolie soft bags and their Unrack System. The adaptable setup lets you strap different Rolie bags to a base harness in various ways, depending on your storage needs. And as the name suggests, it doesn’t require any luggage racks. Using the B-Base (for big bikes), we strapped two medium Rolie Bags on the sides and one large Rolie on top for 44 liters of capacity. Each Rolie bag is fully waterproof without liners and comes with straps and attachment points that make it easy to add more bags in a stackable configuration. For longer trips, we’d strap on a camp chair and additional small Rolie bag to add more capacity. We also added Wolfman’s Enduro Tank Bag, which offers an additional 4 liters of capacity. Given the Himalayan’s comparatively diminutive size, Wolfman’s minimalist Tank Bag fits the Royal Enfield perfectly. Yet it is still large enough to stash a full-size DSLR camera inside. It features a single heavy-duty zipper and four clips that allow you to quickly remove the bag, leaving the straps on the bike. Additional features include an internal lid pocket that doubles as a fanny pack, a detachable map pocket, and a waterproof shell that doesn’t need a liner. During our rides, we appreciated that the tank bag didn’t interfere with our riding position while standing on the pegs. The system as a whole was rock solid stable on the trail and the bags stayed clear of the exhaust. The carbon risers lift the fender just high enough to let sticky mud pass through, while maintaining the stock appearance.The unique high/low dual fender design on the Himalayan is just one of the quirky characteristics of the bike that give it a unique quality. However, that low fender can become a liability in muddy terrain. Sticky mud can build up on the tire until it begins to touch the fender, and eventually the wheel completely locks up. This can lead to either the front fender ripping off or being sent over the handlebars at an inopportune moment. To help avoid this type of situation, we added a fender riser kit from Enfield Accessories. The kit comes with a set of 15mm tall carbon fiber spacers and longer bolts that add more clearance between the tire and fender. Should you ride in a particularly muddy region, they also offer a 25mm kit to provide even more space for mud to accumulate. It’s an inexpensive upgrade that is easy to install and it can save you a lot of hassle on your next mud ride. The machined aluminum mount utilizes four stainless-steel wire ropes at its base to deaden vibration and reduce impacts.Charging a phone on the road is one thing, where to put it is another. The Perfect Squeeze offers an extremely robust and secure option for bar-mounting a phone, with little fear of an “unplanned” departure. A click wheel-style adjuster moves the rubberized jaws to the appropriate size, and while it takes a few turns to get it there, the grip offered by the Perfect Squeeze is among the most solid of any style mounts available. For off-road or single-cylinder bike riders, the Perfect Squeeze can be mounted to a Buzz-Kill vibration isolator. Where the stock low-profile mount would attach the phone holder directly to the bars, the Buzz-Kill uses a stainless-steel “wire rope” isolation design, mounted to aluminum backing plates. This design offers both vibration and impact resistance, and lack of any rubber parts bodes well for a long service life. PowerTRONIC’s programmable ECU device fits snugly under the seat and can be configured using their R-Tune software. You can use PowerTRONIC’s pre-installed fuel maps, configure your own or download additional ones from their website. Saving the most complex upgrade for last, PowerTRONIC makes a programmable ECU for the Himalayan, which allows you to get into the bike’s electronics and tinker with the fuel mapping. As mentioned earlier, the Himalayan isn’t a fire-breathing race machine, but while you’re not going to turn the docile 410cc single into an R1 by pushing some buttons, there are benefits to be found in changing the characteristics of the Himalayan’s fuel delivery. Plus for those who like to tinker, it’s fun to have this level of control over things. Speed run tests using the Himalayan-specific maps downloaded from the PowerTRONIC website did reveal consistently faster timed results climbing both steep and gentle grades, although by just a few seconds. More noticeable was the improved throttle response, particularly off-the-line “snap,” and a more purposeful feel on acceleration. Fuel Map 1 offers mid-range performance gains while Map 2 has mid and top-end performance gains. Both maps showed an improvement over stock in our speed run tests.The install procedure involves several steps, and initially appears complex, however it’s quite straightforward as you simply swap one connection at a time in the PowerTRONIC’s wiring harness. Once the harness is in place, you have a stock coupler which both verifies the system is installed correctly and serves as a way to quickly revert back to the bike’s factory stock fuel mapping. Once the Piggyback ECU is plugged in, the bike can take advantage of whatever map has been uploaded to the unit, or select between two separate maps via the optional handlebar map switch. Programming the unit is done via PowerTRONIC’s R-Tune software. While the ECU ships with dual pre-installed maps, other maps are downloadable from the PowerTRONIC website, and endless user-customization can be done to create one’s own maps. There’s even a “lock” feature in the software which can prevent a map from being copied from the ECU should you come up with a proprietary configuration you want to keep secret. Let the Himalayan track days begin! More Himalayan Mods To Come… Now going on its fourth year, the Himalayan has options available from numerous aftermarket companies spanning a wide range of forms and functions. Here at ADV Pulse, we’re still seeking out and finding interesting products to add to our Royal Enfield project bike. For the next phase, we’ll be focusing on additional off-road protection and maybe a little bling to give it a more custom look. Stay tuned, the little bike that could will likely see additional tweaks coming before long. Author: Jon Beck Jon Beck is fulfilling a dream of never figuring out what to be when he grows up. Racing mountain bikes, competitive surfing, and touring as a musician are somehow part of what led Jon to travel through over 40 countries so far as an adventure motorcycle photographer, journalist, and guide. From precision riding for cameras in Hollywood, to refilling a fountain pen for travel stories, Jon brings a rare blend of experience to the table. While he seems happiest when lost in a desert someplace, deadlines are met most of the time.
  5. În urmă cu 3 luni vă spuneam despre existența unor zvonuri privind reinvierea modelului CBR600RR pentru 2021. Acum zvonurile se confirmă, cei de la Honda lansând astăzi un teaser scurt, intitulat : “Honda CBR600RR – Awaken the Race” [embedded content] Mai mult, pe site-ul japonez al firmei, există și o scurtă prezentare a noului model ,de unde aflăm că motocicleta va avea un motor DOHC, cu 4 cilindri în linie de 599cc și va dispune de cele mai noi tehnologii electronice și aerodinamice. Din clip putem vedea elemente de design similare cu cele de pe Honda CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP, cum ar fi schema grafică HRC, carenele și aripoarele aerodinamice, dar și faptul că evacuarea rămâne sub șa, la fel cum era și la vechiul model. De asemenea, pentru o fracțiune de secundă, se vede și un bord nou, full TFT. Deocamdată nu a fost comunicată nici o dată oficială de lansare, însă la cum se vede în clip, motocicleta este într-o fază avansată de dezvoltare, fiind foarte probabil gata de producție. Cum anul acesta salonul de la Milano, unde era cel mai probabil să o vedem prezentată, a fost anulat, nu ne rămâne decât să așteptăm noi informații de la Honda. Continue Reading Articol preluat de pe motoroute.ro
  6. Primele etape din Campionatul National al Romaniei la Motociclism Viteza pe Circuit sunte programate pe circuitul de la Adancata intre 14 si 16 august 2020. Concursul este organizat de clubul Pascota Ioan Iliei Timisoara in memoria lui Ionel Pascota Senior – Maestru al Sportului. În campionatul național vor concura clasele: SuperSport 600 cc, SuperBike 1000 cc, 300cc, Oldtimer, Debutanti/Gold/Hobby 600 cc; Debutanti/Gold/Hobby 1000 cc. În campionatul BMU vor concura clasele: SP125 / SSP300 / SSP600 / SBK / F600 / F1000 / MK1000 și MK250. Accesul la acest concurs va fi restrictionat conform prevederilor legale in vigoare. Fiecare participant va primi un număr de trei brățări de acces în perimetrul circuitului. Accesul spectatorilor nu este permis. Toți sportivii și însoțitorii lor vor fi nevoiți să treacă printr-un triaj medical pentru a le fi permis accesul și înmânate brățările. Toți participanții trebuie să completeze o Cerere de Înscriere, direct la secretariatul concursului sau în prealabil pe mail la larisa@frm.ro. Pentru acreditarea reprezentanților presei, fotografilor și cameramanilor este obligatorie trimiterea unui email la marius@frm.ro si primirea unui răspuns care confirmă accesul la eveniment. Taxa de înscriere este de 180 euro pentru clasele de 1000 si 600cc. Taxa pentru clasele Oldtimer, 125 si 300 cc este de 100 euro. Această taxă include transponderul care va fi utilizat pe perioada celor trei zile de concurs și antrenamente. Vineri 14 august 2020 este ziua dedicată integral antrenamentelor libere. Sâmbătă 15 august 2020 vom avea în prima parte a zilei antrenamente cronometrate și calificări, prima cursă fiind programată la ora 15:30, iar ultima la ora 18:40. Duminică 16 august 2020 vom începe cu warm-up al tuturor claselor. Urmează apoi ceremonia de deschidere și un moment de reculegere in memoria marelui sportiv Ionel Pascota Senior - Maestru al Sportului Românesc. Cursele etapei a II-a naționale și a IIIa- balcanice vor începe la ora 12:15 și se vor încheia la ora 15:40 cu clasele Oldtimer. Regulamentul Particular al CNIR Vteza Et.I&II este disponibil aici. Regulamentul Particular al CE BMU Et.II & III este disponibil aici.
  7. There’s a new 60 km/h speed limit in Italy’s Dolomite mountains, just approved by the Trentino government—and in some areas, it only applies to motorcyclists. European magazines and newspapers were full of the news over the weekend, as it applies to roads in a popular tourism region. Riders from all over the continent travel to Trentino for the area’s fine roads, but it seems locals are unhappy with their behaviour. On July 24, the regional government restricted all vehicles to 60 km/h on a series of mountain roads, except in areas where the speed limit is 50 km/h or less. On at least two highways, the restriction only applies to motorcyclists. Even if the speed limit is 90 km/h for everyone else, bikes are now restricted to 60 km/h on those roads, unless the speed limit is already lower than that. Motorrad magazine says State Road 85, State Road 25, State Road 3 and sections of State Road 240 all see the 60 km/h restrictions for all motorists, as well as several passes through the Dolomites (Sellajoch, Grödner Joch, Pordoi-Joch, Rolle-Pass). The motorcycle-only speed limits are in effect on State 42 at Tonale and Mendel passes, and State Road 31 at Manghen Pass. The new speed limits are only in effect for the summer, but authorities are supposedly looking at making this a long-term decision. Of course, it’s supposedly all for the sake of safety, but the move comes as Europe sees the beginning of motorcycle-only crackdowns. Germany has been looking to outlaw aftermarket motorcycle exhausts, Paris has set up a new task force to fight loud vehicles (with an apparent emphasis on motorcycles) and in England, authorities are testing “noise camera” technology that was developed to fight loud pipes. Clearly, Europeans are unhappy with motorcyclists who are coloring outside the lines, so to speak. The question is, what’s next? And, if this attitude of restriction continues, where will riders go to blow off steam, if they aren’t given the usual hands-off approach through the Alps? Maybe, this will drive more Euro riders to off-road? We’ll see. Vezi sursa
  8. Honda introduced the CRF1100L Africa Twin adventure bike in 2020; a few months later, and the aftermarket is starting to catch up. Now, we’ve got new exhausts from SC-Project, one for street usage and one for race-only use. Why put on a new exhaust? Most owners think they’ll get more power, but the reality is, modern emissions regs and EFI systems mean you’re probably not going to get a lot of extra horsepower with a new slip-on muffler. You’ll likely shed some weight, and get a bit more noise (again, depending on regulations), and maybe, just maybe, you’ll feel some difference in the power or power delivery. That’s basically what you’re getting with the SC-Project X-Plorer II muffler. Thanks to titanium construction, with carbon-fiber endcap, it weighs 3.5 kilograms, two kilograms less than the stocker. Aside from that? SC-Project says the X-Plorer II makes the bike more rideable, and changes the power delivery, but note that there’s no promise of mad horsepower gains. It’s hard to do that sort of thing while keeping everything street-legal in the EU, where Euro5 emissions regs determine whether or not you can sell a bike, and what aftermarket equipment is street-legal. If you aren’t so fussed about that, then SC-Project can sell you the Rally Raid exhaust system. This is a full replacement for the Honda CRF1100L stock exhaust, with titanium construction and a carbon-fiber heat shield. SC-Project says it uses the Africa Twin’s stock lambda probes, and claims it makes more power (and of course, more noise) than the original, and also cuts a bunch of weight. Chances are, if it really does need more power, it’ll also need a re-tuning via Power Commander or similar unit. Anyway, this is sold as a competition exhaust, so if you’re looking to run a big-bike offroad rally, this is what you want. Pricing for the Rally Raid system is 770 euros for the headers, 670 for the muffler. The X-Plorer muffler costs 870 euros. Find more details at the SC-Project website. Vezi sursa
  9. Photos: BMW BMW has just taken the wraps off another custom machine based on its R18 cruiser, but this one has a bit of a twist. BMW sponsored other customs around this platform, but they were built for looks. This machine built with help from designer Roland Sands, has a lot of emphasis on looks, too—but it’s also built for speed. At least, speed in a straight line; BMW calls this the Dragster, and it certainly looks ready for the strip. The R18 is powered by a massive air-cooled 1800cc flat twin, with lines from the glory days of European roadsters. BMW actually debuted the engine at a custom motorcycle show, with a one-off motorcycle from Custom Works Zon based around the engine. The next glimpse we had was a Revival Cycles custom built around the big flat twin. Now, the production version of the cruiser is ready for pre-order, but BMW has another custom teaser for us. Roland Sands’ machines are always built with a go-fast ethos, as he’s a former 250GP roadracing champ and still likes speed. When he started this project, he says his thoughts went straight to drag racing: “With an engine that’s so visibly the center piece, I immediately thought of muscle cars. My family has always been into going fast and my dad was a drag racer, so I thought it made sense to strip the bike down to the essentials and shape it to go fast on a straight track.” It probably doesn’t hurt that it also looks an awful lot like the Pro Street-style factory customs that Harley-Davidson likes so much. Sands’ bikes are never cookie-cutter builds, and this machine is no exception. Most impressively, he managed to work around the electronics to graft on a nitrous oxide boost system; the front steering geometry is the same, but there’s a set of BMW R nineT forks and S1000RR brakes. There are quite a few RSD off-the-shelf parts as well, and some one-offs. Maybe we’ll actually see this thing on drag strips down the road? Knowing Sands’ love for speed, that wouldn’t be a surprise. More details in the presser below: BMW Motorrad presents the R 18 Dragster. Long Beach, 5 August 2020. The renowned custom bike designer Roland Sands stripped down the BMW R 18 to create a straight line dragster featuring the iconic and massive boxer powerplant. The result: the R 18 Dragster. He and his team have created a unique masterpiece built around the impressive 2-cylinder Big Boxer, giving their creativity free reign in the process. Roland Sands’ personal story served as a source of inspiration for his work on this bike. “With an engine that’s so visibly the center piece, I immediately thought of muscle cars. My family has always been into going fast and my dad was a drag racer, so I thought it made sense to strip the bike down to the essentials and shape it to go fast on a straight track,” the designer explains. The new BMW R 18: a cruiser rooted in history. With the new R 18, BMW Motorrad presented the brand’s first series production bike for the cruiser segment in April 2020. Like no other BMW motorcycle before it, this model stands entirely in the tradition of historical BMW motorcycles – both technically and with regard to its design. It is based on illustrious models such as the BMW R 5 and shifts the focus back to the motorcycle essentials: purist, no-frills technology and the boxer engine as the center of riding pleasure. The “Big Boxer” continues the line of traditional air-cooled boxer engines that have offered inspiring riding since BMW Motorrad first began production in 1923. The technical design process used by Roland Sands. Roland Sands always starts by sketching his ideas on paper. This allows him to figure out the basics of the shape and what the stance and the geometry of the bike could look like. “In the end, the real magic happens when we bring the sketch to life”, Roland explains. More than any other motorcycle, the new R 18 offers a highly customizable design. It features an easily removable rear frame and a simple-to-dismantle painted parts set. This gives the customer a high degree of freedom for easily converting the rear end of the new R 18 to suit personal preferences. In addition you can also change the paint finish to suit your personal taste. “The electronics were definitely the most difficult task we had to deal with as we put in nitrous oxide, stripped out the stock exhaust and changed the intake drastically. It was a bit of an experiment, but we dialed it in! The final product is impressive and characterised by a high level of craftsmanship, as can be expected from BMW Motorrad. Right from the beginning, I couldn’t wait to get customizing!” Roland points out. For the the R 18 Dragster, the team around Roland Sands retained the stock neck geometry of the R 18, removed the bike’s rear end and turned it into a drag racer. Moreover, they chose to modify the front and rear fender to fit the modified frame. The whole customizing process took about three and a half months. The bike then headed to the workshop for final assembly and a day at a drag strip. “Every bike needs different sources depending on the build, special materials or parts. Every new bike concept is a bit of a learning process even after having built over 200 bikes. We always want to understand the genre of the bike we are building in, it’s the key to keeping it authentic and functional,” explains Roland Sands. Aside from the R 18 Dragster custom bike, Roland Sands also created two different design collections of milled aluminium parts for the launch of the R 18 Cruiser: “Machined” and “2-Tone-Black”. The “Machined” and “2-Tone-Black” ranges include front and rear wheels available in different dimensions than the standard sizes. In addition, the range of these exclusive milled parts includes speedometer housings, handlebar clamps, risers, handlebar grips, hand levers and mirrors as well as engine housing trim elements, filler caps, intake silencer covers and much more. For the R 18 Dragster, Roland Sands used the milled parts design collection “2-Tone-Black” to customize levers, wheels, valve covers, breast plate, headlight and gauges. The front end was taken from the BMW R nineT. The seat as well as the exhaust were created from scratch. The R 18 Dragster custom bike in detail The frame has been modified completely removing the rear suspension for drag racing. Front and rear fenders have been slightly modified utilizing the stock sheet metal parts in order to keep the classic R 18 silhouette. The headlight has been taken from the original R 18 and is highlighted with the headlight bezel from the design collection of milled aluminium parts. The standard exhaust has been replaced with a hand fabricated Stainless Steel twin megaphone system utilizing the exhaust tips from the milled aluminium parts. The hydraulic front brake and clutch master cylinders are from Roland Sands Design. The tank has been taken over from the original R 18. The paint finish is a two tone metallic blue with classic white BMW pin-stripes by Roland’s long time painter Chris Wood. The fork has been taken from the BMW R nineT. The front braking system has been taken from the BMW S 1000 RR superbike. The seat has been built from scratch and is a RSD custom seat by Saddlemen. Roland Sands: The man behind the designs By his own account, Roland Sands basically grew up on a motorcycle and motorcycling is in his blood. His dad was a drag racer who built custom bikes and parts. As a result, Roland was brought up surrounded by cool bikes. It wasn’t long before he, too, was riding dirt bikes, taking them apart and rebuilding them. He had a racing career of his own that spanned ten years. Today Roland is a world famous designer of custom bikes and motorcycle apparel with customers in all corners of the world. The designer is best known for combining styles and creating new genres in the process. “Combining a racing aesthetic and function with a custom style – this is what we are probably best known for. We like to make stock machines perform better,” says Roland. For Roland Sands, motorcycling is not simply a job. “It’s really hard to describe in a few sentences. Riding a motorcycle to me is like becoming one with the machine. My motorcycle is my life, it’s everything, it’s what I do.” Vezi sursa
  10. Probabil că dacă prințul Charles nu și-ar fi cumpărat o casă la Viscri în 1996, multe lume nu ar fi auzit de acest loc și acest sat ar fi rămas doar un nume pe hartă, la care ajungi doar dacă te-ai rătăcit de la drumurile principale. La fel de probabil, dacă nu ar fi existat acest interes crescând și tot mai mulți turiști care ajung aici, și căile de access ar fi rămas pline de gropi. Însă iată că în 2020, putem să ajungem la Viscri pe două drumuri proaspăt refăcute, cu un carosabil foarte bun: -prima varianta, de la Rupea, în dreptul cetății/al magazinului Penny, mergeți către comună Dacia pe DJ105A.(ar trebui in urma sa vedeti cetatea Rupea, asemenea pozei de mai jos). De acolo sunt circa 8 km până la Viscri. Acesta este drumul pe unde am fost ultima oară în Mai 2020. DJ105A Rupea – Dacia DJ104L Dacia – Viscri DJ104L Dacia – Viscri – a două, prin satul Bunești, unde aveți indicator direct către Viscri. Pe aici nu am fost, însă un prieten mi-a spus că la începutul lui Iunie carosabilul era refăcut aproape în totalitate, se mai lucra la un singur pod, unde era o zona de ocolire.De ce ai vrea să ajungi la Viscri? Aș spune că Viscri nu este locația potrivită neapărat pentru motocicliști, ci mai degrabă potrivită pentru moto-turiști, aflați într-o tură mai lungă, sau cei ce vor să se deconecteze de la ritmul agitat al orașelor. Viscri este unul dintre cele mai frumoase sate săsești din Transilvania, aparținând Patrimoniului Mondial UNESCO. Construcția bisericii fortificate din sat a fost începută de către secui în anii 1100, inscripțiile pietrelor de mormânt din cimitirul care înconjoară biserica atestând acest fapt. În anul 1185 sașii au colonizat biserica, secuii fiind nevoiți să părăsească satul și să se stabilească în sud-estul Transilvaniei. Localitatea Viscri este atestată documentar în anul 1400 sub denumirea latină Alba Ecclesia, echivalentul ei etimologic fiind denumirea germană Weißkirch. Biserica a dat și numele localității, fiind una dintre cele mai impresionante biserici din Transilvania. Imediat cum intrați în sat, sunteți ghidați către o parcare amplă. Important de știut, un lucru care mi-a plăcut foarte mult, în momentul în care ai intrat în sat, s-a termiant și asfaltul. Este ca o trecere în timp bruscă, unde lași în spate agitația timpurilor prezente și încerci să te acordezi la trecut. Soluția cu parcarea este foarte bună pentru a păstra nealterat farmecul locului. Cel mai important obiectiv este spectaculoasa biserică fortificată săsească, inclusă în patrimonial mondial UNESCO. Lucru imporant de știut, taxa de intrare se poate plăti doar cash. Pe lângă biserica în sine, care este o oază nesperată de răcoare, puteți urca și în turn, de unde veți admira satul de la înălțime. În curtea bisericii, gășiți și un muzeu cu diverse obiecte sășești: costume tradiționale, broderii, război de țesut. De asemenea mai există și o expoziție de teracotă tradițională dar și modernă. Vedere din turnul bisericii Muzeu sasesc Muzeul de teracota În sat sunt mai multe variante de cazare, sunt și câteva restaurante/cafenele. La ultima vizită noi am mâncat foarte bine la Cafe Artizanat, aflat în imediata vecinătate a bisericii fortificate. O plimbare la Viscri poate fi foarte usor integrata intr-o tura mai ampla, in zona fiind multe alte locuri si drumuri pitoresti. In primul rand cetatea Rupea este la mai putin de 30min de mers, Sighisoara se afla la aproximativ 40km, iar inspre Brasov mai gasim, proaspat restaurata, cetatea Feldioara. Apoi un pic mai departe gasim vulcanul stins de la Racos alaturi de Lacul de Smarald si Coloanele de Bazalt. Ca drumuri pitoresti secundare ce se ramnifica din E60 (Sighisoara – Brasov / Padurea Bogatii), avem drumul pana la Racos, cat si Hoghiz – Sercaia. Calitatea asfaltului Peisaje Trafic Dificultate ( 1 - dificil / 5 - usor ) Fun factor Continue Reading Articol preluat de pe motoroute.ro
  11. Ultima săptămână
  12. Published on 08.05.2020 [embedded content] [embedded content]Sena has launched the 5S, a next-generation value-packed intercom system designed with ease of use in mind. The 5S is born from the classic Sena SMH5, one of Sena’s original motorcycle headsets that has been keeping riders connected for nearly a decade. The entry-level 5S puts a new spin on the original SMH5, with Bluetooth 5 and a sleek LCD display for visual confirmation of the device’s settings. With the new 5S, you get High Definition in-helmet speakers, High Definition two-way intercom, and integrated LCD screen plus the 5S with Bluetooth 5 keeps you connected to your riding companion or passenger with HD sound quality, music sharing, and audio equalizer profiles built right in. With even more features packed in, it also lets you answer phone calls hands-free, listen to FM Radio, and hear your GPS prompts. The 5S features a Helmet Clamp Kit and Boom Microphone. The Jog Dial makes for an intuitive user interface that is much easier to control while riding, which means you’ll ride safer. Simplified Setup & Operation The LCD screen enables you to quickly verify your connections and settings before you even put your helmet on. Conversely, manage device functions hands-free while riding using the voice commands supported across 8 languages. And the glove-friendly Jog Dial is perfect for changing volume or answering your phone calls while on the go. Updated HD Speakers ADVERTISEMENT The newly redesigned in-helmet speakers are optimized for both physical comfort and great audio performance. These particular speakers have been designed with a beveled taper and easily fit in the speaker pockets of a helmet, giving the rider a comfortable experience. The 5S speakers have a marked increase in volume, bass boost, and clarity. 2-Way Intercom & Smartphone Connectivity The 5S is equipped with an HD 2-way Bluetooth Intercom system that allows for rider to rider communication at nearly a half mile range (0.4 MI, 700 M), almost doubling the range of the SMH5. Pair your smartphone to the 5S to seamlessly listen to music, GPS directions, take calls and more. Sena’s Audio Multitasking™ will allow 5S users to listen to music while simultaneously talking over Bluetooth Intercom. Sena 5S Bluetooth Intercom Features HD Speakers LCD Display Bluetooth® 5 2-Way HD Intercom Audio Multitasking™ Intuitive Jog Dial Smartphone Connectivity Sena Utility App FM Radio Talk time: 7 hours Standby time: 7 days Charging time: 1.5 hours Working distance: up to 700m (0.4mi) in open terrain Universal intercom allows allows pairing to other brands of Bluetooth headsets GPS navigation Water resistant Up to 7 hours talk time, 7 days stand-by time Upgradeable firmware Availability and Price The 5S is now available with an MSRP of $159 USD / €169 EUR (Incl. VAT) for a single pack, and $299 USD / €319 EUR (Incl. VAT) for a dual pack. Like all Sena products, the 5S is firmware upgradeable and comes with a two-year warranty. Shopping Options:
  13. A Kawasaki patent application shows that the Japanese manufacturer is getting serious about entering the electric motorcycle market. As seen in the video below, Kawasaki has already released some information about its electric motorcycle program. [embedded content] Some of its novel electric motorcycle approaches include a traditional foot-operated gear shift lever, and a thumb-activated energy recovery system. But now, Kawasaki is thinking far outside the traditional electric bike box. A patent application discloses their plan to have the final assembly of their electric machine take place, not at the factory, but the selling dealer’s facility. The fact that Team Green is patenting its assembly process says that the company is thinking ahead to the actual production of electric motorcycles. Typically, motorcycle manufacturers build their machines around the engine. The engine and the frame are installed very early in the assembly process. But electric motorcycles have different concerns and requirements. The batteries that power electric vehicles are often “large” heavy components manufactured in a vendor’s factory. If the battery must be installed at the motorcycle manufacturer’s facility, the vendor will have to ship the battery to the manufacturer. Doing so adds a risk of damage to the battery and/or its electronics. That risk extends to both the shipment to the factory and the final delivery to the dealer. Two-part assembly identified in a patent application But what is even more interesting is that the top of the motorcycle’s frame is easily removable. Once removed, it would be relatively easy to slot the battery pack into the center of the bike. This would allow Kawasaki to utilize a two factory approach to manufacture and deliver electric motorcycles to waiting customers. Kawasaki’s patent application demonstrates its bike’s battery pack installation. The patent application also describes how the bike would be manufactured and delivered. The battery and the bike’s electronics will be made at a dedicated facility (likely a vendor’s facility). While at the same time, the bike’s chassis, suspension, brakes, wheels, and bodywork are in assembly at Kawasaki’s own manufacturing facility. Once complete, both separate assemblies are ready for shipment to their final destination; a dealer. The dealer would then complete the final assembly process by mating the two complete assemblies. Patent assembly process If you think about Kawasaki’s electric motorcycle process, it could substantially simplify production. The two factories manufacturing the complete assemblies could be located on different continents. That would enable each manufacturer to be close to the necessary raw materials and also ensure that the battery and electronics do not have to be shipped twice. The reduced shipping requirements could ultimately increase production yields. The risk of shipping damage to sensitive components in electric batteries and electronics could be cut in half if they only require one shipment. Kawasaki’s process could also reduce the risk associated with environmental hazards, dropping, shaking, mishandling, etc. There is also another consideration. The rules and regulations for shipping high powered electrical components such as motorcycle batteries can be quite complex. Battery manufacturers have significant experience in packing and packaging their products. This is something that the motorcycle manufacturers likely don’t have. Not having to learn or to deal with these regulations, particularly in a fully completed bike, could result in significant cost savings. Final assembly Kawasaki patent application also shows us its final assembly process. A simple drawing shows the entire process starting with each individual final assemblies. In the case of the motorcycle itself, you see the bike in the factory heading to the dealer. In the case of the battery and electronic components, you see the battery packs in storage. When appropriate, Kawasaki will ask the vendor to shop the packs to the dealer. This patent application diagram shows Kawasaki’s intended electric motorcycle final assembly process. Once both assemblies reach the dealer, the final assembly of the electric motorcycle can begin. Kawasaki’s patent application also explains that the battery and its control electronics are a single unit. The unit’s accelerometers and tilt sensors for the machine’s ABS and traction control systems are permanently part of the battery. But this also means that those components can have another purpose. These components can monitor the battery and electronics package during both the production and shipping processes. The battery’s electronics will record any significant impacts, tilting, or jolts. Upon arrival, the dealer can then plug in a diagnostic computer to check the health of the battery pack prior to installation into the motorcycle and reviews the results. If all is in good standing, the dealer will proceed with the final assembly process. And, once all assembly and testing are complete, the bike’s sensors and electronics take on their respective roles as part of the motorcycle’s control systems. When will production begin? Kawasaki has not said when they will start manufacturing electric motorcycles. But considering the above, it’s clear that Kawasaki is serious about bringing them to market. When any manufacturer spends ten years developing a product, you know they are spending a lot of money and will want a return on their investment. So what’s holding Kawasaki up? Perhaps it’s that they are waiting for a time when battery technology has advanced to the point where they can be as efficient as their internal combustion-engined counterparts. Or maybe its that they are waiting for demand for electric motorcycles to rise. Whatever their plan is, Kawasaki is demonstrating its commitment and intent to produce electrically powered motorcycles. When production will ultimately begin is up for discussion. Do you think Kawasaki’s plan is a smart one? Will its assembly process save them money? Will dealers be able to complete the assembly process successfully? Let us know what you think in the comments below. Vezi sursa
  14. A Kawasaki patent application shows that the Japanese manufacturer is getting serious about entering the electric motorcycle market. As seen in the video below, Kawasaki has already released some information about its electric motorcycle program. [embedded content] Some of its novel electric motorcycle approaches include a traditional foot-operated gear shift lever, and a thumb-activated energy recovery system. But now, Kawasaki is thinking far outside the traditional electric bike box. A patent application discloses their plan to have the final assembly of their electric machine take place, not at the factory, but the selling dealer’s facility. The fact that Team Green is patenting its assembly process says that the company is thinking ahead to the actual production of electric motorcycles. Typically, motorcycle manufacturers build their machines around the engine. The engine and the frame are installed very early in the assembly process. But electric motorcycles have different concerns and requirements. The batteries that power electric vehicles are often “large” heavy components manufactured in a vendor’s factory. If the battery must be installed at the motorcycle manufacturer’s facility, the vendor will have to ship the battery to the manufacturer. Doing so adds a risk of damage to the battery and/or its electronics. That risk extends to both the shipment to the factory and the final delivery to the dealer. Two-part assembly identified in a patent application But what is even more interesting is that the top of the motorcycle’s frame is easily removable. Once removed, it would be relatively easy to slot the battery pack into the center of the bike. This would allow Kawasaki to utilize a two factory approach to manufacture and deliver electric motorcycles to waiting customers. Kawasaki’s patent application demonstrates its bike’s battery pack installation. The patent application also describes how the bike would be manufactured and delivered. The battery and the bike’s electronics will be made at a dedicated facility (likely a vendor’s facility). While at the same time, the bike’s chassis, suspension, brakes, wheels, and bodywork are in assembly at Kawasaki’s own manufacturing facility. Once complete, both separate assemblies are ready for shipment to their final destination; a dealer. The dealer would then complete the final assembly process by mating the two complete assemblies. Patent assembly process If you think about Kawasaki’s electric motorcycle process, it could substantially simplify production. The two factories manufacturing the complete assemblies could be located on different continents. That would enable each manufacturer to be close to the necessary raw materials and also ensure that the battery and electronics do not have to be shipped twice. The reduced shipping requirements could ultimately increase production yields. The risk of shipping damage to sensitive components in electric batteries and electronics could be cut in half if they only require one shipment. Kawasaki’s process could also reduce the risk associated with environmental hazards, dropping, shaking, mishandling, etc. There is also another consideration. The rules and regulations for shipping high powered electrical components such as motorcycle batteries can be quite complex. Battery manufacturers have significant experience in packing and packaging their products. This is something that the motorcycle manufacturers likely don’t have. Not having to learn or to deal with these regulations, particularly in a fully completed bike, could result in significant cost savings. Final assembly Kawasaki patent application also shows us its final assembly process. A simple drawing shows the entire process starting with each individual final assemblies. In the case of the motorcycle itself, you see the bike in the factory heading to the dealer. In the case of the battery and electronic components, you see the battery packs in storage. When appropriate, Kawasaki will ask the vendor to shop the packs to the dealer. This patent application diagram shows Kawasaki’s intended electric motorcycle final assembly process. Once both assemblies reach the dealer, the final assembly of the electric motorcycle can begin. Kawasaki’s patent application also explains that the battery and its control electronics are a single unit. The unit’s accelerometers and tilt sensors for the machine’s ABS and traction control systems are permanently part of the battery. But this also means that those components can have another purpose. These components can monitor the battery and electronics package during both the production and shipping processes. The battery’s electronics will record any significant impacts, tilting, or jolts. Upon arrival, the dealer can then plug in a diagnostic computer to check the health of the battery pack prior to installation into the motorcycle and reviews the results. If all is in good standing, the dealer will proceed with the final assembly process. And, once all assembly and testing are complete, the bike’s sensors and electronics take on their respective roles as part of the motorcycle’s control systems. When will production begin? Kawasaki has not said when they will start manufacturing electric motorcycles. But considering the above, it’s clear that Kawasaki is serious about bringing them to market. When any manufacturer spends ten years developing a product, you know they are spending a lot of money and will want a return on their investment. So what’s holding Kawasaki up? Perhaps it’s that they are waiting for a point in time when battery technology has advanced to the point where they can be as efficient as their internal combustion-engined counterparts. Or maybe its that they are waiting for demand for electric motorcycles to rise. Whatever their plan is, Kawasaki is demonstrating its commitment and intent to produce electrically powered motorcycles. When production will ultimately begin is up for discussion. Do you think Kawasaki’s plan is a smart one? Will its assembly process save them money? Will dealers be able to complete the assembly process successfully? Let us know what you think in the comments below. Vezi sursa
  15. MV Agusta has announced its new Brutale 800 SCS and Dragster 800 SCS with a semi-auto clutch. On these new model variants, it’s now possible to shift between gears without using the handlebar clutch lever. We’ve seen MV Agusta’s Smart Clutch System before. Back in mid-2018, MV Agusta announced its Turismo Veloce sport tourer would come in a version with semi-auto clutch. Riders would be able to use the clutch lever to shift through the gears like usual, but the Smart Clutch System also allows them to also ride without using the lever, if they choose to. When the engine rpms drop, the clutch automatically disengages, so your engine won’t die at an intersection; when the revs start to climb, the clutch engages again, and you’re underway without using your clutch lever. Combined with MV Agusta’s standard up/down quickshifter, the Smart Clutch System also allows for lightning-fast launches, as riders can bang through the gearbox without worrying about the clutch. Now, offroaders might think this all sounds familiar, and it should: the Smart Clutch System is actually a Rekluse design. This concept has been around on dirt bikes for years, as some offroaders like the ability to tackle tough terrain without worrying about stalling when things get hectic. Even before the Rekluse, Honda used a similar system on its early ATVs and even two-wheelers. There were also some Brit bikes with similar designs. It’s a clever idea, too, as it’s fairly cheap to graft this onto an existing MV Agusta bottom end, and still allows riders to use the clutch as normal, unlike Honda’s DCT gearbox. It isn’t completely auto, like the DCT, but it does make shifting much easier, and bumper-to-bumper traffic will be much more enjoyable. Vezi sursa
  16. MV Agusta has announced its new Brutale 800 SCS and Dragster 800 SCS with a semi-auto clutch. On these new model variants, it’s now possible to shift between gears without using the handlebar clutch lever. We’ve seen MV Agusta’s Smart Clutch System before. Back in mid-2018, MV Agusta announced its Turismo Veloce sport tourer would come in a version with semi-auto clutch. Riders would be able to use the clutch lever to shift through the gears like usual, but the Smart Clutch System also allows them to also ride without using the lever, if they choose to. When the engine rpms drop, the clutch automatically disengages, so your engine won’t die at an intersection; when the revs start to climb, the clutch engages again, and you’re underway without using your clutch lever. Combined with MV Agusta’s standard up/down quickshifter, the Smart Clutch System also allows for lightning-fast launches, as riders can bang through the gearbox without worrying about the clutch. Now, offroaders might think this all sounds familiar, and it should: the Smart Clutch System is actually a Rekluse design. This concept has been around on dirt bikes for years, as some offroaders like the ability to tackle tough terrain without worrying about stalling when things get hectic. Even before the Rekluse, Honda used a similar system on its early ATVs and even two-wheelers. There were also some Brit bikes with similar designs. It’s a clever idea, too, as it’s fairly cheap to graft this onto an existing MV Agusta bottom end, and still allows riders to use the clutch as normal, unlike Honda’s DCT gearbox. It isn’t completely auto, like the DCT, but it does make shifting much easier, and bumper-to-bumper traffic will be much more enjoyable. Vezi sursa
  17. Fisura GSXR 750L0

    Salut! Am observat ca am niste vibratii in toata motocicleta, simt la maini, picioare. Asta intre 3000-4500 turații, asa ca am decis sa desfac carenele si sa ma apuc de strans suruburi la specificațiile producătorului cu o cheie Manometrica. Totul a fost ok, cu excepția câtorva suruburi de la carcasa motor care erau mai slăbite. Într-un final observ o fisura la codița, acolo unde e suportul rezervorului. Am avut un accident la 60-80 km/h. Sa fie aia cauza? Si se poate repara prin sudura cu argon? Pun si o poza pt voi. Mersi si asfalt uscat! Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  18. Pantofii de șosea FLR F-XX (2020)

    O pereche de pantofi de ciclism performanți și confortabili fac diferența între o tură plăcută și una chinuitoare dar și între stabilirea unui nou record personal, un loc mai bun în clasament dar și doar în senzația fantastică de putere pe care ți-o dă fiecare pedală în care forța ta se transmite roților cu eficiență maximă! FLR este un producător de pantofi de calitate superioară mai puțin cunoscut în România dar care are în palmares victorii aduse de cicliștii sponsorizați, în curse de cel mai înalt nivel. Importați acum în România de CrossBike, am primit la test de la magazinul Click4sport modelul de top pentru șosea, FLR F-XX. Acest pantof este unul de performanță înaltă, cu talpă din fibre de carbon premium, cu o rigiditate foarte mare și cu o greutate la nivel cu cele mai performante modele concurente. FLR F-XX are o talpă R500 din carbon de top, cu o rigiditate de nivel 14, ceea ce înseamă că sunt printre cei mai rigizi pantofi de pe piață. În principiu acest lucru favorizează performanța, dar poate fi și un dezavantaj în ceea ce privește confortul la ture lungi, unde o talpă ceva mai elastică e mai potrivită. F-XX transmit puterea către pedală cu eficiență maximă, prin intermediul oricărui tip de plăcuță cu prindere standard în 3 șuruburi. Pentru a mări confortul și a elimina punctele de presiune, talpa are călcâiul ceva mai ridicat și include câteva orificii de aerisire. Partea superioară e fabricată dintr-o singură bucată de microfibră de calitate superioară. Îmbinările arată fantastic, materialul se simte grozav, totul pare de o calitate fără cusur. Închiderea se face cu un sistem de reglaj micrometric prin rotație cu 2 clapete Atop care funcționează ireproșabil. Pantoful se strânge perfect pe picior, fără puncte de presiune și fără să rămână vreun joc parazit. DCIM100GOPROGOPR0298.JPGPrima impresie la folosirea pantofilor F-XX este că aceștia oferă combinația perfectă de confort și eficiență. Senzația de performanță e totală, materialele sunt plăcute la atingere și învăluie plăcut laba piciorului. Greutatea mică îi fac să se simtă foarte ușori pe picior, aproape insesizabili. Odată însă aplicată presiune pe talpă, bicicleta pornește violent iar senzația de transfer al puterii e impresionantă. Pe căldură, aerisirea e destul de bună iar pe vreme rea materialul reușește să oprească bine curentul de aer. Pantofii vin în set cu o pereche de șosete premium, acestea fiind la ora actuală cele mai bune șosete din arsenalul meu personal, confortabile, răcoroase și până acum fără defecte. DCIM100GOPROGOPR0306.JPGAm folosit deja destul de mult pantofii FLR F-XX, în multe ture atât pe plat cât și pe munte, culminând cu o încercare reușită de Everesting pe Transfăgărășan, unde aceștia au fost pantofii principali, pe care i-am purtat primele 4 urcări din cele 6 efectuate. Recomand clar celor ce doresc un pantof de calitate la un preț avantajos. Cu FLR F-XX, pentru un preț mai avantajos decât cel plătit unei mărci mai cunoscute, oricine poate să aibă parte de performanțe și confort de top, calități confirmate în cursele profesioniste de cel mai înalt nivel. De asemenea, restul gamei de pantofi FLR reprezintă oferte foarte bune în gama lor de performanță, demne de luat în considerare de oricine dorește să cumpere un pantof nou de ciclism, indiferent dacă e de șosea sau de MTB. Importator: CrossBike Primit la test de la Click4sport Preț: 899 lei Toți cititorii Freerider.ro au o reducere de 10% la produsele FLR în magazin aplicând cuponul FLR10 !!! Sursa: Freerider
  19. Motor BMW R60/5

    Dupa prima curatare: Asa arata baia de ulei: Tot stratul de pamant de pe baie bloca racirea uleiului.
  20. Giant a reînnoit modelul lor de MTB hardtail din aluminiu pentru 2021, lansând două noi modele de Giant XTC SLR 29. Au fost implementate câteva schimbări importante, printre care și chainstay-uri destul de mult alungite. Astfel, distanța dintre roți a crescut la toate cadrele mărimile S-XL, modificându-se destul de mult și geometria. Unghiurile importante rămân neschimbate pe Giant XTC SLR 29 2021 față de versiunea de anul trecut. Unghiul tijei de șa e scăzut cu 0.5 grade la 74 de grade la toate mărimile, dar unghiul furcăă rămâne de 69.5 grade la mărimile S și M și de 70 de grade la L și XL. Cea mai importantă schimbare e la lungimea chainstay-urilor, de unde rezultă și creșterea distanței dintre roți. Pe toată gama de mărimi, chainstay-ul a crescut cu 15 mm, având acum 440 mm. Furca de 100 mm are acum un rake de 51 mm față de 43 mm pe modelul 2020. The most notable changes are seen in the chainstay length, and resulting wheelbase figures. Across the size range, the chainstays gain 15mm, now measuring in at 440mm. The 100mm travel fork also moves to a 51mm rake, as compared to the 43mm rake we saw on the 2020 model. Distanța dintre roți a crescut considerabil: 30 mm la mărimile S și M și 24 mm la mărimile L și XL. Reach-ul a rămas însă neschimbat, cu valori între 416 și 477 mm. Seat tube-urile sunt și ele schimbate, având acum lungimea de 475 mm. Mărimile din 2020 rămân însă valabile și în 2021. Giant XTC SLR 29 2021 folosește un cadru ușor din aluminiu ALUXX SLR, ce oferă performanță bună și încredere pe traseele de XC și de concurs. Acesta este format din aluminiu 6011 și oferă cel mai bună raport rezistență/greutate dintre toate cadrele Giant din aluminiu. Sudurile la nivel microscopic făcute de Giant, alături de profilul special al tuburilor, permit folosirea unui material cu 20% mai subțire decât cel folosit pe cadrele ALUXX SL. Cuvetele sunt conice, de 1 1/2 jos și 1 1/8 sus. Giant spune că a fost îmbunătățită astfel rigiditatea direcției pentru precizie mai bună pe trail. Rutarea cablurilor e internă iar butucii folosiți au spațiere Boost: 110 mm în față și 148 mm în spate. Cadrul are prindere pentru 2 suporturi de bidon, unul pe downtube și unul pe seat tube. MTB-ul hardtail Giant XTC SLR 29 2021 este oferit în două echipări: SLR 29 1 și SLR 29 2. Modelul de top XTC SLR 29 1 oferă o transmisie 1×12 Shimano SLX cu casetă 10-51t și frâne Shimano BR-MT500 cu două pistoane. Roțile Giant XTC 29 sunt echipate cu anvelope Maxxis Rekon Race 2.25. Furca are brațe de 34 mm și cursa de 100 mm, fiind modelul Giant Crest cu blocaj de pe ghidon. Modelul mai ieftin Giant XTC SLR 29 2021 primește transmisie Deore cu aceiași casetă 10-51T și cu foaie de 32t. Frânarea e asigurată de o pereche de Shimano BR-MT200 cu două pistoane. Giant nu a anunțat încă prețul acestor biciclete. Mai multe informații găsiți pe pagina producătorului. Informații de pe bikerumor.com Sursa: Freerider
  21. Giant a reînnoit modelul lor de MTB hardtail din aluminiu pentru 2021, lansând două noi modele de Giant XTC SLR 29. Au fost implementate câteva schimbări importante, printre care și chainstay-uri destul de mult alungite. Astfel, distanța dintre roți a crescut la toate cadrele mărimile S-XL, modificându-se destul de mult și geometria. Unghiurile importante rămân neschimbate pe Giant XTC SLR 29 2021 față de versiunea de anul trecut. Unghiul tijei de șa e scăzut cu 0.5 grade la 74 de grade la toate mărimile, dar unghiul furcăă rămâne de 69.5 grade la mărimile S și M și de 70 de grade la L și XL. Cea mai importantă schimbare e la lungimea chainstay-urilor, de unde rezultă și creșterea distanței dintre roți. Pe toată gama de mărimi, chainstay-ul a crescut cu 15 mm, având acum 440 mm. Furca de 100 mm are acum un rake de 51 mm față de 43 mm pe modelul 2020. The most notable changes are seen in the chainstay length, and resulting wheelbase figures. Across the size range, the chainstays gain 15mm, now measuring in at 440mm. The 100mm travel fork also moves to a 51mm rake, as compared to the 43mm rake we saw on the 2020 model. Distanța dintre roți a crescut considerabil: 30 mm la mărimile S și M și 24 mm la mărimile L și XL. Reach-ul a rămas însă neschimbat, cu valori între 416 și 477 mm. Seat tube-urile sunt și ele schimbate, având acum lungimea de 475 mm. Mărimile din 2020 rămân însă valabile și în 2021. Giant XTC SLR 29 2021 folosește un cadru ușor din aluminiu ALUXX SLR, ce oferă performanță bună și încredere pe traseele de XC și de concurs. Acesta este format din aluminiu 6011 și oferă cel mai bună raport rezistență/greutate dintre toate cadrele Giant din aluminiu. Sudurile la nivel microscopic făcute de Giant, alături de profilul special al tuburilor, permit folosirea unui material cu 20% mai subțire decât cel folosit pe cadrele ALUXX SL. Cuvetele sunt conice, de 1 1/2 jos și 1 1/8 sus. Giant spune că a fost îmbunătățită astfel rigiditatea direcției pentru precizie mai bună pe trail. Rutarea cablurilor e internă iar butucii folosiți au spațiere Boost: 110 mm în față și 148 mm în spate. Cadrul are prindere pentru 2 suporturi de bidon, unul pe downtube și unul pe seat tube. MTB-ul hardtail Giant XTC SLR 29 2021 este oferit în două echipări: SLR 29 1 și SLR 29 2. Modelul de top XTC SLR 29 1 oferă o transmisie 1×12 Shimano SLX cu casetă 10-51t și frâne Shimano BR-MT500 cu două pistoane. Roțile Giant XTC 29 sunt echipate cu anvelope Maxxis Rekon Race 2.25. Furca are brațe de 34 mm și cursa de 100 mm, fiind modelul Giant Crest cu blocaj de pe ghidon. Modelul mai ieftin Giant XTC SLR 29 2021 primește transmisie Deore cu aceiași casetă 10-51T și cu foaie de 32t. Frânarea e asigurată de o pereche de Shimano BR-MT200 cu două pistoane. Giant nu a anunțat încă prețul acestor biciclete. Mai multe informații găsiți pe pagina producătorului. Informații de pe bikerumor.com Sursa: Freerider
  22. Garmin Edge 1030 Plus (2020)

    Prezentarea unui produs Garmin devine o sarcină din ce în ce mai dificilă, datorită complexității incredibile la care au ajuns acestea din punct de vedere a funcționalității. Cu atât mai mult dacă vorbim de vârfurile de gamă! Iar în domeniul ciclismului, modelul de top Edge 1030 tocmai a fost înlocuit cu modelul îmbunătățit 1030 Plus, pe care l-am primit și noi la test încă din prima zi de la magazinul Trisport și pe care îl testăm de atunci. Cea mai mare provocare este prezentarea informațiilor cât mai complete dar și cât mai compact. Ca de obicei, v-am pregătit un video de prezentare care ar trebui să fie foarte complet în descrierea funcțiilor disponibile. Iată și varianta scrisă, mai jos: Informații generale Edge 1030 Plus adaugă modelului Edge 1030, pe care l-am testat în momentul apariției, toate elementele necesare pentru a-l aduce la zi. Este vorba în primul rând de o platformă hardware mai performantă, capabilă să facă față noilor funcții introduse în ultima vreme, ce necesită o putere mai mare de calcul. De asemenea, a fost implementat noul senzor de GPS cu un consum mult redus al bateriei, cu impact serios asupra autonomiei. Deși carcasa și ecranul au rămas neschimbate, touch-screen-ul a fost înlocuit cu varianta nouă, destul de precisă și fiabilă, implementată deja pe Edge 830. De fapt toate îmbunătățirile fac ca 1030 Plus să devină un 830 cu ecran mai mare, deoarece practic 830 era un model superior 1030-ului vechi. Practic acestea sunt marile noutăți: hardware îmbunătățit touchscreen nou, similar cu cel de pe 830/530 (dar în spate e același ecran ca la 1030) noul senzor GPS de la Sony cu consum redus de energie baterie mai mare, cu peste 24 de ore autonomie la funcționare normală 32 GB memorie internă față de 16 GB înainte, dar fără slot de card de memorie câteva funcții suplimentare (antrenament recomandat, integrare TrailForks) După cum spuneam, în rest 1030 Plus este foarte asemănător cu vechiul 1030 cu toate update-urile de soft instalate. Funcționalitate Mereu am încercat să prezint detaliat fiecare funcționalitate a GPS-urilor Garmin, însă cu cât ele au devenit mai complexe au rezultat articole de zeci de pagini, greu de citit. Știam că va trebui să spun stop la un moment dat, iar Edge 1030 Plus e un moment excelent. Am încercat să prezint sper aproape toate funcțiile însă în prezentarea video unde lucrurile merg mai repede, iar în continuare o să fac un rezumat (care oricum va ieși și acela lung). Controlul Fiind un model cu touchscreen, numărul de butoane e limitat la 3: on/off/light, start/stop și lap. Restul comenzilor se dau direct pe ecran, pe touchscreen-ul ce se poate folosi și cu mânuși sau cu orice obiect (spre deosebire de cel al majorității telefoanelor) și merge foarte bine (chiar dacă nu perfect) și pe ploaie. Ecranul poate fi blocat în cazul în care plouă puternic, dar în mod ingenios rămâne activă funcția de schimbare a paginilor prin trecerea degetului în lateral, fiind dezactivate toate celelalte comenzi de pe touch – un aspect foarte practic! Putem controla Edge-ul și de la distanță, fie cu telecomanda specială, fie cu butoanele suplimentare ale transmisiei Di2. Conectivitatea Conectivitatea e totală pentru Edge 1030 Plus. Folosind protocoalele ANT+, Bluetooth și WiFi acesta se poate lega la aproape orice senzor existent, dar și la transmisii electronice, biciclete electrice, se sincronizează cu telefonul prin Bluetooth și afișază notificări smart configurabile, cu posibilitatea de răspuns cu mesaj SMS predefinit direct din mers. Singura limitare e că legătura la PC se face doar cu cablul microUSB, nu și wireless. Profile de activitate Edge 1030 Plus permite definirea multor profile de activitate, extrem de configurabile, în detalii fantastice. Edge vine cu câteva profile predefinite, iar cele noi se pot fie defini de la zero, fie se poate copia un profil existent, după care se poate modifica. În funcție de necesități, fiecare va avea un set de profile. De exemplu ale mele sunt: Road Flat, Road Mountain (are în plus date de altitudine/profil), MTB, Gravel (seamănă cu Road dar fără câmpuri de putere) și Indoor (acesta are GPS dezactivat). Putem defini ecrane cu până la 10 câmpuri de date, simple sau complexe/grafice, pe lângă acestea putând fi activate ecranele standard cu harta/profil/cycling dynamics/laps… O parte dintre ecrane apar doar când e nevoie, cum e cel de segmente sau de ClimbPro, care și ele se pot configura. Tipul de navigație, modul de funcționare a gps-ului și al hărții, alertele, toate pot fi configurate individual. În plus, pot fi adăugate ecrane sau câmpuri de date custom din ConnectIQ, asta făcând practic nelimitate posibilitățile de personalizare. Antrenament După părerea mea, principalul motiv pentru care ar cumpăra cineva acest GPS de top este antrenamentul, respectiv funcțiile sale avansate care ajută la organizarea, desfășurarea și analiza antrenamentelor. Și aici stăm bine de tot. Cu Edge 1030 Plus pe ghidon, ai cu tine mereu antrenorul tău personal și toate informațiile de care ai nevoie despre tine ca sportiv. Indiferent cum preferi să te antrenezi, Edge 1030 Plus e gata să te asiste. De fiecare dată când este pornit, el sugerează un antrenament în funcție de activitățile avute în ultima perioadă, focalizând efortul pe intervale lungi și ușoare, medii sau scurte și intense, după cum e nevoie. Pentru cei ce preferă să folosească un plan electronic de antrenament, Edge 1030 Plus e capabil să îl preia și să îți organizeze totul în calendar, apoi să te ghideze pas cu pas de-a lungul antrenamentulu propriuzis. Știe să importe direct antrenamentele din Garmin Connect, TrainerRoad și TrainingPeaks, primul dintre acestea, Garmin Connect, oferind planuri gratuite foarte interesante. De asemenea, cu aplicații ConnectIQ se pot face antrenamente sugerate și de alte aplicații, cum ar fi XERT, folosită de mine. Dacă se preferă un antrenor personal, acesta poate trimite antrenamentele fie prin TrainingPeaks, fie direct sub formă de fișier extrem de ușor de încărcat. Antrenamentele se pot configura, extrem de complex, direct din aplicația Connect. Iar dacă decizia de a face un antrenament structurat vine în ultimul moment, pe bicicletă, se pot porni intervale simple direct din meniul Edge-ului. Ce înseamnă practic un antrenament structurat pe Edge 1030 Plus? Practic computerul te ghidează prin intervale complexe. Acestea pot fi în funcție de putere, puls, viteză, timp, cadență, pot fi de durată fixă, variabilă, până la atingerea unui obiectiv, până la apăsarea tastei LAP, pot fi simple sau se pot repeta, câte unul sau secvențe întregi. Bomboanele de pe tort, dacă pot să zic așa, sunt însă segmentele Strava și funcția ClimbPro. Ambele fac același lucru, te ghidează cu ecrane specializate pe o secțiune bine definită de traseu. În cazul segmentelor, îți arată mereu timpul tău față de cel cu care te concurezi, care poate fi ales de utilizator sau e ales automat. Se poate concura cu KOM-ul, recordul propriu, recordul recent sau cu timpul primului prieten mai bun decât tine. Se pot folosi segmente Strava sau Garmin Connect, dar pentru cele Strava e nevoie de abonament Strava Premium. ClimbPro e o funcție care detectează automat cățărările de pe un traseu și, pe fiecare dintre acestea, ne arată profilul și datele importante, inclusiv lungimea și diferența de nivel rămasă. O pagină specială arată cățărările care urmează, cu toate datele necesare despre acestea. Cățărările sunt detectate atât pentru traseele preîncărcate cât și pentru traseele calculate direct pe Edge, cu funcțiile de navigație într-un punct sau înapoi la start. Odată antrenamentul finalizat, el este analizat și sunt calculați o grămadă de parametrii de performanță. Este calculat efectul aerobic și anaerobic al antrenamentului. Este recalculată mereu valoarea VO2 Max și dacă e cazul și cea a Pragulu Lactic și a FTP-ului. În funcție de activitățile anterioare și evoluția parametrilor, Edge poate stabili dacă cantitatea de antrenament e suficientă, e prea mică sau prea mare și dacă antrenamentul are efectul dorit. Mai mult, poate recomanda tipul de antrenament deficitar: aerobic jos, aerobic înalt sau anaerobic. Nu în ultimul rând, avem timpul de recuperare recomandat. Avem mereu la dispoziție pe Edge, pentru vizualizare, curba de putere actualizată, un instrument foarte important pentru ciclistul modern. Toate acestea sunt calculate luând în considerare nu doar activitățile de ciclism făcute cu acest computer ci toate activitățile înregistrate cu dispozitive Garmin, inclusiv alergare, înot și alte sporturi. Navigație Al doilea motiv pentru care cineva și-ar cumpăra un astfel de computer e navigația cu GPS, dar nu e primul, deoarece doar pentru navigație există și dispozitive mai ieftine, marele plus al Edge-ului fiind multitudinea de funcții de antrenament. Navigația aici ne oferă tot ce e de oferit, ba chiar mai mult decât ne-am aștepta! Hărțile incluse (care pot fi oricând schimbate cu orice alte hărți dacă se dorește) oferă navigație turn-by-turn spre destinații ce pot fi selectate pe hartă, pe bază de adresă, dintre cele salvate sau din imensa listă de POI-uri de pe dispozitiv, organizate pe categorii (hoteluri, restaurante, etc…) și pe subcategorii (restaurant italian, chinezesc, tradițional…). Navigația se poate face însă, față de un telefon sau un gps auto, nu doar pe drumurile normale ci, după cum se selectează, pe traseele speciale de bicicletă, fie ele piste urbane sau single-trail-uri tehnice prin munți. Că tot a venit vorba, pentru single trail-uri Edge 1030 Plus are inclusă baza de date a tuturor traseelor din aplicația Trailforks. Se poate alege chiar și ca traseul ales să fie unul cu mai puține urcări. Rutele pentru navigație pot fi calculate spre un anumit punct, dar pot fi și încărcate anterior. Se pot folosi și activitățile salvate pentru rutare. De asemenea, Edge 1030 are funcția Round-trip Course ce găsește trei trasee de o anumită lungime într-o zonă în care nu știm nimic și unde vrem să dăm o tură, trasee bazate pe heatmap, adică pe zonele pe unde au mai pedalat și alții. Alte funcții Edge 1030 Plus are multe alte funcții incluse, iar numărul acesta poate crește serios prin adăugarea de aplicații ConnectIQ. Alarmă de bicicletă, prognoza meteo, alertă în caz de accident, găsirea GPS-ului pierdut, acestea sunt doar o parte din lucrurile ce le știe face nativ. Concluzie Garmin Edge 1030 Plus e la lansare cel mai complex GPS de ciclism de pe piață și nu se ferește să o arate, în fiecare detaliu. Dar capacitățile acestea vin alături de multe alte calități: autonomie fantastică, de peste 40 de ore în testele noastre, ecran și touch fantastice, funcționalitate și interfețe gândite aproape perfect. De exemplu lista segmentelor sau a traseelor e aranjată mereu în ordine în funcție de distanța până la acestea din locația curentă! Pentru cine se potrivește? Pentru cei ce vor o combinație de performanță și funcții de top cu ecran mare și autonomie imensă. Pentru cei ce consideră dimensiunile prea mari, Edge 830 sau 530 sunt extrem de apropiate ca funcționalitate, dar mai mici și cu o autonomie ceva mai scăzută, dar tot foarte bună. Pentru a beneficia de toate funcțiile incluse, bicicleta trebuie să fie dotată cu un dispozitiv de măsurare a puterii compatibil ANT+ sau Bluetooth!!! Primit la test de la: Trisport.ro, importator oficial Garmin Preț: 2899 lei (varianta simplă), 3399 lei (varianta Bundle cu senzori de viteză, cadență și puls) Disponibil la toți distribuitorii Garmin. Sursa: Freerider
  23. A treia etapă de MotoRC by Rompetrol s-a disputat în condiții meteo excelente, a avut invitați de vază din Bulgaria la Stock 600 și Stock 1000 și a văzut răsturnări de situație interesante la clasa destinată tinerelor talente – Stock 300. Doar ziua antrenamentelor libere – vineri, 31 iulie – le-a pus probleme piloților din MotoRC byRompetrol din punctul de vedere al condițiilor meteo. Canicula a pus la grea încercare atât rezistența fizică și hidratarea piloților, cât și durabilitatea materialului de concurs și compoziția pneurilor. După o primă zi de antrenamente libere, Răzvan Teodorescu de la Team IQRM arăta că a evoluat foarte mult în ultima lună, după antrenamente asidue, dominând fișele cu timpi de vineri la Stock 300. Tot atunci, la clasele Stock 600 și Stock 1000, piloții invitați din Bulgaria își arătau nivelul foarte ridicat, marcând primele locuri în antrenamentele libere – Martin Choy (BMW S 1000 RR) la Stock 1000 și Milen Georgiev și Plamen Petrov (Yamaha R6) la Stock 600. Tot la Stock 600, Ionel Pascotă, liderul clasamentului general și câștigătorul primelor două etape, începea weekendul în condiții fizice departe de cele ideale, după o căzătură serioasă suferită cu puțin timp în urmă, într-o cursă din Bulgaria. În ziua calificărilor, condițiile erau deja mult îmbunătățite, cu temperaturi mai „omenești” de doar 30-31 de grade Celsius. Ionel PascotaLa Stock 1000, liderul clasamentului general, Vlad Neaga, furniza surpriza zilei: cu un record personal de 1:40,9 îi fura pole-position-ul lui Martin Choy, considerat marele favorit. La Stock600, Milen Georgiev reușea pole-position-ul cu timpi apropiați de recordul absolut al circuitului (care îi aparține, de altfel) și, la Stock 300, Răzvan Teodorescu, la doar 12 ani, bătea recordul absolut al pistei la clasa sa, cu un excelent 2:05,2, adjudecându-și primul pole-position al carierei. Vlad NeagaZiua curselor a venit cu o vreme perfectă pentru motorsport – 29 de grade Celsius și o briză răcoroasă. Prima cursă a zilei, cea a clasei Stock 300, a fost una foarte atipică și neobișnuit de scurtă. După un prim start și trei tururi cronometrate, cursa a fost întreruptă cu steag roșu după căzătura tânărului Patrick Pascotă în primul viraj. Deși zdruncinat de căzătură, Patrick s-a dovedit a nu fi suferit vreo leziune serioasă și programul a continuat. După al doilea start, Răzvan Teodorescu se instalase din nou la conducere și impunea un ritm zdrobitor, la 2:05. Alin Grădinaru de la Wizard Racing, câștigătorul primelor două etape, a încercat să țină ritmul impus de pilotul de la Team IQRM, dar a căzut, ajungând cu motocicleta pe mijlocul pistei, ceea ce a dus la un al doilea steag roșu, cursa fiind considerată încheiată în acel moment, cu Răzvan Teodorescu la prima sa victorie din carieră și cu podiumul completat de Cătălin Ciolan și de Cristina Udrescu. La Stock 600, lupta pentru victorie s-a dat între bulgarii Georgiev și Petrov, care aveau un ritm de cursă semnificativ mai bun decât al oricărui alt rider din această clasă. În cele din urmă, Georgiev a obținut victoria, urmat de Petrov. Lupta pentru a treia treaptă a podiumului a fost foarte intensă, între Ionel Pascotă și Florin Bârlădeanu, fiind tranșată pe final în favoarea lui Pascotă, care l-a atacat pe Bârlădeanu pe final de cursă și s-a distanțat decisiv, mărindu-și astfel avantajul în clasamentul general. La Stock 1000, Martin Choy, plecat din a doua poziție a grilei, a ajuns pe primul loc în primul viraj și s-a distanțat treptat de-a lungul întregii curse, nelăsându-i urmăritorului său, Vlad Neaga, nicio șansă de se implica în luptă. Vlad a terminat al doilea, mărindu-și astfel avantajul în clasamentul general. În spate, bătălia pentru locurile 3, 4, 5 a fost foarte intensă. Ultima treaptă a podiumului i-a revenit în cele din urmă lui George Cațan (Racing Academy), urmărit îndeaproape de Bogdan Buleandră (Team BMR-EXE) și de Ionuț Mistode (Team IQRM). La Rookies 1000, Radu Balaș (cunoscut mai bine ca vlogger-ul MotorBike), alergând pentru ACSRU Racing Team, a obținut a treia victorie consecutivă, bătându-și timpii record, iar, la Rookies 600, Georgian Radu (Team BMR-Exe) i-a urmat exemplul. Cursele claselor principale au fost difuzate în direct pe pagina de Facebook MotoRC și urmează să fie difuzate înregistrate pe Look Sport 3. Următoarea etapă de MotoRC by Rompetrol va avea loc pe 4-6 septembrie. Sezonul MotoRC by Rompetrol 2020, care a început pe 12-14 iunie la Motor Park România, are șase etape, cu ultima etapă programată pentru 23-25 octombrie. Continue Reading Articol preluat de pe motoroute.ro
  24. Țara Hațegului MTB Stage Race 2020

    Concursurile mtb pe etape sunt o raritate, la noi în țară cel puțin. Așa că ori de câte ori se întâmplă unul, crește și notorietatea sportului, pentru că acest tip de întrecere este mai greu de dus la bun sfârșit, mai ales când nici vremea nu este cel mai bun aliat. Cum a fost și la Țara Hațegului MTB Stage Race 2020, ediția întâi, care a avut loc între 23 și 26 iulie și unde a participat și Andrei Brebuleț care, împreună cu Cătălin Sprînceană, a format echipa BikeXpert Racing Team. Pentru anul acesta Țara Hațegului MTB Stage Race a oferit patru etape, 250 km lungime și 9000 m urcare, o provocare serioasă, chiar și pentru cel experimentat. foto Tibi HilaÎntrucât concursul a fost unul deosebit, desfășurat într-o regiune deosebită a țării noastre și traversând rând pe rând vârfuri de la poalele Retezatului, l-am rugat pe Andrei Brebuleț să ne spună cum a fost pentru ei de-a lungul celor 4 zile de concurs. Context Prima mea cursă pe 2020 a venit destul de târziu, dată fiind pandemia, lunile de stat acasă și numeroase curse cu tradiție anulate sau amânate pentru 2021. Anul acesta l-am dedicat, încă de când a început pandemia, turelor lungi, de explorare. Astfel că Țara Hațegului MTB Stage Race a venit mănușă peste planurile actuale. foto Tibi HilaÎnscrierea la Hațeg a fost o provocare, să văd dacă mai pot duce ture grele, dar mai ales dacă pot parcurge o zonă superbă a țării, pe care nu o cunoșteam. Spun asta întrucât cursa a fost despre urcări criminale, coborâri foarte tehnice, condiții vitrege și căutat adânc în sine pentru a găsi voința să mergi mai departe. Spun asta pentru că astă iarnă m-am concentrat pe schi de tură, pe explorat munți noi. Iar apoi a venit pandemia, am petrecut 2 luni mai mult sau mai puțin, în casă, timp în care cele mai multe curse s-au anulat pentru acest an. Cert este că din octombrie nu am mai făcut un antrenament structurat, ci doar ture de placere. Format cursă Cursa este una de tip „stage race”, adică pe etape, cu un prolog și alte 3 zile de cursă, fiecare cu specificul ei. Riderii nu concurează individual, ci în echipe de câte 2, regula fiind ca la finiș să nu termine la mai mult de 2 minute unul față de celălalt, altfel riscând descalificarea. Colegul pentru primul meu stage race a fost Cătălin Sprînceană, un rider cu multă experiență, cu 7 stage race-uri la activ. Însă, la fel ca și mine, la fel de „neatrenat” după toată perioada asta nebună. Etapele Ziua 1: prolog de 22km cu 550m diferență de nivel, pe un traseu foarte rapid și cu o coborâre bombă. Totul pe ploaie ușoară și udătură. Știu doar că am început din Hațeg, de la liceul central, am plecat pe o zonă plată, cu iarbă înaltă, urmând unul din râurile din zonă. Era o zonă puțin mlăștinoasă, urmată de o urcare rapidă și agresivă peste dealurile din zonă. Coborârea din munte a fost tehnică, dar foarte distrativă. Nu mai țin minte mare lucru, din cauza concentrării, doar că la final am trecut pe sub un pod foarte jos. Ziua 2: 95km cu 3.200m diferență, cu o vreme ce a ținut cu noi. Urcări interminabile, trasee ce ne-au dus în inima munților, pe lângă vechile cetăți dacice, pe munți, dealuri și poteci de o sălbăticie rară. Peisajele în zonă sunt de vis, fiind un mix de dealuri înalte, păduri vechi, zone alpine, pășuni și stâne. Regula zilei a fost temperarea dorinței de a trage cât mai tare. Am mers moderat, aproape că nu am tras deloc. La început a fost greu să vedem echipe cum ne depășesc, însă pe ultimii 20 km am recuperat și am depășit multe echipa obosite, ce s-au epuizat pe urcările zilei. Ziua 3: etapă scurtată din cauza vremii (doar prima buclă/ucare dintre cele 2 din grafic), 37km cu 1.500m diferență. Bine… 1500m au fost în 21km, pe o urcare monstru, pentru care mi-a fost clar că nu eram antrenat; am tras adânc să găsesc resursele să rămân cu Vali, Lucian (prieteni din alta ehipa) și Cătălin. Cred ca am băgat 4-5 geluri în 15km, doar ca să pot ține pasul – aici s-a văzut lipsa de antrenament structurat, lipsa de intervale. Totul a culminat cu un push bike până pe culmea muntelui, unde picioarele și-au revenit, am luat bicicleta în cârcă și am început să alerg la deal. Am reușit chiar să îi las pe ceilalți în urmă, Cătălin bombănind în spate să o las mai încet. Ziua a fost foarte grea, foarte grea. Startul în cursă a fost pe ploaie torențială, urcarea pe mocănească, iar coborârea pe un forestier devenit râu ca urmare a apei ce se scurgea de pe munte. Nici nu vreau să îmi imaginez ce ar fi fost dacă făceam toti 75 km planificați de organizatori… Ziua 4: ultima etapă, 50km cu 2.000m. Start iar pe ploaie mocănească, după o dimineață în care eram supt de putere, căutând orice scuză să nu încep proba. Însă corpul mai avea de oferit, mintea era obosită. Am plecat bine cu Cătălin, iar picioarele parcă voiau constant să accelereze, chiar și pe urcări (da, au fost iar 3 urcări grele). Însă un „technical” la schimbătorul lui Cătălin a însemnat că nu mai avea la dispoziție ultimele 2 pinioane mari. Am pierdut locuri și preț de 3-4 km am stat amândoi până ce el și-a găsit ritmul pe rapoartele mult mai grele. Am tot respectul pentru el, că a dus până la capăt proba în aceste condiții. După ce ne-am găsit ritmul, am recuperat pozițiile și am reușit chiar să depășim, atacând de mai multe ori. Ultima urcare a fost iar meschină, cu alt push bike la final, până (cred) pe Vf. Peleaga. De acolo a urmat cea mai grea coborâre făcută de mine până acum, cu șanțuri înămolite printre pietre, foarte abrupte, tehnice, alunecoase. A urmat un forestier în viteză, o pășune înămolită (nu glumesc, era ca o cocină de porci, cu nămol apos, alunecos, adânc de 20cm) și finalul lângă vechea cetate Sarmisegetusa. Ultima zi parcă nu mai voiam să se termine, picioarele cereau mai mult, tot corpul se bucura de plăcerea de a merge pe biclă. foto Nicole TrifuMi-a placut că la finalul fiecărei zile aveam câte un râu în apropiere, unde ne băgam cu toții să ne spălăm, să ne răcorim mușchii și să ne relaxăm. Rezultat, păreri, impresii Alături de Cătălin mi-am descoperit noi laturi ale mele, am căutat adânc putere să termin unele curse, ne-am ajutat reciproc în funcție de punctele forte și slăbiciunile fiecaruia. Îi mulțumesc pentru tot! Și am avut satisfacția să terminăm în top 10 la categorie, o cursă la care mulți alții au abandonat. A fost primul meu stage race, o experiență grozavă. De repetat, nu știu dacă îl voi mai face încă o dată, dar vedem ce ne rezervă 2021. Bicla… .e daună totală, dusă deja la service, să vedem dacă bag defibrilatorul. Corpul, culmea, nu pare foarte obosit, mintea e odihnită și detașată, sufletul mulțumit și recunoscător pentru experiență. Vă recomand Țara Hațegului MTB! E de departe unul dintre cele mai grele concursuri de orice fel din țară: 204 km – 7.250 m Sursa: Freerider
  25. GROOMING A NEW HORSE

    Posted in Racing Red Bull KTM Factory Racing gets a new MotoGP™ rider for 2021 and the team composition starts again. We asked Crew Chief Paul Trevathan about the challenge of molding the next Grand Prix star. In the four years that Red Bull KTM Factory Racing have graced the MotoGP™ grid they have relied on the right hands of four different full-time riders. One of those has remained constant throughout and is responsible for the milestones of the fledgling KTM RC16 race bike so far. Pol Espargaró’s team has been headed by Paul Trevathan who has been part of the KTM framework for half a decade after having previously worked in MXGP and for a suspension firm. The combination of the aggressive and committed Catalan and the easy-going Kiwi has helped the factory in their eye-catching progress against competitors with decades of Grand Prix racing experience. Red Bull KTM Factory Racing’s Paul Trevathan is Pol Espargaró’s Crew Chief PC @PhilipPlatzer (2019)While Espargaró heads onto a fresh challenge for 2021, Trevathan and his crew also welcome a change of scene with the arrival of Portugal’s first MotoGP™ athlete and current Red Bull KTM Tech3 rep Miguel Oliveira. The task will be to help the 25-year old achieve new levels of performance (after demonstrating top-ten speed already in his rookie season in 2019) and try to emulate the evolution enjoyed with Espargaró. To do that Trevathan knows that brewing an effective chemistry with his rider inside and outside of the small MotoGP™ pitboxes of circuits around the world is essential. “You need to control the situation around the rider, especially if it’s tense at any moment,” he reveals. “You need to know what to say at any time: does he need to be hyped-up a little bit more or does he need to be calmed-down? What are you asking him to do for you? You have to respect those moments, and you end up bonding with a guy. That makes you a great team or creates a great relationship. There are guys who are very open and others that go into a dark place where you think ‘wow, how can I help him here?!’ This is a big part of it.” Trevathan says ‘it’s the rider that leads and we just try to put the best tools together for him’ PC @PolarityPhotoTrevathan has learned to deal with the demands and intricacies of elite sportsmen. MotoGP™ exists in a technical and often risky world dominated by fractions of a second but the riders themselves are differentiated by their attitude as much as their supreme skill to guide a motorcycle. “These guys spend so much time in that ‘world’ of trying to improve themselves and believing they can be world champion but every Sunday they have to go out alone and show everyone how good they are,” he explains. “I always respect that part so much, and I want to help them go through that motion. I don’t just want to help them with the technical side because that can be such a small part of it. For sure their job is not easy, and it is very interesting – from my side – to assist with the other factors. If you can ‘click’ on the emotional part, then this can make you a great team.” Trevathan asserts that “it’s the rider that leads and we just try to put the best tools together for him” but, as Crew Chief, he also needs to ensure that an immediate unit of seven – eight people and then the wide resources of KTM are working in harmony. The whole structure needs to be a slick and efficient ‘tool’ itself. “If you look at what a Crew Chief does then success in the job comes through the personal side: you have to take the reins and be there for everyone. We all come from different countries and there are different personalities; getting those to gel in this game is a massive thing.” “We are lucky that we hired very good people at the beginning of the project, and we grew as a team,” he continues. “It’s a real mix: you have mechanics with years and years of experience and others with technical degrees and qualifications that could aspire to work in NASA! To be in the middle of that and to get the best out of those people has been a big lesson for me.” It’s important not just to focus on the technical side – the relationship with the rider is vital both in and out of the pitbox PC @PolarityPhotoEspargaró has repeatedly credited the ‘human’ aspect of his team. It has been a component of his preparation that has allowed the former Moto2™ world champion to move from the back of the grid and two-seconds from the fastest lap-time at the first race in Qatar 2017 to the front row and mere slices of the stopwatch from Pole Position by 2019. “Pol was right,” says Trevathan. “If, for example, someone misses a test and another person slots-in then it just works. We have the right environment and level of calm to relax the rider and get the work done. You keep your cool and make any changes in the right way: things like this help a lot. I think you either have this personality or you don’t. Of course, you can get better at handling situations, but I think managing people in the right way is a massive part of the job these days.” Trevathan is accessible, cheery and friendly. It’s hard to imagine him stressed or angry, even if there have been difficult and frustrating moments as the whole Red Bull KTM Factory Racing team find their way against the toughest opponents and under very public scrutiny. For every podium result, such as Valencia 2018, and brilliance in qualification, there have been races when KTM have been handicapped by grip issues or rogue problems such as the one that ended Espargaró’s race early at the Red Bull Ring in 2019. Trevathan tries to keep the balance around what is a tight and crucial bond. “When it is work then it’s work, when it’s time to relax and have some fun then I like that. Pol has a similar character,” he says. “I feel like he’s my rider but also my friend and almost my son: you want to ‘protect’ him because, honestly, the guy has no limits.” Miguel Oliveira will move over to the Red Bull KTM Factory Racing squad for 2021 PC @PolarityPhotoEspargaró is part of the KTM story through talent and brute force. “He always gave you the lap-time and – in the beginning – you could judge things by whether he was faster or slower,” Trevathan explains. “That stuck, and meant he never took us down a wrong path. Did his stuff suit every rider? Maybe not, but we never thought ‘we’ve made a mistake here’. He was good with engine feeling and development.” But now Oliveira will have to assume that mantle. Currently moving through his MotoGP™ education within the confines of Red Bull KTM Tech3, Oliveira has scaled the ranks at KTM: winning Grands Prix in both Moto3™ and Moto2™. This familiarity is another valuable ‘short-cut’ which means Trevathan already knows his charge. “Miguel comes across as a very intelligent man and I know him well enough,” he says. “In 2015 I was responsible for KTM Track Support and I was in the Red Bull KTM Ajo team with him and Brad [Binder]. So that line-up will not be a big shock to us! It will be interesting to see if we can get more out of Miguel than he’s showing, which is already pretty good. I’m looking forward to the challenge and to see if we can get to the same level we are now or maybe better.” Oliveira will work with the team to make the next step in his MotoGP™ career and develop the KTM RC16 PC @PolarityPhotoAside from results and recognition, improvement is the principle target for Trevathan’s side of the pitbox for 2021. With Brad Binder attempting just his second term in MotoGP™ the onus will arguably fall more on Oliveira’s shoulders to fill Espargaró’s leathers. “But I think he’s ready,” Trevathan believes. “He will have to learn to take the load that Pol took-on and there might be different pressures.” Aligning parameters of the rider, team and factory is another vital ingredient for forward momentum. Oliveira might lack the results in the premier class of a rider like Johann Zarco but his feeling for the methods and the philosophy behind the whole Red Bull KTM operation will be a distinct advantage compared to any new racer who comes into the set-up. “I think Johann believed he would come here and thought everything would be given to him on a plate – not [realizing] that he’d have to make the choices himself,” insights Trevathan. “We can give the riders more tools, but it is about the work involved to make things better. For example, when we test with Pol at Sepang then he is riding all those days [six] and the only time he can do – or work on – something for himself is when we give him a new tire. For the rest he is always trying something different on the bike and every outing is an assessment of what is better, what works and where and what is it going to be like for the rest of the year: that workload is massive! I’m interested to see how Miguel will handle that and how he will lead us.” Oliveira will be teammates with #33 rider Brad Binder in 2021 PC @PolarityPhotoA 25-lap MotoGP™ race can be a story of drama, surprises, pain and glory but sometimes the construction of everything behind that narrative can be equally as fascinating.
  26. ktm GROOMING A NEW HORSE

    Posted in Racing Red Bull KTM Factory Racing gets a new MotoGP™ rider for 2021 and the team composition starts again. We asked Crew Chief Paul Trevathan about the challenge of molding the next Grand Prix star. In the four years that Red Bull KTM Factory Racing have graced the MotoGP™ grid they have relied on the right hands of four different full-time riders. One of those has remained constant throughout and is responsible for the milestones of the fledgling KTM RC16 race bike so far. Pol Espargaró’s team has been headed by Paul Trevathan who has been part of the KTM framework for half a decade after having previously worked in MXGP and for a suspension firm. The combination of the aggressive and committed Catalan and the easy-going Kiwi has helped the factory in their eye-catching progress against competitors with decades of Grand Prix racing experience. Red Bull KTM Factory Racing’s Paul Trevathan is Pol Espargaró’s Crew Chief PC @PhilipPlatzer (2019)While Espargaró heads onto a fresh challenge for 2021, Trevathan and his crew also welcome a change of scene with the arrival of Portugal’s first MotoGP™ athlete and current Red Bull KTM Tech3 rep Miguel Oliveira. The task will be to help the 25-year old achieve new levels of performance (after demonstrating top-ten speed already in his rookie season in 2019) and try to emulate the evolution enjoyed with Espargaró. To do that Trevathan knows that brewing an effective chemistry with his rider inside and outside of the small MotoGP™ pitboxes of circuits around the world is essential. “You need to control the situation around the rider, especially if it’s tense at any moment,” he reveals. “You need to know what to say at any time: does he need to be hyped-up a little bit more or does he need to be calmed-down? What are you asking him to do for you? You have to respect those moments, and you end up bonding with a guy. That makes you a great team or creates a great relationship. There are guys who are very open and others that go into a dark place where you think ‘wow, how can I help him here?!’ This is a big part of it.” Trevathan says ‘it’s the rider that leads and we just try to put the best tools together for him’ PC @PolarityPhotoTrevathan has learned to deal with the demands and intricacies of elite sportsmen. MotoGP™ exists in a technical and often risky world dominated by fractions of a second but the riders themselves are differentiated by their attitude as much as their supreme skill to guide a motorcycle. “These guys spend so much time in that ‘world’ of trying to improve themselves and believing they can be world champion but every Sunday they have to go out alone and show everyone how good they are,” he explains. “I always respect that part so much, and I want to help them go through that motion. I don’t just want to help them with the technical side because that can be such a small part of it. For sure their job is not easy, and it is very interesting – from my side – to assist with the other factors. If you can ‘click’ on the emotional part, then this can make you a great team.” Trevathan asserts that “it’s the rider that leads and we just try to put the best tools together for him” but, as Crew Chief, he also needs to ensure that an immediate unit of seven – eight people and then the wide resources of KTM are working in harmony. The whole structure needs to be a slick and efficient ‘tool’ itself. “If you look at what a Crew Chief does then success in the job comes through the personal side: you have to take the reins and be there for everyone. We all come from different countries and there are different personalities; getting those to gel in this game is a massive thing.” “We are lucky that we hired very good people at the beginning of the project, and we grew as a team,” he continues. “It’s a real mix: you have mechanics with years and years of experience and others with technical degrees and qualifications that could aspire to work in NASA! To be in the middle of that and to get the best out of those people has been a big lesson for me.” It’s important not just to focus on the technical side – the relationship with the rider is vital both in and out of the pitbox PC @PolarityPhotoEspargaró has repeatedly credited the ‘human’ aspect of his team. It has been a component of his preparation that has allowed the former Moto2™ world champion to move from the back of the grid and two-seconds from the fastest lap-time at the first race in Qatar 2017 to the front row and mere slices of the stopwatch from Pole Position by 2019. “Pol was right,” says Trevathan. “If, for example, someone misses a test and another person slots-in then it just works. We have the right environment and level of calm to relax the rider and get the work done. You keep your cool and make any changes in the right way: things like this help a lot. I think you either have this personality or you don’t. Of course, you can get better at handling situations, but I think managing people in the right way is a massive part of the job these days.” Trevathan is accessible, cheery and friendly. It’s hard to imagine him stressed or angry, even if there have been difficult and frustrating moments as the whole Red Bull KTM Factory Racing team find their way against the toughest opponents and under very public scrutiny. For every podium result, such as Valencia 2018, and brilliance in qualification, there have been races when KTM have been handicapped by grip issues or rogue problems such as the one that ended Espargaró’s race early at the Red Bull Ring in 2019. Trevathan tries to keep the balance around what is a tight and crucial bond. “When it is work then it’s work, when it’s time to relax and have some fun then I like that. Pol has a similar character,” he says. “I feel like he’s my rider but also my friend and almost my son: you want to ‘protect’ him because, honestly, the guy has no limits.” Miguel Oliveira will move over to the Red Bull KTM Factory Racing squad for 2021 PC @PolarityPhotoEspargaró is part of the KTM story through talent and brute force. “He always gave you the lap-time and – in the beginning – you could judge things by whether he was faster or slower,” Trevathan explains. “That stuck, and meant he never took us down a wrong path. Did his stuff suit every rider? Maybe not, but we never thought ‘we’ve made a mistake here’. He was good with engine feeling and development.” But now Oliveira will have to assume that mantle. Currently moving through his MotoGP™ education within the confines of Red Bull KTM Tech3, Oliveira has scaled the ranks at KTM: winning Grands Prix in both Moto3™ and Moto2™. This familiarity is another valuable ‘short-cut’ which means Trevathan already knows his charge. “Miguel comes across as a very intelligent man and I know him well enough,” he says. “In 2015 I was responsible for KTM Track Support and I was in the Red Bull KTM Ajo team with him and Brad [Binder]. So that line-up will not be a big shock to us! It will be interesting to see if we can get more out of Miguel than he’s showing, which is already pretty good. I’m looking forward to the challenge and to see if we can get to the same level we are now or maybe better.” Oliveira will work with the team to make the next step in his MotoGP™ career and develop the KTM RC16 PC @PolarityPhotoAside from results and recognition, improvement is the principle target for Trevathan’s side of the pitbox for 2021. With Brad Binder attempting just his second term in MotoGP™ the onus will arguably fall more on Oliveira’s shoulders to fill Espargaró’s leathers. “But I think he’s ready,” Trevathan believes. “He will have to learn to take the load that Pol took-on and there might be different pressures.” Aligning parameters of the rider, team and factory is another vital ingredient for forward momentum. Oliveira might lack the results in the premier class of a rider like Johann Zarco but his feeling for the methods and the philosophy behind the whole Red Bull KTM operation will be a distinct advantage compared to any new racer who comes into the set-up. “I think Johann believed he would come here and thought everything would be given to him on a plate – not [realizing] that he’d have to make the choices himself,” insights Trevathan. “We can give the riders more tools, but it is about the work involved to make things better. For example, when we test with Pol at Sepang then he is riding all those days [six] and the only time he can do – or work on – something for himself is when we give him a new tire. For the rest he is always trying something different on the bike and every outing is an assessment of what is better, what works and where and what is it going to be like for the rest of the year: that workload is massive! I’m interested to see how Miguel will handle that and how he will lead us.” Oliveira will be teammates with #33 rider Brad Binder in 2021 PC @PolarityPhotoA 25-lap MotoGP™ race can be a story of drama, surprises, pain and glory but sometimes the construction of everything behind that narrative can be equally as fascinating.
  27. Apple TV+ announces premiere for Long Way Up

    Finally, we’ve got a release date for the Long Way Up television show. Apple TV+ announced the show’s premier will be September 18, 2020, with new episodes rolling out weekly after that. Wait—why do ADV riders care about a TV show? It’s because Long Way Up is the sequel to Long Way Down and Long Way Round, two highly influential travelogues from actors/riders/longtime buddies Ewan McGregor and Charley Boorman. In the first two series (both originally broadcast in the UK), the dynamic duo rode BMW adventure bikes around the world, and then the classic London-to-Cape-Town route. These shows broadcast in the early 2000s, and were responsible for much of the international boom in the ADV scene over the past few years—they exposed a whole generation of motorcyclists to adventure riding. For a long time, Charley and Ewan’s fans speculated they’d do a follow-up trip through the Americas, and last summer, word came out that they were indeed working on that plan. But then, it got weird—no BMW sponsorship, not even a KTM or Yamaha deal. Instead, the travelers took electric Harley-Davidson LiveWires from Argentina to LA. Considering the limitations of electric motorcycles, it was an ambitious project, but they did indeed finish the trip. Now, we’re going to see the results, in a travelogue on Apple TV+. On this trip, Ewan and Charley were on the road for 100 days, covering 13 countries and 13,000 miles. That’s a long ride for anyone, but especially on a battery bike. See more details in the press release below the photo gallery! Photo: Apple TV+ Photo: Apple TV+ Photo: Apple TV+ Photo: Apple TV+ “Long Way Up” to Debut Globally September 18 on Apple TV+ Apple TV+ today unveiled a first look at “Long Way Up,” an epic new motorcycle series, starring and executive produced by Ewan McGregor and Charley Boorman, which reunites best friends after more than a decade since their last motorbike adventure around the world. The first three episodes of “Long Way Up” will premiere globally on Apple TV+ on Friday, September 18, and new episodes will roll out weekly. Covering 13,000 miles over 100 days through 16 border crossings and 13 countries, starting from the city of Ushuaia at the tip of South America, Ewan and Charley journey through the glorious and underexposed landscapes of South and Central America in their most challenging expedition to date, using cutting edge technology on the backs of their electric Harley-Davidson LiveWire® motorcycles in order to contribute to the sustainability of the planet. The new series will follow Ewan and Charley as they journey through Argentina, Chile, Bolivia, Peru, Ecuador and up through Colombia, Central America and Mexico. Also joining them are their longtime collaborators, directors David Alexanian and Russ Malkin following them in their electric Rivians. “Long Way Up” is a new original series that follows Ewan and Charley’s previous adventures in “Long Way Round” and “Long Way Down.” The series will join an expanding offering of acclaimed unscripted series and films including the recently announced Fireball,” an original feature documentary directed by acclaimed filmmaker Werner Herzog and Professor Clive Oppenheimer; the soon-to-premiere 2020 Sundance US Grand Jury Prize award-winning documentary, “Boys State”; and the acclaimed, five-time Emmy nominated – including for Outstanding Documentary or Nonfiction Special – “Beastie Boys Story.” ABOUT APPLE TV+ Apple TV+ is available on the Apple TV app on iPhone, iPad, Apple TV, iPod touch, Mac, select Samsung and LG smart TVs, Amazon Fire TV and Roku devices, as well as at tv.apple.com, for £4.99 per month with a seven-day free trial. The Apple TV app will be available on Sony and VIZIO smart TVs later this year. For a limited time, customers who purchase a new iPhone, iPad, Apple TV, Mac or iPod touch can enjoy one year of Apple TV+ for free. This special offer is good for three months after the first activation of the eligible device.* For more information, please visit apple.com/tvpr. Vezi sursa
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