Mergi la conţinut

Dementor

Prieteni
  • Conţinut

    1.051
  • Membru din

  • Ultima vizită

  • Days Won

    1
  • Online

    12h 54m 44s

Dementor last won the day on 13 Martie 2018

Dementor had the most liked content!

1 Urmăritor

Despre mine

  • Sunt
    Motociclist
  • Locatie
    Bucuresti, sos. Pipera, nr.48
  • Posesor(oare) de
    KTM

Metode de Contact

  • Pagina Web
    http://www.dementor.ro

Vizitatori recenţi

5.202 vizualizări profil
  1. Posted in Racing Only days and hours remain in the 2021 AMA Supercross season and Red Bull KTM Factory Racing have been chasing their second 450SX title in the last three years. We called Team Manager Ian Harrison to ask about Supercross in a pandemic, the evolution of Cooper Webb, and more… Cooper Webb leads the 2021 AMA 450SX Supercross Championship heading into the final few rounds PC @SimonCudby The FaceTime audio call is a little noisy. There is activity going on behind Ian Harrison at the KTM workshop in Murrieta, California as the team get ready for the final weeks and flurry of Main Events that will close a 2021 season of limited venues and a truncated schedule featuring midweek races. Ian has kindly given up some of his time to chat about the campaign as Cooper Webb – the most successful rider in the 450SX field so far in ’21 and holding the red plate at the time of writing – gets nearer to the big prize with Ken Roczen and Eli Tomac still in looming proximity. Ian Harrison – Red Bull KTM Factory Racing Team Manager PC @SimonCudby Harrison has been holding the reigns of Red Bull KTM under the gaze of Roger De Coster since 2019 and has helped steer Webb to a championship and second position in that time. He’s getting close to another AMA/FIM distinction for the factory in what have been unprecedented times both for the sport and the team. But there are other matters on the horizon to keep him busy… Marvin Musquin and Cooper Webb’s KTM 450 SX-F FACTORY EDITIONs under the Red Bull KTM Factory Racing team awning PC @AlignMedia Ian, 2021 is almost over and it’s been close, hectic, different: have you felt that intensity? It’s actually been pretty good. Having multiple races at one venue and not being able to get out and practice during the week has been an equalizer for everyone really. When we were in Indianapolis it was so cold – in fact -5 or -6 degrees each day – we were all stuck in the same boat. It was at that time when I saw Coop starting to come around and that’s when I think having great off-season preparation – and being able to maintain it – meant he could build momentum. When we went down to the warmer states and places like Orlando, Daytona and Dallas he just seemed to catch fire. He was a step ahead of everyone else. I think the precursor of having the last six rounds of 2020 in one stadium and in one hit gave us a good insight of what to expect this season. The 2021 Red Bull KTM Factory Racing Supercross team PC @SimonCudby Was running the team a challenge in the continuing pandemic? Yeah, but I think in the US it is a little different compared to Europe for restrictions and stuff. The toughest thing is being in the pits and being isolated the whole time. Also, the travel is a bit more complicated. You get a bit nervous when it comes to the Covid tests. We do it twice a week and if someone is positive then you need a plan in place to effectively deal with that. You want to protect your riders but there is only so much you can do. You can only hope that people are doing their best away from the track to stay safe or away from potential hazards. Webb, his mechanic and Harrison at the Oakland SX round in 2020 PC @SimonCudby Are you a fan of the midweek races? Do you think it might become a regular occurrence for supercross in the future? Last year I thought it might…but after this year and being stuck in one place for twelve days I’m not too sure. I think by the final Saturday of a triple it is quite tough on people. Being in the same environment, in the same trailers, in the same tents: it gets a little repetitive. I think if it was a Saturday-Tuesday schedule with the following Saturday free then I that might work. But having three in a week looked to be tough on the paddock. How difficult – or weird – has it been completing a season in those stadiums with barely any public or atmosphere to the races? Absolutely. A big part of it is missing. Although, to be perfectly honest with you from our side, once the racing begins you get so hooked into it that you don’t notice, but during the opening ceremonies and practice sessions it just seems so ‘light’ with so few people in there. It is a little awkward and seems ‘off’. I prefer Supercross with a big crowd and you can hear the cheers and people getting behind the riders. Intense weeks of racing have changed the game in Supercross but Webb is enjoying a strong season in 2021 PC @AlignMedia Cooper has been right in the mix for the title with Ken Roczen and Eli Tomac. It’s your third season working with him. Have you seen many changes in his approach? In 2020 he started quite slowly because he was ill and there was the possibility that he even had Coronavirus at that time. Then he had that horrible crash that knocked the wind out of us for a little bit. So, in the end, finishing 2nd was not a terrible season overall but this year I have definitely seen a guy that can really plan how a race will go. He’s really thinking about his positions and what the other riders are going to do, how he is going to attack on the track and where he is going to push and when to be patient. There is more maturity – from a racer’s point of view – and I think he is more confident because of that plan. He’s confident in his training and his bike and all those things together make for a strong rider. Ken Roczen and Eli Tomac are no slouches! You have to be on your A-game to beat them. Coop has been just a step ahead of them with less mistakes, better starts and a number of other factors that have put him up there. Having that plan has really injected him with confidence. I remember years ago when we were working in another team with Ricky Carmichael we had the same feeling. We have that sensation that we’re going to do well and fight for the podium whenever he’s out there. At the time of talking he has won five from the last seven races and finished second in the two others, which is amazing. Webb will be looking to bring home the title at the start of May PC @AlignMedia Is it satisfying to see that evolution in Cooper? Yeah, and his strength is the fact that he’s an incredible racer. He gets stronger as the night goes on. When he’s in the battle and he really needs to dig deep he can stay so calm and be calculated; this is something in which a lot of other guys have a hard time to do. You cannot teach that or give it to somebody. They just have it. Marvin Musquin has been part of the Red Bull KTM Factory Racing team for over a decade PC @AlignMedia There has already been talk of Aaron Plessinger being linked with the team and Marvin Musquin staying on for another season. All will be revealed soon no doubt but how do you feel about the possibility of running three riders in the premier class? Having three would be tough for sure. I think it is great that the KTM Motorsport department want to keep Marvin for another year because he’s done an incredible job for over a decade now but the reality is that eventually the younger guys come in. So, we needed to look at that and have someone ready. Aaron is one of those in the mix and has a lot of potential. We’ve had number of seasons now where we’ve only been able to field one racer because the other one has been hurt. It would not be a bad thing to look at a third rider. We also have Max Vohland in there and perhaps having riders across different classes is a challenging part of the job. It’s been a strange year with relatively empty stadiums once again- Max Vohland is racing in the 250SX category for Red Bull KTM Factory Racing PC @SimonCudby
  2. LEADING THE LEADERS AND DEALING WITH 2021 SUPERCROSS

    Posted in Racing Only days and hours remain in the 2021 AMA Supercross season and Red Bull KTM Factory Racing have been chasing their second 450SX title in the last three years. We called Team Manager Ian Harrison to ask about Supercross in a pandemic, the evolution of Cooper Webb, and more… Cooper Webb leads the 2021 AMA 450SX Supercross Championship heading into the final few rounds PC @SimonCudby The FaceTime audio call is a little noisy. There is activity going on behind Ian Harrison at the KTM workshop in Murrieta, California as the team get ready for the final weeks and flurry of Main Events that will close a 2021 season of limited venues and a truncated schedule featuring midweek races. Ian has kindly given up some of his time to chat about the campaign as Cooper Webb – the most successful rider in the 450SX field so far in ’21 and holding the red plate at the time of writing – gets nearer to the big prize with Ken Roczen and Eli Tomac still in looming proximity. Ian Harrison – Red Bull KTM Factory Racing Team Manager PC @SimonCudby Harrison has been holding the reigns of Red Bull KTM under the gaze of Roger De Coster since 2019 and has helped steer Webb to a championship and second position in that time. He’s getting close to another AMA/FIM distinction for the factory in what have been unprecedented times both for the sport and the team. But there are other matters on the horizon to keep him busy… Marvin Musquin and Cooper Webb’s KTM 450 SX-F FACTORY EDITIONs under the Red Bull KTM Factory Racing team awning PC @AlignMedia Ian, 2021 is almost over and it’s been close, hectic, different: have you felt that intensity? It’s actually been pretty good. Having multiple races at one venue and not being able to get out and practice during the week has been an equalizer for everyone really. When we were in Indianapolis it was so cold – in fact -5 or -6 degrees each day – we were all stuck in the same boat. It was at that time when I saw Coop starting to come around and that’s when I think having great off-season preparation – and being able to maintain it – meant he could build momentum. When we went down to the warmer states and places like Orlando, Daytona and Dallas he just seemed to catch fire. He was a step ahead of everyone else. I think the precursor of having the last six rounds of 2020 in one stadium and in one hit gave us a good insight of what to expect this season. The 2021 Red Bull KTM Factory Racing Supercross team PC @SimonCudby Was running the team a challenge in the continuing pandemic? Yeah, but I think in the US it is a little different compared to Europe for restrictions and stuff. The toughest thing is being in the pits and being isolated the whole time. Also, the travel is a bit more complicated. You get a bit nervous when it comes to the Covid tests. We do it twice a week and if someone is positive then you need a plan in place to effectively deal with that. You want to protect your riders but there is only so much you can do. You can only hope that people are doing their best away from the track to stay safe or away from potential hazards. Webb, his mechanic and Harrison at the Oakland SX round in 2020 PC @SimonCudby Are you a fan of the midweek races? Do you think it might become a regular occurrence for supercross in the future? Last year I thought it might…but after this year and being stuck in one place for twelve days I’m not too sure. I think by the final Saturday of a triple it is quite tough on people. Being in the same environment, in the same trailers, in the same tents: it gets a little repetitive. I think if it was a Saturday-Tuesday schedule with the following Saturday free then I that might work. But having three in a week looked to be tough on the paddock. How difficult – or weird – has it been completing a season in those stadiums with barely any public or atmosphere to the races? Absolutely. A big part of it is missing. Although, to be perfectly honest with you from our side, once the racing begins you get so hooked into it that you don’t notice, but during the opening ceremonies and practice sessions it just seems so ‘light’ with so few people in there. It is a little awkward and seems ‘off’. I prefer Supercross with a big crowd and you can hear the cheers and people getting behind the riders. Intense weeks of racing have changed the game in Supercross but Webb is enjoying a strong season in 2021 PC @AlignMedia Cooper has been right in the mix for the title with Ken Roczen and Eli Tomac. It’s your third season working with him. Have you seen many changes in his approach? In 2020 he started quite slowly because he was ill and there was the possibility that he even had Coronavirus at that time. Then he had that horrible crash that knocked the wind out of us for a little bit. So, in the end, finishing 2nd was not a terrible season overall but this year I have definitely seen a guy that can really plan how a race will go. He’s really thinking about his positions and what the other riders are going to do, how he is going to attack on the track and where he is going to push and when to be patient. There is more maturity – from a racer’s point of view – and I think he is more confident because of that plan. He’s confident in his training and his bike and all those things together make for a strong rider. Ken Roczen and Eli Tomac are no slouches! You have to be on your A-game to beat them. Coop has been just a step ahead of them with less mistakes, better starts and a number of other factors that have put him up there. Having that plan has really injected him with confidence. I remember years ago when we were working in another team with Ricky Carmichael we had the same feeling. We have that sensation that we’re going to do well and fight for the podium whenever he’s out there. At the time of talking he has won five from the last seven races and finished second in the two others, which is amazing. Webb will be looking to bring home the title at the start of May PC @AlignMedia Is it satisfying to see that evolution in Cooper? Yeah, and his strength is the fact that he’s an incredible racer. He gets stronger as the night goes on. When he’s in the battle and he really needs to dig deep he can stay so calm and be calculated; this is something in which a lot of other guys have a hard time to do. You cannot teach that or give it to somebody. They just have it. Marvin Musquin has been part of the Red Bull KTM Factory Racing team for over a decade PC @AlignMedia There has already been talk of Aaron Plessinger being linked with the team and Marvin Musquin staying on for another season. All will be revealed soon no doubt but how do you feel about the possibility of running three riders in the premier class? Having three would be tough for sure. I think it is great that the KTM Motorsport department want to keep Marvin for another year because he’s done an incredible job for over a decade now but the reality is that eventually the younger guys come in. So, we needed to look at that and have someone ready. Aaron is one of those in the mix and has a lot of potential. We’ve had number of seasons now where we’ve only been able to field one racer because the other one has been hurt. It would not be a bad thing to look at a third rider. We also have Max Vohland in there and perhaps having riders across different classes is a challenging part of the job. It’s been a strange year with relatively empty stadiums once again- Max Vohland is racing in the 250SX category for Red Bull KTM Factory Racing PC @SimonCudby
  3. ktm THE TAO OF THE S

    Posted in Bikes What to know and what you need to know about KTM’s latest ‘statement’ for Adventure bikes: the KTM 1290 SUPER ADVENTURE S. The technical specs? Then click HERE. Prices? Then a quick click HERE will deliver an answer. What else? To best dissect the new KTM 1290 SUPER ADVENTURE S we spoke with Head of KTM Product Management Adriaan Sinke to delve into the spirit and technical acumen reached by the latest motorcycling flagship in the KTM range. Read on for some of the keen questions, issues and assets surrounding the bike… Head of KTM Product Management, Adriaan Sinke at the Launch of the KTM 1290 SUPER ADVENTURE S in Fuerteventura, Spain PC @MarcoCampelliWhy would riders want the KTM 1290 SUPER ADVENTURE S when they could be tempted by the KTM 1290 SUPER DUKE GT? AS: Well, I think a GT rider is essentially a KTM 1290 SUPER DUKE R rider. They might have a different type of personality, different goals, different idea of what motorcycling is but with the aspiration to make long trips. While in our Adventure world the KTM 1290 SUPER ADVENTURE S is for riders who are mainly on the street and will occasionally find a dirt road, but they don’t have ambitions to go further offroad. They want the riding position, the comfort, and the ability to do a couple of hundred kilometers on a dirt track: that’s not a problem, while on the GT that isn’t really possible. The GT is still a bike to get your knee down. It’s a Gran Turismo. A very fast Alpine tourer. I see the ‘S’ reaching far more corners of the world, and before you need a KTM 1290 SUPER ADVENTURE R to go even further. “The KTM 1290 SUPER ADVENTURE S is for riders who are mainly on the street and will occasionally find a dirt road.” – Adriaan Sinke (PC @SebasRomero)Adventure bike relevance in 2021…especially with recent narrowing travelling possibilities… AS: The big adventure segment is clearly booming. There is a big market there, specifically in Europe. I think the demographics [of the riders] help a lot. They are typically moving away from Supersport and other types of bikes in search of a different experience. The adventure segment combines everything that used to be sports touring on the tarmac – which is a category that has become very small and with the GT we are one of the few that still have a dedicated sport touring bike – and a lot have moved into adventure riding. In terms of reacting to the pandemic we’ve always promoted the adventure lifestyle and we live it; whether that’s with the KTM 1290 SUPER ADVENTURE S or one of the R models. The situation hasn’t changed much for us. We are happy to see that sales are continuing and that people – maybe more than in the past – are starting to consider motorcycles as a form of transport because they don’t want to use public transportation. Adventure riding is an easy way to escape everyday life. Maybe people are looking at motorcycling again after all the restrictions. “Adventure riding is an easy way to escape everyday life.” – Adriaan Sinke PC @RSchedlShould new riders curious about adventure bikes be worried about the size and bulk of the machinery? AS: Comfort was one of the key topics for this bike. We have always wanted the rider to have as much contact with the motorcycle and the road as possible, so you always know what is happening. You have that sense of full control. In the past, with some other models, it meant we sometimes had to compromise comfort a little bit because we believe that performance is key. With this bike we went the extra mile to combine the two, to give you those contact surfaces, the seat, the fairing and to give more confidence by it being a bit lower, a bit more narrow in the middle, you sit closer to the bars and it’s balanced differently to make it easier to handle without losing any of the sportiness. Adaptive Cruise Control and letting something else control the throttle: to some it’s the opposite of what biking is about… AS: Well, in the real world – unlike in our advertising – I have to actually get to the mountain! I wish the whole world existed around super-tight twisty mountain passes but it’s not true. The huge advantage of adaptive cruise control is that it makes getting there much easier and fun and then when you arrive to those twisty parts you switch it off and enjoy that amazing Adventure bike. It’s very complicated technology. In a car it is relatively easy because the vehicle is stable and doesn’t lean. When the wheels turn you know in which direction the car is travelling. Lean angle doesn’t necessarily indicate this. It’s more complex. Motorcyclists ride differently, you are not always directly following the rider in front of you. You can be staggered. If a car system brakes aggressively then it is still going in the same direction whereas a bike has more at play so factors like how much you can accelerate and decelerate and how aggressively you can react means it’s difficult to achieve. A lot of working has gone into the settings to make it where it is today. It is a big project. The best thing about it is that it’s not a gimmick. It actually makes the bike better. It’s a more fun travel motorcycle. You can skip the boring parts. The KTM 1290 SUPER ADVENTURE S is the first bike on the market with Adaptive Cruise Control standard out the crate. PC @SebasRomeroTogether with WP, KTM have made the latest version of semi-active suspension. Talk about this… AS: The suspension has really evolved since we had the first T model Adventure bikes. The last generation of semi-active was really good. One of the big differences now is that we are using different valves, and these are less complex. It is our own technology and it is something we developed in-house with WP. They react faster and are not as sensitive to tolerances of production. I wouldn’t say they are easier to set up, but they are more consistent in performance from one bike to the next. It helps us a lot because it means you can be very precise in the set-up of the various modes because you know the system has a smaller window of tolerances. The fact that we now have the 6D lean angle sensor and the digital sensor on the fork and swing arm make the data acquisition easier, faster, and cleaner. A lot of work has gone into the system itself. We have taken everything we have learned and applied it to the system of this bike. With the various damping, preload and ‘mode’ options you can pretty much mould the KTM 1290 SUPER ADVENTURE S as you want it… AS: Yes, it’s very versatile. A massive advantage to the semi-active suspension is that you can set the bike to be very sporty if you want to ride it hard or to be very comfortable if you don’t; and then everything in the middle! You can pretty much have two different and extreme types of riding behaviour whereas if you only have conventional suspension then you can make it very comfortable or very sporty but not both. Even if you were to make those set-ups manually you still won’t have the spread of adjustment with the conventional system because you’d actually have to open the suspension. Adriaan Sinke (Head of KTM Product Management) and Riaan Neveling (KTM Marketing Manager Street) presenting the 2021 KTM 1290 SUPER ADVENTURE S to the international press in Fuerteventure, Spain. PC @MarcoCampelliWhile the semi-active seems very techie and complex, the new ‘iPad-ish’ TFT display makes it very easy thanks to the new menu ‘graphics’. It’s an interesting contrast: some highly advanced kit but operated with simplicity… AS: One thing that we always like to remember is that it’s still a motorcycle. It should still be fun and exciting. Semi-active suspension could feel very remote and distance the rider from the feeling of the road so we try to give people this proximity and the sensation of interaction with the street: for us this is the absolute key to the whole thing. It should not be about having to set your clickers – even though with the ‘advanced’ mode you actually can change the damping now – but making it accessible, making it easy and fun. The illustrations and graphics we have on the TFT really helped us. It’s a good combination. Weight. It’s always a factor with Adventure bikes. The LC8 is now also Euro5 compatible and has a new cooling system. How tough is the fight to add (or innovate) more but keep the kilo count down? AS: Very! It’s always a hunt for grams. For everything you win on one part of the bike you then have to compensate for something on the other side. You win some and lose some. We literally looked at every single component of the bike for weight control. We did not try to make it much lighter because it doesn’t have to be: it is super-well balanced. Lighter is always good but the key to this bike was to achieve the behaviour characteristics it has. Maybe chasing the achievement of being the ‘lightest motorcycle’ becomes an issue but at the moment it’s not something that these big bikes are about. Less weight costs money and development time. It means complex engineering, construction methods and materials, and sacrificing comfort in some cases. Making things light means minimalizing. We did that as much as physically possible without sacrificing our design goals for the bike. Highly advanced features – operated with simplicity. PC @RSchedlKTM are using more and more 3D printing methods for prototype and bike production. Was that technique used in development of the KTM 1290 SUPER ADVENTURE S? AS: I would not be surprised if perhaps every single component has been 3D printed at some point. There are guys walking around the factory with 3D printed parts all the time. Designers have large 3D printers running 24hrs a day. We used to have one in R&D and now there are a few. The joke in R&D is that everything fits when it’s drawn on the computer! You have this little dark mark that shows when some parts are overlapping. But to then actually print it and apply it to a prototype bike? Well, this is where our mechanics come in. The engineer can design a part but then it’s the mechanic who has been working on adventure bikes for two decades who will then give feedback on its usefulness and whether it will fit, work, can be properly mounted or installed. Our production guys will come in and then say: ‘this won’t work in production’. I do think 3D printing is allowing a lot more possibilities though. It used to be called ‘rapid prototyping’ and that’s what it is: you can simply make a prototype. We do it with the screens. We design, print, put them on the bike and ride them. We’ll come back in, make a change, print another one and go back out on the bike until it’s right. Get the complete insight by watching the video below: [embedded content]
  4. THE TAO OF THE S

    Posted in Bikes What to know and what you need to know about KTM’s latest ‘statement’ for Adventure bikes: the KTM 1290 SUPER ADVENTURE S. The technical specs? Then click HERE. Prices? Then a quick click HERE will deliver an answer. What else? To best dissect the new KTM 1290 SUPER ADVENTURE S we spoke with Head of KTM Product Management Adriaan Sinke to delve into the spirit and technical acumen reached by the latest motorcycling flagship in the KTM range. Read on for some of the keen questions, issues and assets surrounding the bike… Head of KTM Product Management, Adriaan Sinke at the Launch of the KTM 1290 SUPER ADVENTURE S in Fuerteventura, Spain PC @MarcoCampelliWhy would riders want the KTM 1290 SUPER ADVENTURE S when they could be tempted by the KTM 1290 SUPER DUKE GT? AS: Well, I think a GT rider is essentially a KTM 1290 SUPER DUKE R rider. They might have a different type of personality, different goals, different idea of what motorcycling is but with the aspiration to make long trips. While in our Adventure world the KTM 1290 SUPER ADVENTURE S is for riders who are mainly on the street and will occasionally find a dirt road, but they don’t have ambitions to go further offroad. They want the riding position, the comfort, and the ability to do a couple of hundred kilometers on a dirt track: that’s not a problem, while on the GT that isn’t really possible. The GT is still a bike to get your knee down. It’s a Gran Turismo. A very fast Alpine tourer. I see the ‘S’ reaching far more corners of the world, and before you need a KTM 1290 SUPER ADVENTURE R to go even further. “The KTM 1290 SUPER ADVENTURE S is for riders who are mainly on the street and will occasionally find a dirt road.” – Adriaan Sinke (PC @SebasRomero)Adventure bike relevance in 2021…especially with recent narrowing travelling possibilities… AS: The big adventure segment is clearly booming. There is a big market there, specifically in Europe. I think the demographics [of the riders] help a lot. They are typically moving away from Supersport and other types of bikes in search of a different experience. The adventure segment combines everything that used to be sports touring on the tarmac – which is a category that has become very small and with the GT we are one of the few that still have a dedicated sport touring bike – and a lot have moved into adventure riding. In terms of reacting to the pandemic we’ve always promoted the adventure lifestyle and we live it; whether that’s with the KTM 1290 SUPER ADVENTURE S or one of the R models. The situation hasn’t changed much for us. We are happy to see that sales are continuing and that people – maybe more than in the past – are starting to consider motorcycles as a form of transport because they don’t want to use public transportation. Adventure riding is an easy way to escape everyday life. Maybe people are looking at motorcycling again after all the restrictions. “Adventure riding is an easy way to escape everyday life.” – Adriaan Sinke PC @RSchedlShould new riders curious about adventure bikes be worried about the size and bulk of the machinery? AS: Comfort was one of the key topics for this bike. We have always wanted the rider to have as much contact with the motorcycle and the road as possible, so you always know what is happening. You have that sense of full control. In the past, with some other models, it meant we sometimes had to compromise comfort a little bit because we believe that performance is key. With this bike we went the extra mile to combine the two, to give you those contact surfaces, the seat, the fairing and to give more confidence by it being a bit lower, a bit more narrow in the middle, you sit closer to the bars and it’s balanced differently to make it easier to handle without losing any of the sportiness. Adaptive Cruise Control and letting something else control the throttle: to some it’s the opposite of what biking is about… AS: Well, in the real world – unlike in our advertising – I have to actually get to the mountain! I wish the whole world existed around super-tight twisty mountain passes but it’s not true. The huge advantage of adaptive cruise control is that it makes getting there much easier and fun and then when you arrive to those twisty parts you switch it off and enjoy that amazing Adventure bike. It’s very complicated technology. In a car it is relatively easy because the vehicle is stable and doesn’t lean. When the wheels turn you know in which direction the car is travelling. Lean angle doesn’t necessarily indicate this. It’s more complex. Motorcyclists ride differently, you are not always directly following the rider in front of you. You can be staggered. If a car system brakes aggressively then it is still going in the same direction whereas a bike has more at play so factors like how much you can accelerate and decelerate and how aggressively you can react means it’s difficult to achieve. A lot of working has gone into the settings to make it where it is today. It is a big project. The best thing about it is that it’s not a gimmick. It actually makes the bike better. It’s a more fun travel motorcycle. You can skip the boring parts. The KTM 1290 SUPER ADVENTURE S is the first bike on the market with Adaptive Cruise Control standard out the crate. PC @SebasRomeroTogether with WP, KTM have made the latest version of semi-active suspension. Talk about this… AS: The suspension has really evolved since we had the first T model Adventure bikes. The last generation of semi-active was really good. One of the big differences now is that we are using different valves, and these are less complex. It is our own technology and it is something we developed in-house with WP. They react faster and are not as sensitive to tolerances of production. I wouldn’t say they are easier to set up, but they are more consistent in performance from one bike to the next. It helps us a lot because it means you can be very precise in the set-up of the various modes because you know the system has a smaller window of tolerances. The fact that we now have the 6D lean angle sensor and the digital sensor on the fork and swing arm make the data acquisition easier, faster, and cleaner. A lot of work has gone into the system itself. We have taken everything we have learned and applied it to the system of this bike. With the various damping, preload and ‘mode’ options you can pretty much mould the KTM 1290 SUPER ADVENTURE S as you want it… AS: Yes, it’s very versatile. A massive advantage to the semi-active suspension is that you can set the bike to be very sporty if you want to ride it hard or to be very comfortable if you don’t; and then everything in the middle! You can pretty much have two different and extreme types of riding behaviour whereas if you only have conventional suspension then you can make it very comfortable or very sporty but not both. Even if you were to make those set-ups manually you still won’t have the spread of adjustment with the conventional system because you’d actually have to open the suspension. Adriaan Sinke (Head of KTM Product Management) and Riaan Neveling (KTM Marketing Manager Street) presenting the 2021 KTM 1290 SUPER ADVENTURE S to the international press in Fuerteventure, Spain. PC @MarcoCampelliWhile the semi-active seems very techie and complex, the new ‘iPad-ish’ TFT display makes it very easy thanks to the new menu ‘graphics’. It’s an interesting contrast: some highly advanced kit but operated with simplicity… AS: One thing that we always like to remember is that it’s still a motorcycle. It should still be fun and exciting. Semi-active suspension could feel very remote and distance the rider from the feeling of the road so we try to give people this proximity and the sensation of interaction with the street: for us this is the absolute key to the whole thing. It should not be about having to set your clickers – even though with the ‘advanced’ mode you actually can change the damping now – but making it accessible, making it easy and fun. The illustrations and graphics we have on the TFT really helped us. It’s a good combination. Weight. It’s always a factor with Adventure bikes. The LC8 is now also Euro5 compatible and has a new cooling system. How tough is the fight to add (or innovate) more but keep the kilo count down? AS: Very! It’s always a hunt for grams. For everything you win on one part of the bike you then have to compensate for something on the other side. You win some and lose some. We literally looked at every single component of the bike for weight control. We did not try to make it much lighter because it doesn’t have to be: it is super-well balanced. Lighter is always good but the key to this bike was to achieve the behaviour characteristics it has. Maybe chasing the achievement of being the ‘lightest motorcycle’ becomes an issue but at the moment it’s not something that these big bikes are about. Less weight costs money and development time. It means complex engineering, construction methods and materials, and sacrificing comfort in some cases. Making things light means minimalizing. We did that as much as physically possible without sacrificing our design goals for the bike. Highly advanced features – operated with simplicity. PC @RSchedlKTM are using more and more 3D printing methods for prototype and bike production. Was that technique used in development of the KTM 1290 SUPER ADVENTURE S? AS: I would not be surprised if perhaps every single component has been 3D printed at some point. There are guys walking around the factory with 3D printed parts all the time. Designers have large 3D printers running 24hrs a day. We used to have one in R&D and now there are a few. The joke in R&D is that everything fits when it’s drawn on the computer! You have this little dark mark that shows when some parts are overlapping. But to then actually print it and apply it to a prototype bike? Well, this is where our mechanics come in. The engineer can design a part but then it’s the mechanic who has been working on adventure bikes for two decades who will then give feedback on its usefulness and whether it will fit, work, can be properly mounted or installed. Our production guys will come in and then say: ‘this won’t work in production’. I do think 3D printing is allowing a lot more possibilities though. It used to be called ‘rapid prototyping’ and that’s what it is: you can simply make a prototype. We do it with the screens. We design, print, put them on the bike and ride them. We’ll come back in, make a change, print another one and go back out on the bike until it’s right. Get the complete insight by watching the video below: [embedded content]
  5. Posted in Racing 2021 is the third year of collaboration between KTM and the Tech3 racing team. On the eve of the new season here are five facts you might not have known about the new ‘orange blur’… Tech3 KTM Factory Racing’s KTM RC16 machines of Danilo Petrucci and Iker Lecuona PC @PhilipPlatzer1. Tech3 KTM Factory Racing are one of the oldest teams in MotoGP™ and 2021 will mark the 20th year that the largely French crew moved from the peak of the old 250cc category (where they finished 1st and 2nd in 2000) to the premier class. Tech3 have always had diverse interests in Grand Prix racing and have been present in both Moto2™ and Moto3™ , while also currently fielding an effort in MotoE. After being one of the most prominent satellite squads in the paddock, Tech3 finally earns ‘factory’ status for 2021: both of the KTM RC16s in their care are works-spec machinery. Hervé Poncharal has been part of Tech3 Racing since its inception in 1990 – here he is pictured in 2019 PC @SebasRomero2. Tech3 took their name from the three creators of the team: Hervé Poncharal, Guy Coulon and Bernard Martignac. Today just Poncharal (Team Manager) and Coulon are integrated into the racing set-up that began in 1990. They had competed with three other brands before allying with KTM in 2019 with Miguel Oliveira and Hafizh Syahrin as riders. Despite running an eclectic array of riders, experience and nationalities since 2001, Tech3 only won a single Grand Prix and that was in Moto2 with Yuki Takahashi at Catalunya in 2010. Oliveira ended that dry patch – as well as giving the team their maiden success in the premier class – last summer at the Red Bull Ring. Fittingly for an effort formed and based around the number ‘3’ it was their 373rd GP in Austria. Iker Lecuona begins his second season with Tech3 and in MotoGP in 2021 PC @PolarityPhoto3. Iker Lecuona starts his second season with Tech3 and in MotoGP, and at the age of 21 he is the youngest rider on the grid. The Valencian is one of 9 Spaniards in MotoGP (from a total of 22 riders) and will be eager to jump out of the group of seven racers still looking for their first podium finish in the class. Iker does have two trophies from three full seasons in Moto2. He is the fifth Spaniard to race for Tech3 on a full-time basis, following Ruben Xaus, Toni Elias, Carlos Checa and Pol Espargaro. Iker Lecuona in action at the Losail circuit in Qatar, preparing for 2021 PC @PolarityPhoto4. Like former teammate Andrea Dovizioso, Danilo Petrucci is one of few Italians to wear Tech3 colors. In fact, Marco Melandri was the sole other Italian racer for the squad in the premier class back in 2004. Danilo will be 31 years old in October, meaning he is not only the eldest of the KTM quartet but he has the most experience having been a factory rider for the last two seasons. 2021 will be Petrucci’s 10th in MotoGP and with two wins and 10 podiums he is already the most decorated among the ’21 line-up. ‘Petrux’ is one of only two riders in MotoGP to use a single digit number. Danilo Petrucci joined the Tech3 KTM Factory Racing squad for 2021 PC @PolarityPhoto5. Tech3 will now run a corporate KTM color scheme; the first time ever for the manufacturer in Grand Prix. The squad have won numerous ‘awards’ by media publications and fans’ votes for the best-looking bikes on the track. But take a look for yourself… Petrucci is looking to add to his two MotoGP victories and 10 podiums this season PC @PolarityPhotoIker Lecuona under the famous Losail lights which will host the opening round of MotoGP in 2021 PC @PolarityPhotoThe Tech3 KTM Factory Racing machines have been hailed a firm fans’ favourite for being the best-looking bikes on the track this year PC @PolarityPhotoDanilo Petrucci prepares to head out on track aboard his KTM RC16 PC @PolarityPhotoIker Lecuona at sunset in Qatar PC @PolartiyPhoto
  6. Posted in Racing 2021 is the third year of collaboration between KTM and the Tech3 racing team. On the eve of the new season here are five facts you might not have known about the new ‘orange blur’… Tech3 KTM Factory Racing’s KTM RC16 machines of Danilo Petrucci and Iker Lecuona PC @PhilipPlatzer1. Tech3 KTM Factory Racing are one of the oldest teams in MotoGP™ and 2021 will mark the 20th year that the largely French crew moved from the peak of the old 250cc category (where they finished 1st and 2nd in 2000) to the premier class. Tech3 have always had diverse interests in Grand Prix racing and have been present in both Moto2™ and Moto3™ , while also currently fielding an effort in MotoE. After being one of the most prominent satellite squads in the paddock, Tech3 finally earns ‘factory’ status for 2021: both of the KTM RC16s in their care are works-spec machinery. Hervé Poncharal has been part of Tech3 Racing since its inception in 1990 – here he is pictured in 2019 PC @SebasRomero2. Tech3 took their name from the three creators of the team: Hervé Poncharal, Guy Coulon and Bernard Martignac. Today just Poncharal (Team Manager) and Coulon are integrated into the racing set-up that began in 1990. They had competed with three other brands before allying with KTM in 2019 with Miguel Oliveira and Hafizh Syahrin as riders. Despite running an eclectic array of riders, experience and nationalities since 2001, Tech3 only won a single Grand Prix and that was in Moto2 with Yuki Takahashi at Catalunya in 2010. Oliveira ended that dry patch – as well as giving the team their maiden success in the premier class – last summer at the Red Bull Ring. Fittingly for an effort formed and based around the number ‘3’ it was their 373rd GP in Austria. Iker Lecuona begins his second season with Tech3 and in MotoGP in 2021 PC @PolarityPhoto3. Iker Lecuona starts his second season with Tech3 and in MotoGP, and at the age of 21 he is the youngest rider on the grid. The Valencian is one of 9 Spaniards in MotoGP (from a total of 22 riders) and will be eager to jump out of the group of seven racers still looking for their first podium finish in the class. Iker does have two trophies from three full seasons in Moto2. He is the fifth Spaniard to race for Tech3 on a full-time basis, following Ruben Xaus, Toni Elias, Carlos Checa and Pol Espargaro. Iker Lecuona in action at the Losail circuit in Qatar, preparing for 2021 PC @PolarityPhoto4. Like former teammate Andrea Dovizioso, Danilo Petrucci is one of few Italians to wear Tech3 colors. In fact, Marco Melandri was the sole other Italian racer for the squad in the premier class back in 2004. Danilo will be 31 years old in October, meaning he is not only the eldest of the KTM quartet but he has the most experience having been a factory rider for the last two seasons. 2021 will be Petrucci’s 10th in MotoGP and with two wins and 10 podiums he is already the most decorated among the ’21 line-up. ‘Petrux’ is one of only two riders in MotoGP to use a single digit number. Danilo Petrucci joined the Tech3 KTM Factory Racing squad for 2021 PC @PolarityPhoto5. Tech3 will now run a corporate KTM color scheme; the first time ever for the manufacturer in Grand Prix. The squad have won numerous ‘awards’ by media publications and fans’ votes for the best-looking bikes on the track. But take a look for yourself… Petrucci is looking to add to his two MotoGP victories and 10 podiums this season PC @PolarityPhotoIker Lecuona under the famous Losail lights which will host the opening round of MotoGP in 2021 PC @PolarityPhotoThe Tech3 KTM Factory Racing machines have been hailed a firm fans’ favourite for being the best-looking bikes on the track this year PC @PolarityPhotoDanilo Petrucci prepares to head out on track aboard his KTM RC16 PC @PolarityPhotoIker Lecuona at sunset in Qatar PC @PolartiyPhoto
  7. Posted in Racing KTM mark five years on the MotoGP™ grid in 2021, so to welcome the half-decade and the upcoming new season we dug up some trivia about the two. Red Bull KTM Factory Racing riders, both products of KTM’s GP Academy system. Brad Binder prepares for the start of the 2021 season in Losail, Qatar during pre-season testing PC @PolarityPhoto1. Before the Qatar double header officially opens 2021, Red Bull KTM Factory Racing will have completed a total of 72 Grands Prix. The journey started with a debut wildcard appearance at the 2016 season-ending Gran Premi de la Comunitat Valenciana in Spain. Their first event as full-time members of the grid came only four months later at the Losail International Circuit where Pol Espargaro and Bradley Smith finished 16th and 17th. From the next 70 races KTM managed to score 3 wins, 9 podiums, 4 Fastest laps and 3 Pole Positions. They rose from last place to 3rd position in the 2020 Teams Championship and from 16th in the riders’ standings in 2017 to 5th in 2020. A fast turnaround! Miguel Oliveira joins the Red Bull KTM Factory Racing MotoGP team for 2021 PC @PhilipPlatzer2. Miguel Oliveira is new to the team for 2021. The 26-year old is the seventh rider to wear Red Bull KTM MotoGP race colors after Mika Kallio, Espargaro, Smith, Loris Baz, Johann Zarco and Brad Binder. 2020 was Miguel’s 10th year in Grand Prix and he boasts wins for KTM in Moto3™ and Moto2™ (six in both divisions and all with the Red Bull KTM Ajo team). He moved from 12 career victories to 14 in 2020 by giving the Tech3 crew their maiden success in the premier class at the Red Bull Ring. Oliveira is the sole Portuguese racer in the FIM Grand Prix World Championship. Binder and Oliveira have previously been teammates in the Red Bull KTM Ajo team and are reunited for 2021 PC @GoldAndGoose3. Brad Binder was the original KTM ‘hat-trick’ man last summer. The 25-year old was a rookie in the MotoGP class for 2020 and went from being more than two seconds per lap slower at the end of his first tests to MotoGP victory by over five seconds in just 10 months (five of which were inactive due to the COVID-19 pandemic). In his moment of glory in the Czech Republic and only his third MotoGP race, Binder achieved the ‘set’ of Moto3/Moto2/MotoGP victories in Red Bull KTM colors; which Oliveira could match in 2021. Both riders came through the Red Bull MotoGP Rookies Cup (although neither earned the championship) and first coincided as teammates at Red Bull KTM Ajo in Moto3 in 2015. They reunited in Moto2 for the same squad in 2017 and 2018, appearing on the podium six times together. 2021 will be their four year of collaboration already. Oliveira is ready for the challenge of 2021 following the tests in Losail, Qatar PC @PolarityPhotoIncidentally this is not the first time that a Red Bull KTM Factory team have had a Portuguese and a South African in the same line-up. In 2008 Rui Gonçalves and Tyla Rattray were steering works KTM 250 SX-Fs in the MX2 class of the FIM MXGP Motocross World Championship and – promisingly – Rattray would go on claim the title that year. Gonçalves would be MX2 runner-up in 2009. Binder took his and KTM’s first MotoGP victory at only his third race in the premier class, which took place in the Czech Republic PC @PolarityPhoto4. The KTM RC16 crossed the finish line first at Brno on Sunday, August 9th 2020 for the Grand Prix české republiky. The win meant KTM became the first manufacturer to triumph in Moto3, Moto2 and MotoGP categories and equalled Yamaha for wins in the most amount of classes: Red Bull KTM also won in the 125 and 250cc divisions in the ‘00s. Binder’s Czech feat was a milestone for the company and the first time KTM had led a lap in MotoGP. They would have many more by the end of the season. Moto3 – and the original KTM RC4 that won the championship at the first attempt in 2012 – helped towards the thinking and the creation of the KTM RC16; still the sole motorcycle on the grid to use a steel chassis and WP Suspension. KTM has lost its ‘concessions’ for development due to the Austrian manufacturer’s excellent results in 2020 PC @PolarityPhoto5. 2021 will be a curious campaign for Red Bull KTM. For the first time the brand has lost their ‘concessions’ as a result of their excellent results in 2020. This means a cap on testing and modifications permitted during the year. The engine development freeze agreed by the manufacturers causes the beating heart of the KTM RC16 – which can make more than 345kmph – to remain largely untouched from 2020 to 2021. The effects of the global pandemic forced five-days of pre-season testing to take place at the Losail International Circuit which is the scene of the opening back-to-back races of the calendar. KTM riders accrued more than a thousand laps in the 35 hours of permitted track time. Oliveira and Binder regularly haunted the top 10 of the results sheets as they worked through suspension upgrades, different aerodynamic forms and electronics. Oliveira under the lights of Losail, home to the opening round of 2021 PC @PolarityPhotoThe diversity of Losail was a challenge as hot, late afternoons turn to dusk and then cooler evening humidity forces adjustments and alterations to keep the speed through the flowing turns. The team were not only working for rounds 1 and 2 but for settings that have to be homologated for the duration of 2021 before the first ‘red light’ disappears. Nobody said MotoGP was a pressure-less environment! Binder completes laps in the Qatar sunset with his KTM RC16 PC @PolarityPhoto
  8. Posted in Racing KTM mark five years on the MotoGP™ grid in 2021, so to welcome the half-decade and the upcoming new season we dug up some trivia about the two Red Bull KTM Factory Racing riders, both products of KTM’s GP Academy system. Brad Binder prepares for the start of the 2021 season in Losail, Qatar during pre-season testing PC @PolarityPhoto1. Before the Qatar double header officially opens 2021, Red Bull KTM Factory Racing will have completed a total of 72 Grands Prix. The journey started with a debut wildcard appearance at the 2016 season-ending Gran Premi de la Comunitat Valenciana in Spain. Their first event as full-time members of the grid came only four months later at the Losail International Circuit where Pol Espargaro and Bradley Smith finished 16th and 17th. From the next 70 races KTM managed to score 3 wins, 9 podiums, 4 Fastest laps and 3 Pole Positions. They rose from last place to 3rd position in the 2020 Teams Championship and from 16th in the riders’ standings in 2017 to 5th in 2020. A fast turnaround! Miguel Oliveira joins the Red Bull KTM Factory Racing MotoGP team for 2021 PC @PhilipPlatzer2. Miguel Oliveira is new to the team for 2021. The 26-year old is the seventh rider to wear Red Bull KTM MotoGP race colors after Mika Kallio, Espargaro, Smith, Loris Baz, Johann Zarco and Brad Binder. 2020 was Miguel’s 10th year in Grand Prix and he boasts wins for KTM in Moto3™ and Moto2™ (six in both divisions and all with the Red Bull KTM Ajo team). He moved from 12 career victories to 14 in 2020 by giving the Tech3 crew their maiden success in the premier class at the Red Bull Ring. Oliveira is the sole Portuguese racer in the FIM Grand Prix World Championship. Binder and Oliveira have previously been teammates in the Red Bull KTM Ajo team and are reunited for 2021 PC @GoldAndGoose3. Brad Binder was the original KTM ‘hat-trick’ man last summer. The 25-year old was a rookie in the MotoGP class for 2020 and went from being more than two seconds per lap slower at the end of his first tests to MotoGP victory by over five seconds in just 10 months (five of which were inactive due to the COVID-19 pandemic). In his moment of glory in the Czech Republic and only his third MotoGP race, Binder achieved the ‘set’ of Moto3/Moto2/MotoGP victories in Red Bull KTM colors; which Oliveira could match in 2021. Both riders came through the Red Bull MotoGP Rookies Cup (although neither earned the championship) and first coincided as teammates at Red Bull KTM Ajo in Moto3 in 2015. They reunited in Moto2 for the same squad in 2017 and 2018, appearing on the podium six times together. 2021 will be their four year of collaboration already. Oliveira is ready for the challenge of 2021 following the tests in Losail, Qatar PC @PolarityPhotoIncidentally this is not the first time that a Red Bull KTM Factory team have had a Portuguese and a South African in the same line-up. In 2008 Rui Gonçalves and Tyla Rattray were steering works KTM 250 SX-Fs in the MX2 class of the FIM MXGP Motocross World Championship and – promisingly – Rattray would go on claim the title that year. Gonçalves would be MX2 runner-up in 2009. Binder took his and KTM’s first MotoGP victory at only his third race in the premier class, which took place in the Czech Republic PC @PolarityPhoto4. The KTM RC16 crossed the finish line first at Brno on Sunday, August 9th 2020 for the Grand Prix české republiky. The win meant KTM became the first manufacturer to triumph in Moto3, Moto2 and MotoGP categories and equalled Yamaha for wins in the most amount of classes: Red Bull KTM also won in the 125 and 250cc divisions in the ‘00s. Binder’s Czech feat was a milestone for the company and the first time KTM had led a lap in MotoGP. They would have many more by the end of the season. Moto3 – and the original KTM RC4 that won the championship at the first attempt in 2012 – helped towards the thinking and the creation of the KTM RC16; still the sole motorcycle on the grid to use a steel chassis and WP Suspension. KTM has lost its ‘concessions’ for development due to the Austrian manufacturer’s excellent results in 2020 PC @PolarityPhoto5. 2021 will be a curious campaign for Red Bull KTM. For the first time the brand has lost their ‘concessions’ as a result of their excellent results in 2020. This means a cap on testing and modifications permitted during the year. The engine development freeze agreed by the manufacturers causes the beating heart of the KTM RC16 – which can make more than 345kmph – to remain largely untouched from 2020 to 2021. The effects of the global pandemic forced five-days of pre-season testing to take place at the Losail International Circuit which is the scene of the opening back-to-back races of the calendar. KTM riders accrued more than a thousand laps in the 35 hours of permitted track time. Oliveira and Binder regularly haunted the top 10 of the results sheets as they worked through suspension upgrades, different aerodynamic forms and electronics. Oliveira under the lights of Losail, home to the opening round of 2021 PC @PolarityPhotoThe diversity of Losail was a challenge as hot, late afternoons turn to dusk and then cooler evening humidity forces adjustments and alterations to keep the speed through the flowing turns. The team were not only working for rounds 1 and 2 but for settings that have to be homologated for the duration of 2021 before the first ‘red light’ disappears. Nobody said MotoGP was a pressure-less environment! Binder completes laps in the Qatar sunset with his KTM RC16 PC @PolarityPhoto
  9. Posted in Riding By: Paolo Cattaneo @paolocattaneophoto If bikers get their adrenaline rush by exploring new paths and pushing beyond limits, for me the effort to quench the endless thirst for adventure saw me cross more than 40 countries while clocking 200,000 km aboard my KTM 1190 ADVENTURE over the past six years. Across four continents and after many border crossings, here’s five of my best places to ride a bike in this world. The end of the Carretera Austral makes you reflect about the beauty of Nature, after seeing 1300 km of some of its best work (Chile). PC @PaoloCattaneoIn many ways, all of us Adventure riders are the new generation of explorers. The world is our playground, ready to be discovered, and our bikes our trustworthy steeds. We get our adrenaline rush by exploring new paths, by adventuring through dangers, by pushing their limits, in search of the perfect ride. That’s what 200,000 km in 6 years of travelling through 4 continents, more than 40 countries on a KTM 1190 ADVENTURE looks like on a map. PC @PaoloCattaneoAfter loads and loads of hours spent on the saddle, it’s hard to pinpoint which one was the best ride for me. There have been so many great adventures on my KTM, so it’s impossible to simply choose one. Thus, here are my five favorites: #1 Carretera Austral, Chile – South America No doubt, this is probably one of the most famous roads in the world for bikers. Ruta 7 or Carretera Austral is a 1,300 km stretch of road that goes from Puerto Montt to Villa O’Higgins, in the very south part of Chile. This track is basically a paradise for any Adventure rider or photographer. The road is 50% paved and 50% gravel, perfectly doable with a fully loaded motorcycle and a set of 70/30 tires. Impossible not to stop, take a break on my KTM 1190 ADVENTURE and gaze at the horizon on the Carretera Austral (Chile). PC @PaoloCattaneoWhat makes this road unique, and probably one of the most spectacular in the world, is the fact that it stretches right in the middle of the beautiful fjords of Patagonia and the majestic Andes, peaking over 5,000 m above sea level. When I got to ride this amazing piece of land on earth, it was autumn and, despite the sometimes-freezing temperatures, the colors were incredible. That was probably the best natural spectacle I’ve witnessed in my life. Snow peaked mountains, trees in shades of red, orange and bright yellow, turquoise lakes and the most lavish green vegetation. The dangers in this part of the world are mostly related to two factors; first the weather conditions that could become quite extreme, and also the sketchy oncoming traffic. Being directly on the coast, the road gets often quite narrow and wet too. Regardless, Carretera Austral is an absolute must for all bikers. First few km into the Eduardo Avaroa National Park and the first white lagoon already appears in the distance (Bolivia). PC @PaoloCattaneo#2 Eduardo Avaroa National Park, Bolivia – South America This national park sits in between San Pedro de Atacama, Chile, and the famous Salar de Uyuni, Bolivia, the largest salt flat in the world. The park is absolutely unique and became quite popular between tourists for its colorful lagoons. There are mainly two issues to overcome while riding through EANP on a bike: one is fuel – no gas station for more than 500 km – and second is the altitude. The park sits at 4,500 m so breathing and sleeping become difficult. I remember I started panicking at a certain point because I was running low on fuel and I wasn’t even at the halfway point. With low oxygen levels and the panicking, my riding was consequently compromised. Even with the extra gallon of fuel I had with me, I realized I wouldn’t have been able to reach Uyuni. At 4,300 m above sea level this landscape is out of this world. Red lagoon with pink flamingos in the distance (Bolivia). PC @PaoloCattaneoIt started to get late and I got lost few times, as there are no clear roads or signs to follow. When I was at the halfway point, right near the red Lagoon, I only had 50 km range left in my tank; the freezing winds and the altitude were already wearing me down (at night it gets easily -10°C). Luckily a 4×4 filled with tourists passed by and I was able to buy 10 more liters of fuel from them. They also pointed me to a hut nearby where I could spend the night, sheltered from the winds. What an adventure! Hands down this is probably one of the most spectacular and challenging places on the planet to ride motorcycles. The majestic Huascaran National Park (Peru), peaking at 6,700 m of altitude. The view from up here and the lack of oxygen makes one lightheaded. PC @PaoloCattaneo#3 San Luis – Santa, Peru – South America This road, that goes from the small town of San Luis, behind the 5,300 m high mountains of the Huascaran National Park, to the infamous Cañon del Pat, is somehow my favorite in the whole Peru. The riding through the NP is rough for its climates and terrain, as it easily reaches over 4,000 m above sea level. The climb up to the pass is rather challenging but absolutely magical, culminating at the top of the mountain, overlooking the mind-blowing canyon filled with turquoise lagoons. No room for mistakes in the Cañon del Pato road (Peru). PC @PaoloCattaneoOnce reached the valley, the offroad section ends and the fun begins. This part is known for the infamous Cañon del Pat Road, a two-way road the w of a small car, with pitch black tunnels, carved inside the mountains, and 80m canyon with no barrier on one side. The thrilling factor comes from the sketchy tarmac, with chunks missing on the cliff side. Swallowed by nature at its finest. Riding up and down some of the deepest canyons in the world (Peru). PC @PaoloCattaneoWhat was shocking for me was the speed of oncoming traffic, which were mostly mining trucks and locals, driving their vehicles like maniacs on suck sketchy road. Needless to say that I got close so many times to a head-on collision and to fall into the canyon. This is, without a doubt, one of those roads you don’t want to talk to your mom about. A modern “knight” and his iron steed (Scotland). PC @PaoloCattaneo#4 NC 500, Scotland – Europe On the old continent there are many roads that are worth a mention. Every country has its long list of mountain passes, coastal roads or sketchy offroad tracks with incredible views. But I believe that somehow Scotland deserves to enter this list for many reasons. First of all for the uniqueness of its 500 miles of incredible coastal road. Secondly for the fact that it’s one of the few countries in Europe that allows free camping. Scotland leaves one speechless for it’s pristine landscapes and white sand beaches. Water is only 6-7°C unfortunately. PC @PaoloCattaneoNC 500 is somehow famous also for its unpredictable weather and its strong winds. Also, the roads can become very narrow and with barely any safety net on both sides. Head-on collisions are quite frequent since lots of campers and tourists tend to come in this part of the world for leisure or holidays. 500 miles of these kind of turns and colors in Scotland. PC @PaoloCattaneoI remember being completely mesmerized by riding through the beautiful Scottish Highlands, gazing at ancient medieval castles, nestled in pristine fjords – the famous ‘lochs’. It truly felt like going back in those times when knights and swords used to rule the lands. Those mystical hills and freezing waters made men and women tough. And riders humble and proud. #5 Gibb River Road, WA – Australia It’s no secret that Australia has a special place in my heart, since my trip around the world by motorcycle started from there. I rode around the whole continent and indeed there have been many highlights, like Tasmania – the motorcycle lovers’ destination. Crossing Pentecost River with my unstoppable KTM 1190 ADVENTURE (Australia). PC @PaoloCattaneoBeing mostly a flat and inhospitable island, the adventurous part of riding down under comes from unconventional sources. The most adventurous ride I had was through the famous Gibb River Road. This part of Western Australia, called Kimberley, is one of the most remote of the whole continent. The challenging part comes from being comfortable with ourselves. I spend days basically being alone surrounded by nothing but dust. Bell Gorge. A 300 million years old natural pool in the middle of the desert (Australia). PC @PaoloCattaneoThere’s only one roadhouse in the very middle of the 1,200 km track. The rest is dust, sharp rocks and sand. Temperatures vary between 34°C to 43°C all year long. There are three river crossings to reach the end of it. The rivers are infested with crocodiles and poisonous snakes. The road is popular, for some weird reasons, also for road trains – famous Australian trucks with 4/5 trailers attached – which can lift a red dust cloud that completely obliterates everything that gets struck by it. Not particularly good for motorcyclists, as you can imagine! 1,500 km of this in 35°C heat could break some people’s spirit… PC @PaoloCattaneoThe road is mostly made of sharp rocks. When I rode through it, a rock literally sliced my front tubeless tire, snapping two of the steel wires inside of it, after only 120 km. I had to use three tire plugs to fix the puncture and some cable ties to keep the plugs in place. The world is out there waiting to be explored. You just have to #GoAdventure!
  10. MY TOP 5 PLACES TO RIDE A BIKE ACROSS THE GLOBE

    Posted in Riding By: Paolo Cattaneo @paolocattaneophoto If bikers get their adrenaline rush by exploring new paths and pushing beyond limits, for me the effort to quench the endless thirst for adventure saw me cross more than 40 countries while clocking 200,000 km aboard my KTM 1190 ADVENTURE over the past six years. Across four continents and after many border crossings, here’s five of my best places to ride a bike in this world. The end of the Carretera Austral makes you reflect about the beauty of Nature, after seeing 1300 km of some of its best work (Chile). PC @PaoloCattaneoIn many ways, all of us Adventure riders are the new generation of explorers. The world is our playground, ready to be discovered, and our bikes our trustworthy steeds. We get our adrenaline rush by exploring new paths, by adventuring through dangers, by pushing their limits, in search of the perfect ride. That’s what 200,000 km in 6 years of travelling through 4 continents, more than 40 countries on a KTM 1190 ADVENTURE looks like on a map. PC @PaoloCattaneoAfter loads and loads of hours spent on the saddle, it’s hard to pinpoint which one was the best ride for me. There have been so many great adventures on my KTM, so it’s impossible to simply choose one. Thus, here are my five favorites: #1 Carretera Austral, Chile – South America No doubt, this is probably one of the most famous roads in the world for bikers. Ruta 7 or Carretera Austral is a 1,300 km stretch of road that goes from Puerto Montt to Villa O’Higgins, in the very south part of Chile. This track is basically a paradise for any Adventure rider or photographer. The road is 50% paved and 50% gravel, perfectly doable with a fully loaded motorcycle and a set of 70/30 tires. Impossible not to stop, take a break on my KTM 1190 ADVENTURE and gaze at the horizon on the Carretera Austral (Chile). PC @PaoloCattaneoWhat makes this road unique, and probably one of the most spectacular in the world, is the fact that it stretches right in the middle of the beautiful fjords of Patagonia and the majestic Andes, peaking over 5,000 m above sea level. When I got to ride this amazing piece of land on earth, it was autumn and, despite the sometimes-freezing temperatures, the colors were incredible. That was probably the best natural spectacle I’ve witnessed in my life. Snow peaked mountains, trees in shades of red, orange and bright yellow, turquoise lakes and the most lavish green vegetation. The dangers in this part of the world are mostly related to two factors; first the weather conditions that could become quite extreme, and also the sketchy oncoming traffic. Being directly on the coast, the road gets often quite narrow and wet too. Regardless, Carretera Austral is an absolute must for all bikers. First few km into the Eduardo Avaroa National Park and the first white lagoon already appears in the distance (Bolivia). PC @PaoloCattaneo#2 Eduardo Avaroa National Park, Bolivia – South America This national park sits in between San Pedro de Atacama, Chile, and the famous Salar de Uyuni, Bolivia, the largest salt flat in the world. The park is absolutely unique and became quite popular between tourists for its colorful lagoons. There are mainly two issues to overcome while riding through EANP on a bike: one is fuel – no gas station for more than 500 km – and second is the altitude. The park sits at 4,500 m so breathing and sleeping become difficult. I remember I started panicking at a certain point because I was running low on fuel and I wasn’t even at the halfway point. With low oxygen levels and the panicking, my riding was consequently compromised. Even with the extra gallon of fuel I had with me, I realized I wouldn’t have been able to reach Uyuni. At 4,300 m above sea level this landscape is out of this world. Red lagoon with pink flamingos in the distance (Bolivia). PC @PaoloCattaneoIt started to get late and I got lost few times, as there are no clear roads or signs to follow. When I was at the halfway point, right near the red Lagoon, I only had 50 km range left in my tank; the freezing winds and the altitude were already wearing me down (at night it gets easily -10°C). Luckily a 4×4 filled with tourists passed by and I was able to buy 10 more liters of fuel from them. They also pointed me to a hut nearby where I could spend the night, sheltered from the winds. What an adventure! Hands down this is probably one of the most spectacular and challenging places on the planet to ride motorcycles. The majestic Huascaran National Park (Peru), peaking at 6,700 m of altitude. The view from up here and the lack of oxygen makes one lightheaded. PC @PaoloCattaneo#3 San Luis – Santa, Peru – South America This road, that goes from the small town of San Luis, behind the 5,300 m high mountains of the Huascaran National Park, to the infamous Cañon del Pat, is somehow my favorite in the whole Peru. The riding through the NP is rough for its climates and terrain, as it easily reaches over 4,000 m above sea level. The climb up to the pass is rather challenging but absolutely magical, culminating at the top of the mountain, overlooking the mind-blowing canyon filled with turquoise lagoons. No room for mistakes in the Cañon del Pato road (Peru). PC @PaoloCattaneoOnce reached the valley, the offroad section ends and the fun begins. This part is known for the infamous Cañon del Pat Road, a two-way road the w of a small car, with pitch black tunnels, carved inside the mountains, and 80m canyon with no barrier on one side. The thrilling factor comes from the sketchy tarmac, with chunks missing on the cliff side. Swallowed by nature at its finest. Riding up and down some of the deepest canyons in the world (Peru). PC @PaoloCattaneoWhat was shocking for me was the speed of oncoming traffic, which were mostly mining trucks and locals, driving their vehicles like maniacs on suck sketchy road. Needless to say that I got close so many times to a head-on collision and to fall into the canyon. This is, without a doubt, one of those roads you don’t want to talk to your mom about. A modern “knight” and his iron steed (Scotland). PC @PaoloCattaneo#4 NC 500, Scotland – Europe On the old continent there are many roads that are worth a mention. Every country has its long list of mountain passes, coastal roads or sketchy offroad tracks with incredible views. But I believe that somehow Scotland deserves to enter this list for many reasons. First of all for the uniqueness of its 500 miles of incredible coastal road. Secondly for the fact that it’s one of the few countries in Europe that allows free camping. Scotland leaves one speechless for it’s pristine landscapes and white sand beaches. Water is only 6-7°C unfortunately. PC @PaoloCattaneoNC 500 is somehow famous also for its unpredictable weather and its strong winds. Also, the roads can become very narrow and with barely any safety net on both sides. Head-on collisions are quite frequent since lots of campers and tourists tend to come in this part of the world for leisure or holidays. 500 miles of these kind of turns and colors in Scotland. PC @PaoloCattaneoI remember being completely mesmerized by riding through the beautiful Scottish Highlands, gazing at ancient medieval castles, nestled in pristine fjords – the famous ‘lochs’. It truly felt like going back in those times when knights and swords used to rule the lands. Those mystical hills and freezing waters made men and women tough. And riders humble and proud. #5 Gibb River Road, WA – Australia It’s no secret that Australia has a special place in my heart, since my trip around the world by motorcycle started from there. I rode around the whole continent and indeed there have been many highlights, like Tasmania – the motorcycle lovers’ destination. Crossing Pentecost River with my unstoppable KTM 1190 ADVENTURE (Australia). PC @PaoloCattaneoBeing mostly a flat and inhospitable island, the adventurous part of riding down under comes from unconventional sources. The most adventurous ride I had was through the famous Gibb River Road. This part of Western Australia, called Kimberley, is one of the most remote of the whole continent. The challenging part comes from being comfortable with ourselves. I spend days basically being alone surrounded by nothing but dust. Bell Gorge. A 300 million years old natural pool in the middle of the desert (Australia). PC @PaoloCattaneoThere’s only one roadhouse in the very middle of the 1,200 km track. The rest is dust, sharp rocks and sand. Temperatures vary between 34°C to 43°C all year long. There are three river crossings to reach the end of it. The rivers are infested with crocodiles and poisonous snakes. The road is popular, for some weird reasons, also for road trains – famous Australian trucks with 4/5 trailers attached – which can lift a red dust cloud that completely obliterates everything that gets struck by it. Not particularly good for motorcyclists, as you can imagine! 1,500 km of this in 35°C heat could break some people’s spirit… PC @PaoloCattaneoThe road is mostly made of sharp rocks. When I rode through it, a rock literally sliced my front tubeless tire, snapping two of the steel wires inside of it, after only 120 km. I had to use three tire plugs to fix the puncture and some cable ties to keep the plugs in place. The world is out there waiting to be explored. You just have to #GoAdventure!
  11. Posted in Bikes Think of the new KTM 890 DUKE as legendary boxer Sugar Ray Robinson. Why? Like the devastating middleweight, the new version of THE SCALPEL can easily move and outhit bigger opponents. Sister naked bike, the KTM 790 DUKE, has already been humbled and semi-retired by the new champ’s arrival. Like Sugar Ray, the KTM 890 DUKE is also mould-breaking. The KTM ​8​90 DUKE ​redefines the word ‘sharp’ by adding an extra edge PC @RSchedlWe’ve seen the strut and the character of the feisty cousin – the KTM 890 DUKE R – and even read about some of the KTM PowerParts to juice things up but the latest addition to the 890 range is a confident all-rounder. Here are a few reasons to jump in the ring… With 115 Hp and 92 Nm, this compact, liquid-cooled 8 valve powerplant, is the most compact twin in class punching way above its weight in terms of output PC @JamesLissimoreFeel the power: A bigger engine means bigger fun. The 890 makes 10 more horsepower and 5 more newton meters of torque than the KTM 790 DUKE. The mine of excitable goodness that is the LC8c engine platform has been excavated by KTM technicians once more for a larger bore and boosted excitement. Even though the internals have grown the motor remains the lightest and smallest twin in the midweight class (thinner engine cases, new conrods). New balancer shafts calm any worries of vibration and an all new crankshaft helps towards a 20% increased rotating mass. The effect? There is a noticeable difference in cornering stability and the feel of the throttle at lower revs. The KTM 890 DUKE will carry a rider faster and better than any midclass KTM naked bike yet. Despite the eye-catching mix of orange, grey and black the bike is also ‘green’. The LC8c hits Euro5 emission standards and will make a heady 4,8l/100km thanks to the updated, smarter fuel injection system. Powered by an 889 cc parallel-twin nestled into one of the lightest and most compact chassis around, the KTM 890 DUKE boasts the agility you’d expect from a 600 cc​, ​but with the ​meaty punch of a bigger twin PC @JamesLissimoreFeel the sway: There’s not much point in having extra power if it comes with ballast or an unappreciative chassis. The frame is made from chromium molybdenum tubular steel with a design brief to save and trim weight in every aspect. An example of KTM’s design-thinking is seen in the cast aluminum single part subframe. As well as the minimal function and aesthetic, the unit contains the airbox with air intakes located under the seat. The triangular construction weave of the material brings more strength. Using the LC8c as a stressed member of the chassis, the bike is compact and purposeful. The geometry is toned down from the extremism of the KTM 890 DUKE R but the 890 can easily cope with a winding mountain pass, a tight country lane or a set of curves on the track. New Continental ContiRoad tires emerged first from a comprehensive period of testing. The rubber has a very fast warm-up phase and was found to provide exceptional grip in the wet as well as stability and durability. WP Suspension bring their damper and reworked APEX technology to the package; of which several weight-saving modifications have been made (lighter springs) compared to the KTM 790 DUKE. The whole show thunders ahead with an improved gearbox through lighter spring action and shorter lever travel. Those who cannot live without Quickshifter+ (let’s face it, who doesn’t these days?) will benefit from an overhauled system. It clearly takes some of its design cues from the KTM 1290 SUPER DUKE R, showing off distinctive sharp lines and compact proportions, perfectly set off by signature KTM graphics PC @RSchedlFeel the lines: Aesthetically the KTM 890 DUKE is fresh and stylish. The idiosyncratic blend of attitude and minimalism is as much about character as it is functionality. Want an example? Check out the new lower seat, relocated airbox and the full integrated taillight and rear seat section. The subframe is a work of art when it comes to containment. Brackets, plastic and unnecessary components are an extinct enemy. The open lattice swingarm is not just for show; the design brings the desired level of stiffness and flex. Further along the bike the lines are made for comfortable ergonomics but with the right level of feeling and sensation to make the most of the nimble chassis. Like all rider, DUKE riders need easy access to information. In that regard, the KTM 890 DUKE features an intuitive multicolor, light variable TFT display PC @KTMFeel the options: The multicolor, light sensitive TFT display (with rev lights) will show riders the choices they can make on their journey. The KTM 890 DUKE may look raw and is primed to deliver that pure naked bike experience but there is electronic sophistication inside to reach a full level of control. Winding the ride-by-wire throttle (goodbye to judders, jolts and surprises) engages the new engine mapping logic for more efficient response. Then, there are two braking preferences: Cornering ABS and Supermoto ABS (for those who like to break rear wheel traction now and again). Motorcycle Traction Control (MTC) works thanks to a new 6D lean angle sensor that informs the computer as to the position, pitch, drift, lean and overall status of the KTM 890 DUKE. Traction control (Motor Slip Regulation for low grip conditions) is administered through two different sensors to provide greater linear acceleration and anti-wheelie. Riders who might be bristling at this level of interference can adjust or disengage to find the ideal setting for either the trip or the conditions. The 2021 modes of RAIN, STREET, SPORT are self-explanatory and standard but TRACK is pretty exciting to unleash the full rasp of the KTM 890 DUKE. Say ‘auf wiedersehen’ to anti-wheelie and MSR but being able to modify throttle and traction control at will with a few easy button-presses of the handlebar selector. ​The KTM 890 DUKE doesn’t rewrite the mid-sized naked bike rule book. It obliterates it PC @RSchedlThe KTM 890 DUKE can make use of special electronic ‘bundles’. The Tech Pack applies all the available additions to the bike: Track pack + Quickshifter+ +MSR). The Track Pack ensures maximum thrill capacity: Track mode + anti-wheelie mode disengage capability + launch control + slip adjuster + throttle control. More customization means brake and clutch levers, triple clamps and 760mm handlebars can all be turned or tilted. Choosing the KTM 890 DUKE is reflective of a lifestyle choice: it’s a statement PC @RSchedlFeel the love: Look around the street. Some motorcycles you see are clearly made for transportation. There is little thrill or identity about these bikes. This accusation can never be thrown at a KTM, especially one with the performance and the profile of the KTM 890 DUKE. Choosing this model is also reflective of a lifestyle choice: it’s a statement. When the DUKE becomes part of day-to-day existence then there is a fondness or a desire to make it even more ‘yours’. This is where the KTM PowerParts and KTM PowerWear accessories really come to the fore. The catalogues are ‘Aladdin’s caves’ for the DUKE owner. Over 100 special parts for the KTM 890 DUKE will either help tweak performance, settings, colours, practicality or carrying potential while the possibility to personally ‘sync’ further with the bike comes through a raft of KTM functional and casual apparel and co-operative unions with renowned industry brands like Alpinestars, Gimoto, Shoei and Ogio. You can go ‘full DUKE’. Check out our last Blog post for some of the essentials. So, overall, five strong points to back this particular ‘slugger’. Now we just need to find an opponent. Seconds out… If you want to stay up to speed with the latest KTM news, subscribe to the monthly KTM NEWSLETTER.
  12. CAN YOU DANCE? KEY REASONS TO PUNCH WITH THE KTM 890 DUKE

    Posted in Bikes Think of the new KTM 890 DUKE as legendary boxer Sugar Ray Robinson. Why? Like the devastating middleweight, the new version of THE SCALPEL can easily move and outhit bigger opponents. Sister naked bike, the KTM 790 DUKE, has already been humbled and semi-retired by the new champ’s arrival. Like Sugar Ray, the KTM 890 DUKE is also mould-breaking. The KTM ​8​90 DUKE ​redefines the word ‘sharp’ by adding an extra edge PC @RSchedlWe’ve seen the strut and the character of the feisty cousin – the KTM 890 DUKE R – and even read about some of the KTM PowerParts to juice things up but the latest addition to the 890 range is a confident all-rounder. Here are a few reasons to jump in the ring… With 115 Hp and 92 Nm, this compact, liquid-cooled 8 valve powerplant, is the most compact twin in class punching way above its weight in terms of output PC @JamesLissimoreFeel the power: A bigger engine means bigger fun. The 890 makes 10 more horsepower and 5 more newton meters of torque than the KTM 790 DUKE. The mine of excitable goodness that is the LC8c engine platform has been excavated by KTM technicians once more for a larger bore and boosted excitement. Even though the internals have grown the motor remains the lightest and smallest twin in the midweight class (thinner engine cases, new conrods). New balancer shafts calm any worries of vibration and an all new crankshaft helps towards a 20% increased rotating mass. The effect? There is a noticeable difference in cornering stability and the feel of the throttle at lower revs. The KTM 890 DUKE will carry a rider faster and better than any midclass KTM naked bike yet. Despite the eye-catching mix of orange, grey and black the bike is also ‘green’. The LC8c hits Euro5 emission standards and will make a heady 4,8l/100km thanks to the updated, smarter fuel injection system. Powered by an 889 cc parallel-twin nestled into one of the lightest and most compact chassis around, the KTM 890 DUKE boasts the agility you’d expect from a 600 cc​, ​but with the ​meaty punch of a bigger twin PC @JamesLissimoreFeel the sway: There’s not much point in having extra power if it comes with ballast or an unappreciative chassis. The frame is made from chromium molybdenum tubular steel with a design brief to save and trim weight in every aspect. An example of KTM’s design-thinking is seen in the cast aluminum single part subframe. As well as the minimal function and aesthetic, the unit contains the airbox with air intakes located under the seat. The triangular construction weave of the material brings more strength. Using the LC8c as a stressed member of the chassis, the bike is compact and purposeful. The geometry is toned down from the extremism of the KTM 890 DUKE R but the 890 can easily cope with a winding mountain pass, a tight country lane or a set of curves on the track. New Continental ContiRoad tires emerged first from a comprehensive period of testing. The rubber has a very fast warm-up phase and was found to provide exceptional grip in the wet as well as stability and durability. WP Suspension bring their damper and reworked APEX technology to the package; of which several weight-saving modifications have been made (lighter springs) compared to the KTM 790 DUKE. The whole show thunders ahead with an improved gearbox through lighter spring action and shorter lever travel. Those who cannot live without Quickshifter+ (let’s face it, who doesn’t these days?) will benefit from an overhauled system. It clearly takes some of its design cues from the KTM 1290 SUPER DUKE R, showing off distinctive sharp lines and compact proportions, perfectly set off by signature KTM graphics PC @RSchedlFeel the lines: Aesthetically the KTM 890 DUKE is fresh and stylish. The idiosyncratic blend of attitude and minimalism is as much about character as it is functionality. Want an example? Check out the new lower seat, relocated airbox and the full integrated taillight and rear seat section. The subframe is a work of art when it comes to containment. Brackets, plastic and unnecessary components are an extinct enemy. The open lattice swingarm is not just for show; the design brings the desired level of stiffness and flex. Further along the bike the lines are made for comfortable ergonomics but with the right level of feeling and sensation to make the most of the nimble chassis. Like all rider, DUKE riders need easy access to information. In that regard, the KTM 890 DUKE features an intuitive multicolor, light variable TFT display PC @KTMFeel the options: The multicolor, light sensitive TFT display (with rev lights) will show riders the choices they can make on their journey. The KTM 890 DUKE may look raw and is primed to deliver that pure naked bike experience but there is electronic sophistication inside to reach a full level of control. Winding the ride-by-wire throttle (goodbye to judders, jolts and surprises) engages the new engine mapping logic for more efficient response. Then, there are two braking preferences: Cornering ABS and Supermoto ABS (for those who like to break rear wheel traction now and again). Motorcycle Traction Control (MTC) works thanks to a new 6D lean angle sensor that informs the computer as to the position, pitch, drift, lean and overall status of the KTM 890 DUKE. Traction control (Motor Slip Regulation for low grip conditions) is administered through two different sensors to provide greater linear acceleration and anti-wheelie. Riders who might be bristling at this level of interference can adjust or disengage to find the ideal setting for either the trip or the conditions. The 2021 modes of RAIN, STREET, SPORT are self-explanatory and standard but TRACK is pretty exciting to unleash the full rasp of the KTM 890 DUKE. Say ‘auf wiedersehen’ to anti-wheelie and MSR but being able to modify throttle and traction control at will with a few easy button-presses of the handlebar selector. ​The KTM 890 DUKE doesn’t rewrite the mid-sized naked bike rule book. It obliterates it PC @RSchedlThe KTM 890 DUKE can make use of special electronic ‘bundles’. The Tech Pack applies all the available additions to the bike: Track pack + Quickshifter+ +MSR). The Track Pack ensures maximum thrill capacity: Track mode + anti-wheelie mode disengage capability + launch control + slip adjuster + throttle control. More customization means brake and clutch levers, triple clamps and 760mm handlebars can all be turned or tilted. Choosing the KTM 890 DUKE is reflective of a lifestyle choice: it’s a statement PC @RSchedlFeel the love: Look around the street. Some motorcycles you see are clearly made for transportation. There is little thrill or identity about these bikes. This accusation can never be thrown at a KTM, especially one with the performance and the profile of the KTM 890 DUKE. Choosing this model is also reflective of a lifestyle choice: it’s a statement. When the DUKE becomes part of day-to-day existence then there is a fondness or a desire to make it even more ‘yours’. This is where the KTM PowerParts and KTM PowerWear accessories really come to the fore. The catalogues are ‘Aladdin’s caves’ for the DUKE owner. Over 100 special parts for the KTM 890 DUKE will either help tweak performance, settings, colours, practicality or carrying potential while the possibility to personally ‘sync’ further with the bike comes through a raft of KTM functional and casual apparel and co-operative unions with renowned industry brands like Alpinestars, Gimoto, Shoei and Ogio. You can go ‘full DUKE’. Check out our last Blog post for some of the essentials. So, overall, five strong points to back this particular ‘slugger’. Now we just need to find an opponent. Seconds out… If you want to stay up to speed with the latest KTM news, subscribe to the monthly KTM NEWSLETTER.
  13. Posted in Bikes German know-how from Bosch has been integral to the electronics and innovations seen on KTM machinery for over a decade, and some of the sophistication on the new 2021 KTM 1290 SUPER ADVENTURE S means milestones are still being set. It was time to get someone from the firm to talk about their involvement with the orange… The technologies of Bosch contribute to making the KTM 1290 SUPER ADVENTURE S a real-world, versatile Adventure package. PC @RudiSchedl KTM’s alliance with Bosch has helped fashion the latest wizardry of algorithms and hardware seen on more and more Austrian machinery and especially for flagship motorcycles like the KTM 1290 SUPER DUKE R & the 1290 SUPER ADVENTURE S. Whether it’s for direct contributions to safety systems or rider assistance tools, the synergy has put energy into the tech that the KTMs now carry. Think of Motorcycle Stability Control (MSC), Motorcycle Traction Control, Motor Slip regulation, Cornering ABS, the fresh generation of ride modes, WP Semi-Active suspension and the excellent ACC, the Adaptive Cruise Control fitted as standard on the KTM 1290 SUPER ADVENTURE S. Bosch’s tagline of ‘Invented for Life’ could be tweaked to ‘Invented for living’ if applied to the sensations of motorcycling and this is where KTM’s Bosch technician and KTM 1290 SUPER ADVENTURE S Project leader, Davide Olerni – a keen motorcyclist himself – comes into play. We grabbed some time with the engineer at the launch of the bike through the pouring rain on the island of Fuerteventura. The electronics were getting a thorough testing in the climate both for their effectiveness and their resistance. The electronics were getting a thorough testing in the climate both for their effectiveness and their resistance at the launch in Fuerteventure, Spain. PC @SebasRomero We’d already heard from Dominik Bodner, the Chief Engineer of LC8 R&D, when he said “Bosch for us was the most competent partner for such a new project, and for years we have a very tight collaboration to get everything right. There was a lot of testing and approval steps together”, and we knew of the origins of the union for the KTM ADVENTURE bikes in particular with the ground-breaking MSC emerging on the 2014 models. Olerni has been with Bosch for 15 years and between bases in both Italy and Germany. “I started on the engineering side and initially with cars,” he explains. “In the last three years I moved to the two wheels and Powersport department. I’m a rider myself, so I was happy to have this chance. As a supplier we deal with more customers. We have a dedicated team for each one and I work only for KTM. The relationship we have built is awesome and there is a big difference to the passenger car world. Motorbikes and powersports are much more intimate with very passionate people; they want to do a good job for a product that will really serve other people in the end. The relationship is day-to-day.” The new LED Headlight has been designed to integrate Bosch’s front Radar Sensor on the 2021 KTM 1290 SUPER ADVENTURE S. PC @SebasRomero How does the working relationship with KTM function exactly? “I used to visit the factory a lot but that changed in the bizarre year that was 2020. We also have one of our team based full-time in Mattighofen; installed there to work on the radar topics and new technology. KTM are better served by having someone there.” How many people do Bosch have in their two-wheel division? “Difficult to say exactly. I don’t’ know a number but it is beyond hundreds. We have people for the development of systems, hardware development and hardware applications and software. It is spread across Japan, India and Germany. It’s a pretty big team.” It would seem that motorcycling has become more important to Bosch in recent years… PC @SebasRomero It would seem that motorcycling has become more important to Bosch in recent years… “It has become more of a priority and the fact that the two-wheel and powersport department was set-up just over five years ago is an indication of how much Bosch are looking at this market. Bosch has always been an innovation leader for assistance systems and electronics: this was always our ‘bread-and-butter’. Maybe it wasn’t so focussed on motorcycles before, but our work derived from passenger cars and has grown a lot in five years. Traction control is a good example and how it developed to what it is today.” Are bikes more limited for development or do they offer more challenge and variety compared to a car? “You might think carrying a system from a car to a bike would be pretty easy in terms of the basics but it’s not always like that for obvious reasons. For instance, in the Adaptive Cruise Control and the RADAR sensor we implemented for the KTM 1290 SUPER ADVENTURE S we had more of a challenge because of the lean, and you don’t have things like the angle of the steering wheel. You have to rely on the measurement from the 6-axis unit which is also one of the main innovations on the KTM 1290 SUPER ADVENTURE S. Overall the motorcycle world has some significant benefits and challenges.” “…with the KTM 1290 SUPER DUKE R we were really able to take advantage of the additional information we gained for the KTM 1290 SUPER ADVENTURE S…” – Davide Olerni PC @RudiSchedlThe 6D lean angle sensor was first seen on the KTM 1290 SUPER DUKE R. Are we talking about very advanced kit? “The 6D lean angle sensor is the highest level of technology for an inertia measurement unit we have today. With the KTM 1290 SUPER DUKE R we were really able to take advantage of the additional information we gained for the KTM 1290 SUPER ADVENTURE S ACC but also the traction control, which takes advantage of more detailed data and gave us a big benefit for this next version of the system. The end user might not necessarily have more options to choose but you can feel and appreciate that the controls are much better and smoother on the KTM 1290 SUPER ADVENTURE S.” How do you think people perceive your work at Bosch? Some might really appreciate all the safety and user-friendly systems. Others might be turned off by all the electronic assistance… “First of all, we are all motorcycle riders in our division and personally – perhaps I can also speak for the other guys – we always think about safety first. It’s a big priority…while also trying to keep the fun spirit of the bike. Assist systems are important, and it’s important we have them. Many people might not agree. Some change their mind after using them or trying them for the first time, luckily, and people who don’t want them are able to switch them off or tone them down. I respect everyone’s opinion. Even the ABS and Cornering ABS was met with a lot of scepticism in the beginning and people ended up changing their mind.” [embedded content] The all-new KTM 1290 SUPER ADVENTURE S comes right out of the factory with Adaptive Cruise Control. Together with a host of more innovative features and rider aids, it is like an inter-continental, heat-seeking missile.What about the future? Will it be about making existing systems better and cheaper or something totally new? “I guess both. We think the innovative systems we see on the KTM 1290 SUPER ADVENTURE S will gain more acceptance and they will start to be present on more bikes, maybe not only the high-end models. At the same time, it is important that we find new ways to support the riders actively or passively. There is much more still to go.” Check out a series of videos on the KTM YouTube channel to discover the Features & Benefits that make the KTM 1290 SUDER ADVENTURE S the ultimate high-performance Adventure bike. If you want to stay up to speed with the latest KTM news, subscribe to the monthly KTM NEWSLETTER.
  14. DIFFERENT CIRCUITS: BOSCH & KTM

    Posted in Bikes German know-how from Bosch has been integral to the electronics and innovations seen on KTM machinery for over a decade, and some of the sophistication on the new 2021 KTM 1290 SUPER ADVENTURE S means milestones are still being set. It was time to get someone from the firm to talk about their involvement with the orange… The technologies of Bosch contribute to making the KTM 1290 SUPER ADVENTURE S a real-world, versatile Adventure package. PC @RudiSchedl KTM’s alliance with Bosch has helped fashion the latest wizardry of algorithms and hardware seen on more and more Austrian machinery and especially for flagship motorcycles like the KTM 1290 SUPER DUKE R & the 1290 SUPER ADVENTURE S. Whether it’s for direct contributions to safety systems or rider assistance tools, the synergy has put energy into the tech that the KTMs now carry. Think of Motorcycle Stability Control (MSC), Motorcycle Traction Control, Motor Slip regulation, Cornering ABS, the fresh generation of ride modes, WP Semi-Active suspension and the excellent ACC, the Adaptive Cruise Control fitted as standard on the KTM 1290 SUPER ADVENTURE S. Bosch’s tagline of ‘Invented for Life’ could be tweaked to ‘Invented for living’ if applied to the sensations of motorcycling and this is where KTM’s Bosch technician and KTM 1290 SUPER ADVENTURE S Project leader, Davide Olerni – a keen motorcyclist himself – comes into play. We grabbed some time with the engineer at the launch of the bike through the pouring rain on the island of Fuerteventura. The electronics were getting a thorough testing in the climate both for their effectiveness and their resistance. The electronics were getting a thorough testing in the climate both for their effectiveness and their resistance at the launch in Fuerteventure, Spain. PC @SebasRomero We’d already heard from Dominik Bodner, the Chief Engineer of LC8 R&D, when he said “Bosch for us was the most competent partner for such a new project, and for years we have a very tight collaboration to get everything right. There was a lot of testing and approval steps together”, and we knew of the origins of the union for the KTM ADVENTURE bikes in particular with the ground-breaking MSC emerging on the 2014 models. Olerni has been with Bosch for 15 years and between bases in both Italy and Germany. “I started on the engineering side and initially with cars,” he explains. “In the last three years I moved to the two wheels and Powersport department. I’m a rider myself, so I was happy to have this chance. As a supplier we deal with more customers. We have a dedicated team for each one and I work only for KTM. The relationship we have built is awesome and there is a big difference to the passenger car world. Motorbikes and powersports are much more intimate with very passionate people; they want to do a good job for a product that will really serve other people in the end. The relationship is day-to-day.” The new LED Headlight has been designed to integrate Bosch’s front Radar Sensor on the 2021 KTM 1290 SUPER ADVENTURE S. PC @SebasRomero How does the working relationship with KTM function exactly? “I used to visit the factory a lot but that changed in the bizarre year that was 2020. We also have one of our team based full-time in Mattighofen; installed there to work on the radar topics and new technology. KTM are better served by having someone there.” How many people do Bosch have in their two-wheel division? “Difficult to say exactly. I don’t’ know a number but it is beyond hundreds. We have people for the development of systems, hardware development and hardware applications and software. It is spread across Japan, India and Germany. It’s a pretty big team.” It would seem that motorcycling has become more important to Bosch in recent years… PC @SebasRomero It would seem that motorcycling has become more important to Bosch in recent years… “It has become more of a priority and the fact that the two-wheel and powersport department was set-up just over five years ago is an indication of how much Bosch are looking at this market. Bosch has always been an innovation leader for assistance systems and electronics: this was always our ‘bread-and-butter’. Maybe it wasn’t so focussed on motorcycles before, but our work derived from passenger cars and has grown a lot in five years. Traction control is a good example and how it developed to what it is today.” Are bikes more limited for development or do they offer more challenge and variety compared to a car? “You might think carrying a system from a car to a bike would be pretty easy in terms of the basics but it’s not always like that for obvious reasons. For instance, in the Adaptive Cruise Control and the RADAR sensor we implemented for the KTM 1290 SUPER ADVENTURE S we had more of a challenge because of the lean, and you don’t have things like the angle of the steering wheel. You have to rely on the measurement from the 6-axis unit which is also one of the main innovations on the KTM 1290 SUPER ADVENTURE S. Overall the motorcycle world has some significant benefits and challenges.” “…with the KTM 1290 SUPER DUKE R we were really able to take advantage of the additional information we gained for the KTM 1290 SUPER ADVENTURE S…” – Davide Olerni PC @RudiSchedlThe 6D lean angle sensor was first seen on the KTM 1290 SUPER DUKE R. Are we talking about very advanced kit? “The 6D lean angle sensor is the highest level of technology for an inertia measurement unit we have today. With the KTM 1290 SUPER DUKE R we were really able to take advantage of the additional information we gained for the KTM 1290 SUPER ADVENTURE S ACC but also the traction control, which takes advantage of more detailed data and gave us a big benefit for this next version of the system. The end user might not necessarily have more options to choose but you can feel and appreciate that the controls are much better and smoother on the KTM 1290 SUPER ADVENTURE S.” How do you think people perceive your work at Bosch? Some might really appreciate all the safety and user-friendly systems. Others might be turned off by all the electronic assistance… “First of all, we are all motorcycle riders in our division and personally – perhaps I can also speak for the other guys – we always think about safety first. It’s a big priority…while also trying to keep the fun spirit of the bike. Assist systems are important, and it’s important we have them. Many people might not agree. Some change their mind after using them or trying them for the first time, luckily, and people who don’t want them are able to switch them off or tone them down. I respect everyone’s opinion. Even the ABS and Cornering ABS was met with a lot of scepticism in the beginning and people ended up changing their mind.” [embedded content] The all-new KTM 1290 SUPER ADVENTURE S comes right out of the factory with Adaptive Cruise Control. Together with a host of more innovative features and rider aids, it is like an inter-continental, heat-seeking missile.What about the future? Will it be about making existing systems better and cheaper or something totally new? “I guess both. We think the innovative systems we see on the KTM 1290 SUPER ADVENTURE S will gain more acceptance and they will start to be present on more bikes, maybe not only the high-end models. At the same time, it is important that we find new ways to support the riders actively or passively. There is much more still to go.” Check out a series of videos on the KTM YouTube channel to discover the Features & Benefits that make the KTM 1290 SUDER ADVENTURE S the ultimate high-performance Adventure bike. If you want to stay up to speed with the latest KTM news, subscribe to the monthly KTM NEWSLETTER.
  15. Posted in People, Racing In 2021 the 31-year old has been part of the AMA Supercross and Motocross paddock for a decade so we decided to make a call and ask #25 about coming back to the Indoor series after a year away through injury, making an impact in a crazily close ’21 contest, KTM longevity, his career and more… Marvin Musquin – Red Bull KTM Factory Racing PC @SimonCudby“Can you hear me?” Marvin Musquin is surrounded by hissing and squirts of air. It sounds like he’s in a submarine. “I’m just sitting in a hyperbaric chamber…so it’s a good time to talk!” Twelve and a half years submerged in Red Bull KTM colours means Marvin is the longest-serving racer for the company, bagging two FIM MX2 world titles, a 250SX crown, Motocross of Nations glory and a seven-figure cheque at the Monster Energy Cup. It’s been quite a career since his protracted move into the factory Grand Prix team in 2009 and the likeable Florida resident is still operating at the highest level, earning podium finishes already in the current 450SX supercross campaign. Musquin got back into the swing of Supercross at the opening round of the 2021 series in Houston, Texas PC @AlignMediaWe might be disturbing his post-training moment of tranquillity, but it is a rare occasion to get the Frenchman during some ‘downtime’ while the hectic supercross season is running… Why exactly are you in a hyperbaric chamber? It’s something Aldon [Baker, trainer] has at his house, in his gym. It’s a cool machine to help with recovery and I’ll do it after a workout or any time really. It’s good to put my headphones on and take a nap or listen to some music for an hour or so. It’s relaxing. So, you must be in there a few times a week? Well, at least once a week. The way the pressure works in here is like going to altitude. Training with his teammate Cooper Webb helped Musquin get back up to Supercross speed – here they are together on the AMA Supercross gate PC @AlignMediaHow are you feeling generally? The biggest question around you for 2021 – after missing a year of racing – is about the time it takes to get back to the highest level of performance…? Good. I had the pace in some qualifications and was right there for the top three in some rounds. My speed has been pretty good. I missed 2020 Supercross with the injury and came back for the outdoors, which was slightly easier to do; I noticed how much of a totally different ‘game’ supercross is and supercross tracks are for any kind of injury. That question was one I had for myself: I thought ‘can I come back to my potential?’ and the good thing about being here in Florida with Aldon’s program is that I get to ride with Cooper [Webb] and Zach [Osborne] and we had RJ Hampshire as well. It was a good comparison and in the first few weeks I was not doing what I wanted to do, but that was normal. I wanted to get better every day and that’s how it turned out, both physically and mentally. I started getting closer to those guys and battling in practice. It was good because it was pushing me and gave me more confidence. I had two good months of preparation without any injury worries and went to Houston [round one] pretty excited. I knew I was capable of racing to my full potential for twenty minutes but, wow, the level [of the riders] going for the podium surprised me. At Houston the top 15 was inside a second in practice. Starts became so important. It was amazing to take third at the first race. I had a few crashes and mistakes in the other rounds. Musquin won the 2009 FIM MX2 World Championship PC @KTMIs that just the rustiness of being back in a race situation? I think it is. The season has been so hard, especially if you cannot get a start. Bad times, bad gatepicks, bad starts, chaos on the first lap trying to pass: it all rolls into each other. So, it’s been frustrating to be in positions where I shouldn’t sometimes…but at the same time I’m showing decent speed. Musquin battled hard in 2009 to showcase his talent PC @KTMThe parity in supercross seems crazier this year. It’s similar to MotoGP™ and MXGP now where there is such a spread of riders that can win or be on the podium… I feel it was like that last year already. I wasn’t racing but I was watching and the level went up. A few years ago – two, three or four – it wasn’t that close. If you look now then a rider like Adam Cianciarulo can qualify first but then in the Main Event he’s struggling. I feel like everybody can be fast for one lap this year. The tracks were quite basic in Houston and they started to get a little bit more technical after but some are – I don’t want to say ‘too easy – but….well, the bikes are close, the riders are close and everyone can do the same thing on the tracks. I really feel we need to look at the tracks of 15-20 years ago, maybe make the jumps steeper so we don’t go as flat, far and fast. This season is definitely tough. When you go back to the truck and you look at a paper that says you are P14 in qualifying then you start to go a bit crazy about it and think ‘I suck…’ Even with your experience I guess that could stress you out… It does! But then you have to look at it a different way and see that you are just half a second from the top five. Still, it’s hard not to think about the position only! Musquin went on to defend his title for KTM aboard his KTM 250 SX-F in 2010 PC @KTMTwelve and a half years now with Red Bull KTM. Behind the wins, titles and achievements is that something you’re proud of? Yeah, for sure. I’ve always said KTM are like family. Especially in the way I moved to KTM. There are a lot of stories and it’s quite unique. Without their support I would never have done anything like I did. It was the beginning of my career and I was in a bad position in 2009. I remember it well… You do! KTM did a lot to help me, Pit Beirer especially, so I feel a lot of loyalty and always wanted to move forward with them and keep climbing. Moving to America was a joint project and goal, and we did that together. Of course, things didn’t always work out the way I wanted to, and I chased better results but I won a supercross championship and did my best to win races. In the 450 class I was right there for a few seasons and was close for the title. Musquin with some of KTM’s key management after his championship win in 2010 PC @KTMOne consequence of that long association is the fact that you’ve ridden different generations of the KTM 250 and 450 SX-Fs. Have you seen or felt much variation in the bikes over the last decade? Yeah! At the same time I feel that I have done really well with those changes. When I first rode the KTM 250 SX-F in 2009 it was with the PDS shock: remember that?! I won one of the most prestigious GPs by winning both motos at Lommel [deep sand track in Belgium]. Nobody expected that. We moved to a new bike in 2010 and we did some great things but a lot of guys were fast on that bike, like Jeffrey [Herlings] and Ken [Roczen]. It’s a cool story. One strong example for me with KTM was the electric start. I know now practically every brand has them now but people were still getting excited about them only a couple of years ago. Man, my KTM 250 SX-F had an electric start back in 2011! That’s only one example of how KTM always try to improve and be ahead of the rest. They do a lot of work. Here in America we have the production rule for racing but they still push to provide the best bike for sale so we can race it. Musquin went over to the US in 2011 to race Supercross – here he is pictured in 2012 aboard his KTM 250 SX-F PC @KTMYou’re 31 now. How is the physical cost of your career? I remember being at the Bercy Supercross in Paris when you suffered your first knee injury… That was at the end of 2010, going into 2011 and I was racing Bercy before starting my career in America. I ended up missing supercross. I mean those injuries like ligaments and tendons…I wish I’d broken bones. Do you know what I’m saying? But that’s how my body is. Surgeons and physios have told me that I’m very flexible so I tend to injure ligaments and tendons more than anything. My last knee problem was probably the biggest and where I had the most things repaired. The other knee – that I hurt twice – is actually pretty good but this last one was big. It’s a bummer. My hand also in 2015. I don’t feel that they are ‘massive’ injuries but little ones that bother you over a long time. I’m still capable of training and racing but I do think about the effects on my body now and again and, unfortunately, that’s part of racing. I know my body is not 100% ‘normal’. Musquin won the AMA 250 East Supercross title in 2015 PC @KTMYou’re one of the most technical riders I’ve seen. Can that skill and feeling still get better or do you think it’s an area where you peak and then look for improvements elsewhere? Can you still surprise yourself? I have to say: ‘unfortunately not’. [pause] Also it’s harder on the 450 compared to the 250. It’s also nice to hear what you just say. There is a part of me that always wishes to be a bit better. I guess that’s the never-ending ambition for a racer or an athlete… Exactly. Good memories – Musquin high fives the fans in 2015 with the #1 plate on his bike PC @KTMYou put a rare old photo of you battling former MXGP racer Clement Desalle on 85cc bikes on Instagram the other day. Clement, and your countryman Gautier Paulin, both retired in 2020. Does watching your peers and former teammates like Ryan Dungey walk away make you reflect on your own career? For sure I still follow MXGP so I saw that Clement and Gautier had both retired. Racing in Europe is quite a bit different to what I’m doing here in America. Every single rider has a different type of career. I mean, they both already had kids and a wider family whereas I don’t. Clement had been on the 450 for a very long time whereas 2021 is just my sixth. Everybody is so different. Also Dungey: another type of career. So, it is always hard to compare but it does make me think about things. When you turn 30-31 you think about the future and I always said as long as I’m having fun and good results then I’ll keep going. Obviously if I cannot fight for results then there is no point. I don’t want to race if it’s not to my full potential. Can you see yourself doing a ‘Tony Cairoli’ and making it to 35-36? Er, no! Lastly, you were the last guy to win the big million-dollar bonus at the Monster Energy Cup in Las Vegas [2017]. Have you blown any of the cash yet or is it sitting in the bank? Haha! We didn’t spend anything. Unfortunately, I want to say that what you see on paper is not what you actually get! The plan was to put it in the bank and watch it grow. The 2021 season has seen Musquin back at the sharp end of Supercross following injury PC @SimonCudbyWith a stacked field, starts have been even more key in 2021 – the #25 has enjoyed some strong gates so far this season. PC @AlignMedia Back on the podium – Musquin proved that despite time out he’s back on top form. PC @AlignMedia There’s still more to come – Musquin is enjoying his racing in one of the toughest championships in the world. PC @AlignMedia And to finish – a customary heel-clicker from the Frenchman aboard his KTM 450 SX-F. PC @SimonCudby
×