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green.kecske last won the day on 15 Decembrie 2016

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  1. If you were going to rob a bank on a motorcycle, what would you choose? It needs to be fast, like any good getaway vehicle, and agile enough to evade Johnny Law. There might as well be comfort and amenities too, right? Bluetooth connectivity to contact your crew on the burner phone, plus cruise control so you maintain an inconspicuous speed while you make the call. Plus electronically adjustable suspension and ride modes for city, freeway, and back roads. You’re a bank robber, not an animal! And of course, you’ll need space for the stacks of money. Allow me to suggest a Multistrada. It’s fast, comfortable, dripping with technology, and there are approximately 10,000 new ones on the road each year, so you won’t stand out in the wrong way. Since you’ll be wealthy from your bold raid of First Merchants you might as well spring for the swankiest one to date: the 2018 Ducati Multistrada 1260 S Touring. Yes, I know, $22,395 is a pretty penny to spend—and we’ll talk about why you might as well splurge on the S version rather than $18,695 for the base model—but you get an awful lot of motorcycle for the money. The Tech, And What’s New You might be thinking that the new Multi 1260 looks a lot like the bike that debuted in 2010 with the 1,198cc 11° engine, and you’d be right. Aesthetics withstanding, since then the bike has been updated with and Desmodromic Variable Timing (2015) as well as many other small upgrades over the years—saddlebag latches, a color dash unit, and the like. The meaningful moves for the 2018 model involve inheriting the ’s 1,262cc engine, a longer wheelbase, and updates to the color dash. The 2018 Ducati Multistrada 1260 in white. First, the powerplant, which caused a bit of a stir around here when it debuted the . Genius as it is, , but in XDiavel form the engine grew to be monstrously torquey (thanks to 1.6mm of stroke added) and smoothed out considerably with evolution of the tuning. Ducati claim 18 percent more torque at 5,500 rpm, patching the dip in torque that plagued the Multi 1200 DVT mill. This is Ducati’s provided dyno chart for the 1260 torque curve versus the 1200 engine—if nothing else, an admission that there was a massive hole in the torque on the first DVT engine. The chassis updates involved lengthening the swingarm by 1.9 inches and adding a degree of rake (and 0.2 inch of trail), which adds up to a wheelbase that’s 2.2 inches longer—that’s a lot. The frame was also updated to hold the XDiavel powerplant, and while the Sachs fork and shock use the same external hardware, they are adjusted differently for the new setup. I asked why the wheelbase and rake stretch and what I heard was, “stability.” Apparently, Ducati felt it could make a bike just as agile but more stable when ridden fast with a passenger and full luggage. More on that later. The 2018 Ducati Multistrada 1260 in profile. My, what a long wheelbase you have! Beefy M50 brakes from Brembo are high-end binders and they feel like it. Good stuff. The dash is the same size but has a higher-resolution TFT screen and updated software to navigate the galaxy of options within—that includes everything from damping characteristics in the suspension to adjusting each of the electronic rider aids individually. Basically, instead of only offering a spread of settings from which to choose (1 through 8 for traction control, for example), there is guidance built in—select TC Level 2 and the bike tells you that’s best for performance on dry roads, where TC Level 7 is best for performance on wet roads. It’s all a little arbitrary, and dependent on rider skill, of course, but it’s a step toward people learning how the system is meant to operate. (For an example of how the menus look and work, see the video embedded below.) Other changes and updates slung around the Multi 1260 include new heated grips, a “more reliable” keyless ignition (evidently the previous one was finicky), an up/down quickshifter option (standard on the S), and a tire-pressure monitoring system option. There’s also the Ducati Link App, which will allow owners to adjust settings from their phone, link with social media, track and share rides, win badges and points for logging miles, and keep track of service intervals—18,000 miles between valve adjustments, by the way, and 9,000 for basic service. The app is available starting in February of 2018. How It Feels To Ride Enough with the specs! You want to know how fast this sucker can get you away from the vault and into the hills—hypothetically, of course. The short answer is, quickly and splendidly. So much of what has made the Multistrada a popular machine since 2010 is captured wholly in the new 1260. The engine is the biggest improvement. Ducati claim 6 additional ponies over the 1200, but it doesn’t really feel faster. The longer wheelbase makes it less prone to wheelie, I’m sure—mostly it’s how linear the power delivery is that made me smile. It’s happy to lug around town,and has a fat midrange that won’t disappoint. Dual fenders keep the Multi’s tail clean. Note that the left bag is larger because of the exhaust on the right side. Luggage is standard on the Touring models, an upgrade on everything else. Wheels are updated on the 2018 Multistrada 1260, and Ducati claims they are 300 grams lighter. Plus they’re gold! (Unless you get the bike in red, then they’re black.) The chassis updates didn’t do it for me. In adding rake and trail and wheelbase I think they’ve dulled one of my favorite parts of the Multistrada blade—only a little, but it’s noticeable. It just doesn’t feel as light and direct to steer as it has in the past. The old bike is , and I love that about it. Ducati staff say the more relaxed geometry helps direct more feedback to the rider, but I’m not sure I felt it. If it’s for the sake of safety and stability, then I can’t argue—that should always be a priority in motorcycle design. Even if it felt less excitable, I dragged my toes all day and never broke a sweat. The 1260 is fully capable of slaying a twisty road. More to the point of a getaway vehicle, the Multistrada’s ride modes are still some of my favorite of any bike. Trundling through small towns on the test ride, I flicked the 1260 into Urban mode. The preload in the shock automatically decreases, making the ride h lower (nice for stoplights) and the damping in the fork and shock loosens way up. Then there’s the engine, which mellows out in the Low power mode, making the bike easy to trot through suburban streets. Lastly, the dash reconfigures to show the clock and speedo nice and big, and forgoes the tachometer. Who cares about revs in the city? It’s excellent. At 6-foot-2 I thought the Multi 1260 offered excellent touring manners and all-day comfort. It’s a tall and heavy bike, and rewards experience. The 2018 Ducati Multistrada 1260 has an up/down quickshifter that works really nicely. You can turn it off if you hate it. Should your getaway cover be blown and you need to make haste, Sport mode awaits. The suspension tightens, dash displays a prominent tach, and all 158 claimed horses are on tap. Touring mode is somewhere in the middle, and Enduro mode is designed to help if your ride takes you off road. Lots of bikes have different power modes available, others have adjustable suspension, and some even do this same trick of tweaking everything at once. In my opinion, though, the Multistrada offers the most comprehensive and drastic available changes. The bike’s personality really does change, and it’s a fantastic option to have. Moreover, every parameter built in to the ride mode—traction control, wheelie control, ABS, throttle map, dash display, quickshifter, and suspension settings—are able to be tailored individually in the menu. That means each of the four ride modes becomes customizable to your preferred settings. Urban mode could be soft suspension for the cobblestone street approaching the bank, Touring mode could have full preload in the shock to account for the payload after the robbery. I’m just spitballing here. My preference for twisty roads was Sport mode, with the preload set a shade high, rear ABS and wheelie control off, and the throttle map set to Medium (that’s full power, but gentler delivery). One of my favorite things about the Multistrada is that if you ask it to be bad, it’s more than willing. How many 500-something-pound sport-touring bikes are comfortable when sideways? Not many, but the 2018 Multi 1260 is one of them. Switches on the 2018 Ducati Multistrada 1260 are largely the same as they were on the previous DVT model. The rim around the base of the switch glows, too, which is handy in the dark—though you still can’t see what the buttons do. You’ll have to learn that yourself. Aside from the nifty tricks that the Multi does, it delivers everything a sport-touring bike should. The weather protection is good, and easily adjustable via the pinch-’n’-slide windscreen. The mirrors are decent, the seat is nicely shaped, and the brakes are stellar. The seat is adjustable for h, if you please, and the saddlebags work nicely other than not being able to leave them unlocked. The quickshifter is great, and the LED headlights that come on the up-spec models also include cornering lights. The Bottom Line The Multistrada 1260 S Touring delivers everything it promises and, in my opinion, it damn well should. For a price tag north of $22,000 you, the consumer, should be getting everything you want in a motorcycle. Back to one of the first questions I posed: Why not get the base bike? For a “scant” $18,700 you can still have the new engine and new chassis so why not? The upsell is $2,300 to the S (in red), plus $1,400 for the Touring, and $200 for the gray paint on my testbike, which ends up at $22,595. That’s a no-joke, at nearly $4,000 more than the base bike, but I still say it’s worth it. If you want this burly beast of a sport-tourer, then you want the quickshifter, the color dash, LED headlight, luggage, centerstand, and the fancy suspension. You can think the Multistrada is ugly, or doesn’t sound good, or is too big. Opinions are good to have. As far as delivering an exciting and capable grand touring experience, the Multistrada 1260 succeeds in spades. It would probably be a perfect getaway vehicle, too, if you happen to be up to no good. TECH SPEC PRICE $22,395 (S model) ENGINE 1262cc liquid-cooled 90° V-twin TRANSMISSION/FINAL DRIVE 6-speed/chain CLAIMED HORSEPOWER 158.0 hp @ 9500 rpm CLAIMED TORQUE 95.1 lb.-ft. @ 7500 rpm FRAME Steel-tube trellis FRONT SUSPENSION Sachs 48mm fork with adjustable spring preload and semi-active compression and rebound damping; 6.7 in. travel REAR SUSPENSION Sach shock with adjustable spring preload and semi-active compression and rebound damping; 6.7 in. travel FRONT BRAKE Brembo M50 four-piston calipers (S), 330mm discs with ABS REAR BRAKE Brembo two-piston caliper with ABS RAKE/TRAIL 25°/4.4 in. WHEELBASE 62.4 in. SEAT HEIGHT 33.3/32.5 in. (845/825mm) FUEL CAPACITY 5.3 gal. (20L) CLAIMED WET WEIGHT 518 lb. (235kg) CONTACT The list of options and models in the 2018 Ducati Multistrada 1260 lineup. The MSRP on the Pikes Peak version is $24,995, and it comes with Öhlins suspension instead of the Sachs Skyhook kit, as well as a Termignoni pipe and a spicy livery. We won’t get the S D|air version (developed with Dainese airbag systems) in the US of A. 2018 Ducati Multistrada 1260 cockpit: ready for whatever sport tour you can handle. 2018 Ducati Multistrada 1260 bags are decent. You can also get the aluminum top-loading cases from the Enduro model if you like. 2018 Ducati Multistrada 1260 Sursa
  2. This article was originally published in the December-January 1999 issue of Cycle World's Big Twin magazine. You don’t normally think of a Big Twin as much of a corner-carver; but with its combination of Convertible chassis and Twin Cam 88 power, the FXDX Dyna Sport is a barrel of fun on a serpentine road. Steal just a quick glance of a , and you might miss the good stuff. Concealed under slath­erings of flat-black paint, its Twin Cam 88 engine looks much like an Evo. The distinctive timing cover fails to stand out without a polished finish, and the big cylinder fins are diminished by the darkness. It could be just another Dyna. Turn the key and ride off, though, and you’ll definitely know that you have entered a new world of Harley-Davidsons. The Sport pulls hard and smoothly from down low, getting no­ticeably stronger around 3500 rpm. It keeps pulling past 5000 rpm—where a stock Evos have long since begun wheezing—and keeps on going to the 5500-rpm redline and beyond. From the rumbles and shakes, you know you’re riding a Big Twin, but every moment on board tells you it’s not an Evo. The light-flywheeled Twin Cam has a revvy eagerness that is lacking in a stock Evo, and all its 88 cubic inches respond now when you twist the throttle open. At the same time, it really is mechanically quieter, with noticeably less clatter from its top end, all while running a little smoother than an Evo. Harley’s engineers deserve a cigar or six for this performance. Harley's engineers deserve a cigar for this performance. Almost as importantly, the Twin Cam engine has given the Dyna line something beyond improved ac­cel­eration, a higher degree of refinement and better roll-ons: a new direction. According to Al Wagner, Dyna Platform Manager, the FXDX is “taking the design into a sportier Big Twin.” Both Wagner and Motor Company Design Chief Louie Netz insist that Harley need­ed, in Netz’s words, “a model that would showcase the Twin Cam. The other models that the new engine came in weren’t changed cosmetically. We needed to showcase the motor someplace. And to match the engine performance, it had to be a sport/handling package.” That matched perfectly with Wag­ner’s own desire to take at least part of the Dyna lineup down a sportier path. Harley’s market researchers—not to mention the company’s European distributors—were telling him that people were eager for a stronger-performing, better-handling Big Twin. The con­tinuing strength of the FXR chassis among custom builders was reinforcing that message, as was the continuing trend for big-bore customs using forks and brakes that could have come from the VR1000 Superbike. Twin Cam 88 gives the Sport considerable punch in stock form. But engine performance can be significantly upgraded with a factory Stage 1 kit that won’t even void the warranty if installed by a Harley dealer. So, Twin Cam engine married Dyna chas­sis at an opportune time. But the decision to proceed with the sportier version was made late, in the autumn of 1997, less than a year from production. That meant the ’99 FXDX could only be the first step toward a more hot-rod production Big Twin, not the final statement. Fortunately, The Motor Company had a good place to start in the Dyna Convertible. That bike had long ago been given longer-travel suspension that made it the best-riding Big Twin, as well as the one that—because of its chassis h—could lean over farthest in a corner before hard parts be­gan dragging. It also had the sportiest Dyna frame, the one with a 28-degree steering-head angle to provide sharp, easy steering. And it was fitted with powerful, twin-disc front brakes in the bargain. Essentially, the Convertible contributed its chassis and suspension to the Dyna Sport. But the Sport got a new look, more contemporary and less fussy than that of the Convertible. The engine was blacked-out almost entirely, save for polished fin ends and a few bright spots of chrome. Black wrinkle paint also darkened the rear fender stays and air-cleaner housing. Fenders and gas tank were given a simple, monochromatic finish, either the black seen here, or an elegant pearl silver, or a competition-like orange. Instead of a com­pli­cated, nostalgic tank logo, the Sport only wears “” in simple type down the sides of its tank. The Twin Cam met the Dyna at an opportune time. Much like the Night Train Softail, the Sport gets a seat that emphasizes a streamlined appearance over passenger comfort. Fortunately, the passenger accommodations on the FXDX aren’t as sparse as those on the Night Train, with the rear of the seat wider and less crowned. The highly scalloped and far wider seat intended for the rider is more like it, and will keep your butt content through a tank of gas or two. When asked about the passenger seating, Netz says, “Our best selling accessory seats—at least for some models—are the least comfortable. That tells you a lot about priorities.” But perhaps the most significant dif­ference between the Sport and any other Dyna is its handlebar. According to Wagner, surveys conducted by Harley indicated that “buckhorns are out,” with that result supported by 80 out of 100 riders. Instead, the company reached deep into the parts bin and gave the Sport a bar identical in bend to that of the —though executed in black stainless rather than the carbon steel of the original. Similar to dirt-track bends, the 32-inch-wide handlebar stretches out and curves back gradually, placing you on the bike in a very slight rearward lean, your arms out naturally in front of you, elbows bent. It’s very much like the control-oriented riding position found on most dirtbikes. Compared either to drag bars on risers or buckhorns, the XR-style bar gives you more steering lever­age that makes the Sport seem lighter and more maneuverable. Overall, then, the quick-responding, hard-accelerating Twin Cam en­gine and the in-control riding position make the FXDX Sport feel, well, sport­ier. It’s a combination that makes you want to rev it through the gears, to toss it into a corner, and to brake harder and later than you might on any other Big Twin. Black-on-black paint treatment and lean, clean lines make the Big Twin FXDX look more like a slightly overgrown Sportster. But it’s not as though you’re sacrificing anything for that feeling, other than maybe a marginally greater seat h. The long-travel shocks in the rear ride over even substantial bumps without the harshness that comes with bottoming, and the riding position is comfortable over miles and miles of freeway travel. Yes, the shocks could use a little more damping, especially if you ride the FXDX hard enough to leave footpeg and exhaust-pipe dust on the asphalt; and the pulled-in steering head doesn’t cause the bike to lock in on straight-ahead the way a dowser’s stick goes toward water. On the other hand, the 28-degree head angle re­duces the effort required to lean the Sport over, and it eliminates the low-speed, falling-in sensation shared by most machines that have substantially greater rake and trail. Plus, the brakes are very powerful, but easily controllable. The Sport is simply a Big Twin that does about everything well. That also includes protecting your wallet. With solid paint, the Sport car­ries a list price of only $12,995 (pearl paint is another $240). Perhaps that reasonable price tag explains a phenomenon reported by Wagner: So far, Harley has shipped just about one 94-cubic-inch big-bore kit for every Sport sold. If fitted by a dealer, this Stage 1 factory big-bore kit boosts both power and torque by about 8 percent while allowing you to maintain the original new-vehicle warranty. That also fits into another tidbit of info from the Dyna’s Platform Manager: “This is just the start of the journey,” says Wagner. “The Dyna is going to evolve. It’s going to get sportier yet.” Based on what we’ve experienced with the FXDX, we can hardly wait. Sursa
  3. This issue was originally published in the December-January 1998 issue of Cycle World's Big Twin magazine. Increased torque makes itself known immediately on this 1998 Harley-Davidson Sportster Sport. Four sparkplugs. High-compression heads. Hotter cams. More power. The new, 1998 XL1200S Sport promises to beat with a hot-rod heart. But think again. All the engineering changes made to this first “P-3”-powered Sporty have resulted in more of a seamless, torquey type of acceleration rather than brute, wide-eyed, idle-skipping power. When you first lay eyes on this latest Sportster, the detailing impresses: black cylinders with polished fin ends; black fender stays and handlebar; a new, aluminum-powder finish on the cases, sidecovers, and top and bottom rock-er covers that makes them look like sand-blasted alloy. The bike looks purposeful and a little nasty. Fire it up and the purposefulness remains, but not much of the nasty. This new XL quickly falls into the smoothest idle of any Sportster ever, and with the least mechanical noise. There’s little of the loping, syncopated, random misfiring that traditionally has defined H-Ds at idle; instead, you find the same kind of regular beat as with the fuel-injected FLs. Ride off, and increased torque makes itself known immediately; no stock Sportster has ever pulled harder from low rpm than this one. It’s a short-shifter’s delight that will accept full throttle from as low as 1500 revs. If you shift by ear and feel, you’ll seldom exceed 3500, yet will still be impressed by the quickness. If you watch the tach and rev it out more, this newest XL will keep pulling out to 5200 rpm, but you’ll feel the torque falling off. And if you try to reach the 6200-rpm redline, you’ll find a surprise: The rev limiter in the ignition system has the bike staggering with misfires by 5500 rpm. What Harley’s engineers have done with the P-3 Sportster engine is to enhance what Sportster powerplants have always done well; but they have done so without magically transforming the Sport into a rocketship, regardless of what the marketing department may indicate. The emphasis has been on increasing low-speed power and throttle response down in the engine operating range most used by real-world riders, rather in coming up with top-end numbers that look impressive on a spec sheet. When you first lay eyes on this Sportster, the detailing impresses. The bike looks purposeful and a little nasty. The starting point was new cylinder heads based on the ones introduced on the S1 Lightning in 1996. The heads mate the compact combustion chamber of the 883 Sportster with 1200cc-size valves and better-flowing ports. The combustion chamber yields a 10.0:1 compression ratio and allows quick burning of the mixture, even with a single sparkplug per cylinder; but Harley has given each head (on the 1200S only) two plugs. This exemplifies the difference in tuning philosophy between The Motor Company and its Buell division. Buell works with rubber-mounted machines that run smoother and smoother the higher they rev; the newest Buell engines peak about 1000 rpm higher than this Sportster P-3 engine, and concentrate their best power in the 4500- to 6500-rpm range. But on the solid-mount Sportster, those kinds of revs risk homogenizing a rider’s internal organs, not to mention eventually leaving a trail of parts scattered along the road-way. Buell also has been willing to mount huge, if not graceful, airboxes and mufflers to allow a Sportster-based engine to make power up high; it’s simply not possible to design shorty duals and a classic-looking air filter that breathe as well as they look, at least while passing the government’s mandatory sound checks. So, took a different road with the new Sportster, one similar to that followed with the fuel-injected FLs. Since high-rpm power couldn’t be had with the standard intake and exhaust plumbing, the new engine would instead make the best possible low-end power. To that end, the 1200S Sport—much like the injected FLs—got new, short-duration camshafts. And the Buell heads helped raise peak power through improved breathing and higher compression ratio. The torque cams, however, increased low-speed cranking pressures even beyond the ability of the new combustion chamber to tolerate. So, the solution was a classic one often employed to curtail detonation problems: dual sparkplugs. Using two plugs speeds up the combustion process by starting the fire in two locations, so the end gases don’t have a chance to explode uncontrollably. Assisting was a new, mapped ignition system with an intake-manifold-pressure sensor that would dial-in exactly the amount of spark needed, no more and no less. This helps reduce detonation while improving throttle response and fuel economy. Aside from dual-plug heads, 1200S motor has an improved oil pump with 50-percent more scavenging capacity. Rear shocks aren’t just the usual units with reservoirs attached; they’re higher-quality dampers that greatly improve ride and wheel control. What results is an engine that produces more power and torque down low with improved throttle response, makes a couple of more peak horsepower and foot-pounds of torque than previously, and signs off a little earlier. Previous Sportster cams peaked the engine at 5800-6000 rpm when aftermarket exhausts and a Screamin’ Eagle air filter and ignition box were fitted; the new cams are optimized to peak at just over 5000 rpm. When you ride the XL1200S, you find it has a nearly ideal powerband for a Sportster. It grunts out torque where you want it, and runs smoothly up to about 67 mph in top gear. That’s the point, at about 3000 rpm, where the handgrips begin buzzing and growing; if you want to go faster, you have to have a fair tolerance for vibration. But short-shift around town, or ride at a mellow pace on country lanes instead of freeways, and you’ll really appreciate the new engine. The rest of the Sportster Sport retains XL1200S virtues and vices. The brakes are the strongest on any machine outside of a VR1000 racebike, and the suspension is both notably compliant and adept at keeping the wheels under control. The riding position is—for better and for worse—classic Sportster. The pegs are slightly forward and high, the seat low and close. It’s neither as comfortable as a stretched-out Big Twin nor as control-oriented and sporty as any Buell. The handlebar puts you close to bolt-upright, and the wind pressure and lack of Softail-like back support turn you into a human sail at about the same highway speeds at which vibration begins to annoy. Keep the needle under 65, though, and this is a motorcycle that could carry you through several tanks of fuel without regrets. In the end, what Harley has built with the XL1200S Sport is the most competent and civilized Sportster ever—though “civilized” is perhaps the least likely word to tag on a descendent of an XLCH. But Harley dealers are already selling the spiritual descendent of that legendary machine in the Buell White Lightning. If what you want is a performance-intense, Milwaukee-powered hot-rod, the Buell is your bike. But if you want a quick, solid, thoroughly competent machine with a Sportster’s unique looks, long traditions and respectable sport handling, the XL1200S is right up your alley. All it has to offer is the best, most seamless engine and most charismatic powerband ever found on an XL. UPS: Torquey powerband Brick-wall brakes Precise and smooth shifting Looks good Compliant and controlled suspension Sounds better than most Big Twins DOWNS: Solid-mount vibration at higher speed Not quite the rocketship expected Footpegs still too close to seat Sursa
  4. After recently riding every model in Harley-Davidson’s newly updated , the Heritage Classic 114 stood out as being among the most diverse and capable models in the bunch. Possessing the best of both worlds with nimble handling, strong power output, wind management and storage options, the Heritage 114 is lean and low, and ready for long miles. The floorboards—which would scrape at a shamefully early lean angle on past Heritage models—are now much more effective in the turns. Saddlebags provide ample storage, and black leather and blackened nickel studs keep the look dark and aggressive. A two-tone windshield adds more of the old school vibe, as well as shield your body from buffeting. The look is classic, dark and mean but the ride is smooth and strong. Starting at $20,299, the is definitely in the higher echelon of motorcycles, right up there with its touring chassis-equipped brethren. But the lighter weight, shorter wheelbase and more responsive handling give the Heritage 114 a distinct advantage when it comes to city riding and the twisties. For more video reviews like this, check out to hear our thoughts on the Ducati XDiavel, Polaris Slingshot and more! Sursa
  5. The 2018 Suzuki GSX250R has looks inspired by the GSX-R family, but it was designed more with the practical approach of the Katana series in mind. goal for their 2018 GSX250R was to capture both new and returning riders with a fresh small-capacity sport bike. Call it adventitious, call it bold—but whatever you do, don’t call their new bike a “Gixxer”. From the words of Tak Hayasaki, president of Suzuki Motor of America, “Why are we coming into the market with a 250cc bike now? We’re focused on practicality, and we see this bike as being bought by those who want an experience—a bike that will last them many, many years.” Be it as it might, some of you out there will still be wondering why Suzuki decided not to punch the GSX250R’s parallel-twin powerplant up to 300cc, a completely justifiable quandary. It might bear a striking resemblance to its larger GSX-R cousins, but it draws its biggest inspiration from the Katana lineage—blending rideability with reliability. This concept, Suzuki hopes, will help convince new owners to hold on to their bike for a longer period of time, as opposed to being in a rush to replace it. This also explains the “GSX” part of the name, as the earlier Katana line featured the same model designation. It’s still not enough to make me think that calling it the “GSX-R250” would have been too detrimental, as the more recognizable name would fetch more interest. There’s no denying that the styling works—and works well! THE TECH Right out of the gate, Suzuki’s new checks all the right boxes in the looks department. From the sleek, stylish bodywork, down to the GSX-R1000R-inspired headlight and taillight, Suzuki’s new mini machine sure screams, “I’m a sport bike,” however it quickly apologizes for raising its voice at you with comfortable, upright ergonomics and simplistic controls. An easy-to-read digital gauge relays all the necessary information to the rider in real-time, and doesn’t feel cheap. At the heart of this minuscule beast is a parallel-twin, 248cc engine that some of the more eagle-eyed readers will notice bears a certain similarity to Suzuki’s older engine from the GW250. Luckily for you, they’ve since updated it, and it now features redesigned valves that have a new tapered profile, a better cylinder wall finish that retains oil, and rollers on the rocker arms. They’ve also added new throttle bodies that house new injectors. What this boils down to is this: Suzuki have increased the durability, flow, RPM ceiling, fuel economy, and compression while lowering the emissions. The controls keep the riding position more upright, far more comfortable during longer rides. Suspension comes in the form of a standard, telescopic fork in the front, and a standard, preload-adjustable shock in the rear. Neither are adjustable for compression or rebound damping, which is par for the course at this price point. New 10-spoke, 17 inch wheels at both the front and rear aid with aftermarket tire selection, and the 31.1-inch seat h welcomes riders of shorter stature—as does the narrow seat profile itself. The seat is comfortable, and narrow enough that the 31.1-inch seat h does not feel intimidating to shorter riders. Suzuki claims their GSX250R’s 4.0-gallon tank will stretch the bike’s range to about 280 miles—doing the math will show that they’re assuming 70mpg. Not too bad, but similar to the estimates for 300cc bikes claimed by other manufacturers. THE RIDE San Pedro, California was the sunny (and brutally warm) site of our road test, a good mixture of city streets bustling with traffic, and flowing hillside littered with twists and turns. Straight away, the GSX250R felt nice and planted, and I was indeed impressed with the overall fit and finish of the machine. The digital dash is high-contrast and easy enough to read and featured a bar-type RPM gauge. The seating position was comfortable for my 30-inch inseam—as well as some of my taller counterparts. I was pleasantly surprised with the ride quality of the GSX250R. Sure, the suspension was a hair on the soft side, but it handled corners well enough, and the brakes did a good job of slowing the bike down in time. Although this bike is heavier than we’d prefer at 392lbs, the steering geometry was quick and made the bike feel light on its feet. The suspension wasn’t anything to write home about; a rather springy front fork mixed with a very basic rear shock did all it could to soak up the irregularities in the road, but was easily overloaded under harder braking. Good enough, but not great. Braking was definitely another strong suit, the included ABS stepped in just as the bike became too unruly in a panic situation. Is the GSX250R the ultimate around-town commuter motorcycle? If you’re sold on Suzuki’s styling and don’t mind the slightly smaller displacement, I’d say it’s a good choice. At risk of sounding like a broken record, I’d like to thank Suzuki for including an adjustable front brake lever—something too often overlooked in a bike that’s meant for people of all shapes and sizes. It’s a small detail, but I appreciate it. The six-speed transmission was—to my surprise—noticeably smooth. The engine provided decent grunt, and although it might technically be outclassed in the power area, it pulled strong across the RPM range, and I never felt like it was struggling while pulling me up any hills. THE VERDICT The Suzuki GSX250R is a solid little motorcycle—if what you’re looking for is practicality over performance. Their reasoning for not bumping up the displacement to 300cc comes down to reliability and ease of use, mainly. I applaud them for the angle they’re going for—they made a point to state that this bike still features tappet-style valves (for easy adjustments), and they’re even offering a complete “Oil Change Kit” available separately at the dealerships that contains everything needed to change your own oil. It’s still strange to me that Suzuki didn’t decide to punch the engine out to a competitive 300cc, but at least the inclusion of roller-type rockers, new cylinder coating and redesigned valves make for a better version of the engine than found in the earlier GW250. While this bike won’t win any drag races against its closest twin-cylinder competitors, the linear power delivery is on-par with single-cylinder CBR300R. With a $4,499 price tag (including ABS), it’s a bit cheaper than the Honda CB300R, Kawasaki Ninja 300 and Yamaha R3, while still offering a high level of fit and finish, comfort, and enjoyment. Again, I understand idea behind the bike, but personally I’d spend a small amount more for any of the other bikes which all offer more power and still return excellent fuel economy. It still makes me wonder though—why not employ the same line of thinking behind the GSX250R, but with a 300cc engine? It seems like a logical step, seeing as how all the direct competitors have already made the jump. It seems then, that only time will tell if Suzuki will eventually come around and join the 300cc troupe. TECH SPEC Evolution: A newly-designed, small-capacity sport bike that borrows from older designs to provide a practical approach. Rivals: , , , , TECH PRICE $4,499 ENGINE 248cc liquid-cooled parallel-twin TRANSMISSION/FINAL DRIVE 6-speed/chain CLAIMED HORSEPOWER N/A CLAIMED TORQUE N/A FRAME Aluminum semi double-cradle frame FRONT SUSPENSION Telescopic fork, non-adjustable; 4.5-in. travel REAR SUSPENSION Single shock adjustable for spring preload; 4.9-in. travel FRONT BRAKE Two-piston Nissin caliper, single disc REAR BRAKE Single-piston Nissin caliper, single disc RAKE/TRAIL 25.6°/4.1 in. WHEELBASE 56.3 in. SEAT HEIGHT 31.1 in. FUEL CAPACITY 4.0 gal. CLAIMED WEIGHT 392 lb. (dry) AVAILABLE Fall 2017 CONTACT Verdict: Comfortable, punctual, and very useable—a solid choice if you don’t mind taking a bit of a hit in the horsepower area. Sursa
  6. Riding past the terraced orange groves of the Sierra Nevada foothills in Andalucía, Spain, I’m struck by the foreignness of the place. The landscape is wild and seemingly untrammeled, though it’s dotted here and there with long-entrenched civilization. The sleepy mountain villages with narrow lanes and whitewashed facades seem as native to the environment as the olive trees that attract my attention from behind the windscreen. I’m riding the top-spec 2018 Tiger 1200 XCA ($21,750), a motorcycle capable of tackling any adventure inspired by the allure of the roads we ride and the vistas we behold. For 2018, the Tiger 1200 receives significant updates to improve ergonomics, shed weight, and to include next-gen tech such as self-balancing semi-active suspension, a rev-matching up/down quickshifter, linked brakes with cornering ABS, a hill hold feature, adjustable traction control, and adaptive cornering lighting. You’re forgiven if your eyes glaze over reading such a list. While you’ll need an engineering degree to comprehend how the systems work, it’s immediately clear the way they work, palpably changing the character of the motorcycle and improving rider control. The Tiger 1200 line is divided into two ranges. The XC range (responsible for about 70 percent of Tiger sales) has spoked wheels and more off-road-ready touches, like handguards and off-road pegs, and is available in two trim levels: the XCX ($19,550) and top-shelf XCA. The XR range has cast-aluminum wheels and is available in four trim levels: the base level XR ($16,500), which does not feature the TSAS semi-active suspension among other features; the XRX ($18,750); the XRX LRH, a shorter version with a 31.1-inch to 31.8-inch adjustable seat h and dedicated suspension ($18,750); and the top-line XRT ($21,500). Starting off on the motorway heading out of Almería, I use the five-way joystick on the left handlebar to adjust the windscreen’s h, creating a body of still air around me. Next, I toggle the joystick to adjust the suspension damping on the fly, optimizing it for comfort as I take in the snowcapped peaks in the distance. The stunning views and the Tiger’s all-day comfy ergos have me wishing the panniers were full and my wife was on the back of the bike to share the experience. Besides, that would give the suspension’s self-adjusting preload another chance to shine. All but the base-model XR feature Triumph Semi Active Suspension (TSAS), which uses WP hardware and Triumph’s own electronic trickery in the IMU (inertial measurement unit), which adjusts damping at 10-millisecond intervals. The IMU is the Tiger 1200’s brain, sensing the motorcycle’s vertical, lateral, and longitudinal acceleration, as well as its pitch, yaw, and roll. After stopping for lunch beneath the gaze of Castillo de La Calahorra, an earthy red Italian Renaissance castle built in the early-16th century, the roads grow narrow and winding as they ascend into the mountains. When I put the ride mode in Sport, and the suspension firms up and the throttle map becomes more aggressive, though it maintains its incredibly neutral and linear characteristic. When I roll back the throttle, a claimed 141 hp and 90 pound-feet of torque propel the Tiger out of the corners with gusto even from low revs, the three-cylinder engine insistently and smoothly accelerating to peak power while the three-piston symphony sings through the titanium Arrow exhaust. Throttle response is exceptional with zero on/off jerkiness. When it comes to natural-feeling electronic connections between rider input and hardware, Triumph is on its game. Slowing for the blind tight corners of the mountain road, I leave my hand off the clutch and gently click down the gearbox, the revs matching perfectly without any rider assistance. It’s an action that goes against instinct, but the effectiveness of the system soon has me changing my habits. I take advantage of the linked braking system and the reassurance of the cornering ABS, braking deeper into corners than I would ordinarily, the Tiger responding predictably as the suspension maintains its superb contact with the road. Grabbing another gear exiting the corner, it does the job just as well. In fact, when upshifting at neutral throttle positions, using the quickshifter is less invasive than at full chat where many quickshifters operate best. The torque assist hydraulic clutch gives a light feel at the lever for smooth gear changes. I never missed a gear doing standard gear changes or when using the quickshifter for clutchless, throttle-open gear changes. At a standstill, it always popped right into neutral as well. The road winds through the deciduous forests of the mountains, mist clings to the trees beneath a low gray sky, and the Tiger 1200 remains poised, agile, and amazingly easy to ride as the asphalt descends toward the sea. The Tiger is equally happy galloping through the corners as it is trotting along at a leisurely pace, a light push on the bars dipping it toward the apex. It places no demands on the rider in terms of how it must be ridden. It makes everything easy. Triumph shaved nearly 25 pounds off the top-spec XCA, in large part by including a titanium Arrow exhaust, but also by lightening the frame and engine, utilizing a lighter flywheel and crankshaft, and using magnesium engine covers. Still, the XCA weighs in with a claimed dry weight of 534 pounds. It’s impressive then, that it’s so light on its toes. The next day, on bikes fitted with Pirelli Scorpion Rally knobbies, former racer Nick Plumb and Charley Boorman (of Long Way Round fame) guide the group of assembled journalists through the canyons and hills of the Tabernas Desert. Setting off, I switch to Offroad mode, which turns off ABS in the rear and softens the suspension, effectively increasing rake as the rear squats. As I’ve not ridden in the dirt since I was a teenager, I avoid the new Offroad Pro Mode, which turns off both ABS and traction control. I, for one, am reassured by feeling the computer take over as the rear end steps out in sandy washes. I would expect a motorcycle of such size, weight, and power to be a bit of a handful in the gravel and sand, but the Tiger is just as unflappable and easy to use as it is on pavement. I get a bit overeager in the soft stuff, the front wheel seeming to gain senescence and guide me of its own accord, but the tractable and immediately responsive power quickly straighten the bike out. I’m grinning ear to ear at this point. To be honest, it’s some of the most fun I’ve ever had on a motorcycle. The top-of-the-line Tiger 1200 XCA and XRT come fully loaded with amenities to rival luxury cars, including heated grips adjustable with a dedicated button, independently heated rider and passenger seats, illuminated switchgear, tilting 5-inch full-color TFT dash with customizable display, adaptive cornering LED lights, electronically adjustable windscreen, and keyless ignition. With features like the Titanium Arrow exhaust as standard, the Tiger is fully equipped straight from the factory in top trim level. The Triumph caters to the rider’s needs to the benefit of the larger riding experience. Its utility, comfort, and reliability mean it can carry you to whatever winding mountain road, dusty desert trail, or lush forest glade that inspires you. On paper it’s a big, heavy machine, but underway, it’s so easy to use and balanced as every system works in concert. It’s a bike that puts the rider first. And when the road or trail overwhelms the senses with the grandeur of the landscape it bisects, the Tiger justifies the sum of its impressive parts and transforms into a magic carpet into the unknown. Ergonomic changes include a softer seat compound and handlebars that have been moved 20mm closer to the rider. Switchgear feels high-quality and is intuitive to use. SPECIFICATIONS PRICE $21,750 (as tested) ENGINE 1,215cc liquid-cooled inline three-cylinder TRANSMISSION/FINAL DRIVE 6-speed/shaft CLAIMED HORSEPOWER 141.0 hp @ 9,350 rpm CLAIMED TORQUE 90.0 lb.-ft. @ 7,600rpm FRAME Tubular-steel trellis FRONT SUSPENSION WP 48mm fork with adjustable spring preload with semi-active compression and rebound damping; 7.5 in. travel REAR SUSPENSION WP shock adjustable for preload with semi-active compression and rebound damping; 7.6 in. travel FRONT BRAKE Brembo four-piston calipers, 305mm discs with ABS REAR BRAKE Nissin two-piston calipers, 282mm disc with ABS RAKE/TRAIL 23.2°/3.9 in. WHEELBASE 59.8 in. SEAT HEIGHT 32.9/33.7 in. FUEL CAPACITY 5.3 gal. CLAIMED DRY WEIGHT 534 lbs. (as tested) AVAILABLE February 2018 CONTACT 2018 Triumph Tiger 1200 XCA 2018 Triumph Tiger 1200 XCA 2018 Triumph Tiger 1200 XCA 2018 Triumph Tiger 1200 XCA 2018 Triumph Tiger 1200 XCA 2018 Triumph Tiger 1200 XCA Sursa
  7. Anticipation has mounted since The Motor Company announced its newly designed family of . Technical Editor Kevin Cameron whetted our appetite with an of what has been touted as “the largest product development project in company history.” Also, Editor-At-Large Peter Egan provided his take following a brief . Much like a year ago when I joined a select handful of motojournalists at Blackhawk Farms Raceway near Beloit, Illinois, to be the first to sample the then-, Egan’s seat time at Blackhawk amounted to the same rapid-fire two-lap stints on the 2018 Softails and their respective 2017 predecessor. That’s a whole lot to digest in a single day—an intoxicating tasting that would leave even the most disciplined connoisseur wobbly with wonder. 2018 Harley-Davidson Softail Heritage Classic 114 While I can’t speak for Egan, I identify as a beer man who prefers the full-body experience of a large-displacement jug of Milwaukee’s finest consumed on the home front. To this end we’ve wrangled a 114ci Softail Heritage Classic and took to some favorite Southern California roads to learn how this latest breed Big Twin cruiser rides in the wild. Our Vivid Black test unit (color and two-tone options are also available) projects a purposeful no-frills appearance that forgoes shiny distractions that can blind one’s measure of a bike’s performance, handling, and functionality. Before I had even thumbed the starter and brought the easy cranking air-/oil-cooled twin to life, I noted a standout feature that’s given the Softail line a new leg to stand on: The newly designed sidestand is much easier to deploy and retract. My boot located the tang without fail, and there’s more clearance swinging through its motion when parked on an uneven surface. 2018 Harley-Davidson Softail Heritage Classic 114 Fob-sensing keyless ignition is another new convenience, and the traditional barrel-key steering-head lock has been replaced by a quarter-turn conventional-style key. I like the new larger LCD multi-function display integrated into the lower portion of the boldface speedometer located on the fuel tank console. The old display was “harley” bigger than a stick of gum, whereas one can now more easily read engine rpm, tripmeter, or fuel range remaining at a glance. The LCD features a fuel-level bar graph and gear position indicator that both remain persistent as you toggle through the other functions with the left thumb switch. Adhering to Softail doctrine, the solid-mount engine transmits a pleasing level of mass-rich vibration at idle. Its assist-style clutch requires only moderate effort at the lever, and while engagement was a bit grabby initially, it soon became more linear as I rode. This and a bit of difficulty engaging neutral when at a complete stop was possibly due to dragstrip testing the previous day. While the new Heritage lacks the heel-toe shifter of its predecessor, I didn’t mind, as the M-8 Cruise Drive six-speed box has very good shift action under way and there’s unobstructed aft foot placement on the floorboard to boot. The jukebox has left the building. Previous Heritage style was a bit more sparkle and a lot more candy. Counterbalanced Milwaukee-Eight V-twin features twin sparkplugs, hence four plug wires from its coils. Short-shifts at low revs produced truly relaxed chugging from one traffic signal to the next. Even in top cog the engine pulls cleanly from low as 1,400 rpm equating to 40 mph but feels happiest running between 2,000 and 4,000 rpm, producing more than 100 pound-feet of torque throughout this range and only begins to feel busy once revs surpass 4,000 and approach the 5,500-rpm rev limit. A good twist of throttle in any gear unleashes linear acceleration and a very hearty exhaust note accompanied by amazingly little mechanical clatter reflecting off the windscreen. Cruising the freeway en route to the desert community of Borrego Springs shed light on a number of key areas. Given its 114ci capacity, the dual counterbalanced M-8 runs remarkably smooth at speeds beyond 80 mph, the cruise control is simple to operate (tap it rather than hold it for smooth acceleration response), the mirrors remain clear, the mid-h ape bars are comfortably positioned and angled, the saddle is oh-so plush, and the floorboards rock. Harley-Davidson's comment regarding the hard-formed leather bags on the Heritage Softail this year was, "No more saggy bags." They are lockable, easy to use, and carry enough for a solo weekend trip. If it's a weekend at the beach, maybe you can bring a friend. I soon achieved a good sense of what the Heritage Classic offers over its Softail stablemates. All-day ergonomics, storage, and wind protection top the list. Its new hard-formed “sagless” leather saddlebags provide a deep rectangular cavity that appears capable of consuming a 12-can case of PBR (not that I tried) and has a locking flip lid for blue-ribbon security. I did fill one bag with a change of clothes, quilted hipster jacket, beanie cap, and toiletry bag, while the other swallowed my backpack containing a laptop. While tall enough to keep bug splat from soiling my jacket, the top edge of the PD-style windscreen sat just below my line of sight. While I appreciated the coverage (doubly so had it rained) I have to report that helmet buffet proved tiresome at sustained speed above 75 mph. The screen can be removed in mere seconds without tools, so I logged some miles without it, to air out the pits and take in the unobstructed view of the headlamp nacelle while enjoying clean airflow at helmet h. 2018 Harley-Davidson Softail Heritage Classic 114 Speaking of headlights, a moonless desert night provided a good test of the new LED Daymaker lamp’s excellent side coverage and illumination. Leaving the desert floor the following morning and heading up Montezuma Grade, a serpentine ribbon composed of tight hairpin, medium and fast sweeping corners put the all-new Softail chassis through its paces. Manhandling the bike produced rider-induced wiggles and wobbles. Steering is light effort and rewards a gentle touch. Give the Heritage its head, bank smoothly into corners and it tracks sweet and true. Despite being sprung and damped foremost for comfort, the Showa bending valve fork and single shock also proved up for a spirited pace. Aside from the hinged floorboards grounding, ridden in a swift-yet-sensible manner the frame and lower muffler were spared from contact when exploring the claims of improved cornering clearance. The fork felt supportive under hard braking, and the rear resisted bottoming in all but the most extreme hits. It took some extensive searching for my 180-pound weight to find a G-out bump that used all available rear travel, and even then, after repeated passes I remained impressed with the chassis composure and improved ability to take a sharp blow. If the 114ci Heritage Classic is any indicator, Harley-Davidson has brought the Softail family in line with the times, delivering the most refined powertrain and chassis The Motor Company has brewed to date. 2018 Harley-Davidson Softail Heritage Classic 114 SPECIFICATIONS GENERAL List Price $20,299 (black), $20,699 (color), $21,049 (two-tone), $21,199 (anniversary) Importer Harley-Davidson Motor Co. Inc. Customer service phone (414) 343-4680 Warranty 2 years/unlimited mi. ENGINE & DRIVETRAIN Engine Air-/oil-cooled 45º V-twin Bore & stroke 102.0 x 114.3mm Displacement 1868cc Compression ratio 10.5:1 Valve train Single cam, eight valve Valve adjust intervals N/A Fuel delivery EFI Oil capacity 5.0 qt. Electric power 390W Battery 17.5 Ah AGM CHASSIS Weight: Tank empty 698 lb. Weight: Tank full 728 lb. Fuel capacity 5.0 gal. Wheelbase 64.0 in. Rake/trail 30/5.5 in. Seat h 28.5 in. Ground clearance 4.7 in. GVWR 1160 lb. Load capacity (tank full) 432 lb. SUSPENSION & TIRES Front suspension: Manufacturer Showa Tube diameter 49mm Claimed wheel travel 5.1 in. Adjustments N/A Rear Suspension: Manufacturer Showa Type Single shock Claimed wheel travel 4.4 in. Adjustments Spring preload Front tire 130/90-B16 Dunlop D401F Rear tire 150/80-B16 Dunlop D401T PERFORMANCE 1/4 mile 13.23 sec. @ 100.7mph 0–30 mph 1.9 sec. 0–60 mph 4.4 sec. 0–90 mph 9.4 sec. 0–100 mph 12.9 sec. Top gear time to speed: 40–60 mph 4.4 sec. 60–80 mph 4.9 sec. Measured top speed N/A Engine speed @ 60 mph 2250 rpm FUEL MILEAGE High/low/average 45/42/44 mpg Avg. range inc. reserve 220 mi. BRAKING DISTANCE From 30 mph 33.7 ft. From 60 mph 132.2 ft. SPEEDOMETER ERROR 30 mph indicated 29.5 mph 60 mph indicated 58.6 mph Editor’s Notes Sean MacDonald, Digital Content Manager The Heritage 114 surprised me the most out of all the bikes from Harley-Davidson’s new Softail lineup. It’s ready to ride across the country as soon as you get it off the showroom floor with super-comfy ergonomics, a potent powerplant, and a chassis that begs to drag floorboards. Pull the fairing and bags off and the perfectly swept bars and triple headlight come into their own aesthetically to make for a tastefully blacked-out take on the classic cruiser that’s perfect for a daily rider. Birds, meet stone. Don Canet, Road Test Editor Radical change can be difficult to accept, particularly for those vested in a bike that’s been around for decades. For many Harley faithful, the wholesale update to the Softail platform may carry elements of bittersweetness. That’s only natural, but don’t be quick to judge until you’ve ridden the new machine. As often is the case, time marches on and the new generation soon becomes the status quo. I like the direction Harley-Davidson has taken the Softail and look forward to where it’s headed. Mark Hoyer, Editor-in-Chief There’s this thing called “Dyna bounce,” and if you spent any time on the now-discontinued rubber-mount cruisers from H-D, you’ll know what I’m talking about. It was real. I felt it a lot on the old Dyna Switchback long-term testbike we had. This Heritage Softail is a much better light touring bike, and the 114ci kick is a nice touch. As for the old Heritage Softail, there’s no comparison with this all-new design. Check out more photos of the 2018 Harley-Davidson Softail Heritage Classic 114: 2018 Harley-Davidson Softail Heritage Classic 114 2018 Harley-Davidson Softail Heritage Classic 114 2018 Harley-Davidson Softail Heritage Classic 114 2018 Harley-Davidson Softail Heritage Classic 114 2018 Harley-Davidson Softail Heritage Classic 114 2018 Harley-Davidson Softail Heritage Classic 114 2018 Harley-Davidson Softail Heritage Classic 114 2018 Harley-Davidson Softail Heritage Classic 114 Sursa
  8. Published on 11.20.2017 [embedded content] Royal Enfield is gearing up for a groundbreaking 2018 with the entry of the highly anticipated Himalayan model to the North America market. The Himalayan is purpose-built for adventure while allowing for a less extreme and more accessible form of adventure touring. “2018 will be a very exciting year for Royal Enfield in North America, as we introduce three entirely new motorcycles. These new motorcycles are fun, easy and affordable — and are perfect for new motorcyclists, veteran riders and everyone in between.” said Rod Copes, President, Royal Enfield, North America. “Royal Enfield is committed to growing the middle-weight motorcycle segment, and these new motorcycles are exactly what motorcycle enthusiasts have been desiring for years.” The People’s Adventure Bike Building on a successful launch overseas in 2017, Royal Enfield North America will bring the popular Himalayan model to US showroom floors in summer of 2018. The Himalayan is purpose-built for adventure with a rugged duplex split cradle frame designed and developed by Harris Performance. The Himalayan’s 9-inch ground clearance and long-travel suspension allows it to take on trail obstacles comfortably. A 21″/17″ wheel size combination provides better control while riding over rocks and ruts. The Himalayan is powered by a simple air-cooled, overhead camshaft engine platform that forms the base of Royal Enfield’s new long-stroke LS 410 engine. The engine delivers high torque and usable power at lower RPMs that delivers smooth riding in higher gears at lower speeds, making it easier to climb hills with confidence. Modern design and materials translate into increased efficiency and reduced maintenance. Touring utility is built inherently into the Himalayan. A 4-gallon fuel tank provides a long range of approximately 280 miles. An ergonomically optimized layout for the footpegs, handlebar and seat h produce a comfortable upright riding posture that is necessary for long rides. An accessible 31.5-inch seat h with lower center of gravity and relatively light weight of 401 pounds, ensures ease of planting feet on the ground and more control. The Royal Enfield Himalayan comes fitted with dual-sport tires that lend a confident grip and performance across a range of terrain. Braking control is provided by a large 300mm front and 240mm rear disc, which also help to reduce braking effort. The Himalayan will be in available in two colors — Graphite and Snow — in the summer of 2018. The model will retail for $4,499 MSRP and a full range of motorcycle accessories will also be available. We look forward to getting an opportunity to test out the new Himalayan this coming spring. Stay tuned for more details! 2018 Royal Enfield Himalayan Specs Engine Type: Single cylinder, air-cooled, 4 stroke, SOHC Displacement: 411cc Bore & Stroke: 78mm x 86mm Compression: 9.5:1 Max. Power Output: 24.5 BHP @ 6500 RPM Max. Torque 26 ft-lbs Fuel System: Fuel injected Ignition System: TCI, multi-curve Engine Start: Electric only Fuel Capacity: 4 gallons Fuel Efficiency: 70 MPG (estimated) Lubrication: Wet Sump Clutch Wet, multi-plate Gearbox / Transmission Type: 5 speed constant mesh Final Drive: O-ring chain Frame Type: Half-duplex split cradle frame Suspension (front): Telescopic 41mm forks, 7.9 in. (200mm) Travel Suspension (rear): Monoshock with linkage, 7.1 in. (180mm) Travel Dimensions (L x W x H): 86 in. x 33 in. x 53 in. Wheelbase: 58 in. Seat Height: 31.5 in. Ground Clearance: 9 in. Wet Weight: 401 lbs. Tires (front): 90/90-21″ Tires (rear): 120/90-17″ Brakes (front): 300mm single disc, 2-piston floating caliper Brakes (rear): 240mm single disc, single piston floating caliper Electrical System: 12 Volt DC Instruments: 12 Volt, 8 AH VRLA Headlight: 12V H4 60/55 W Taillight: LED . Photos and video by Stephen Gregory
  9. Published on 11.20.2017 [embedded content] Royal Enfield is gearing up for a groundbreaking 2018 with the entry of the highly anticipated Himalayan model to the North America market. The Himalayan is purpose-built for adventure while allowing for a less extreme and more accessible form of adventure touring. “2018 will be a very exciting year for Royal Enfield in North America, as we introduce three entirely new motorcycles. These new motorcycles are fun, easy and affordable — and are perfect for new motorcyclists, veteran riders and everyone in between.” said Rod Copes, President, Royal Enfield, North America. “Royal Enfield is committed to growing the middle-weight motorcycle segment, and these new motorcycles are exactly what motorcycle enthusiasts have been desiring for years.” The People’s Adventure Bike Building on a successful launch overseas in 2017, Royal Enfield North America will bring the popular Himalayan model to US showroom floors in summer of 2018. The Himalayan is purpose-built for adventure with a rugged duplex split cradle frame designed and developed by Harris Performance. The Himalayan’s 9-inch ground clearance and long-travel suspension allows it to take on trail obstacles comfortably. A 21″/17″ wheel size combination provides better control while riding over rocks and ruts. The Himalayan is powered by a simple air-cooled, overhead camshaft engine platform that forms the base of Royal Enfield’s new long-stroke LS 410 engine. The engine delivers high torque and usable power at lower RPMs that delivers smooth riding in higher gears at lower speeds, making it easier to climb hills with confidence. Modern design and materials translate into increased efficiency and reduced maintenance. Touring utility is built inherently into the Himalayan. A 4-gallon fuel tank provides a long range of approximately 280 miles. An ergonomically optimized layout for the footpegs, handlebar and seat h produce a comfortable upright riding posture that is necessary for long rides. An accessible 31.5-inch seat h with lower center of gravity and relatively light weight of 401 pounds, ensures ease of planting feet on the ground and more control. The Royal Enfield Himalayan comes fitted with dual-sport tires that lend a confident grip and performance across a range of terrain. Braking control is provided by a large 300mm front and 240mm rear disc, which also help to reduce braking effort. The Himalayan will be in available in two colors — Graphite and Snow — in the summer of 2018. The model will retail for $4,499 MSRP and a full range of motorcycle accessories will also be available. We look forward to getting an opportunity to test out the new Himalayan this coming spring. Stay tuned for more details! 2018 Royal Enfield Himalayan Specs Engine Type: Single cylinder, air-cooled, 4 stroke, SOHC Displacement: 411cc Bore & Stroke: 78mm x 86mm Compression: 9.5:1 Max. Power Output: 24.5 BHP @ 6500 RPM Max. Torque 26 ft-lbs Fuel System: Fuel injected Ignition System: TCI, multi-curve Engine Start: Electric only Fuel Capacity: 4 gallons Fuel Efficiency: 70 MPG (estimated) Lubrication: Wet Sump Clutch Wet, multi-plate Gearbox / Transmission Type: 5 speed constant mesh Final Drive: O-ring chain Frame Type: Half-duplex split cradle frame Suspension (front): Telescopic 41mm forks, 7.9 in. (200mm) Travel Suspension (rear): Monoshock with linkage, 7.1 in. (180mm) Travel Dimensions (L x W x H): 86 in. x 33 in. x 53 in. Wheelbase: 58 in. Seat Height: 31.5 in. Ground Clearance: 9 in. Wet Weight: 401 lbs. Tires (front): 90/90-21″ Tires (rear): 120/90-17″ Brakes (front): 300mm single disc, 2-piston floating caliper Brakes (rear): 240mm single disc, single piston floating caliper Electrical System: 12 Volt DC Instruments: 12 Volt, 8 AH VRLA Headlight: 12V H4 60/55 W Taillight: LED . Photos and video by Stephen Gregory
  10. The clock on the wall says 8 a.m. as we spill out of a coffee house in downtown San Diego. Today’s route offers a taste of everything Southern California—rush-hour traffic, twisty canyons, and deserted desert—before circling back at the end of the day to the same corner shop. And with each passing mile, the 2018 Yamaha XSR700 looks even more impressive, especially to the hipster barista who complemented it while brewing my espresso. Yamaha says the idea behind the XSR700 was to design a motorcycle to answer consumer demand for a classically styled machine with performance that meets today’s sporting standards. To achieve this goal, engineers began with the MT-07 (previously known as the FZ-07). Core components—engine, frame, and suspension—are identical, with only “Sport Heritage” cosmetics distinguishing the two models. The XSR700 benefits from using the MT-07 as its base, retaining all of its sporty handling while adding a unique, classic look. Despite the round headlight, taillight, and LCD instrument panel, plus the addition of a reshaped gas tank and a stubby seat, the general character of XSR700 is very similar to that of its sportier-looking sibling. Compared to the previous-generation FZ-07, the KYB suspension has six percent stiffer fork springs, an 11 percent stiffer shock spring, and corresponding increases in damping. At the heart of the XSR700 is the same 689cc parallel twin that’s used in the MT-07. Torquey? Yes. Capable of wheelies? Heck, yeah. On the road, those changes prove beneficial, enhancing stability and feel at maximum lean angles. The previous FZ-07 would wallow mid-corner, whereas the stiffer setup of the XSR delivers a more planted feel that gives the rider confidence to brake later and carry more speed. Pirelli Phantom Sportscomp tires with a retro tread pattern complement the suspension changes and provide excellent feel and grip. 2018 Yamaha XSR700 Engine Type: liquid-cooled, DOHC, parallel twin Displacement: 689cc Seat h: 32.1 in. Fuel capacity: 3.7 gal. Claimed wet weight: 410 lb. MSRP: $8,499 Subtle changes were also made to the ergonomics for a more upright riding position. Seat h is slightly higher (32.1 in. versus 31.7 in.) and the handlebar is nearly 3 in. wider. At 5-foot-7, I fit well, with a comfortable reach to the handlebar and plenty of legroom; taller riders shouldn’t have any problems, either. My only gripe is that the softly padded seat cut into my comfort quotient after just 50 miles or so. Part of the XSR’s classic styling is this round-shaped LCD instrument panel, which is legible even at a full clip. Opening the throttle on the 689cc parallel twin makes discomfort a distant memory. This compact powerplant is famous for its torquey nature and pointing the front wheel skyward under hard acceleration is no problem. The XSR really takes off around 5,500 rpm, and the strong delivery only tapers off near redline. Initial throttle response is impressive, direct without being overly abrupt at slower speeds. Up front, a pair of Advics monoblock brake calipers do a fine job of bringing the XSR700 to a halt. ABS is standard. Good brakes are critical for mitigating all that steam, so Yamaha equipped the XSR700 with Advics monoblocks clamping 282mm discs up front with a Nissin unit in the rear. The combination manages stopping needs just fine, even if a lack of feel at the front lever hinders true potential. ABS is standard and only intervened during overly enthusiastic slow-speed braking. Regardless of the environment, the XSR700’s upright seating position is relaxed and comfortable, but the spongy saddle makes longer rides a pain in the, um, seat. This modern-day performance and timeless styling cater to both exploring open roads and kicking tires at the coffee shop. At $8,499, the Yamaha XSR700 costs $900 more than an MT-07 but if you really like that classic look and don’t mind ponying up a little extra cash, the XSR700 may be the bike for you. As for me, though, I would rather pocket the difference and buy more coffee. The 2018 Yamaha XSR700 in its Matte Gray/Aluminum colorway. Raspberry Metallic is the second paint option for the 2018 XSR700. Sursa
  11. After flying in from Seattle at an unspeakably early hour and rendezvousing with ADV Pulse Senior Editor Rob Dabney, we fled from LA like we were running from the law, lane splitting past Sunset Boulevard over the Grape Vine into the San Joaquin Valley, fighting high winds and triple digit temperatures the whole way. Just as I was beginning to wonder whose idea it was to ride all the way out to this event, we reached the Sierra foothills and my dissent evaporated. Desert floor gave way to curvy climbs and long sweeping turns. The Honda Africa Twin and BMW R1200GS Rallye we were riding transitioned from racking up mind-numbing highway miles to scraping pegs with ease. The twenty-five-mile ascent from Prather up to Shaver Lake could be some of the best pavement I’ve ever experienced on two wheels. The closer we got to our final destination of Huntington Lake, it became more and more clear why this has been the home of the Adventure Rally Sierra Edition since its inception in 2013. This event is designed to get people to experience riding in a new location with little or no preparation. The format is essentially a two-day scavenger hunt with a home base of China Peak Mountain Resort located in the heart of the Sierra. Imagine showing up to a region that you’ve never ridden before and being handed a map marked up by the most knowledgeable locals, with all the best routes and points of interest. Price of admission includes six meals; a loaded goody bag and more amazing riding than you could shake a stick at. Pushing the big BMW R1200GS Rallye on a loose hill climb. Each team of two to six people was given a map, score sheet, time card and guidebook just 30 minutes before being let loose in the Sierras Friday morning. The Rever app was employed to prove that groups had actually gone to where they claimed (along with Instagram posts) but navigation occurred primarily without GPS. Once you reached a point of interest on the map, you marked it on your scorecard, took a picture with all the riders in your group (or all of the bikes) and then posted said picture to Instagram using pre-determined hash tags. The more places you visited the more points you got, with higher points awarded for harder-to-reach waypoints. Although it might seem complicated, it was actually quite an ingenious way to document and score the event. The Adventure Rally is designed to get you out on the trail to see as many incredible vistas and unique destinations in California’s Sierra Nevada Mountains as possible. Riding the Gauntlet Friday was one of the most memorable days of riding I’ve ever had. It’s the only time I’ve ever been on an adventure ride that nearly degraded into a survival situation. Our group rode out of China peak at 8:30am brimming with excitement and didn’t return until 10:30pm that night: exhausted, dehydrated and cold as hell. Not due to lack of preparation but simply because we ended up on one of the gnarliest trails any of us had ever encountered on big bikes. It was getting late in the afternoon and after completing several trails rated “black diamond” earlier in the day with no trouble, we figured this one would be no different. With a description in the book of “Masochists will love it” and what looked like only a short distance on the map, we couldn’t resist. The first rocky descent had us all thinking “I hope we don’t have to ride back up that” and the trail just continued to get more brutal with one loose, rocky hill climb after another. Every now and then we’d get a few hundred yards of smooth riding that would tempt us into thinking we were done with the hard part, but this only lured us into more torturous terrain. Eventually, we caught up with another team of riders from the rally that had made the same fateful decision. One of the riders was too exhausted to ride anymore and another had smoked the clutch on his KTM 950 Adventure. At this point we were all struggling to get our big bikes through the rough sections, so we joined forces and worked together as a team (leaving the 950 on the side of the trail) pushing on. [embedded content] We were sure salvation was just around the next bend, but as the Sun began to set, we ran into a group of locals in heavily modified jeeps that gave us the bad news that we had more difficult riding ahead of us than behind us. Continuing on would guarantee us a night in the forest with no food, water or shelter, soaking wet with sweat in freezing temperatures. Reluctantly, we made the decision to turn tail and head back the way we came in. To no one’s surprise, what was difficult in daylight was nearly impossible in darkness. Steam emanated from our helmets and sweat dripped off our chins while we repeatedly dropped and picked up 500-pound bikes at over 9,000 feet elevation. Having run out of water long ago, at one point we were literally taking turns face down in a creek sucking water through a Life Straw. We hiked steep grades, rode at the upper-most limits of our skill (what we had left) and dug deep to find the will to keep pushing forward. This was the kind of exertion that reeks of desperation and we still had miles to go. One of the riders in the group we had merged with was in bad shape and was struggling just to walk the trail. There was no cell reception in this remote part of the forest, but one of our team members had a Garmin InReach with two-way text messaging that allowed us to alert event organizers to our situation. Working together to get all the bikes up the last gnarly hill climb, we finally got everyone out. Event coordinators were there to meet us at the trailhead with hot food and water and were in sheer amazement that we even attempted the trail on our big bikes. They told us the waypoint we were trying to reach was intended to be accessed from the south and that normally when riders try to reach it from the north, they immediately turn around after encountering the first rough section. We discovered later that this particular trail was actually an infamous rock crawling gauntlet similar to the Rubicon Trail. While it’s just 16 miles long from start to finish, the Swamp Lake trail is usually done over a two-day span in well-equipped, high-clearance vehicles with expert operators. It it doable on 500-pound adventure motorcycles? Yes but not advisable, especially with a late afternoon start. We tried almost every trick in the book to get this KTM 950’s clutch working again. Unfortunately, it had to be left on the side of the trail overnight to be retrieved the next day. Luckily, there were no major injuries and our motorcycles were still able to get us back to camp under their own power. Soaked in sweat and shivering cold with an ambient air temperature of around 35 degrees, we finally headed back. I watched animal eyes flash and disappear in the dark abyss on the side of the road and all I could think about was what we would get to experience tomorrow. Sleep came easy after one of the most thrilling, humbling and adventurous days I’ve seen. The Aftermath Saturday morning was greeted with aching bodies and sleepy eyes. No longer concerned with the competition aspect of the weekend, we opted to drink coffee while other attendees hurried out the door. Once adequately caffeinated and dosed with enough ibuprofen to function, we set about fixing our hobbled motorcycles. The master at work! Owen Balduf of RawHyde Adventures offered to help repair the Rallye. He has performed countless valve cover repairs on GSs over the years. Of the bikes in our group, the BMW R1200GS Rallye had a hairline crack in the valve cover along with a broken off shift lever. One of the Africa Twins had a right foot peg that was completely severed from the bike and the other had a cracked water pump housing as well as a skid plate that was dangling from its subframe. The RawHyde staff, managing the demo fleet for BMW, were kind enough to assist us with repairs on the GS while Team Red (Honda) helped us with the Africa Twins. In the interest of time, the guys at Honda let us to swap our press loaners for AT’s from their demo fleet, allowing us to continue without delay. With a “good as new” GS and two fresh Africa Twins, the ADV Pulse team was back on the make but ready to take it a bit easier than the previous day. We ran into the REV’IT! Women’s Team on our way out and decided to join forces checking out part of the famous Dusy Ershim trail and several scenic points of interest. We got a chance to ride with the REV’IT! Women’s Team on day two. It was great to see how passionate these ladies are about adventure riding. Carving twisty asphalt deep into the Sierra Mountains, we eventually made it to Mono Hot Springs. We soaked our sore bones in the warm pools, lay in the Sun and marveled at the distant sequoias. Our ride Saturday was the polar opposite of the day before and a good example of how the Adventure Rally can be anything you want it to be. That night points were tallied and an award ceremony was held after dinner, along with boisterously swapped war stories and battle scars from the weekend. My biggest takeaway was the community atmosphere that the event organizers were able to cultivate. It was a refreshing take on the standard adventure motorcycle rally format. I had more fun, logged more miles and connected with more people than at any other event this year. I was more than a little impressed with the Africa Twin after testing it in extreme conditions. It felt much more nimble than its weight specs would suggest on the technical trails of the Sierras. Returning to the smog, heat and clogged highways of Los Angeles after the long weekend in the Sierra made me appreciate this event even more. It’s hard to imagine a starker contrast than the one between the rugged beauty of that mountain wilderness and the urban sprawl of LA. Not only is the remote location of the Adventure Rally Sierra Edition its defining characteristic but also its best kept secret. The Adventure Rally Series events are held annually in June and September with one in Colorado (Rockies Edition) and the other in California (Sierra Edition). If you haven’t been to one already, it’s an event you have got to experience for yourself. About the Author: Spencer Hill “The Gear Dude” has been fueling his motorcycle addiction with adventure since first swinging his leg over a bike in 2010. Whether he’s exploring his own backyard in the Pacific Northwest or crisscrossing the United States, Spencer is always in search of scenic off road routes, epic camping locations and the best gear possible. He began writing shortly after taking up two-wheel travel to share his experiences and offer insight with his extensive backpacking, camping and overland background. Photos and video by Spencer Hill and Eric Hall
  12. Moto Guzzi V11 Tenni YEARS SOLD: 2000–2006 MSRP NEW: Sport $11,900 (’00) to $14,490 (’06) BLUE BOOK RETAIL VALUE: Sport $3,855 (’00) to $5,345 (’06) BASIC SPECS: Sporting the iconic longitudingally mounted air-cooled 90-degree, pushrod 1,064cc V-twin, the V11 was ’s shot at a factory café racer-styled sportbike. This was evident in the equipment that the bikes had over the many years it was made. The two-valve-per-cylinder engine produced a very streetable 91 hp with 69 pound-feet of torque. Most models came with two 320mm front discs with four-piston Brembo calipers along with a 282mm disc two-piston caliper in the rear. Some models also came with factory Öhlins suspension, while most others had a Marzocchi fork and Sachs shock. A 5.0-gallon tank gave it a range of about 200 miles, ensuring you can get to the coffee shop and your favorite canyon road. WHY IT’S DESIRABLE: Beginning production just before the turn of the millennium, the Moto Guzzi V11 helped lay the groundwork for the resurgence of “café” styled bikes conceived and built by manufacturers. V11 models are generally naked or with a small café fairing to fit the look. For performance, the traditional Guzzi platform had many updates to the 30-year-old design—a lighter clutch, six-speed gearbox, fuel injection, and stiffer frame, to name a few. The V11 was produced in many versions, each with unique style, from the naked Sport in Guzzi yellow to the sleek Le Mans Nero Corse in black and red. The Tenni (pictured) is a particularly desirable model. THE COMPETITION: Supersport 900, Sprint RS, ZRX 1100, 1200, R1100RS, V-Max Sursa
  13. Published on 11.10.2017 There is just something so right about the look of Walt Siegl Motorcycles’ (WSM) new adventure bike, the L’Avventura. From the dual headlights (one clear, one yellow, for improved contrast and night vision), to the upswept exhaust tucked neatly under the tail section, this built-to-order bike pulses with style and purpose. It pays homage to classic big-bore Dakar bikes from the days when the ultimate off-road race was held on the same continent as the city it’s named after, yet also manages to update the desert-racer look. The result is a stunning blend of form and function that makes you wish other motorcycle manufacturers were paying closer attention. It’s not really surprising that the L’Avventura comes from WSM, a New Hampshire-based custom builder of some of the most beautiful motorcycles in the world. Siegl himself is a true renaissance man: artist, engineer, endurance racer, cultural tastemaker, business exec. His other two “production” models – the Bol d’ Or and the Leggero – manage to transform Ducati street bikes into something even more beautiful. And the spec sheet indicates the L’Avventura is meant for adventure riding. It’s powered by an 1,100cc air-cooled Ducati L-Twin. The smooth, flowing Kevlar fairing blends seamlessly into a fuel tank that holds 6.5 gallons, enough to actually get to places adventure riders want to go. The front end looks the business, featuring Showa USD forks that are tuned to the individual needs and riding style of each buyer, a 21-inch front wheel and massive Brembo brakes. Out back is a 17-inch wheel, a beefy double-sided swingarm with Öhlins rear shock and a smoothly rounded tail section that speaks of an artist’s hand. L’Avventura riders face a large fairing-mounted GPS just below the line of sight that can be removed for security or to help you find your way on foot. Nice touch. Crash bars are integrated into the trellis frame’s overall design so smoothly you almost miss them at first, and the distinctive Ducati engine is protected front to back by a long, drilled aluminum skidplate. WSM hasn’t published full official specs for the L’Aventurra, but we’ve seen reports that the whole package weighs in at a curb weight of under 350 pounds. If true, that means it would seriously undercut big-bore adventure bikes from BMW, KTM, Honda and Yamaha. Clearly, the L’Aventurra is one bike that was meant to do more than look pretty. For more info go to www.waltsiegl.com About the Author: Bob Whitby has been riding motorcycles since age 19 and working as a journalist since he was 24, which was a long time ago, let’s put it that way. He quit for the better part of a decade to raise a family, then rediscovered adventure, dual sport and enduro riding in the early 2000s. He lives in Arkansas, America’s best-kept secret when it comes to riding destinations, and travels far and wide in search of dirt roads and trails.
  14. Published on 11.10.2017 There is just something so right about the look of Walt Siegl Motorcycles’ (WSM) new adventure bike, the L’Avventura. From the dual headlights (one clear, one yellow, for improved contrast and night vision), to the upswept exhaust tucked neatly under the tail section, this built-to-order bike pulses with style and purpose. It pays homage to classic big-bore Dakar bikes from the days when the ultimate off-road race was held on the same continent as the city it’s named after, yet also manages to update the desert-racer look. The result is a stunning blend of form and function that makes you wish other motorcycle manufacturers were paying closer attention. It’s not really surprising that the L’Avventura comes from WSM, a New Hampshire-based custom builder of some of the most beautiful motorcycles in the world. Siegl himself is a true renaissance man: artist, engineer, endurance racer, cultural tastemaker, business exec. His other two “production” models – the Bol d’ Or and the Leggero – manage to transform Ducati street bikes into something even more beautiful. And the spec sheet indicates the L’Avventura is meant for adventure riding. It’s powered by an 1,100cc air-cooled Ducati L-Twin. The smooth, flowing Kevlar fairing blends seamlessly into a fuel tank that holds 6.5 gallons, enough to actually get to places adventure riders want to go. The front end looks the business, featuring Showa USD forks that are tuned to the individual needs and riding style of each buyer, a 21-inch front wheel and massive Brembo brakes. Out back is a 17-inch wheel, a beefy double-sided swingarm with Öhlins rear shock and a smoothly rounded tail section that speaks of an artist’s hand. L’Avventura riders face a large fairing-mounted GPS just below the line of sight that can be removed for security or to help you find your way on foot. Nice touch. Crash bars are integrated into the trellis frame’s overall design so smoothly you almost miss them at first, and the distinctive Ducati engine is protected front to back by a long, drilled aluminum skidplate. WSM hasn’t published full official specs for the L’Aventurra, but we’ve seen reports that the whole package weighs in at a curb weight of under 350 pounds. If true, that means it would seriously undercut big-bore adventure bikes from BMW, KTM, Honda and Yamaha. Clearly, the L’Aventurra is one bike that was meant to do more than look pretty. For more info go to www.waltsiegl.com About the Author: Bob Whitby has been riding motorcycles since age 19 and working as a journalist since he was 24, which was a long time ago, let’s put it that way. He quit for the better part of a decade to raise a family, then rediscovered adventure, dual sport and enduro riding in the early 2000s. He lives in Arkansas, America’s best-kept secret when it comes to riding destinations, and travels far and wide in search of dirt roads and trails.
  15. Triumph has launched the brand new 2018 Tiger 1200 XC and XR line-up, the most advanced Tiger models to date. The all-new range is the latest addition to a legendary Triumph Tiger heritage that began 80 years ago. The new Tiger 1200s have been purpose-built to handle on-road adventures and off-road challenges, with every single new technological innovation, engine enhancement, premium specification, and style update. Triumph’s brand-new Tiger 1200 range changes result in an even more responsive adventure bike designed to combine maximum enjoyment on the road with complete confidence off-road. The 1200’s silhouette now carries an even more distinctive style with new premium bodywork details and finish. And with multiple model variants in the lineup, there’s a Tiger for every road, rider and adventure. “The new Tiger 1200 range is so advanced it has taken a full four years to develop. These are by far the most adventure-ready Tigers ever built.” – Paul Stroud, Chief Commercial Officer for Triumph Motorcycles. The new Tiger 1200 range sees a substantial weight reduction of up to 22 pounds (10kg) compared to the previous generation thanks to a range of developments across the engine, chassis and exhaust system. This has improved each model’s responsiveness and dynamic capability even further, while significantly enhancing its agility and maneuverability – both on and off-road. The result is a performance-tuned engine that delivers all the power needed for any terrain, yet with a first major service that’s not due until 10,000 miles (16,000 km). Improvements To Tiger 1200’s Off-Road Capability • Up to 22 lbs (10kg) lighter than the previous generation. • Weight savings achieved across the engine, chassis and exhaust components. • Delivering improved maneuverability and better off-road agility and handling. • Engine upgraded for more immediate power delivery and feel. • New “Off Road Pro” riding mode, with a choice of up to six riding modes. • New Triumph Shift Assist for clutchless gear changes, both up and down. Technological Advances The new Tiger 1200’s technology is state-of-the-art and now even more fully loaded. Both XR & XC models include all-new innovative Triumph Adaptive Cornering Lighting for active enhanced visibility when cornering, updated cruise control, new adjustable full-color TFT display screen, all-new LED lighting, new ergonomically sculpted backlit handlbebar switches and heated grip function, new Triumph Shift Assist for smooth clutchless changes up and down the gearbox, rider-friendly keyless ignition on higher spec models, and an all-new ‘Off-Road Pro’ riding mode on the XC models. Next Generation 1215cc Triple Maintaining its position as the most powerful shaft-driven engine in its class with an impressive 139 HP, a significant new engine update gives the Tiger 1200 a more immediate power delivery lower down the rev range and an even better soundtrack. The new torque-laden 1200cc engine enables a breathtakingly smooth reliable delivery through the torque-assist clutch, helping rider control on all surfaces. Complementing these updates are an Arrow titanium and carbon fiber silencer offering the same thrilling Tiger Triple sound through an even lighter system. This new generation of Tiger is designed to push every adventure further, in first-class comfort. Improved Riding Comfort A new seat compound, revised handlebar positioning and updated frame geometry enhances rider ergonomics for a more commanding riding position and ultra-long-distance comfort. All improvements including the new off-road tire specifications have been carefully chosen to improve rider enjoyment. Distinctive Styling New elegant sculpted bodywork and stylish wheel specifications enhance the presence and muscular style of the new model, while new metallic badges, signature LED lighting and contemporary graphics create eye-catching points of interest. The Tiger 1200’s even higher quality finish includes wet-painted engine covers that contrast with the black crinkle-effect crank cases and titanium coloured powder-coated frame. Tiger 1200 Core Technology On top of the new generation state-of-the-art technology, the new Tiger 1200 range offers a huge choice of ‘core’ features, innovations and benefits to deliver a superior riding experience; fully integrated management systems controlled by an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU), integrated braking system (developed with Continental), optimised cornering ABS & traction control, hill hold, ride-by-wire throttle, and up to six riding modes to configure the motorcycle to suit its terrain at the press of a button. An electrically-adjustable windscreen, heated equipment, and power sockets make every journey even more comfortable. High-Spec Components The new Tiger also maintains its premium levels of finesse with high specification Brembo brakes, adjustable WP suspension controlled by Triumph’s Semi-Active Suspension technology, a two-position seat h (32.8 – 33.6 in.), adjustable to suit riding style and terrain, and a Low Ride Height XRx model variant that at 32-32.8 in is 0.8 in. (20 mm) lower than the standard seat. Different Tiger 1200 Models The new XR line-up is tailor-made to deliver the ultimate on-road/off-road adventure; from the base model XR, to the mid-specification XRx and the highest specification XRT. An XRx Low Ride Height model is also available, making the Tiger 1200 even more accessible to every adventurer. The new XC line-up has been specifically designed to respond to the most challenging of adventures thanks to a range of specialized off-road features offering even more rough terrain capability, from the XCx to the highest specification XCA. The new Tiger 1200s are expected to start arriving on US showroom floors around mid-February 2018. Prices to be announced. 2018 Triumph Tiger 1200 Specs Engine Type: Liquid-cooled 12 valve, DOHC, in-line 3-cylinder Displacement: 1215cc Bore & Stroke: 85 x 71.4mm Max. Power Output: 139 HP @ 9,350rpm Max. Torque: 90 ft-lbs @ 7,600rpm Compression: 11.0:1 Fuel System: Ride by Wire, fuel injection Exhaust: Stainless steel 3 into 1 header system, stainless steel silencer Clutch: Wet, multi-plate hydraulically operated, torque assist Gearbox: 6 speed Final Drive: Shaft drive Frame Type: Tubular steel trellis Suspension (front): WP 48mm upside down forks, rebouand and compression manual damping adjustment Suspension Travel (front): XR: 7.48 in.; XRx Low: 6.61 in.; XC: 7.48 in. Suspension (rear): Cast aluminium swing arm with shaft drive, WP mono-shock, rebound damping and hydraulic preload adjustment Suspension Travel (front): XR: 7.59 in.; XRx Low: 6.22 in.; XC: 7.59 in. Brakes Front: Twin 305mm floating discs radially mounted monoblock Brembo 4-piston calipers, Switchable ABS Brakes Rear: Single 282mm disc, Nissin 2-piston sliding caliper, Switchable ABS Tires Front: 120/70-19 Tires Rear: 170/60-17 Wheels Front: XR: Cast aluminum 19 x 3.0 in.; XC: Wire spoke 19 x 3.0 in. Wheels Rear: XR: Cast aluminum 17 x 4.5 in.; XC: Wire spoke 17 x 4.5 in. Seat Height (STD/Low): 32.8/33.6 in. Height (without mirrors): 57.8 in. Rake: 23.2º Trail: 3.93 in. Length: 87.2 in. Wheelbase: 87.8 in. Dry Weight: XR: 534 lbs.; XRx: 538 lbs.; XRx Low 538 lbs.; XRT: 536 lbs.; XCx: 547 lbs.; XCA: 547 lbs. Fuel Capacity: 5.3 US Gallons Fuel consumption: 40.6 mpg Color Options: Matt Cobalt Blue, Jet Black, Crystal White, Korosi Red [embedded content]
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