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Advpulse last won the day on 27 Ianuarie 2018

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  1. Adventure Gloves are one of those products that often try to do many things and end up compromising on everything. Adding all that street protection to a glove tends to make them feel bulky and hot for off-road riding. The new Battle Born Air gloves from A.R.C. keep it simple and focus on dirt performance. They are designed for warm weather and more aggressive off-road riding, with just enough abrasion protection for short stints on the street. The Battle Born Air is closer to a motocross glove in fit and feel than it is to typical ADV gloves. It uses breathable neoprene on the top of the hands and durable goat skin leather material on the palm, with reinforced fingertips and thumb. In between each finger, is a thin lycra material to give extra breathability and fast moisture wicking. You also have a large mesh nylon panel below the wrist to provide ventilation, plus pinhole vents in the goatskin palm give an additional cooling effect. Beefy D3O knuckle pads offer good protection but remain comfortable on the skin.Impact protection is provided by a thick knuckle protector made by D3O. D3O is a molecular armor which remains soft and pliable until impact when the molecules lock together absorbing the energy and dissipating it. There are also small TPU protectors on the finger knuckles for some additional impact and abrasion protection. ADVERTISEMENT Securing the glove is a basic Velcro closure with a neoprene wrist and it features Touch-Tech leather panels on the index fingers so you can use them with touchscreen devices. There is no wind protection, waterproofing, palm sliders or pinkie guards to be found, but the Air is not trying to be a do-it-all glove. Index fingers feature Touch-Tech leather panels for operating touchscreen devices.How They Performed The Battle Born Air gloves have a light stretchy feel that doesn’t make you struggle to get them on or off. You barely notice the D3O knuckle protector even though there is a substantial amount of padding in there. Everything is form fitted and comfortable but I did notice the fingers are a little longer than most standard size gloves I’ve tested. The D3O knuckle protector is very comfortable on the skin while riding and I never noticed any hot spots nor any seams that caused discomfort. The goat skin palm offered excellent feel on the bars and my hands stayed cool and dry on hot days or when working hard on a rocky-strewn trail. After testing these on many different rides over the last year, I’ve been impressed that my typical blisters never appeared — most likely, due to their excellent breathability and fast moisture wicking. That same breathability means they don’t do too well in cold temps. While riding early on cold mornings, I was always cranking up the heated grips or wishing I had some. Fortunately (or unfortunately) I did get to test their impact protection in a fall. Riding on a rocky trail in Death Valley, I lost the front end and went down at speed (I believe it was one of those moving rocks that jumped out in front of me). My clinched hand punched a rock hard when I hit the ground. That had me pretty concerned about broken fingers. After taking off the glove, I could actually see the indent in my skin from the knuckle protector. But that D3O armor did its job. No serious injury, just some swollen fingers for a few weeks. The Battle Born Air features a goatskin leather palm with pinhole vents along the fingers for improved breathability. The thumb and first two fingers are reinforced with goatskin panels.The glove held up well from the impact too, with only a few stitches tearing on a top seam. I’ve put a lot of miles on these gloves now and typically, gloves start coming apart at the fingertips and wearing through on the palms around this time, but so far so good. Their structure is still solid and willing to take on more abuse. About the only small annoyance I have noticed with these gloves is that the Velcro straps can come loose while riding if you aren’t very deliberate with closing them. The touchscreen tips have also come in handy when using a handlebar mounted Phone or the Trail Tech Voyager Pro. The first few times I used them, the Touch-Tech finger tip on the index finger was precise but I have noticed precision has lessened over time. And while the thumbs do not have the Touch-Tip leather covers, they still seem to work on screens for zooming maps. They don’t work well enough to type a message, but they are good enough to perform basic GPS navigation functions without taking your gloves off. [embedded content] [embedded content]As a dirt-specific glove, I was left very satisfied with the performance of the Battle Born Air and they’ve become my go-to glove for any serious dirt riding. But for street riding, they don’t offer much protection for a high-speed fall on asphalt or cold weather. You can use them all day for rides that stick mostly to dirt, linking up trails. However, if there are any twisty asphalt roads or major highway sections, it’s best to use a street glove and keep the Air gloves in a tank bag to throw on once you hit the trail. Who Are They For The Battle Born Air gloves are for Dual Sport and Adventure Riders who spend a significant amount of time in the dirt. They can act as your primary glove if your travels are almost exclusively on dirt, or a secondary glove used when you reach the trails. Their excellent breathability and fast moisture wicking makes them an ideal warm-weather glove, or for use during more aggressive off-road rides when you are working up a sweat. If you are regularly switching from street to dirt, a glove with a bit more protection like the Battle Born Wind Block would make a better choice. TPU protectors on the top of the fingers offer some additional impact and abrasion protection and the large mesh panel around the wrist area gives good ventilation right where you need it.Our Verdict All too often ADV gear tries to be too many things at once. But when it comes to gloves, sometimes specializing is the best approach. For the more dirt-focused rides, the Battle Born Air gloves have become my new favorite glove. And don’t be put off by the low price tag ($29), these gloves punch above their weight when it comes to quality and construction. While they may not offer the wind protection and waterproofing needed for long-range adventuring, a quick swap to a more street-focused glove isn’t that big of an inconvenience for most journeys. What We Liked Low price for a quality glove. They last a long time and hold up to abuse. Lots of breathability for warm days and aggressive rides. D3O knuckle pad offers great impact protection. What Could Be Improved Make the fingers a little shorter. A Velcro closure that stays closed. A tad more accurate touchscreen tips. Battle Born Air Specs Color: Black Sizes: Small to XXX-Large Armor: D3O knuckle pad and TPU on fingers Palm: Goatskin leather with reinforced panels Main Body: Neoprene, Lycra and Nylon Mesh Price: $29.99 Shopping Options Author: Rob Dabney Rob Dabney started a lifelong obsession with motorcycles at the age of 15 when he purchased his first bike – a 1982 Honda MB5. Through his 20’s and 30’s he competed in off-road desert races, including the Baja 250, 500 and 1000. Eventually, his proclivity for exploration led him to dual sport and adventure riding. Rob’s never-ending quest to discover what’s around the next bend has taken him on Adventures in Mexico, North Africa, Europe, and throughout the American West. As a moto journalist, he enjoys inspiring others to seek adventure across horizons both near and far.
  2. I can recall a day, about a week ago, when things were different. When cold weather meant throwing on an extra layer and dealing with it as best you can. I think I was tougher then. However, why be tough when you can simply push a button and be warm? FirstGear’s assemblage of heated gear provides the rider nearly any environment they want to dial in, in nearly any cold environment they want to ride in. Highly functional and solidly constructed, different items can be run simultaneously or independently depending on rider preference. At the core of the system is the heated jacket, which is worn as a liner underneath your motorcycle jacket. The lightweight nylon/polyester construction features a main zipper plus five smaller zippers for compartments serving different functions. Inside the back of the jacket is a small storage compartment, and on the outside of the jacket, roughly where the left pocket would normally go, is another storage compartment intended for a high-capacity (15600 mAh) lithium-ion battery that is motion activated. Inside this pocket is a pass-through hole where the jacket’s power cable can be routed either inside or outside the pocket, depending on whether it is being powered directly from the bike, or via the portable battery. The jacket liner, pant liner, gloves, and sock liners can be interlocked together and powered off a portable battery or from the bike’s power.When the weather warms up, and juicing up the jacket is not required, the power cable can be tucked away in a small zippered pocket directly beneath the battery compartment. Two more power leads can be found zipped up near the cuffs of each sleeve, which allow either heated gloves or glove liners to be attached. Zippered pockets in the jacket sleeves hide cables which provide pass-thru power to the heated gloves. ADVERTISEMENT A small flap at the hemline on the left side of the jacket holds the three-way power button. Pressing and holding the button for approximately two seconds will power the jacket on or off. Once powered on, simply clicking the button toggles it through the three heat setting options of high, medium, and low. The illuminated button changes color to correspond to each setting – either red, white, or green. An optional remote control, powered by a disposable A23 battery, can be mounted on the handlebar. And after a straightforward, seamless Bluetooth sync procedure, the jacket’s settings can be easily controlled on-the-fly while riding without taking one’s eyes off the road. A small flap sticks out the bottom of your heated jacket liner that allows you to control temperature settings with the push of a button.Removing the power leads from their storage compartments at the end of each sleeve, provides connections for the heated Outrider gloves. As a stand-alone glove, the fit and construction are both excellent. In addition to knuckle and finger protection, the gloves feature Knox SPS scaphoid protectors on the palm side. The left glove has a rain squeegee on the index finger, although it is attached in a “laid down” orientation which is sleek, but less effective as a squeegee than some designs. Both gloves feature touch-screen-friendly fingertips. Pulling heavier cold weather gloves on and off is a bit more difficult than lightweight MX gloves, so being able to check a phone or GPS, gloves on, is a plus on any ride. When plugged in, pass-through circuitry allows the settings on the gloves to be controlled independently from the jacket, as well as independently from each other. Typically, one would most likely want to run both gloves on the same heat setting. However if desired, each glove can be set to any temperature on its own, with the jacket either on or off. Touch-screen-compatible fingertips were a welcome feature when navigating by GPS app.Moving down, heated pants and sock liners complete the ensemble. The nylon/polyester/spandex pants are robust enough to work as a stand-alone layer, or even stand-alone pants in a travel context. A long flap on the left provides access to the power switch even when wearing a low-hemmed jacket. Behind the switch is a zippered pocket containing the power lead, which can also double as a battery compartment should a rider want to electrify the pants while off the bike. Short ankle zippers allow for easy entry and exit, and small hook-and-loop closure pockets inside each ankle store the power leads to connect electric sock liners. Either the upper items (jacket and gloves), or the lower items (pants and socks), can connect to either the bike or battery power source, and be run independently of each other. Use of a Y-splitter cable allows all items to be run simultaneously. First Impressions Before connecting anything to power and firing up the heated gear’s circuitry, simply putting on everything reveals the high level of construction and fit. Use of spandex in the pants allows them to form-fit, which better transfers heat to the body. The nylon/polyester jacket has a good fit as a liner, however if you are in between sizes it’s possible the smaller would be more effective in overall heat transfer. Use of polyester and spandex in the sock liners mean they fit snug, and thin enough that very little extra “bulk” is felt inside one’s boots. The heated jacket liner has heating elements on the arms, neck, back, and chest.Possibly the most impressive part of the ensemble are the Outrider gloves. Bulky winter gloves can sometimes be a pain to get on and off, however excellent fit makes these gloves surprisingly easy to use for such a robust build, and use of touch-screen-compatible materials in the fingertips means you’ll likely not need to remove them as often as gloves lacking this feature. Knuckle flex panels in the thumb and first three fingers, various armor panels, and inclusion of Knox sliders all lend to an overall high-quality feel in these gloves. The excellent fit of the Outrider Gloves makes them surprisingly easy to get on and off for a padded winter glove.After syncing the bluetooth remote switch, the jacket can be powered up and controlled either by the on-board switch or the remote. While both the remote switch and the jacket have three-color LED lights corresponding to the heat settings, one minor point to note is that the colors don’t entirely agree. While High (red) and Low (green) match up respectively on both the remote control and the jacket, medium is represented by a white light on the jacket’s button, and an orange light on the remote switch. It’s significant to mention that the bluetooth connection to the remote switch was retained from the initial pairing, and did not have to be reset over several weeks of testing. The jacket’s heat settings can be easily controlled from a Bluetooth remote mounted on the handlebar, so you don’t have to take your eyes off the road.How It Performed Heat is felt almost instantaneously once the jacket is powered up, and in the high setting it is hot! Where the jacket is pressed into the body (by virtue of a backpack, fold in the material of an outer jacket, etc..) the heat sensation is more pronounced. As the jacket shifts while moving around, one can feel heat touching different parts of the body from elements in the chest, back, arms, and collar. Running a smaller size with a tighter fit might allow for a more uniform distribution of heat. Activating the gloves results in a less-pronounced but equally effective heat sensation. Perhaps the thicker construction of the gloves compared to the jacket acts as a heat-sink, or simply the fact the hands are more exposed to the wind and the cold than a jacket liner leads to the comparatively lesser heat sensation. The full-gauntlet glove’s heating elements are in the back of the hand and along the back of each finger. A typical problem that occurs when riding in cold weather with heated grips is that the palms of your hands can be burning while the tops can be freezing cold. Running these gloves simultaneously with heated grips creates an ideal microclimate for the entire hand when the surrounding climate is less than ideal. Warmth aside, the fit and construction allows for good grip and feel of the controls for a winter glove, and the aforementioned touch-screen compatibility is a welcome feature. Spandex positions the heating elements snugly against the front of each leg in the pant liners. Like the jacket, heat is felt almost instantaneously in the pants when power is activated. Like the gloves, the heat sensation is less pronounced in the socks, but an adequately warm climate is created. Given the socks are the only items without independent heat adjustment control, it’s possible a “safer” heat level was designed into them. Powered By Bike or Portable Battery A couple motorcycles were involved in testing this electric clothing: a KTM 1090 Adventure R (with aftermarket heated grips installed), and Royal Enfield Himalayan (without heated grips). Aboard the big KTM, firing up all the clothing items and setting everything to broil made a pre-dawn run out to the desert like no other ride I’ve done. Dark skies with rain and temperatures dipping into the high 30’s didn’t reflect the bizarre level of comfort riding through it on such an exposed vehicle. I felt like I was back in my truck with heated seats and cabin climate control. Even in these conditions, the high (red) setting was seldom needed on the jacket or pants – medium was fine. I prefer my hands to be warm, and thankfully the gloves’ independent heat control meant I could have them running on high while the jacket and pants were on lower settings. If the portable battery runs out of juice during your trip, you can recharge it via your bike’s USB power port. Depending on which items of clothing are fired up, and what heat settings are selected, the portable lithium-ion battery can be used to power everything for several hours – or potentially all day depending on settings or whether just one or two items are in use. Once the battery is depleted, the clothing can be plugged directly into the bike’s power, while the portable battery is recharged through a USB port. Running the jacket and gloves with vehicle power results in identical levels of heat as when using portable battery power. When all clothing items are running together, while connected to the portable battery, noticeably lower heat levels at each setting can be felt in certain items. This was also true when running the gear on the Himalayan. Compared to the KTM, the Enfield’s less-powerful charging system seemed to struggle a bit with powering all the heated gear simultaneously. With only 221 watts coming out of its alternator, after using roughly 86 watts of power to run the bike itself, the Royal Enfield is left with around 135 watts to spare. All of the heated gear running simultaneously sucks up nearly 103 watts of that surplus between the jacket (42 watts), pants (38 watts), gloves (14.4 watts), and socks (8.2 watts). The numbers technically work, but with margin for power consumption variance of just under 33 watts. The heated gear may also be powered off the bike if the portable battery runs low. An SAE to Coax adapter cable allowed us to plug into our battery tender line.On the other hand, when running all of the FirstGear heated gear, plus heated grips, and charging the portable battery as well as a cellphone, the KTM’s 450-watt stator output didn’t seem to struggle. It’s also worth noting the jacket and gloves performed equally well when running them together on either bike. Once the riding day (or night) is done, the ability to power up heated clothing with a portable battery really shines. Rather than needing to layer up at a cold campsite, one simply pushes a button (or buttons) and dials in their own level of comfort. Uses quickly expand beyond the adventure realm as well. While a mid-day break stop on a cold high mountaintop is an obvious place heated gear would be beneficial, rather than turn on the heat in my office, I typed up this review in the cold pre-dawn hours wearing motorcycle gear with little glowing buttons. Product testing never felt so nice. Who It Is For FirstGear’s new heated motorcycle gear is ideal for anyone who rides in a country that has a winter, which is most riders. While the most common use of this electric clothing would be in an adventure touring context, connecting it to the portable lithium-ion battery means running the heated gear in a dual sport or even dirt bike context is possible. Our Verdict Addition of heated clothing to the adventure touring realm is a luxury which fast becomes part of one’s standard kit. Given these items can work well as liners either with or without power means the user might well end up running them in lieu of stock liners all the time. Why be tough when you can be warm. Maybe not the best ad slogan. What We Liked Great fit and construction. Independent heat control settings for different areas. High heat levels for colder weather. Keep the heat going once you’re off the bike. What Could Be Improved Squeegee on the left index finger could be positioned better. No manual included for lithium-ion battery. Shopping Options: Photos by Jon Beck and Rob Dabney Author: Jon Beck Jon Beck is fulfilling a dream of never figuring out what to be when he grows up. Racing mountain bikes, competitive surfing, and touring as a musician are somehow part of what led Jon to travel through over 40 countries so far as an adventure motorcycle photographer, journalist, and guide. From precision riding for cameras in Hollywood, to refilling a fountain pen for travel stories, Jon brings a rare blend of experience to the table. While he seems happiest when lost in a desert someplace, deadlines are met most of the time.
  3. Published on 04.01.2020 Adventure proof packing systems innovator Giant Loop has introduced the world’s first seat-top tent for motorcycles, the EXPANDER™ Adventure Tent. Weighing in at just under 20 lbs., the EXPANDER™ mounts to virtually any adventure touring motorcycle, providing 100 square feet of hazard free living space while deployed safely off the ground. Constructed in the USA with tubular and extruded titanium framework, ladder and supports, with ultralight Vapor™ fabrics, the EXPANDER™ packs into its own case 6” tall x 18” wide x 18” long, or about the size of a box of Donuts. Upgrades include one-click remote controlled deployment and packing, anti-microbial UV interior lighting and a Dyneema®/Kevlar® predator barrier (patent pending). Ladder and supports fold up to fit neatly inside the 6″ x 18″ x 18″ pack. Straps on securely to most adventure bikes and dual sports. ADVERTISEMENT USA MSRP is $2,999.99. Pre-orders for the Giant Loop EXPANDER™ Adventure Tent are available now, with a non-refundable deposit of $299.99 USD, exclusively at giant-loop.com. Estimated first production ship date is April 1, 2021. Get it today!
  4. Most riders hide from winter. Dutch adventure motorcyclist Sjaak Lucassen embraces it, seeing bitter cold, snow and ice as a path to one of the most remote places on earth. Beginning in January 2021, Lucassen will ride his modified 2001 Yamaha YZF-R1, from Anchorage, Alaska to the geographic North Pole. The 3,000-mile journey includes hundreds of miles over sea ice, which means he has to go at the coldest time of the year in order for the ice to remain frozen. Due to the extreme conditions, the trip will require three winter seasons and over two years to complete. ADVERTISEMENT Sjaak’s journey to the North Pole during the peak of winter will mean he’ll have to battle temperatures as low as -40° F (-40° C) through skin piercing snowstorms. But Sjaak actually hopes temperatures stay as low as possible to decrease his chances of running into what he considers the biggest danger — falling through the open ice. Deep snow drifts and cracks in the ice could swallow the bike. And Sjaak will have to receive periodic weather updates and satellite data about open spots on the ice cap. Then there is the ever-present threat of polar bears who consider humans on the menu. He’ll be as independent as possible, hauling his own food, tools and camping gear in a sled and sleeping in a tent. To keep warm, Sjaak will use several different options including a generator, a motor, a heat gun, and fuel. Given the small window in the year when temperatures drop to the extreme lows he needs to ride the polar ice, Lucassen is aiming to reach the North Pole in three stages: Stage 1 – Anchorage, Alaska to Tuktoyaktuk, Canada (1,800km/1,100 miles): This section of the ride will be on winter roads, which will give Sjaak time to get used to the weather and his R1 as well as make any small modifications if needed. Stage 2 – Tuktoyaktuk to Ward Hunt Island (2,300km/1,400 miles): Things get more challenging in 2022, when he’ll venture over the frozen Beaufort Sea and across coastal islands. He’ll have to avoid pressure ridges which can result in big blocks of ice piled up and is most likely going to require the navigational skills of a local guide. Stage 3 – Ward Hunt Island to North Pole (800km+/500miles+): Things get crazy in 2023 when he points the R1 directly north and heads out over the frozen ocean. Sjaak’s exact route will depend mainly on ice conditions. He’ll have to be on high alert for stretches of open water and the presence of huge pressure ridges could mean big detours. So what’s the inspiration for this crazy adventure? Lucassen hatched the idea of a ride to the North Pole during an around-the-world trip he took in 1995. “In Pakistan, on the Karakoram Highway, I felt like I was on the end of the world. But it’s not the end of the world. The end of the world is the North Pole . That popped up in my mind and since then I kept in my mind to go there once in my life.” And why an R1? Sjaak has always preferred sportbikes for his adventures. He praises his R1 as reliable and surprisingly capable in rough terrain after airing down the tires. The Test Run Sjaak had completed several winter rides before but he says none were as important as the one through Beaufort Sea. In February 2013, Lucassen rode over 6,200 miles on a R1 from the northernmost tip of the continental US to the southernmost tip, a test trip of sorts for the North Pole push. “To keep it a real motorcycle journey, I had put myself some limits. Like travelling the entire distance by using the bike’s strength and my own, so no physical help from others,” he explained. The journey began in the polar ice of Barrow, where there are no roads, which meant he had to ride over the frozen waters of the Beaufort Sea to civilization. The trip was an eye-opener for him, highlighting how far behind he still was in his planning and preparations. The tires were too stiff and not wide enough, and the bike would dig into soft snow. The tires were also too tall, making the bike difficult to upright after a tip over. The bike would also overheat if he covered the radiators, or not warm up enough if he didn’t. And his sled, which was big enough to carry all his supplies and sleep in, was far too heavy. The Bike – Arctic 1 Sjaak’s sled in 2013 was too big . He will now sleep in a tent and pull a lighter sled that can carry 150 kg of supplies.To address the issues he experienced in his test run, Lucassen built another 2001 R1. Enter ‘Arctic 1,’ his new weapon built specifically for the North Pole expedition. The upgraded R1 rides on squishy, monster tires: 60-cm (23.6 inches) wide in the rear, and 40 cm (16 inches) in the front. No such motorcycle tire exists off the shelf, so Lucassen designed them himself and found a company to make them. He also widened the swingarm and designed a drive system with primary and secondary chains to accommodate the fat rear rubber. In the front he designed extra-wide triple clamps and modified the fairings to make it all fit, somehow managing to keep the R1’s sportbike lines intact. Sjaak can increase the h of his R1 for obstacles or lower it so it is easier to pick up the bike after a fall. An onboard compressor also allows him to deflate or inflate the tires while riding.During his previous winter challenges, Sjaak used BestGrip studs. “They made such a difference that I am going to use them again, for sure,” he says.In addition, Lucassen added a new radiator with more cooling capacity, heating elements to warm the carbs and the antifreeze, and had special oil developed that wouldn’t solidify in the extreme cold he’ll be facing. He will also carry a small generator to warm the bike for morning starts.The sled was also modified to make it lighter and ensure it can pull 150kg of supplies. It’s taken 13 years of preparation for the trip and he’s not done yet. Lucassen is still working on the necessary permits and paperwork needed to access the North Pole and get the Guiness Book of World Records to recognize his attempt, raising money and finding a support driver to haul fuel during the last stretch and possibly provide protection from polar bears. There’s no big-money team behind the expedition, just a man and a dream most would consider crazy. But he embodies the DIY spirit, and you get the feeling that he’ll make it. “If there is too much open water I’ll come back the next year,” he said. “And if there is too much open water in that year too, then I’ll make the bike float. But I will go to the North Pole .” Follow Lucanssen’s incredible journey on Facebook, YouTube or his website. [embedded content] [embedded content] Author: Bob Whitby Bob has been riding motorcycles since age 19 and working as a journalist since he was 24, which was a long time ago, let’s put it that way. He quit for the better part of a decade to raise a family, then rediscovered adventure, dual sport and enduro riding in the early 2000s. He lives in Arkansas, America’s best-kept secret when it comes to riding destinations, and travels far and wide in search of dirt roads and trails.
  5. BMW of North America has issued two new recalls on certain R1250GS-range motorcycles and several other models for a brake fluid reservoir cover issue and swing arm/final drive pivot pin defect. Approximately 51 R1250GS and 60 R1250GS Adventure models, for the 2019 and 2020 model years, may be affected by the NHTSA (National Highway Traffic Safety Administration) recall related to the brake fluid reservoir cover issue. Another 252 non-GS models (RnineT, RnineT Scrambler, RnineT Pure, RnineT Racer, R1250R, R1250RT, R1250RS) were also affected by the same reservoir cap issue. In addition, two 2020 R1250GS models were affected by a pivot pin defect along with another two 2020 R1250RT models, for a total of 369 motorcycles affected by both recalls. ADVERTISEMENT According to the first recall defect report (20V166), certain vehicles were produced with a brake fluid reservoir cover which may not fully conform to US Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards. This non-compliance recall involves an optional color-specific brake fluid reservoir cap, which may not clearly state the required type of brake fluid or process for filling the reservoir. The second more serious recall (20V165) states that a pivot pin, which connects the final drive to the swing arm, may be faulty. During motorcycle assembly at a rework station, the pin showed signs of cracking prior to reaching the specified torque settings after being torqued a second time. It was concluded that the pin may not have been produced to specifications during a particular production period. What Could Happen The NHTSA report on the first recall notes that the non-compliant brake fluid reservoir cover contained language that may be confusing or misunderstood, which could lead to an improper maintenance procedure. Improper brake system maintenance could affect braking performance. The second recall states the defective pivot pin could cause the connection between the final drive and swing arm to loosen. A loose connection between the final drive and swing arm could reduce stability and control, increasing the risk of a crash. Models Affected By The Recall: Make Model Issue Year BMW Motorrad R1250GS Brake Fluid Reservoir Cap 2019-2020 BMW Motorrad R1250GS Adventure Brake Fluid Reservoir Cap 2019-2020 BMW Motorrad RnineT Brake Fluid Reservoir Cap 2018-2020 BMW Motorrad RnineT Scrambler Brake Fluid Reservoir Cap 2018-2020 BMW Motorrad RnineT Racer Brake Fluid Reservoir Cap 2018 BMW Motorrad RnineT Pure Brake Fluid Reservoir Cap 2019-2020 BMW Motorrad R1250R Brake Fluid Reservoir Cap 2018-2020 BMW Motorrad R1250RT Brake Fluid Reservoir Cap 2019-2020 BMW Motorrad R1250RS Brake Fluid Reservoir Cap 2020 BMW Motorrad R1250GS Swing arm pivot pin 2020 BMW Motorrad R1250RT Swing arm pivot pin 2020 How To Get It Fixed Owners will be notified by First Class mail and instructed to take their motorcycle to an authorized BMW motorcycle dealer to have the defective brake reservoir cap or pivot pin replaced for free. If this condition occurred on an affected motorcycle prior to this recall, the remedy would be covered by the BMW Motorcycle New Vehicle Limited Warranty program. Therefore, reimbursement for a pre-notification remedy is not necessary. Notification of dealers is planned to begin on March 27, 2020. Owners will begin getting notified on May 11, 2020. Owners may contact BMW customer service at 1-800-525-7417 or the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Vehicle Safety Hotline at 1-888-327-4236 (TTY 1-800-424-9153). You can also check your VIN to see if you are affected by the recall at www.nhtsa.gov.
  6. BMW of North America has issued two new recalls on certain R1250GS-range motorcycles and several other models for a brake fluid reservoir cover issue and swing arm/final drive pivot pin defect. Approximately 51 R1250GS and 60 R1250GS Adventure models, for the 2019 and 2020 model years, may be affected by the NHTSA (National Highway Traffic Safety Administration) recall related to the brake fluid reservoir cover issue. Another 252 non-GS models (RnineT, RnineT Scrambler, RnineT Pure, RnineT Racer, R1250R, R1250RT, R1250RS) were also affected by the same reservoir cap issue. In addition, two 2020 R1250GS models were affected by a pivot pin defect along with another two 2020 R1250RT models, for a total of 369 motorcycles affected by both recalls. ADVERTISEMENT According to the first recall defect report (20V166), certain vehicles were produced with a brake fluid reservoir cover which may not fully conform to US Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards. This non-compliance recall involves an optional color-specific brake fluid reservoir cap, which may not clearly state the required type of brake fluid or process for filling the reservoir. The second more serious recall (20V165) states that a pivot pin, which connects the final drive to the swing arm, may be faulty. During motorcycle assembly at a rework station, the pin showed signs of cracking prior to reaching the specified torque settings after being torqued a second time. It was concluded that the pin may not have been produced to specifications during a particular production period. What Could Happen The NHTSA report on the first recall notes that the non-compliant brake fluid reservoir cover contained language that may be confusing or misunderstood, which could lead to an improper maintenance procedure. Improper brake system maintenance could affect braking performance. The second recall states the defective pivot pin could cause the connection between the final drive and swing arm to loosen. A loose connection between the final drive and swing arm could reduce stability and control, increasing the risk of a crash. Models Affected By The Recall: Make Model Issue Year BMW Motorrad R1250GS Brake Fluid Reservoir Cap 2019-2020 BMW Motorrad R1250GS Adventure Brake Fluid Reservoir Cap 2019-2020 BMW Motorrad RnineT Brake Fluid Reservoir Cap 2018-2020 BMW Motorrad RnineT Scrambler Brake Fluid Reservoir Cap 2018-2020 BMW Motorrad RnineT Racer Brake Fluid Reservoir Cap 2018 BMW Motorrad RnineT Pure Brake Fluid Reservoir Cap 2019-2020 BMW Motorrad R1250R Brake Fluid Reservoir Cap 2018-2020 BMW Motorrad R1250RT Brake Fluid Reservoir Cap 2019-2020 BMW Motorrad R1250RS Brake Fluid Reservoir Cap 2020 BMW Motorrad R1250GS Swing arm pivot pin 2020 BMW Motorrad R1250RT Swing arm pivot pin 2020 How To Get It Fixed Owners will be notified by First Class mail and instructed to take their motorcycle to an authorized BMW motorcycle dealer to have the defective brake reservoir cap or pivot pin replaced for free. If this condition occurred on an affected motorcycle prior to this recall, the remedy would be covered by the BMW Motorcycle New Vehicle Limited Warranty program. Therefore, reimbursement for a pre-notification remedy is not necessary. Notification of dealers is planned to begin on March 27, 2020. Owners will begin getting notified on May 11, 2020. Owners may contact BMW customer service at 1-800-525-7417 or the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Vehicle Safety Hotline at 1-888-327-4236 (TTY 1-800-424-9153). You can also check your VIN to see if you are affected by the recall at www.nhtsa.gov.
  7. Published on 03.27.2020 Motorcycle chain lubrication specialists Scottoiler have launched the newest version of their popular electronic chain oiling system – the eSystem v3.1. The Scottoiler kit is designed to automatically lubricate your motorcycle’s chain and sprockets while you ride, keeping them properly coated and significantly reducing drivetrain maintenance. The eSystem feeds minimal amounts of oil to your chain only when you ride. This allows the electronic oil kit to use a lubricant that has almost no tack additives preventing dirt and grit from sticking to it. A cleaner lubrication means your chain does not develop the typical layer of black, grinding paste. Scottoiler claims your chain and sprockets will last up to 7 times longer, and the oil reservoir lasts for up to 1,800 miles between refills. Scottoiler eSystem Features The new eSystem version 3.1 offers self-calibration, additional flow rate settings and retention of all pre-established settings.Increase chain and sprocket life up to 7 times Improves performance Reduces chain maintenance Motion Sensitive Graphic Display Accelerometer technology Lubricant oil level gauge Precision flow rate Lubricates while you ride Includes 250ml bottle of Scottoil chain lubricant Up to 1,800 miles between refills The new eSystem version 3.1 has evolved based on extensive research conducted with customers of the original models through version 2. Now even more user-friendly, v3.1 self-calibrates, allowing for an even quicker start-up. Plus additional flow rate settings, particularly on the lower end, allow for even more precise, measured and gradual oiling of your chain. ADVERTISEMENT As a response to existing eSystem users requesting to introduce this feature, the new eSystem now retains all pre-established settings. If you’re coming back to your bike after winter, or returning to your bike after taking a break, then don’t worry about having to input your settings again, all your previous preferences will be stored in the memory, even when disconnected from the battery. Version 3.1 offers an easier to operate interface and keeps all your previous settings stored in memory, even when disconnected from the battery.The Scottoiler eSystem V3.1 is made for both seasoned bikers and newcomers to the world of chain oiling alike, with easy installation and calibration. With a one-time investment in chain oiling, the eSystem V3.1 ensures a high level of control and precision when looking after your motorcycle chain, paying for itself in its maintenance and preservation qualities. The V3.1 system comes in both High Temp and Standard Temp versions with an MSRP of $299.99. [embedded content] [embedded content]Version 3.1 Updates All new software pack Upgraded hardware Upgraded buttons & screen Easier to operate interface Long term memory retains settings Shopping Options
  8. Published on 03.24.2020 Wolfman’s all-new Tincup Pocket is a minimalist waterproof storage solution (1.2 liters capacity) that holds just your bare essentials like keys, snacks, wallet and phone. It’s incredibly versatile as well. Depending on the base you choose, you can strap it onto the tank, a number plate, waist belt, or use it as an auxiliary bag attached to your primary luggage. When used as a tank bag, it offers easy-access storage that doesn’t get in the way during aggressive off-road rides. What’s In The Box Tincup Pocket WP Bag Removable clear map pocket Sold Separately: Mounting bases for tank bag, waist belt, auxiliary bag, and number plate. First Impressions We’re currently testing the Tincup Pocket in the tank bag configuration with the ‘Sloped’ Tank Bag Base which fits most motorcycles. There is also a ‘Crown’ Tank Bag Base for fuel tanks that are shaped like a peak. Getting the harness on the tank was simple, attaching it around the steering stem and on the frame rails near the seat. A large Velcro panel holds the bag in place with a single quick-release strap over the top to secure it. This makes the Tincup Pocket easy to remove in seconds if you need to run into a gas station for snacks. The new Tincup Pocket is part of Wolfman’s next-gen line of bags that are waterproof, without needing an inner or exterior waterproof bag. Construction looks sturdy with a 840D Nylon TPU laminate material that uses a beefy YKK waterproof zipper to get quick access to your items. And there is a detachable map pocket that sticks to the top with Velcro. Two inner sleeve pockets and a hi-viz yellow interior make finding gear and staying organized easier. So far, it seems well built and has an economical use of space. ADVERTISEMENT Highlights Stash small essentials like wallets, keys, and phones in this protective motorcycle bag. Mounts quickly to other Wolfman Motorcycle Luggage. Multiple mounting points make this easy to place anywhere on your bike. Numerous pockets make it easy to find gear and stay organized. Wolfman Tincup Pocket Wolfman Tincup Pocket We’ll be putting the Tincup Pocket through its paces in the coming months to get a better idea of how well it works on real-world adventures. Let us know any questions you have in the comments below and we’ll try to get answers for you. Stay tuned for more to come! Wolfman Tincup Pocket Features 1.2 liter capacity Waterproof 840D nylon TPU laminate, black outside bright yellow inside Radio frequency welded seams #8 YKK waterproof zipper Easy to find yellow cord on zipper sliders 0.35 lbs Removable clear map pocket, 4.5″ L x 3″ W (11cm L x 7cm W) 4″ L x 7″ W x 2.75″ H (10cm L x 18cm W x 7cm D) Price: $39.99 bag; $24.99 tank base Shopping Options
  9. While every element of your riding gear is important for comfort and safety, there’s no question your helmet is the most consequential. It’s also the most complex, needing to meet multiple behind-the-scenes reliability standards that are continually evolving. The most universal motorcycle helmet testing standards are those imposed by the Economic Commission for Europe (ECE), a branch of the United Nations. After not seeing a change in the last 20 years, updated ECE standards will require new levels of safety from helmet manufacturers, and will likely increase costs as well. In the U.S. we’re familiar with our own very basic Department of Transportation’s (DOT) standards for helmet integrity, as well as the Snell seal of approval, which satisfies safety parameters developed for racing. The ECE testing standards, currently denoted as 22.05 and soon to be version six (22.06), are the most comprehensive testing requirements, measuring everything from the polystyrene’s reaction to different temperatures, to the prismatic effect of the visors. If your helmet meets ECE standards you’ll find a requisite stamp on the shell or a white tag sewn into your helmet’s liner. ADVERTISEMENT The upcoming amendments to current ECE standards will include additional trials, as well as construction requirements, such as added reflectivity. The new regulations will also expand to visors, sun-shades and helmet-specific accessories. In the testing department, new helmets – currently rated by how well they hold up when propelled onto an anvil – will be subjected to “drops” at a wider range of speeds, including low speed tests to determine how helmets perform in minor or secondary impacts. Rotational tests will also be introduced for the new ECE standard approval. Studying the new impact data that results from prescribed hits at specified anvil angles will address important new research on the dangerous effect of glancing blows. In this scenario, sensors will measure the twisting motion of a head inside the helmet, which is significant since rotational force can cause significant damage to brain tissue without any obvious external trauma. Currently, modular helmets can be certified without testing with the chin bar raised. This will no longer be allowed, and all modular lids must meet or exceed the regulations in their closed as well as their open positions.New testing procedures will also address modular helmets and how their integrity might be altered when the chin bar is raised. As it stands, a modular helmet can be tested and certified as a locked and closed full-face. The new 22.06 standard will require all modular lids meet or exceed the regulations in their closed and locked, as well as their open positions. Flip-down sun shades, tested in their working position, will be assessed to make sure they don’t restrain or prevent the movement of the visor. Any official accessory communicators and/or cameras specific to a helmet (think Sena’s “smart” road-riding helmets) will also be examined to determine their influence on shells and visors in the case of impacts from various angles. Use of any other accessory not tested during ECE approval will render the standard certification invalid. Use of any other accessory not tested during ECE approval will render the standard certification invalid.Visors will undergo more vigorous testing than ever, only passing if they don’t deform, fracture or detach when shot with a steel ball at 60 m/s (134mph) to simulate the visor being struck by road-borne debris. While the United Nations Economic and Social Council isn’t scheduled to vote these measures through until June, helmet manufacturers around the globe are gearing up to make sure their products will pass muster, an undertaking speculated to result in a 5% increase in price at the consumer end. What this also means for buyers is there should be some good deals down the line on all the ECE 22.05 standard helmets still in production today. Manufacturers and dealers will have 36 months from the commencement date of the new standards to clear the outdated inventory before it becomes illegal to sell. If you’re feeling bored during this weird season of Coronavirus quarantines you can read all 127 pages of the official proposal here. It’s super brainy —pun intended. Photos by Spencer Hill and Stephen Gregory Author: Jamie Elvidge Jamie has been a motorcycle journalist for more than 30 years, testing the entire range of bikes for the major print magazines and specializing in adventure-travel related stories. To date she’s written and supplied photography for articles describing what it’s like to ride in all 50 states and 43 foreign countries, receiving two Lowell Thomas Society of American Travel Writer’s Awards along the way. Her most-challenging adventure yet has been riding in the 2018 GS Trophy in Mongolia as Team AusAmerica’s embedded journalist.
  10. Published on 03.20.2020 [embedded content] [embedded content]You’ve seen bike’s with their auxiliary lights customized to come on with the high beam switch or synchronized with the turn signals, as well as flashing auxiliary and brake lights that get other driver’s attention fast. How do they do it? The easy way is with a CAN bus accessory controller. Denali has been a leader in this technology with their plug-n-play CANsmart controller for BMW and Harley models, now they are making it available for CAN bus-equipped KTMs. With the CANSmart you can customize the functionality of up to four accessories for improved safety and awareness on the road, all controlled with the original handlebar switches. Simply connect the CANsmart Controller to your KTM diagnostic port to access over 35 programmable accessory settings designed to control auxiliary lights, turn signals, horns, brake lights, or any accessory you can imagine. Control OEM accessories, 3rd party accessories or use the included wiring harnesses for plug & play connection to DENALI driving lights, DRLs, SoundBomb Horns, and B6 Brake Lights. ktm_light_square_720x The Integrated Accessory Control allows you to control up to two sets of LED lights right from your KTM’s SET button. Simply toggle your DRLs on/off twice to turn you auxiliary lights on or off.Key Features Include: Integrated accessory control allows you to independently control up to two sets of LED lights right from your KTM’s SET button. On the fly dimming allows you to dim up to two sets of lights without connecting to the software, while riding. CANsmart accessory manager software lets you set each of the four circuits to control whatever accessory type you want. Lights can be set to synchronize high/low beam with factory high/low beam switch, dim on the fly, modulate during the day to increase visibility, flash to pass, strobe with horn, and cancel inversely with turn signal. You can also set amber lights to flash as a turn signal. Brake lights flash upon deceleration using “Smart Brake” technology. Plug & play installation of all DENALI lights and horns, no additional wiring harness needed. On board power allows you to connect any electrical accessories such as phones, GPS units, or heated gear. Fits new model KTM Duke & Adventure models: 790 & 1290 Duke, 790 Adventure, 1090 & 1190 Adventure, and 1290 Super Adventure. The free Accessory Manager Software lets you set each of the four circuits to control whatever accessory type you want. You can choose between dozens of features and settings to customize each accessory type to match your riding style.Shopping Options: ADVERTISEMENT
  11. BMW of North America has issued a recall on certain GS models as well as other non-GS models for a brake light issue. Approximately 906 GS motorcycles, for the 2020 model year, may be affected by the recall issued by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. BMW GS models affected by the recall are the R1250GS, R1250GS Adventure, F850GS, F850GS Adventure, and F750GS. Another 3,120 non-GS models (F900R, F900XR, R1250R, R1250RS, RnineT, RnineT Pure, RnineT Scrambler, S1000R, S1000RR, K1600B ) may also have the same recall issue for a total of 4,026 units affected. According to the defect report, certain vehicles were produced for the US market with an emergency stop signal function which causes the brake lamp to flash during emergency braking, instead of remaining steady. While allowed in certain markets, brake lamps in the US must remain “steady burning” in accordance with the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS). BMW has identified the specific models where this emergency stop signal programming, which would remove this function, was not included in the build configuration. What Could Happen: The NHTSA notes a flashing stop lamp during emergency braking could be misinterpreted by a driver following the affected motorcycle. Confusion to other drivers on the road could increase the risk of a crash. BMW has not yet received any reports, nor is BMW otherwise aware of any accidents or injuries related to this issue. ADVERTISEMENT Models Affected By Recall: Make Model Year BMW Motorrad F750GS 2020 BMW Motorrad F850GS 2020 BMW Motorrad F850GS Adventure 2020 BMW Motorrad R1250GS 2020 BMW Motorrad R1250GS Adventure 2020 BMW Motorrad K1600B 2019-2020 BMW Motorrad F900R 2020 BMW Motorrad F900XR 2020 BMW Motorrad R1250R 2020 BMW Motorrad R1250RS 2020 BMW Motorrad RnineT 2020 BMW Motorrad RnineT Pure 2020 BMW Motorrad RnineT Scrambler 2020 BMW Motorrad S1000R 2019-2020 BMW Motorrad S1000RR 2020 How To Get It Fixed: Owners will be notified by First Class mail and instructed to take their motorcycle to an authorized BMW motorcycle dealer to have the remedy performed for free. Affected motorcycles will be programmed to remove the emergency stop signal function. If this condition occurred on an affected motorcycle prior to this recall, the remedy would be covered by the BMW Motorcycle New Vehicle Limited Warranty program. Therefore, reimbursement for a pre-notification remedy is not necessary. Notification of dealers is planned to begin on March 19, 2020. Owners will begin getting notified on May 04, 2020. Owners may contact BMW customer service at 1-800-525-7417. Owners may also contact the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Vehicle Safety Hotline at 1-888-327-4236 (TTY 1-800-424-9153), or check your VIN to see if you are affected by the recall at www.nhtsa.gov.
  12. BMW of North America has issued a recall on certain GS models as well as other non-GS models for a brake light issue. Approximately 906 GS motorcycles, for the 2020 model year, may be affected by the recall issued by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. BMW GS models affected by the recall are the R1250GS, R1250GS Adventure, F850GS, F850GS Adventure, and F750GS. Another 3,120 non-GS models (F900R, F900XR, R1250R, R1250RS, RnineT, RnineT Pure, RnineT Scrambler, S1000R, S1000RR, K1600B ) may also have the same recall issue for a total of 4,026 units affected. According to the defect report, certain vehicles were produced for the US market with an emergency stop signal function which causes the brake lamp to flash during emergency braking, instead of remaining steady. While allowed in certain markets, brake lamps in the US must remain “steady burning” in accordance with the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS). BMW has identified the specific models where this emergency stop signal programming, which would remove this function, was not included in the build configuration. What Could Happen: The NHTSA notes a flashing stop lamp during emergency braking could be misinterpreted by a driver following the affected motorcycle. Confusion to other drivers on the road could increase the risk of a crash. BMW has not yet received any reports, nor is BMW otherwise aware of any accidents or injuries related to this issue. ADVERTISEMENT Models Affected By Recall: Make Model Year BMW Motorrad F750GS 2020 BMW Motorrad F850GS 2020 BMW Motorrad F850GS Adventure 2020 BMW Motorrad R1250GS 2020 BMW Motorrad R1250GS Adventure 2020 BMW Motorrad K1600B 2019-2020 BMW Motorrad F900R 2020 BMW Motorrad F900XR 2020 BMW Motorrad R1250R 2020 BMW Motorrad R1250RS 2020 BMW Motorrad RnineT 2020 BMW Motorrad RnineT Pure 2020 BMW Motorrad RnineT Scrambler 2020 BMW Motorrad S1000R 2019-2020 BMW Motorrad S1000RR 2020 How To Get It Fixed: Owners will be notified by First Class mail and instructed to take their motorcycle to an authorized BMW motorcycle dealer to have the remedy performed for free. Affected motorcycles will be programmed to remove the emergency stop signal function. If this condition occurred on an affected motorcycle prior to this recall, the remedy would be covered by the BMW Motorcycle New Vehicle Limited Warranty program. Therefore, reimbursement for a pre-notification remedy is not necessary. Notification of dealers is planned to begin on March 19, 2020. Owners will begin getting notified on May 04, 2020. Owners may contact BMW customer service at 1-800-525-7417. Owners may also contact the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Vehicle Safety Hotline at 1-888-327-4236 (TTY 1-800-424-9153), or check your VIN to see if you are affected by the recall at www.nhtsa.gov.
  13. It’s one thing to cross a continent on an electric motorcycle accompanied by a fleet of support vehicles and your buddy riding next to you (see “Long Way Up”). It’s quite another to do it two-up on one electric bike, unsupported because your chase car died in Cameroon and you had to abandon it and sell most of your gear to continue the rest of your crossing of Africa. That’s how adventurers Thomas Jakel, 33, and Dulcie Mativo, 24, got from Morocco to South Africa on a Zero DSR Black Forest Edition. For six months, the intrepid couple rode 9,300 miles (15,000 kilometers) through 20 countries across the length of the continent. They rode through deserts and jungles, and over mountains one charge at a time until the end of their expedition in Cape Town. Starting out they had all the necessities for a long, documented journey through countries with spotty infrastructure for electric vehicles: extra battery packs, luggage, cameras and recording equipment. And, according to the original plan, a chase vehicle to carry it all. But when the car broke down at about the halfway point and couldn’t be fixed, the only way to carry on was to leave it behind and continue solely on the Zero. To do so, the duo had to sell all the stuff they couldn’t carry, hop on the bike and hope it would make it the rest of the way. Due to the chase vehicle with all their equipment breaking down, Jakel and Dulcie had to sell all the stuff they couldn’t carry and continue their journey solely on the electric bike. ADVERTISEMENT Luckily, the electric bike proved up to the task. The DSR Black Forest Edition is Zero’s newest version of the off-road oriented DSR. It adds a windshield, GIVI side and top cases, crash protection, auxiliary lights, a headlight grill and wider footpegs to come up with an adventure-ready package. It’s got a 19/17-inch front/rear wheel combo, Showa suspension and a curb weight of 489 pounds. Standard combined range (city and highway) is 112 miles. A bigger battery pack boosts that to 141 miles. Completing the trip relying exclusively on electric power meant careful route planning, said Jakel. But the surprise was that they were typically able to “fill” their tank at no cost. “It requires some planning to ride through Africa on an electric motorcycle but with forward planning and sufficient charging breaks, usually overnight, the low-maintenance Zero was a reliable partner. We got the electricity for free or included in our hotel fees, whereas no one is giving the gasoline away for free,” he explained. “It is easy to say that we would have saved a ton of money even if we would have had to pay every time we recharged.” Jakel, an entrepreneur from Germany, and Mativo, a social media coordinator from Kenya, planned their trip as a way to highlight people transforming communities through business initiatives and positive change. It turned out that riding an electric motorcycle the length of Africa was a great way to meet and interact with people. “We shocked many with our adventurous plan to master such a route with an electric motorcycle,” Mativo said. Border police in Sierra Leone wanted to be in a picture with the Zero, while other officials along the route would salute the passing bike because they assumed it was a military vehicle, thanks to its blacked-out appearance and camouflage graphics. [embedded content] [embedded content]Jakel and Mativo are planning a full-length documentary of their trip and the 100 “changemakers” they interviewed along the way. Info on the trip and some of the interviews are available on their website, AfricaX. Photos courtesy AfricaX Author: Bob Whitby Bob has been riding motorcycles since age 19 and working as a journalist since he was 24, which was a long time ago, let’s put it that way. He quit for the better part of a decade to raise a family, then rediscovered adventure, dual sport and enduro riding in the early 2000s. He lives in Arkansas, America’s best-kept secret when it comes to riding destinations, and travels far and wide in search of dirt roads and trails.
  14. Published on 03.16.2020 Mosko Moto has announced the immediate availability of their updated Reckless 80 Revolver, the third iteration of their flagship rackless soft luggage systems. The V3.0 Revolver is the most versatile Reckless 80 yet. Adjustable leg angle makes it equally at home on enduro-style dual sports like the CRF450L or KTM 500, as it is on larger ADV bikes like the Africa Twin. From GSA’s to 150cc dual-sports, the Reckless 80 is a luggage system that can do it all! The original Reckless 80 was designed for minimalist off-road riding/camping, Backcountry Discovery Route exploration, and international fly-to-ride trips. The Reckless 80 follows the traditional three-bag packing configuration of adventure touring bikes (two side panniers and a rear duffle) but doesn’t require side pannier racks, saving significant weight and cost. It expands and contracts to accommodate a wide variety of loads, making it an extraordinarily ‘livable’ luggage system. ADVERTISEMENT With the updated Reckless 80, Mosko Moto strives to set a new benchmark for large-capacity, rackless luggage systems. In its third incarnation, designers used all of the advantages of hindsight, making changes both large and small, in their attempt to develop the ultimate rackless luggage system. Reckless 80 V3.0 Revolver What’s New Custom-fit for motorcycles of all shapes and sizes with adjustable leg bag angles and improved versatility making it easier to swap between bikes. Upgraded harness highlighted by additional padding, reinforcement, and adjustability to withstand even more rigorous off-road conditions. New configuration options with removable beavertail and optional AUX Pox, in addition to carryover MOLLE webbing from former generations. Increased serviceability by way of nearly every individual piece being replaceable: Buckles, Straps, Beavertail, even the Harness itself if need be. The new Mosko Moto Reckless 80 V3.0 Revolver is available at moskomoto.com with an MSRP starting at $625.
  15. Published on 03.13.2020 The AVANTOUR 2 is Falco’s new top of the line waterproof adventure boot featuring traditional Italian craftsmanship and the latest technology. The Falco AVANTOUR 2 adventure motorcycle boot is geared more towards on-road adventure touring, but with plenty of durability and quality to last during light off-road riding. And with a sub $300 price tag, it’s also a great value. The Avantour 2 feature a Hi-Tex waterproof membrane. The boots also include and integrated P.U. heat-shield and reinforced arch support. All new for 2020, the AVANTOUR 2 features a water-resistant full-grain leather upper paired with a High-Tex waterproof/breathable liner for waterproof protection. Maximum comfort, movement, and support are achieved with a P.U. Moulded shin plate, Eso-Motion 2 articulating ankle hinge system, and D3O shock-absorbing ankle cups. Black anodized aluminum buckles are fully adjustable and replaceable if damaged. While the outsole has a differentiated compound for maximized optimum grip on the foot-pegs. Multiple-pieces integrated into the security skeleton support movements of foot. The moulded outsole has a differentiated compound for optimum grip on the foot-pegs. Impact force transmitted to ankle area is significantly reduced thanks to D3O™ impact protection. From fire roads to lunch at the burger shop, Falco claims the AVANTOUR 2 provides the comfort, performance and style you would expect from a classic Italian-made adventure touring boot. ADVERTISEMENT Available in black or brown, sizes 41-48 EU. Look for them at retailers starting in March 2020. MSRP is €249.90 Euro (about $278 USD). For more information visit giannifalco.com. Falco AVANTOUR 2 Core Features Full-grain leather construction High-Tex waterproof, breathable liner Eso-Motion 2 articulating rear hinge D3O shock-absorbing padding High-grip textured rubber sole Made in Italy CE Certified Black or brown colors available Sizes 41-48
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