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Advpulse last won the day on 27 Ianuarie 2018

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  1. KTM has lifted the covers on what they are calling “its most hardcore adventure bike for 2020” – the limited edition KTM 790 Adventure R Rally. Until recently, the ‘790 Adventure R’ was described by the orange marque as the most off-road capable adventure bike the company had ever produced. Now KTM is announcing a new ‘rally’ variant that takes off-road performance to a higher level. The third and newest member of the 790 Adventure family is an exclusive model KTM is positioning as the “most travel-capable rally bike” and will be restricted to just 500 units worldwide. KTM designed this bike for riders who demand the most hardcore performance and best suspension components available, a machine that can easily cross continents in order to ride to the start line of a rally. ADVERTISEMENT Based heavily on the KTM 790 Adventure R, this exclusive model retains the same steel trellis chassis and the potent and compact 95hp LC8c parallel twin engine, with the major component difference being the addition of the special WP XPLOR PRO suspension. Built in the same department as WP’s Factory Racing equipment, it offers even higher levels of performance for extreme riding. An additional 1.2 inches (30mm) of suspension travel front and back helps clear tough obstacles and also creates a seat h of 35.8 inches (910mm) for this special model. The WP XPLOR PRO 7548 fork uses cone valve technology; a unique valving system that permits almost limitless damping performance and combines comfort with bottoming resistance. Setting levels that normally can only be achieved by changing the shim stack can now be adjusted from the outside. The cone valve allows unlimited opening, so harshness of the suspension is reduced. The high quality and fully adjustable WP XPLOR PRO 6746 shock absorber for the KTM 790 Adventure R Rally has been developed based on KTM’s unrivalled experience from top-level rally competition. Due to modern, low-friction components, the shock absorber shows a significant increase in its damping performance and reduces the physical strain for riders. The shock absorber employs a progressive damping system (PDS) and has completely – and easily – adjustable damping behavior. To emphasize its READY TO RACE credentials along with the WP XPLOR PRO suspension, the KTM 790 Adventure R Rally features a weight-saving Akrapovič exhaust, carbon fiber tank protectors and Quickshifter+ as standard. Easily distinguished by its unique color and graphic design with clear screen and winglets, this special edition model comes with narrower rims fitted with tubes for hard offroad conditions, a high, straight racing seat to improve racing ergonomics and Rally footrests for comfort and grip when standing for long days. Hubert Trunkenpolz (KTM AG Chief Marketing Officer): “Quite simply, we’ve built the KTM 790 ADVENTURE R RALLY because we can! At KTM we continually try to push ourselves and the development of our products – this is the READY TO RACE way. We have the equipment at our disposal and we know how to make a truly special bike for our hardcore customers. With its Pro Components range, WP offers suspension close to the same level used by the Dakar-winning Red Bull KTM Factory Racing Rally team on the KTM 450 RALLY. The new KTM 790 ADVENTURE R RALLY is exactly as it says: A rally bike ready for any adventure.” Further details on pricing, availability and the ordering process for purchasing one of the limited number KTM 790 Adventure R Rally machines will be announced in the months to come.
  2. KTM has lifted the covers on what they are calling “its most hardcore adventure bike for 2020” – the limited edition KTM 790 Adventure R Rally. Until recently, the ‘790 Adventure R’ was described by the orange marque as the most off-road capable adventure bike the company had ever produced. Now KTM is announcing a new ‘rally’ variant that takes off-road performance to a higher level. The third and newest member of the 790 Adventure family is an exclusive model KTM is positioning as the “most travel-capable rally bike” and will be restricted to just 500 units worldwide. KTM designed this bike for riders who demand the most hardcore performance and best suspension components available, a machine that can easily cross continents in order to ride to the start line of a rally. ADVERTISEMENT Based heavily on the KTM 790 Adventure R, this exclusive model retains the same steel trellis chassis and the potent and compact 95hp LC8c parallel twin engine, with the major component difference being the addition of the special WP XPLOR PRO suspension. Built in the same department as WP’s Factory Racing equipment, it offers even higher levels of performance for extreme riding. An additional 1.2 inches (30mm) of suspension travel front and back helps clear tough obstacles and also creates a seat h of 35.8 inches (910mm) for this special model. The WP XPLOR PRO 7548 fork uses cone valve technology; a unique valving system that permits almost limitless damping performance and combines comfort with bottoming resistance. Setting levels that normally can only be achieved by changing the shim stack can now be adjusted from the outside. The cone valve allows unlimited opening, so harshness of the suspension is reduced. The high quality and fully adjustable WP XPLOR PRO 6746 shock absorber for the KTM 790 Adventure R Rally has been developed based on KTM’s unrivalled experience from top-level rally competition. Due to modern, low-friction components, the shock absorber shows a significant increase in its damping performance and reduces the physical strain for riders. The shock absorber employs a progressive damping system (PDS) and has completely – and easily – adjustable damping behavior. To emphasize its READY TO RACE credentials along with the WP XPLOR PRO suspension, the KTM 790 Adventure R Rally features a weight-saving Akrapovič exhaust, carbon fiber tank protectors and Quickshifter+ as standard. Easily distinguished by its unique color and graphic design with clear screen and winglets, this special edition model comes with narrower rims fitted with tubes for hard offroad conditions, a high, straight racing seat to improve racing ergonomics and Rally footrests for comfort and grip when standing for long days. Hubert Trunkenpolz (KTM AG Chief Marketing Officer): “Quite simply, we’ve built the KTM 790 ADVENTURE R RALLY because we can! At KTM we continually try to push ourselves and the development of our products – this is the READY TO RACE way. We have the equipment at our disposal and we know how to make a truly special bike for our hardcore customers. With its Pro Components range, WP offers suspension close to the same level used by the Dakar-winning Red Bull KTM Factory Racing Rally team on the KTM 450 RALLY. The new KTM 790 ADVENTURE R RALLY is exactly as it says: A rally bike ready for any adventure.” Further details on pricing, availability and the ordering process for purchasing one of the limited number KTM 790 Adventure R Rally machines will be announced in the months to come.
  3. [embedded content] Kawasaki has announced the release of an all-new dual sport model – the KLX230. It’s not a replacement for the KLX250, but sits next to it in the line up as more of a budget-friendly trail bike. It features a SOHC two-vale 233cc air-cooled and fuel-injected engine, built with reliability and smooth power in mind. The all-new dual sport includes disc brakes front and rear, along with an ABS option jointly developed with Bosch and tuned for both on-road and off-road use. The KLX230 also gets a 6-speed, making it more capable of handling travel over longer distances or your daily commute. A shorter 54.3″ wheelbase gives it greater maneuverability on the trail, while its full-size 21″/18″ wheels, 8.8″ suspension travel, 37mm fork, and 10.4″ ground clearance makes it easier to handle trail obstacles. With its electric starter, any trail spills will be easier to recover from as well. ADVERTISEMENT Kawasaki’s latest KLX model has Suzuki’s DR200S and Yamaha’s XT250 clearly in its sites. As a budget-oriented dual sport, it looks like an appealing option for new riders and should be fun for more seasoned riders too. Read on for more details about the KLX230 from Kawasaki: Kawasaki’s all-new, affordable KLX230 dual-purpose motorcycle has been purpose-built with trail riding in mind. Taking cues from the KX line and Kawasaki’s racing heritage, this 2020 street legal motorcycle features a torquey engine, nimble chassis and long-travel suspension. And in the case of the KLX230 ABS, Kawasaki’s first dual-purpose anti-lock braking system is also available to help instill extra confidence in riders. · ALL-NEW 233 cc fuel-injected, air-cooled, four-stroke engine · ALL-NEW steel perimeter frame · ALL-NEW long travel suspension · ALL-NEW large diameter wheels (21”/18”) · ALL-NEW large headlamp · ALL-NEW dual purpose ABS The KLX230 was designed and built to be a lightweight and easily maneuverable motorcycle for a wide range of riders. Utilizing the simple air-cooled engine design along with the easy handling perimeter frame helped keep the KLX230 compact, while the balance between the engine and frame results in optimal trail fun performance. A smooth and reliable, powerful, 233cc air-cooled engine and compact steel perimeter frame were designed with trail riding in mind. Full-size wheels, long-travel suspension, ample ground clearance, and KX inspired styling and ergonomics all contribute to the off-road capability of the KLX230 motorcycle. Front and rear disc brakes supported by Kawasaki’s first dual-purpose ABS provide sure stopping power when riding on trails as well as on-road. Engine & Transmission · ALL-NEW 233 cc fuel-injected, air-cooled, four-stroke engine · ALL-NEW electric start · ALL-NEW six speed transmission The four-stroke air-cooled single cylinder engine offers smooth, reliable and durable performance in a compact package. The engine has a bore and stroke of 67.0 x 66.0 mm, with a displacement of 233 cc. The long-stroke offers robust low-mid range torque for smooth and easy handling. A simple SOHC two-valve design was chosen for its easy-to-use power character and reliability. Fuel injection ensures consistent fuel delivery regardless of outside air temperature or elevation. It also enables the use of an electric starter, for easy starting at the push of a button, whether the engine is hot or cold, and contributes to clean emissions. The fuel injection system utilizes a 32 mm throttle body, which delivers precise response. Exhaust pipe length was selected to contribute to the engine’s low-mid range performance. To match the strong off-road image of the KX-inspired bodywork, the exhaust features a tapered silencer with an oval cross-section. A smooth-shifting six-speed transmission covers a wide range of street-riding conditions and allows for more comfortable cruising on the highway, while also effective when trail riding. A 45/14 final gear ratio was selected for an ideal balance for both road and trail riding. Chassis · ALL-NEW steel perimeter frame · ALL-NEW 37 mm telescopic long travel fork · ALL-NEW Uni-Trak long travel suspension Designed from the start for off road and street riding, the all-new high-tensile steel perimeter frame offers the optimal handling needed for enjoyable riding in a wide range of environments. The engine and frame were designed together, which helped engineers achieve a low engine h, ideal chassis rigidity balance, and a low center of gravity, all in a compact chassis. The short 54.3” wheelbase combined with the high 10.4” ground clearance contributes to the bike’s maneuverability, allowing riders to more easily navigate the trail. A large, 37 mm diameter telescopic fork handles suspension duties up front; equipped with 8.8” long of travel suspension offers controllability on a variety of terrain. At the rear, the new Uni-Trak rear suspension with 8.8” of wheel travel provides great road holding ability and bump absorption. The single rear shock absorber with pressurized nitrogen gas is adjustable for preload, allowing riders to set the bike up for their weight or a passenger. Wheels & Brakes · ALL-NEW large diameter wheels · ALL-NEW large diameter disc brakes · ALL-NEW Bosch dual-purpose ABS Full-size aluminum wheels, measuring 21” at the front and 18” at the rear, make it easier to overcome obstacles encountered on trails. The KLX230 motorcycle comes equipped with petal disc brakes, front and rear, which provide sure stopping power. On non-ABS models, a 240 mm front disc gripped by a twin-piston caliper offers strong, easy-to-control braking. Slowing the rear, a single-piston caliper grips a 220 mm disc. ABS equipped models utilize a 265 mm front disc, gripped by a twin-piston caliper, which offers strong, easy-to-control braking. A 220 mm disc operated by a single-piston caliper slows the rear. The new dual purpose ABS system was carefully tuned for both on-road and off-road use. Designed to assist riders to stop effectively in a short distance in most conditions, dual-purpose ABS offers additional reassurance to riders when braking on a low-traction surface. Ergonomics · ALL-NEW low seat h · ALL-NEW KX inspired ergonomics The frame, seat, and tank of the KLX230 motorcycle were designed with a combination of form and function in mind, making the frame easy to grip with the legs, offering superior chassis control. Thanks to the compact design of the KLX230, a low seat h of 34.8” was achieved. Similar to the KX lineup of motorcycles, the flat design of the tank and seat gives the rider greater freedom of movement when changing riding positions, and facilitates sitting farther forward. In addition to trail riding, cruising comfort was also a consideration when deciding the seat shape and thickness. The seams between the shrouds, seat and side covers all fit flush, making it much easier for the rider to move around on the bike. Styling & Instrumentation · ALL-NEW KX-inspired styling · ALL-NEW LCD display instrumentation · ALL-NEW large, bright headlamp The KLX230 takes its styling cues from Kawasaki’s line of KX motocross motorcycles, giving the bike an agile, aggressive look to match its trail-riding prowess. A two-gallon fuel tank allows the good times to keep rolling over the course of a long day. Brightness was a priority when designing the headlamp of the KLX230 ; the large-size 60/55 watt lamp offers excellent illumination for riding at night or on covered trails. A pair of passenger footpegs enables easy two-up riding. The KLX230 motorcycle is also equipped with a lockable toolbox compartment, located in the left side cover, which features everything necessary for quick, on-the-spot maintenance jobs The toolbox utilizes the Kawasaki One-key system, which means that the side cover panel is conveniently unlocked with the ignition key. An all-digital instrument panel offers at-a-glance information care of a large, easy-to-read LCD display screen. Features include: speedometer, odometer, fuel gauge, clock, and indicator lamps. Accessories Riders can personalize their KLX230 to meet their needs, with numerous Kawasaki Genuine Accessories to choose from, such as: skid plate, frame covers, hand covers, oversized handlebar, handlebar pad, helmet lock, and a rear carrier. Kawasaki KLX230 (ABS Edition) Color: Lime Green MSRP: $4,899 Availability: Late Summer 2019 Kawasaki KLX230 (NON-ABS Edition) Color: Lime Green MSRP: $4,599 Availability: Late Summer 2019 2020 Kawasaki KLX230 Specs Engine: 4-stroke, 1-cylinder, SOHC, air-cooled Displacement: 233cc Bore x Stroke: 67.0 x 66.0mm Compression Ratio: 9.4:1 Fuel System: DFI w/32mm Throttle Body Ignition: TCBI Electronic Advance Transmission: Six-speed with wet multi-disc manual clutch Final Drive: Chain Front Suspension / Wheel Travel: 37mm telescopic fork/8.8 in Rear Suspension / Wheel Travel: Uni-Trak® linkage system and single shock with preload adjustability/8.8 in Front Tire: 2.75 x 21 Rear Tire: 4.10 x 18 Front Brakes: Single 265mm petal disc with a dual-piston caliper Rear Brakes: Single 220mm petal disc with single-piston caliper Frame Type: High-tensile steel perimeter Rake/Trail: 27.5°/4.6 in Overall Length: 82.9 in. Overall Width: 32.9 in. Overall Height: 45.9 in. Ground Clearance: 10.4 in. Seat Height: 34.8 in. Curb Weight: 293.3 lb. / 297.7 lb. CA model** Fuel Capacity: 2.0 gal. Wheelbase: 54.3 in. Color Choices: Lime Green Warranty: 6 Months Kawasaki Protection Plus™ (optional): 12, 24, or 36 months
  4. [embedded content] Kawasaki has announced the release of an all-new dual sport model – the KLX230. It’s not a replacement for the KLX250, but sits next to it in the line up as more of a budget-friendly trail bike. It features a SOHC two-vale 233cc air-cooled and fuel-injected engine, built with reliability and smooth power in mind. The all-new dual sport includes disc brakes front and rear, along with an ABS option jointly developed with Bosch and tuned for both on-road and off-road use. The KLX230 also gets a 6-speed, making it more capable of handling travel over longer distances or your daily commute. A shorter 54.3″ wheelbase gives it greater maneuverability on the trail, while its full-size 21″/18″ wheels, 8.8″ suspension travel, 37mm fork, and 10.4″ ground clearance makes it easier to handle trail obstacles. With its electric starter, any trail spills will be easier to recover from as well. ADVERTISEMENT Kawasaki’s latest KLX model has Suzuki’s DR200S and Yamaha’s XT250 clearly in its sites. As a budget-oriented dual sport, it looks like an appealing option for new riders and should be fun for more seasoned riders too. Read on for more details about the KLX230 from Kawasaki: Kawasaki’s all-new, affordable KLX230 dual-purpose motorcycle has been purpose-built with trail riding in mind. Taking cues from the KX line and Kawasaki’s racing heritage, this 2020 street legal motorcycle features a torquey engine, nimble chassis and long-travel suspension. And in the case of the KLX230 ABS, Kawasaki’s first dual-purpose anti-lock braking system is also available to help instill extra confidence in riders. · ALL-NEW 233 cc fuel-injected, air-cooled, four-stroke engine · ALL-NEW steel perimeter frame · ALL-NEW long travel suspension · ALL-NEW large diameter wheels (21”/18”) · ALL-NEW large headlamp · ALL-NEW dual purpose ABS The KLX230 was designed and built to be a lightweight and easily maneuverable motorcycle for a wide range of riders. Utilizing the simple air-cooled engine design along with the easy handling perimeter frame helped keep the KLX230 compact, while the balance between the engine and frame results in optimal trail fun performance. A smooth and reliable, powerful, 233cc air-cooled engine and compact steel perimeter frame were designed with trail riding in mind. Full-size wheels, long-travel suspension, ample ground clearance, and KX inspired styling and ergonomics all contribute to the off-road capability of the KLX230 motorcycle. Front and rear disc brakes supported by Kawasaki’s first dual-purpose ABS provide sure stopping power when riding on trails as well as on-road. Engine & Transmission · ALL-NEW 233 cc fuel-injected, air-cooled, four-stroke engine · ALL-NEW electric start · ALL-NEW six speed transmission The four-stroke air-cooled single cylinder engine offers smooth, reliable and durable performance in a compact package. The engine has a bore and stroke of 67.0 x 66.0 mm, with a displacement of 233 cc. The long-stroke offers robust low-mid range torque for smooth and easy handling. A simple SOHC two-valve design was chosen for its easy-to-use power character and reliability. Fuel injection ensures consistent fuel delivery regardless of outside air temperature or elevation. It also enables the use of an electric starter, for easy starting at the push of a button, whether the engine is hot or cold, and contributes to clean emissions. The fuel injection system utilizes a 32 mm throttle body, which delivers precise response. Exhaust pipe length was selected to contribute to the engine’s low-mid range performance. To match the strong off-road image of the KX-inspired bodywork, the exhaust features a tapered silencer with an oval cross-section. A smooth-shifting six-speed transmission covers a wide range of street-riding conditions and allows for more comfortable cruising on the highway, while also effective when trail riding. A 45/14 final gear ratio was selected for an ideal balance for both road and trail riding. Chassis · ALL-NEW steel perimeter frame · ALL-NEW 37 mm telescopic long travel fork · ALL-NEW Uni-Trak long travel suspension Designed from the start for off road and street riding, the all-new high-tensile steel perimeter frame offers the optimal handling needed for enjoyable riding in a wide range of environments. The engine and frame were designed together, which helped engineers achieve a low engine h, ideal chassis rigidity balance, and a low center of gravity, all in a compact chassis. The short 54.3” wheelbase combined with the high 10.4” ground clearance contributes to the bike’s maneuverability, allowing riders to more easily navigate the trail. A large, 37 mm diameter telescopic fork handles suspension duties up front; equipped with 8.8” long of travel suspension offers controllability on a variety of terrain. At the rear, the new Uni-Trak rear suspension with 8.8” of wheel travel provides great road holding ability and bump absorption. The single rear shock absorber with pressurized nitrogen gas is adjustable for preload, allowing riders to set the bike up for their weight or a passenger. Wheels & Brakes · ALL-NEW large diameter wheels · ALL-NEW large diameter disc brakes · ALL-NEW Bosch dual-purpose ABS Full-size aluminum wheels, measuring 21” at the front and 18” at the rear, make it easier to overcome obstacles encountered on trails. The KLX230 motorcycle comes equipped with petal disc brakes, front and rear, which provide sure stopping power. On non-ABS models, a 240 mm front disc gripped by a twin-piston caliper offers strong, easy-to-control braking. Slowing the rear, a single-piston caliper grips a 220 mm disc. ABS equipped models utilize a 265 mm front disc, gripped by a twin-piston caliper, which offers strong, easy-to-control braking. A 220 mm disc operated by a single-piston caliper slows the rear. The new dual purpose ABS system was carefully tuned for both on-road and off-road use. Designed to assist riders to stop effectively in a short distance in most conditions, dual-purpose ABS offers additional reassurance to riders when braking on a low-traction surface. Ergonomics · ALL-NEW low seat h · ALL-NEW KX inspired ergonomics The frame, seat, and tank of the KLX230 motorcycle were designed with a combination of form and function in mind, making the frame easy to grip with the legs, offering superior chassis control. Thanks to the compact design of the KLX230, a low seat h of 34.8” was achieved. Similar to the KX lineup of motorcycles, the flat design of the tank and seat gives the rider greater freedom of movement when changing riding positions, and facilitates sitting farther forward. In addition to trail riding, cruising comfort was also a consideration when deciding the seat shape and thickness. The seams between the shrouds, seat and side covers all fit flush, making it much easier for the rider to move around on the bike. Styling & Instrumentation · ALL-NEW KX-inspired styling · ALL-NEW LCD display instrumentation · ALL-NEW large, bright headlamp The KLX230 takes its styling cues from Kawasaki’s line of KX motocross motorcycles, giving the bike an agile, aggressive look to match its trail-riding prowess. A two-gallon fuel tank allows the good times to keep rolling over the course of a long day. Brightness was a priority when designing the headlamp of the KLX230 ; the large-size 60/55 watt lamp offers excellent illumination for riding at night or on covered trails. A pair of passenger footpegs enables easy two-up riding. The KLX230 motorcycle is also equipped with a lockable toolbox compartment, located in the left side cover, which features everything necessary for quick, on-the-spot maintenance jobs The toolbox utilizes the Kawasaki One-key system, which means that the side cover panel is conveniently unlocked with the ignition key. An all-digital instrument panel offers at-a-glance information care of a large, easy-to-read LCD display screen. Features include: speedometer, odometer, fuel gauge, clock, and indicator lamps. Accessories Riders can personalize their KLX230 to meet their needs, with numerous Kawasaki Genuine Accessories to choose from, such as: skid plate, frame covers, hand covers, oversized handlebar, handlebar pad, helmet lock, and a rear carrier. Kawasaki KLX230 (ABS Edition) Color: Lime Green MSRP: $4,899 Availability: Late Summer 2019 Kawasaki KLX230 (NON-ABS Edition) Color: Lime Green MSRP: $4,599 Availability: Late Summer 2019 2020 Kawasaki KLX230 Specs Engine: 4-stroke, 1-cylinder, SOHC, air-cooled Displacement: 233cc Bore x Stroke: 67.0 x 66.0mm Compression Ratio: 9.4:1 Fuel System: DFI w/32mm Throttle Body Ignition: TCBI Electronic Advance Transmission: Six-speed with wet multi-disc manual clutch Final Drive: Chain Front Suspension / Wheel Travel: 37mm telescopic fork/8.8 in Rear Suspension / Wheel Travel: Uni-Trak® linkage system and single shock with preload adjustability/8.8 in Front Tire: 2.75 x 21 Rear Tire: 4.10 x 18 Front Brakes: Single 265mm petal disc with a dual-piston caliper Rear Brakes: Single 220mm petal disc with single-piston caliper Frame Type: High-tensile steel perimeter Rake/Trail: 27.5°/4.6 in Overall Length: 82.9 in. Overall Width: 32.9 in. Overall Height: 45.9 in. Ground Clearance: 10.4 in. Seat Height: 34.8 in. Curb Weight: 293.3 lb. / 297.7 lb. CA model** Fuel Capacity: 2.0 gal. Wheelbase: 54.3 in. Color Choices: Lime Green Warranty: 6 Months Kawasaki Protection Plus™ (optional): 12, 24, or 36 months
  5. Published on 06.14.2019 After years of testing and development, Giant Loop has announced the launch of a new Tail Rack for dual sport motorcycles. The new product is designed to deliver a rugged, lightweight, low-profile, universal-fitting solution for anchoring saddlebags, tool packs and gear to any motorcycle’s rear plastic fender. Crafted from black anodized aluminum, the Tail Rack features unique stainless steel wire and gate carabiner-style clips for quick strap attachment and detachment. Stainless steel hardware makes installation quick and easy. Included aluminum spacers slightly raise the Rack, so Giant Loop’s stretch polyurethane Pronghorn Straps and webbing straps can slide beneath for solid mounting of Giant Loop’s Coyote Saddlebag, MoJavi Saddlebag, Klamath Tail Rack Pack, Possibles Pouch. They can also be used with many other lightweight rackless saddlebags and auxiliary bags. The Tail Rack can be used to provide a secure anchor point for a set of rackless saddlebags, tail bags or lighter gear. Weighing just 9.4 ounces (including hardware and spacers), the Giant Loop Tail Rack measures 5-inches wide by 8-inches long x 5/8-inch tall. Four wire-gate closures prevent webbing from disconnecting even when riding in the roughest terrain. The product can be mounted in two different positions on virtually any dirt bike, dual sport or enduro rear plastic fender. All hardware required for installation is included (4x stainless steel button head bolts, 4x stainless steel nylock nuts, 4x stainless steel washers and 4x aluminum spacers). Total load restricted to 10 lbs. maximum, as the Tail Rack is designed to provide secure anchor points for small Saddlebags, tail bags and lighter gear- NOT to support heavy loads. ADVERTISEMENT USA MSRP for Giant Loop’s universal Tail Rack solution is $49. You can find more details on the product by going to the Giant Loop website at giantloopmoto.com. Shopping Options
  6. Husqvarna Motorcycles has announced the launch of the new generation FE and FEs models – a revamped line-up of off-road and dual-sport machines that introduce key chassis, suspension and engine developments to allow riders to further extend their limits of off-road potential. All-new for 2020 are the off-road only FE 501 and FE 350. These models shed the road-going components of their dual-sport counterparts, the FE 501s and FE 350s, and feature more aggressive mapping and a less restrictive power pack, resulting in a lighter overall package and more power to put to the ground. Controlling this power is made easy with industry-leading Traction Control and a handlebar-mounted Map Select switch that allows the rider to select between two EFI maps, easily changing the engine character to suit the terrain or rider preference. ADVERTISEMENT Delivering high levels of dynamic performance, class-leading power across all engine sizes and equipped with updated WP suspension, the 2020 models benefit from comfortable ergonomics and a progressive design. Thanks to engine advances, a new frame, subframe, shock linkage and bodywork, updated fork and shock settings, and premium components as standard, the new range is designed to boost comfort and further allow riders of all skill levels better control while riding off-road or on. Major Chassis Upgrades Continuing the brand’s approach to innovation, the new generation of MY20 machines features new frames, subframes, bodywork, updated suspension and engines. All frames feature increased longitudinal and torsional rigidity, which when added to the new, lighter composite carbon fiber subframe, ensures excellent handling, stability and rider feedback. New aluminum cylinder head mountings provide reduced vibration and optimized flex to further improve handling. Updated 48 mm WP XPLOR front forks and WP XACT shocks offer simple adjustment, more consistent damping and better resistance to bottoming. Superior performance, comfort and traction is further enhanced thanks to the linkage system that reduces seat h, ensuring that riding over technical terrain is easier than ever. Engine Upgrades and Lower Seat Height The entire 4-stroke range features a revised exhaust systems and wiring harnesses for increased performance and rideability, with the FE 501 and FE 501s receiving a new cylinder head, as well as extensive revisions to the FE 350 and FE 350s engine. The new range also features distinctive, new bodywork and graphics. Allowing riders to perform at the highest level for extended periods, the slimmed down bodywork and 0.8 inch (20 mm) reduction in seat h deliver ergonomics that ensure easier movement on the bike and confidence inspiring riding positions. FE and FEs Highlights New frame on all models offering increased longitudinal & torsional rigidity New 250g lighter 2-piece subframe across the model range Updated WP XPLOR fork with new mid-valve piston & setting Updated WP XACT shock with new main piston & setting New shock linkage dimension providing reduced seat h & added control All-new exhaust systems for optimal performance & durability New seat places the rider 0.8 inches (20 mm) closer to the ground Improved cooling circuit with radiators mounted 12 mm lower Progressive new bodywork design offering new and improved ergonomics Updated 4-stroke engines offering improved performance & rideability Off-road only 4-strokes with Map Select switch and Traction Control The new Husqvarna 2020 FE and FEs models arrive in September of 2019. US pricing has not yet been announced. More details at husqvarna-motorcycles.com. 2020 Husqvarna FE 350/350s Specs Displacement: 349.7 cm³ Design: 1-cylinder, 4-stroke engine Bore: 88 mm Stroke: 57.5 mm Starter: Electric starter Transmission: 6-speed Clutch: Wet, DDS multi-disc clutch, Magura hydraulics EMS: Keihin EMS Frame design: Central double-cradle-type 25CrMo4 steel Rear suspension: WP shock absorber with linkage Suspension travel (front): 11.8″ (300 mm) Suspension travel (rear): 11.8″ (300 mm) Front brake: Disc brake Rear brake: Disc brake Front disc diameter: 260 mm Rear disc diameter: 220 mm Chain: X-Ring 5/8 x 1/4″ Steering head angle: 63.5 ° Ground clearance: 14.2″ (360 mm) Seat h: 37.4″ (950 mm) Tank capacity (approx.): 9 l Weight without fuel: 235 lbs (106.8 kg) 2020 Husqvarna FE 501/501s Specs Displacement: 510.9 cm³ Design: 1-cylinder, 4-stroke engine Bore: 95 mm Stroke: 72 mm Starter: Electric starter Transmission: 6-speed Clutch: Wet, DDS multi-disc clutch, Magura hydraulics EMS: Keihin EMS Frame design: Central double-cradle-type 25CrMo4 steel Rear suspension: WP shock absorber with linkage Suspension travel (front): 11.8″ (300 mm) Suspension travel (rear): 11.8″ (300 mm) Front brake: Disc brake Rear brake: Disc brake Front disc diameter: 260 mm Rear disc diameter: 220 mm Chain: X-Ring 5/8 x 1/4″ Steering head angle: 63.5 ° Ground clearance: 14.2″ (360 mm) Seat h: 37.4″ (950 mm) Tank capacity (approx.): 9 l Weight without fuel: 239 lbs (108.4 kg)
  7. Husqvarna Motorcycles has announced the launch of the new generation FE and FEs models – a revamped line-up of off-road and dual-sport machines that introduce key chassis, suspension and engine developments to allow riders to further extend their limits of off-road potential. All-new for 2020 are the off-road only FE 501 and FE 350. These models shed the road-going components of their dual-sport counterparts, the FE 501s and FE 350s, and feature more aggressive mapping and a less restrictive power pack, resulting in a lighter overall package and more power to put to the ground. Controlling this power is made easy with industry-leading Traction Control and a handlebar-mounted Map Select switch that allows the rider to select between two EFI maps, easily changing the engine character to suit the terrain or rider preference. ADVERTISEMENT Delivering high levels of dynamic performance, class-leading power across all engine sizes and equipped with updated WP suspension, the 2020 models benefit from comfortable ergonomics and a progressive design. Thanks to engine advances, a new frame, subframe, shock linkage and bodywork, updated fork and shock settings, and premium components as standard, the new range is designed to boost comfort and further allow riders of all skill levels better control while riding off-road or on. Major Chassis Upgrades Continuing the brand’s approach to innovation, the new generation of MY20 machines features new frames, subframes, bodywork, updated suspension and engines. All frames feature increased longitudinal and torsional rigidity, which when added to the new, lighter composite carbon fiber subframe, ensures excellent handling, stability and rider feedback. New aluminum cylinder head mountings provide reduced vibration and optimized flex to further improve handling. Updated 48 mm WP XPLOR front forks and WP XACT shocks offer simple adjustment, more consistent damping and better resistance to bottoming. Superior performance, comfort and traction is further enhanced thanks to the linkage system that reduces seat h, ensuring that riding over technical terrain is easier than ever. Engine Upgrades and Lower Seat Height The entire 4-stroke range features a revised exhaust systems and wiring harnesses for increased performance and rideability, with the FE 501 and FE 501s receiving a new cylinder head, as well as extensive revisions to the FE 350 and FE 350s engine. The new range also features distinctive, new bodywork and graphics. Allowing riders to perform at the highest level for extended periods, the slimmed down bodywork and 0.8 inch (20 mm) reduction in seat h deliver ergonomics that ensure easier movement on the bike and confidence inspiring riding positions. FE and FEs Highlights New frame on all models offering increased longitudinal & torsional rigidity New 250g lighter 2-piece subframe across the model range Updated WP XPLOR fork with new mid-valve piston & setting Updated WP XACT shock with new main piston & setting New shock linkage dimension providing reduced seat h & added control All-new exhaust systems for optimal performance & durability New seat places the rider 0.8 inches (20 mm) closer to the ground Improved cooling circuit with radiators mounted 12 mm lower Progressive new bodywork design offering new and improved ergonomics Updated 4-stroke engines offering improved performance & rideability Off-road only 4-strokes with Map Select switch and Traction Control The new Husqvarna 2020 FE and FEs models arrive in September of 2019. US pricing has not yet been announced. More details at husqvarna-motorcycles.com. 2020 Husqvarna FE 350/350s Specs Displacement: 349.7 cm³ Design: 1-cylinder, 4-stroke engine Bore: 88 mm Stroke: 57.5 mm Starter: Electric starter Transmission: 6-speed Clutch: Wet, DDS multi-disc clutch, Magura hydraulics EMS: Keihin EMS Frame design: Central double-cradle-type 25CrMo4 steel Rear suspension: WP shock absorber with linkage Suspension travel (front): 11.8″ (300 mm) Suspension travel (rear): 11.8″ (300 mm) Front brake: Disc brake Rear brake: Disc brake Front disc diameter: 260 mm Rear disc diameter: 220 mm Chain: X-Ring 5/8 x 1/4″ Steering head angle: 63.5 ° Ground clearance: 14.2″ (360 mm) Seat h: 37.4″ (950 mm) Tank capacity (approx.): 9 l Weight without fuel: 235 lbs (106.8 kg) 2020 Husqvarna FE 501/501s Specs Displacement: 510.9 cm³ Design: 1-cylinder, 4-stroke engine Bore: 95 mm Stroke: 72 mm Starter: Electric starter Transmission: 6-speed Clutch: Wet, DDS multi-disc clutch, Magura hydraulics EMS: Keihin EMS Frame design: Central double-cradle-type 25CrMo4 steel Rear suspension: WP shock absorber with linkage Suspension travel (front): 11.8″ (300 mm) Suspension travel (rear): 11.8″ (300 mm) Front brake: Disc brake Rear brake: Disc brake Front disc diameter: 260 mm Rear disc diameter: 220 mm Chain: X-Ring 5/8 x 1/4″ Steering head angle: 63.5 ° Ground clearance: 14.2″ (360 mm) Seat h: 37.4″ (950 mm) Tank capacity (approx.): 9 l Weight without fuel: 239 lbs (108.4 kg)
  8. Hepco & Becker created a high bar to clear with their original plastic Gobi panniers. In their new Xceed aluminum pannier system, they may have either cleared that bar or reset where it is entirely. An industry first, H & B offers two different rack mounting systems for the Xceed Panniers. One could be considered “traditional” – racks bolted to either side of the bike, the right side being further out to clear the pipe. The other is a unique “symmetrical” system, which positions the boxes above the pipe, allowing them to rest at equal distances from each side of the bike. While symmetry may be a godsend for anyone suffering from OCD, it’s an even larger benefit for those living in lane splitting legal states to always know you have the same amount of clearance available on both sides of the bike. Increasing box h by roughly five inches also means anyone riding pillion now has armrests with this system too. The H&B Xceed Panniers come with handy cargo nets attached under the lids and convenient carrying handles on top. How They Performed Electing to test Hepco & Becker’s symmetrical arrangement, the installation of the racks was quite simple with only a handful of bolts required to mount them. The only snag encountered during the install was some difficulty getting a few bolts threaded in. Running the bolts through from the opposite end helped clean out some extra powder coating that had gotten on the threads and the racks went on smoothly after that. ADVERTISEMENT The first thing one notices once the Xceed Panniers are mounted with the Symmetric Racks is the high kicks now required to get on and off the bike. Your inner ninja needs to swing that leg about five inches higher for dismounts. While Jean-Claude Van Damme will feel right at home with this system, a significant swath of the remaining riding population will likely elect to mount and dismount as if a top case was present. Two large 1/4-turn Lock-It bolts in the center and two outer (optional) safety bolts hold the pannier racks in place. The racks can be removed quickly with the rear cross-bar attached. During the first test on a multi-day camping trip, the slight increase in box altitude offered an unforeseen benefit in that the storage spaces were now “workbench h”. Loading and unloading was possibly the most effortless of any system I’ve tried. Aesthetically, the symmetrical system is a welcome arrangement which harkens back to the days of Gobi panniers mounted on KTM 950 Adventure bikes. That bike was symmetrical however with its dual pipes, so the pannier design inherently was as well, but I wax nostalgic. Functionally, these boxes are lighter than the Gobi panniers by nearly three pounds each, and two pounds lighter than Touratech Zega Pro panniers of the same volume. Shedding that weight means the Xceed panniers lack the water storage reservoir of the Gobis, as well as the horizontal “groove” shaped into box, allowing for a safety strap to be used if need be. Gained is anodized aluminum/impact-resistant plastic hybrid construction, front/rear opening access, greater internal storage volume, and all while still sporting the familiar key latch system, which is repairable should the need arise. Dual front and rear lid latches are a joy to work, requiring no fussing around with alignment to the box or opening/closing of the latch. A welcome feature, each lid features an included interior cargo net to take advantage of the space available above the rim of the pannier itself. This proved very useful on multi-day adventure rides, as it quickly became the preferred location to store items such as snacks, toiletries, and light rain layers. Large handles on both ends of the lids, just above the latches, make for easy removal and mounting of the boxes, as well as carrying around at campsites. Another unique twist to the Xceed pannier setup is the “Lock-It” system employed by the racks, which gives you the option to quickly remove the mounting racks. With the release of four large quarter-turn bolts, two on each side, the entire pannier rack system can be removed from the bike in a matter of seconds. Weight Comparison (Measured) Pannier Make & Model Capacity Weight Hepco & Becker Xceed 38 Liter 10 pounds, 6 ounces Hepco & Becker Gobi 37 Liter 13 pounds, 3 ounces Touratech Zega Pro 38 Liter 12 pounds, 3 ounces Sharing the same quick-release bolt arrangement, both symmetrical and asymmetrical Rack mounting systems are virtually identical, other than where they leave the boxes placed. As tested on a KTM 1090 Adventure R, the rack systems rely on the four quarter-turn bolts, a rear crossbar connecting the racks in front of the license plate, and the stock rubber pannier inserts towards the front of the boxes to keep everything in place. For light adventure touring, the system proved more than adequate. When the going got rough, the single horizontal mounting axis of the quick-release bolts means the rack system has some inherent flex under the weight of (often overloaded) boxes. Conventional threaded “safety bolts” can be installed adjacent to the quick-release bolts, and are recommended for off-road travel. The symmetric racks give the KTM 1090 Adventure a slimmer profile and balanced look, but do raise the center of gravity. Asymmetric racks are also available. Who Are They For With solid yet lightweight construction, the Xceed panniers are a good fit for both sport touring as well as adventure travel. Which rack system to use likely comes down to the individual rider’s intended use. For those who often ride two up, spend a good deal of time commuting in traffic, or who’s primary focus is “light adventure”, the symmetrical arrangement could very well be a good fit. For solo travel, the asymmetrical system could offer a handling advantage by keeping the weight of the entire system lower. The quick-disconnect nature of either choice in less-than-brutal conditions, means one could do without the additional safety bolts, and best take advantage of the removable nature of the racks. Those who use their adventure bikes for both urban and “big bike enduro” style riding can now quickly switch between lockable panniers or “rackless” soft luggage options in less time than it takes to make a cup of coffee. Our Verdict High build quality, light weight, and the only pannier system offering a choice of two different ways to mount the boxes make Hepco Becker’s Xceed pannier system worth checking out. While robust enough for general adventure touring, the quick release mounting systems could be subject to excessive flex in more extreme off-road conditions. Rather than a disadvantage, this is perhaps exactly the point. Choosing between hard luggage, soft luggage, or no luggage is a source of debate when it comes to adventure motorcycles that inherently fit a wide variety of contexts. Hepco Becker’s introduction of a quick-release pannier system now means riders don’t necessarily have to choose between one type of luggage or the other. What We Liked Light weight for their size. Refined build quality with solid latches. Easy to open/close latches and Convenient handles. Cool look slimmer profile with asymmetric design. What Could Be Improved Inclusion of conventional “non quick release” rack option. Addition of tie down points on sides of lids. Xceed Panniers & Racks Specs COLOR: Black or Titan Boxes with Black Racks SIZE: 38 Liters each side CONSTRUCTION: Cases: Anodized aluminum / impact-resistant plastic; Racks: Powder coated 5/8″ (16mm) round steel tubing racks PRICE: $440.50 – $485.50 per case; $370.85 – 381.74 for racks Shopping Options Author: Jon Beck Jon Beck is fulfilling a dream of never figuring out what to be when he grows up. Racing mountain bikes, competitive surfing, and touring as a musician are somehow part of what led Jon to travel through over 40 countries so far as an adventure motorcycle photographer, journalist, and guide. From precision riding for cameras in Hollywood, to refilling a fountain pen for travel stories, Jon brings a rare blend of experience to the table. While he seems happiest when lost in a desert someplace, deadlines are met most of the time.
  9. Published on 06.05.2019 For the last four model years, Honda’s CRF1000L Africa Twin has held an interesting position in the burgeoning adventure bike marketplace. Just enough bike to play in the high-buck, large displacement game yet, approachable enough to be an option for those looking for more of a middleweight mount – something along the lines of BMW’s F850GS, Triumph’s Tiger 800. Although, it’s not light and nimble enough to compete with the new breed of middle-weight players like KTM’s 790 Adventure R and the so-close-yet-so-far-from-the-U.S.-market Yamaha Ténéré 700. Speculation regarding upcoming Africa Twin offerings has so far been trained on a probable bump in displacement, rendering a presumably modest increase in performance (and cost), most likely an effort to compensate for stringent emissions requirements on the horizon for the EU. Yes, pretty boring stuff, especially when we care even more that an upgraded Africa Twin comes with seemingly obvious e-goodies like cruise control and real-world adventure options like tubeless spoked rims than a few extra digits on the dyno. ADVERTISEMENT But then over the weekend tongues around the globe set to wagging over a story that broke on the Japanese Motorcycle Magazine Autoby featuring renderings of an all-new 850cc Africa Twin proclaimed to be in the pipeline for release as a 2021 model. Yes, yes, yes! Wouldn’t we all like to see an all-new edition — and especially a true ADV middleweight option — from Honda? Because by now we all know displacement does not make the adventure. While some riders want more power, zero riders crave a heavier bike. What’s always more important than output is how we feel on the bike, especially as we explore new skills and venture further from the main roads. However, with bikes like KTM’s new 790 Adventure R entering the middleweight arena boasting comparable engine output and better off-road performance than the current Africa Twin, and for just about the same dough, Honda has its work cut out. Autoby has a reputation for getting these Honda predictions right, so in the spirit of more choices are better, let’s all light a mental candle that this 850cc Africa Twin rendering materializes into a real bike in the next year or two. Better yet, that it’s in the same mold as the new-gen middleweights and comes to the market with the reliability we know Honda is capable of, and the affordable pricing that made the company one of the world’s most highly-regarded brands. Author: Jamie Elvidge Jamie has been a motorcycle journalist for more than 30 years, testing the entire range of bikes for the major print magazines and specializing in adventure-travel related stories. To date she’s written and supplied photography for articles describing what it’s like to ride in all 50 states and 43 foreign countries, receiving two Lowell Thomas Society of American Travel Writer’s Awards along the way. Her most-challenging adventure yet has been riding in the 2018 GS Trophy in Mongolia as Team AusAmerica’s embedded journalist.
  10. Published on 06.05.2019 For the last four model years, Honda’s CRF1000L Africa Twin has held an interesting position in the burgeoning adventure bike marketplace. Just enough bike to play in the high-buck, large displacement game yet, approachable enough to be an option for those looking for more of a middleweight mount – something along the lines of BMW’s F850GS, Triumph’s Tiger 800. Although, it’s not light and nimble enough to compete with the new breed of middle-weight players like KTM’s 790 Adventure R and the so-close-yet-so-far-from-the-U.S.-market Yamaha Ténéré 700. Speculation regarding upcoming Africa Twin offerings has so far been trained on a probable bump in displacement, rendering a presumably modest increase in performance (and cost), most likely an effort to compensate for stringent emissions requirements on the horizon for the EU. Yes, pretty boring stuff, especially when we care even more that an upgraded Africa Twin comes with seemingly obvious e-goodies like cruise control and real-world adventure options like tubeless spoked rims than a few extra digits on the dyno. ADVERTISEMENT But then over the weekend tongues around the globe set to wagging over a story that broke on the Japanese Motorcycle Magazine Autoby featuring renderings of an all-new 850cc Africa Twin proclaimed to be in the pipeline for release as a 2021 model. Yes, yes, yes! Wouldn’t we all like to see an all-new edition — and especially a true ADV middleweight option — from Honda? Because by now we all know displacement does not make the adventure. While some riders want more power, zero riders crave a heavier bike. What’s always more important than output is how we feel on the bike, especially as we explore new skills and venture further from the main roads. However, with bikes like KTM’s new 790 Adventure R entering the middleweight arena boasting comparable engine output and better off-road performance than the current Africa Twin, and for just about the same dough, Honda has its work cut out. Autoby has a reputation for getting these Honda predictions right, so in the spirit of more choices are better, let’s all light a mental candle that this 850cc Africa Twin rendering materializes into a real bike in the next year or two. Better yet, that it’s in the same mold as the new-gen middleweights and comes to the market with the reliability we know Honda is capable of, and the affordable pricing that made the company one of the world’s most highly-regarded brands. Author: Jamie Elvidge Jamie has been a motorcycle journalist for more than 30 years, testing the entire range of bikes for the major print magazines and specializing in adventure-travel related stories. To date she’s written and supplied photography for articles describing what it’s like to ride in all 50 states and 43 foreign countries, receiving two Lowell Thomas Society of American Travel Writer’s Awards along the way. Her most-challenging adventure yet has been riding in the 2018 GS Trophy in Mongolia as Team AusAmerica’s embedded journalist.
  11. [embedded content] Early on life teaches us to be skeptical of things that sound too good to be true. Take for example the concept of a lightweight (around 6 pounds), weatherproof tent that comes with a built-in air mattress and its own sleeping bag. Then make it affordable (compared to buying everything separately), able to attach to the same-model tents of friends and lovers, and best of all compact enough to slip into the average ADV-bike pannier. Too good to be true? RhinoWolf is currently hosting a Kickstarter campaign as a means to sell the second version of its all-in-one tent concept. The original RhinoWolf was sold to the public via a similar and very successful campaign in 2017, this one hosted by Indiegogo. RhinoWolf replaces your traditional camping sleep setup with an all-in-one tent. The sleeping system has a mattress, pole and sleeping bag integrated into the design and packs into a compact 6.2 lbs bundle. The original tent was the same concept as the 2.0: Ripstop nylon construction for the tent, wide openings with mosquito netting on each side, side wings for shade and to stabilize the single pole design, blow-up mattress complete with pump sack and down sleeping blanket (it’s a top “blanket” connected to the mattress, not a full bag). As a unique extra, the tent can be zipped to another RhinoWolf for coupling, or to as many RhinoWolfs as you want to create a cool tunnel tent. For the 2.0 version RhinoWolf has integrated the pole and tent pegs into the design, added some ventilation and improved connect-ability with a more runoff-resistant roll-and-lock system. ADVERTISEMENT The original tent came in three climate versions: a 2-, 3- and 4-season ratings dependent on the weight of the duck-down blanket (150g to 560g). The new version appears to only be available in 2- and 3-season versions, the 2-season with a blanket filled with 150g synthetic fiber and the 3-season with 375g of duck down. Additional details remain a bit vague, for example whether the company will continue using Klymit-branded air mattresses, as it did in the previous version. The RhinoWolf attaches to other same-model tents. The modular all-in-one tent uses a 1-pole frame design and comes with 6 anchoring pegs. Integrated air vents at the top and side facilitate airflow and reduce humidity. When we asked RhinoWolf to clarify details on 2.0 construction they responded: “Since this is an innovative design, the product can be manufactured in all types of fabrics and materials.” Additionally, the company says any fabric test results will not be supplied until the production phase of the project, yet claims the tent to be windproof, waterproof and bugproof. To the skeptics among us these are not very reassuring declarations. Additionally, since the original tent was sold only via the initial Indiegogo campaign, there is no bank of reviews to ponder, save two lonely write-ups on Amazon where units were assumably resold by original Indeigogo backers. The air mattress uses a pump sack for faster inflation. So, is the RhinoWolf all-in-one tent system too good to be true? Buying into one certainly feels like a leap of faith (and patience, as they will not be delivered to Kickstarter backers until December 2019). But for the optimist, the RhinoWolf, which does come with a one-year satisfaction guarantee, is certain to be a viable option if you roll out into the wild for only a handful of adventures a season. It’s also a huge win and super-smart use of space for the veteran traveler who prefers hoteling and rarely camps. And ADV aside, if your have kids: Bingo! The RhinoWolf Kickstarter campaign is scheduled to end on July 25, 2019 at 5 a.m. Pacific standard time with the current early bird price set at $199. At time of writing there is no word on what the next crowdfunding price will be once the early bird offer expires, but the “retail price” is said to be $349. So check it out and let us know your thoughts. And if you were one of the original backers and own a RhinoWolf already, let us all know how it’s working out for you! Author: Jamie Elvidge Jamie has been a motorcycle journalist for more than 30 years, testing the entire range of bikes for the major print magazines and specializing in adventure-travel related stories. To date she’s written and supplied photography for articles describing what it’s like to ride in all 50 states and 43 foreign countries, receiving two Lowell Thomas Society of American Travel Writer’s Awards along the way. Her most-challenging adventure yet has been riding in the 2018 GS Trophy in Mongolia as Team AusAmerica’s embedded journalist.
  12. When Honda introduced its wee 125cc Grom for the 2014 model year the whole world smiled. The pint-sized naked bike looked like a cute toy, but packed an adult-sized fun factor. Five years on, the Grom is still super popular with a cultish following of unapologetic funsters who use the versatile fat-tired bike for everything from pit errands to round-the-world travel. Surprisingly comfortable and uncannily quick, the affordable, super fuel-efficient Honda Grom seemed a complete package, at least until Industrial Moto threw a Grom Utility Sidecar (GUS) into the mix. So yes, now you can outfit your tiny naked bike with a sidecar for a result that is way more serious than it sounds. The GUS is designed to bolt directly to your Grom for easy install and removal. LED lights can be added as an option. More of a “side cart” than a sidecar, the easily removable $1,600 GUS features independent suspension and a steel chassis powder coated in a variety of color options. Its matching wheel is also powder coated and can be adjusted for negative/positive toe. Tire choices are a Kenda dual sport, street or Big Block. The GUS comes stock with pre-installed D-rings, a cargo net, a set of Quick Fist clamps for securing tools or accessories and pre-drilled holes for potential add-ons. For an extra hundy you can purchase the cool LED light kit, and for another $220 you can add a small passenger seat and grab rail set. ADVERTISEMENT To be real, that passenger will be a child or an adventurous dog, and your haul of kit something along the lines of groceries, camping gear or an ice chest loaded with cold ones, but what’s sad about that? Industrial Moto’s Grom sidecar only ups the trendy Grom’s cool factor, allowing the runabout bike to be more versatile and useful than ever. The GUS comes stock with D-rings, a cargo net, a set of Quick Fist clamps, pre-drilled holes for potential add-ons, and several tire choices. You can also add an easily removable small passenger seat with a wrapped grab bar. Seat stitching color will match your sidecar color. Project GUS was the invention of Industrial Moto owner and custom builder Tyler Haynes who specializes in making his one-off projects as functional as they are stylish. After creating the first GUS for a project bike, he decided to take the option mainstream. In addition, there is a version on the way to fit Honda’s cool new vintagesque 125cc Monkey (Project MUS), which will be sold for the same price as the GUS. The only thing problematic about these new sidecars might be availability, as they are currently flying off the shelves at Industrial Moto. That and the niggle that if you bought the $3,399 Grom for reasons of budget rather than whimsy, throwing out an additional $1,600 – $1,920 for a tiny sidecar to match might feel more diamond-studded cat collar than commonsensical. For more details head over to Industrial Moto’s site. Photos courtesy of Industrial Moto Author: Jamie Elvidge Jamie has been a motorcycle journalist for more than 30 years, testing the entire range of bikes for the major print magazines and specializing in adventure-travel related stories. To date she’s written and supplied photography for articles describing what it’s like to ride in all 50 states and 43 foreign countries, receiving two Lowell Thomas Society of American Travel Writer’s Awards along the way. Her most-challenging adventure yet has been riding in the 2018 GS Trophy in Mongolia as Team AusAmerica’s embedded journalist.
  13. When Honda introduced its wee 125cc Grom for the 2014 model year the whole world smiled. The pint-sized naked bike looked like a cute toy, but packed an adult-sized fun factor. Five years on, the Grom is still super popular with a cultish following of unapologetic funsters who use the versatile fat-tired bike for everything from pit errands to round-the-world travel. Surprisingly comfortable and uncannily quick, the affordable, super fuel-efficient Honda Grom seemed a complete package, at least until Industrial Moto threw a Grom Utility Sidecar (GUS) into the mix. So yes, now you can outfit your tiny naked bike with a sidecar for a result that is way more serious than it sounds. The GUS is designed to bolt directly to your Grom for easy install and removal. LED lights can be added as an option. More of a “side cart” than a sidecar, the easily removable $1,600 GUS features independent suspension and a steel chassis powder coated in a variety of color options. Its matching wheel is also powder coated and can be adjusted for negative/positive toe. Tire choices are a Kenda dual sport, street or Big Block. The GUS comes stock with pre-installed D-rings, a cargo net, a set of Quick Fist clamps for securing tools or accessories and pre-drilled holes for potential add-ons. For an extra hundy you can purchase the cool LED light kit, and for another $220 you can add a small passenger seat and grab rail set. ADVERTISEMENT To be real, that passenger will be a child or an adventurous dog, and your haul of kit something along the lines of groceries, camping gear or an ice chest loaded with cold ones, but what’s sad about that? Industrial Moto’s Grom sidecar only ups the trendy Grom’s cool factor, allowing the runabout bike to be more versatile and useful than ever. The GUS comes stock with D-rings, a cargo net, a set of Quick Fist clamps, pre-drilled holes for potential add-ons, and several tire choices. You can also add an easily removable small passenger seat with a wrapped grab bar. Seat stitching color will match your sidecar color. Project GUS was the invention of Industrial Moto owner and custom builder Tyler Haynes who specializes in making his one-off projects as functional as they are stylish. After creating the first GUS for a project bike, he decided to take the option mainstream. In addition, there is a version on the way to fit Honda’s cool new vintagesque 125cc Monkey (Project MUS), which will be sold for the same price as the GUS. The only thing problematic about these new sidecars might be availability, as they are currently flying off the shelves at Industrial Moto. That and the niggle that if you bought the $3,399 Grom for reasons of budget rather than whimsy, throwing out an additional $1,600 – $1,920 for a tiny sidecar to match might feel more diamond-studded cat collar than commonsensical. For more details head over to Industrial Moto’s site. Photos courtesy of Industrial Moto Author: Jamie Elvidge Jamie has been a motorcycle journalist for more than 30 years, testing the entire range of bikes for the major print magazines and specializing in adventure-travel related stories. To date she’s written and supplied photography for articles describing what it’s like to ride in all 50 states and 43 foreign countries, receiving two Lowell Thomas Society of American Travel Writer’s Awards along the way. Her most-challenging adventure yet has been riding in the 2018 GS Trophy in Mongolia as Team AusAmerica’s embedded journalist.
  14. When Honda introduced its wee 125cc Grom for the 2014 model year the whole world smiled. The pint-sized naked bike looked like a cute toy, but packed an adult-sized fun factor. Five years on, the Grom is still super popular with a cultish following of unapologetic funsters who use the versatile fat-tired bike for everything from pit errands to round-the-world travel. Surprisingly comfortable and uncannily quick, the affordable, super fuel-efficient Honda Grom seemed a complete package, at least until Industrial Moto threw a Grom Utility Sidecar (GUS) into the mix. So yes, now you can outfit your tiny naked bike with a sidecar for a result that is way more serious than it sounds. The GUS is designed to bolt directly to your Grom for easy install and removal. LED lights can be added as an option. More of a “side cart” than a sidecar, the easily removable $1,600 GUS features independent suspension and a steel chassis powder coated in a variety of color options. Its matching wheel is also powder coated and can be adjusted for negative/positive toe. Tire choices are a Kenda dual sport, street or Big Block. The GUS comes stock with pre-installed D-rings, a cargo net, a set of Quick Fist clamps for securing tools or accessories and pre-drilled holes for potential add-ons. For an extra hundy you can purchase the cool LED light kit, and for another $220 you can add a small passenger seat and grab rail set. ADVERTISEMENT To be real, that passenger will be a child or an adventurous dog, and your haul of kit something along the lines of groceries, camping gear or an ice chest loaded with cold ones, but what’s sad about that? Industrial Moto’s Grom sidecar only ups the trendy Grom’s cool factor, allowing the runabout bike to be more versatile and useful than ever. The GUS comes stock with D-rings, a cargo net, a set of Quick Fist clamps, pre-drilled holes for potential add-ons, and several tire choices. You can also add an easily removable small passenger seat with a wrapped grab bar. Seat stitching color will match your sidecar color. Project GUS was the invention of Industrial Moto owner and custom builder Tyler Haynes who specializes in making his one-off projects as functional as they are stylish. After creating the first GUS for a project bike, he decided to take the option mainstream. In addition, there is a version on the way to fit Honda’s cool new vintagesque 125cc Monkey (Project MUS), which will be sold for the same price as the GUS. The only thing problematic about these new sidecars might be availability, as they are currently flying off the shelves at Industrial Moto. That and the niggle that if you bought the $3,399 Grom for reasons of budget rather than whimsy, throwing out an additional $1,600 – $1,920 for a tiny sidecar to match might feel more diamond-studded cat collar than commonsensical. For more details head over to Industrial Moto’s site. Photos courtesy of Industrial Moto Author: Jamie Elvidge Jamie has been a motorcycle journalist for more than 30 years, testing the entire range of bikes for the major print magazines and specializing in adventure-travel related stories. To date she’s written and supplied photography for articles describing what it’s like to ride in all 50 states and 43 foreign countries, receiving two Lowell Thomas Society of American Travel Writer’s Awards along the way. Her most-challenging adventure yet has been riding in the 2018 GS Trophy in Mongolia as Team AusAmerica’s embedded journalist.
  15. The adventure motorcycle segment has seen significant change in the diversity of its product offerings in recent years. While displacement one-upmanship continues at the far end of the cc spectrum, roughly 10 years ago a “middleweight” twin-cylinder category began gaining traction among adventure traveling enthusiasts. In the early 2000’s, other than the KTM 950, most big adventure bikes were over 1,000cc. Around 2008, things began to change as BMW introduced the F800GS, and Triumph introduced the Tiger 800 a couple years later in 2010. Today, either V-twin or parallel-twin bikes dominate this sector, the Triumph being the outlier with its in-line triple powerplant. With recent updates to the Triumph Tiger 800 XCa and the release of the all-new BMW F850GS, we decided to take a fresh look at these long-term rivals. Read on to see how their latest iterations match up. At First Glance Aesthetics between these two bikes are left up to the eye of the beholder. Attempting to break down design aspects of each bike in a logical way, the Triumph has more symmetrical lines, where asymmetry has been built into BMW’s design philosophy for years. Svelte frame and crashbar bends on the Triumph meld together resulting in the Tiger looking like something Ducati might have built. The familiar “raised eyebrow” headlight arrangement on the BMW is echoed by a trapezoidal pipe and header arrangement, connected by a somewhat voluminous catalytic converter when viewed from the right side. ADVERTISEMENT On the surface, both bikes were similarly equipped with color-TFT display, ABS, 21″/17″ wire-spoke wheel combo, heated grips, hand guards, sump protection, cruise control, center stand, and traction control with multiple riding modes, yet several key differences exist. And while Cagiva wasn’t involved in this test, there was an elephant in the room: Price. As tested, the Tiger comes in at $1,400 less than the F850GS. But that doesn’t mean the Tiger lacks features compared to the BMW. Let’s take a closer look… The Tiger 800 XCa model gets a larger windscreen than the BMW which is also adjustable. Also larger footpegs, one gallon more fuel (5.0 vs 4.0 gallons), aluminum radiator guard, crash bars, heated driver and passenger seats, LED fog lights, and fully-adjustable WP suspension (except front preload). Our F850GS was loaded with BMW’s Premium, Comfort, Touring, Dynamic, and ‘Exclusive Style’ packages. Stand out features on the BMW included Keyless Ride (ignition fob), Gear Shift Assist Pro (i.e. quick shifter), Dynamic ESA Electronically adjustable rear shock, TPMS, and lean angle sensing for ABS and Traction control. While both bikes are stacked to the brim with technology, the Tiger gets some additional off-road and touring equipment the F850GS doesn’t. Yet the BMW receives a more-advanced electronics package that helps to justify the premium price. The Motors While the feature set in each of the two builds is a glaring contrast based on price, the experience behind the bars brings up other nuances. Given the Triumph is unique in this category by virtue of adding an extra cylinder to the mix, the familiar grunt of the BMW’s parallel twin is a welcome feature while on the trail. Wanting empirical verification of the riding experience between the two bikes, we rode them over to Rottweiler Performance in Newport Beach, California, for testing in their state-of-the-art dyno room. While the BMW has the grunt advantage, the Tiger offers smooth, consistent torque that is available right off idle and doesn’t drop off until after 8,000 rpm. | Dyno test courtesy of Rottweiler Performance. Dyno tests bear out the additional power and torque provided by the higher-displacement motor of the BMW, and distinctly illustrate the perceived smoothness of the Triumph’s triple-cylinder powerplant. While the BMW has an advantage in grunt, the Tiger offers smooth, consistent torque that is available right off idle and really only drops off after 8,000 rpm. Just as comparing a single to a twin results in numerous caveats, comparing a twin to a triple presents certain challenges as well. Both engines produce great power, but they do so very differently. Having both sound and feel that seems borrowed from a road race bike, the Tiger produces its best power in each gear around 1,000 rpm higher than the GS. That addicting quickness comes at the price of the familiar “hit” of a twin. Carrying this train of thought down to thumpers, where the low-end torque can be even more readily apparent, highlights the idea. In slower, more technical conditions, the GS powerplant felt more predictable with a bit more pop where the Triumph’s soft-hitting, tractable power was a little distracting at first. While using the subtle buzz of a triple takes some getting used to on the trails, the learning curve on the tarmac is much shorter. With almost no perceptible kinks in the torque curve, the Triumph offers up whatever power is desired, in whatever gear, at whatever speed. Those more oriented to off-road riding just have to get used to hearing the scream of a three cylinder motor moving them along. Ergonomics Extensive road miles in pre-dawn freezing temperatures proved the Triumph to be the clear winner in the touring category. While both bikes were equipped with heated grips, Triumph’s inclusion of heated seats and a larger, adjustable windscreen were key features to improve the riding experience in less-than-desirable weather. The uniquely simple adjustment mechanism for the Tiger’s large windscreen is likely the easiest to work with while riding of any bike in this category. Once moved to the desired detent, helmet buffeting was minimal. Off-road, the cockpit arrangement of both bikes inspired confidence. Bar and peg arrangement of either machine agreed with my 5’ 11” frame. The Tiger’s larger footpegs, and fully-adjustable WP suspension resulted in noticeably better handling when the desert roads turned to whooped out, rocky trails. Wheel travel between the two bikes is very close in the rear, with the Tiger having about 2/3” more suspension up front (8.7″ vs 8.0″). Handling One of the first things noticed on tight, rocky trails where muscling the bike through was required, was the greater amount of leverage and more solid boot contact provided by the Tiger’s comparatively larger footpegs. Simply having a bigger and more grippy platform to work from allowed the WP suspension to shine. Other than on a couple high-speed boosts over steep sections of dirt road, we didn’t notice either the front or rear bottom out once during the entire trip. Even fully loaded with camping gear, both the front and rear suspension on the Triumph maintained a solid progressive feel. Damping tuned for rough desert conditions allowed the Tiger to walk up and down steep, rocky obstacles like a large three cylinder mountain goat. Nearly two inches longer than the Tiger, the BMW’s 62.7 inch wheelbase gave the bike a more stable feel in many situations. The longer chassis had a more open cockpit feel as well, which helped to compensate for the F850’s unusually tiny footpegs. Relatively soft forks compromised that stability as conditions became more challenging, and the front end could be felt diving and wandering into sandy whoops as speeds increased. The torquey parallel twin helped overcome some of the front-end vagueness by offering up corrective blips of power when needed, even at lower rpms. At 504 pounds wet, the F850GS’s claimed weight is roughly 10 pounds heavier than the Tiger 800 XCa fully fueled. On paper, this would tip the scales in favor of the Triumph being the more nimble machine. Behind the bars, however, the BMW uniquely carries this weight in a way that provides a strangely lighter feel in many situations. Overall, initial impressions of the F850GS’s handling, both on-road an off, is preferable to the older F800GS. Despite this latest iteration of the model line carrying 25 pounds of additional weight over its predecessor, the 850 tracks better off-road, and has a more balanced feel on twisty pavement. The Electronics Like so many things, modern motorcycles have adopted aspects of the “device” era. Given that truth, menus become an integral component of the riding experience. While very difficult to determine a best practice in the arrangement of these various means for selection of desired features, the idea can perhaps be distilled down to a number of required steps. In this regard, both the Triumph and BMW came out ahead, and both behind. In standard configuration, the Tiger comes with six riding modes: ‘Road’, ‘Off-road’, ‘Rain’, ‘Sport’, ‘Rider-Programmable’, and ‘Off-Road Pro’. Although the GS only comes with two standard riding modes, ‘Rain’ or ‘Road’, the available option of “Ride Modes Pro” adds two more, ‘Dynamic’ and ‘Enduro’, as well as a third, ‘Enduro Pro’, which is accessible when an optional dongle is installed under the seat. The F850GS also has a lean angle sensor which works in concert with adjustable dynamic traction control, and a cornering-optimized “ABS Pro” feature. Triumph requires less button pushing from the rider to enter the “Off Road Pro” mode (preferred mode for the nature of the riding in this comparison test), where BMW requires more “clicks” to achieve the similar settings in the optional Ride Modes Pro package. BMW, however, features the ability to store one’s settings indefinitely when the optional Enduro Pro dongle is installed. Having the ability to simply fire up the bike and roll away without navigating through menus to enter the desired ride mode, however brief, results in a significant difference to the overall experience during the course of a multi-day adventure ride. Although BMW’s optional dongle overrides the F850GS’s slightly more complex menu arrangement and mode selection process, Triumph’s computer is more direct in that “Off Road Pro” not only adjusts the power delivery, but also disengages both ABS and traction control in one fell swoop. Which system wins out is entirely a matter of rider preference. Unique to the BMW, the Electronic Suspension Adjustment, or “ESA”, was fun to work with, but only applies to the rear shock. Non-adjustable front suspension meant most tweaks to the rear shock were inherently out of balance overall. For simple rear preload adjustments to compensate for luggage or passenger, BMW’s ESA system is much more convenient than typical manual adjustment methods. At a standstill, one’s left thumb simply has to push a button and the rear end can be felt raising or lowering itself as preload increases or decreases. While rolling, the same thumb switch can affect shock damping on-the-fly. With fork settings remaining unchanged through ESA selections, frequent adjustments to the rear shock seem intended for urban settings where payload changes might be likely to occur multiple times a day. Off-road, suspension is generally set for what the terrain requires, or based on the payload weight involved in a multi-day adventure ride. While the Triumph requires tools for the conventional adjustment of the WP forks and shock, it becomes a “set it and forget it” exercise in most cases. Conclusions Although in the same class, these two machines are different enough that choosing a “winner” can depend on preferred feature set and riding style. Side-by-side, each has a mix of features which seem to steer both bikes more towards the off-road world, and more towards the on-road world, at the same time. In spite of its greater weight, the larger BMW chassis and torquey parallel twin initially feel more at home on smooth gravel roads than the Triumph. A smallish, non-adjustable windscreen further lends itself to the GS having an “enduro” feel. Yet its tiny footpegs and a comparatively soft front end undermine the off-road characteristics of the GS when the going gets rough, giving the advantage to the Tiger in more difficult terrain. Advanced features such as Gear Shift Assist Pro, lean angle sensors,and electronic suspension speak to the BMW being a more street-oriented machine. Features such as a high-revving triple power plant, large adjustable windscreen, and heated seats on the Triumph all sound like specs of a sport-touring bike. However, slightly taller and adjustable WP suspension, followed by a long list of trail-friendly accessories typically reserved for the aftermarket realm, pushes the Tiger firmly back over to the off-road side of things. By the numbers, the Tiger provides the most bang for the buck with its inclusion of many features normally seen as optional in this bike class. Triumph’s list of standard accessories covers a wide range of elements, meeting the needs of both on-road and off-road performance. BMW’s numerous electronics package options bring a trick futuristic element to the mix, and possibly make the GS a more road-friendly machine, especially for a newer rider. Numbers and build sheet roster aside, these two machines have different enough characters that aesthetics, riding style, and simply “which one turns your key” will likely become prominent deciding factors. Unless, of course, one chooses Keyless Ride. In that case “which one pockets your fob” could be said, but that sounds weird. Specs Comparison Adventure Bike Models HP Torque (lb.-ft.) Wet Weight (lbs.) Suspension Travel (Fr./Rr.) Seat Height (in.) Fuel Capacity (Gallons) Price USD Triumph Tiger 800 XCa 76 48 495* 8.7/8.5 33.1/33.9 5.0 $16,200** BMW F850GS 80 56 504 8.0/8.6 32.1/35.0 4.0 $17,560** * Estimated wet weight; ** Price as tested Photos by Jon Beck Author: Jon Beck Jon Beck is fulfilling a dream of never figuring out what to be when he grows up. Racing mountain bikes, competitive surfing, and touring as a musician are somehow part of what led Jon to travel through over 40 countries so far as an adventure motorcycle photographer, journalist, and guide. From precision riding for cameras in Hollywood, to refilling a fountain pen for travel stories, Jon brings a rare blend of experience to the table. While he seems happiest when lost in a desert someplace, deadlines are met most of the time.
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