Mergi la conţinut

Advpulse

Membri
  • Conţinut

    627
  • Membru din

  • Ultima vizită

    Niciodată
  • Days Won

    1

Advpulse last won the day on 27 Ianuarie 2018

Advpulse had the most liked content!

Metode de Contact

  • Pagina Web
    www.advpulse.com
  • Facebook
    https://www.facebook.com/advpulse/
  1. For decades, Enduro Riders have been carrying their tools in waist bags. Not only does it help ensure important tools don’t go flying off the back of your bike in rough terrain, but they help avoid back soreness and fatigue from carrying a heavy backpack. GIVI recently released the GRT710 Enduro Waist Bag as part of their off-road-specific Gravel-T line, designed for racers and dual sport riders exploring technical terrain. In fact, GIVI developed it together with the Honda HRC Monster Energy Rally Team that races in the Dakar. The GRT710 is constructed with heavy-duty 1200D polyester fabric and beefy zippers to make it resistant to wear and tear from trail abuse. Elastic waist straps are made wide to evenly distribute the weight, attached with Velcro and an adjustable strap to secure everything in place. On the right side is a zipper pocket used for carrying spare bolts, JB Weld, tape, a multi tool, or other things you need quick access to, while the left pocket has a Velcro flap closure and adjustable strap designed specifically for carrying a water bottle. In the center is the main compartment,which unzips and unfolds into a tool roll with pockets and slots to organize and carry individual tools. There is also a large central zipper pocket which can be used for odd-shaped tools or trail snacks. Everything in the main compartment is closed up with zippers so that tools remain dust free, and an outer flap goes over the top with a quick-release buckle closure. Also on the main closure flap, are two elastic bands that can be used for holding a rain layer and there is also a small pocket built into the flap for carrying keys, a driver’s licence, or other small items. How It Performed If you are planning on doing enduros, rallies, or any aggressive dual sport rides, the GRT710 is a more secure way to carry tools than strapping them onto a fender. ADVERTISEMENT I tend to carry a lot of tools so I am prepared for anything we encounter with the various bikes we are testing. Loading up the GRT710 waist bag with tools for the first time, I was surprised how much it could swallow. The tool roll has a variety of slots and there are big zipper pockets for storing any overflow. You can use the large outer flap of the main compartment to hold down loose items as well, although I would have liked to have some adjustment in the buckle strap closure to allow for more versatility in carrying items of various sizes. At first I used the large outer flap to carry a front inner tube, but I later found it more convenient to stuff it in the water bottle holder. Since I ride with a light hydration pack, there was no need for carrying a bottle of water there. Yet, that bottle holder can just as well be used for spare oil or a flask depending on your needs. Getting it strapped on, it felt a little strange at first. Standing up on the pegs, it took some getting used to having weight above my tuchus. Although, I have to admit, I liked it better than carrying tools in a backpack. Carrying a heavy weight on my back usually leads to soreness and I feel it interferes with my balance when the weight is up higher. I’ve tried Enduro Vests before as well, which are designed to distribute weight more evenly around your torso, but I feel those create extra bulk in the front that can interfere with my riding. By the end of my first ride, my body had mostly adjusted to the new weight of the waist sack and I was fully acclimated to it by the second day, liking it even more as I rode. Just unstrap the waist bag, throw it on the ground, and you’ve got your tools spread out in seconds.After several more rides I found it nice not having to dig into a pannier or a top bag to find tools when trailside repairs are calling. Just quickly unstrap the waist sack, throw it on the ground, and you’ve got your tools spread out in seconds. It also can be used as a small mat to place bolts, spacers or other items you want to avoid losing in the dirt. Getting it back on can be a bit cumbersome, if you have it stuffed to the brim like me, but the Velcro attachment and the elastic waistband ensures a comfortable fit. Riding in aggressive terrain, everything stays in place, and you don’t feel like there is a ball bouncing around back there. These elastic straps can be used to carry a rain layer, but without being able to cinch the straps down, its not the most secure storage option.Now with more than a thousand miles or riding with the GRT710, on shorter trips I’ve appreciated not having to strap on luggage and having my tools in the same place when switching from bike to bike. It has also proven to be very durable: the thick material and high-quality zippers haven’t given me any trouble so far. While the GRT710 waist bag does come with a waterproof phone holder, personally I would avoid carrying anything fragile inside it because if you do fall (don’t ask me how I know), it’s likely to come in contact with the ground. Also worth noting, is the fabric is water resistant but not waterproof. This isn’t a problem most of the time but if you get soaked in a downpour or fail at a water crossing, make sure you dry your tools out when you get home or they could turn into a rusty mess next time you open up the bag. Who’s It For Those who are taking shorter adventures and day rides, who are packing light and riding on aggressive terrain, will appreciate the quick access and security of carrying tools in the GRT710 waist bag. Also, those who own multiple bikes and want to be able to strap on and go, rather than adapt a tool carrying solution for each bike. Our Verdict The GIVI GRT710 Waist Bag is a convenient and effective way to store your trail tools on shorter, aggressive off-road rides. Accessing your tools is always quick and easy, so much so, that you can expect an uptick in your riding buddies asking if you have a screwdriver, wrench or tire pressure gauge handy. At about $100 it’s on the pricey side for a waist bag, but it backs it up with smart storage and heavy-duty construction that can handle gnarly terrain. What We Liked Enough capacity to carry lots of tools. Durable construction that can take abuse. Comfortable waist belt with secure fit. What Could Be Improved Make outer flap elastic bands adjustable for a more secure hold. Make outer flap buckle closure adjustable for greater versatility. Perhaps a waterproof version? GRT710 Enduro Waist Bag Specs CONSTRUCTION: 1200D Polyester UV-Resistant Fabric POCKETS: 4 zipper pockets and a water bottle pocket. DIMENSIONS: 10.5″ w x 7″ h x 4″ deep (Main Compartment) WEIGHT: 1.5 pounds (0.7 kg) PRICE: $105.00 Shopping Options: Photos by Jeff Kiniery, Jon Beck and Rob Dabney Author: Rob Dabney Rob Dabney started a lifelong obsession with motorcycles at the age of 15 when he purchased his first bike – a 1982 Honda MB5. Through his 20’s and 30’s he competed in off-road desert races, including the Baja 250, 500 and 1000. Eventually, his proclivity for exploration led him to dual sport and adventure riding. Rob’s never-ending quest to discover what’s around the next bend has taken him on Adventures in Mexico, North Africa, Europe, and throughout the American West. As a moto journalist, he enjoys inspiring others to seek adventure across horizons both near and far.
  2. Published on 08.11.2020 Akrapovic has unveiled a Titanium Slip-On exhaust system for Honda’s new CRF1100L Africa Twin. Constructed from high-grade lightweight titanium, this system is 24.6% lighter than the standard stock exhaust and is part of the company’s ʼDurability Reimagined range,ʼ with increased ruggedness and the latest evolution of Akrapovic’s muffler design and shape. The new Titanium slip-on includes a double-flow muffler and features an exhaust valve designed to deliver a distinct sound tuned by Akrapovic sound engineers. The unique exhaust note includes powerful pulses in the higher rpms and throughout the transition between closed and open valve. The change in sound is especially noticeable when the revs are lowered, providing a deep fuller sound pattern as the revs drop (listen here). Akrapovic’s slip-on for the Honda CRF1100L is the latest exhaust in the Durability Reimagined range. Created for increased durability, the design is an evolution of the iconic hexagonal shape launched by Akrapovič in 2005. The new profile is shaped to complement the new Africa Twin’s lines and features an outer sleeve with a newly designed carbon-fiber end cap and heat shield to add a more robust look to the bike. Stock Akrapovic HP: 94.7 / 7400 rpm HP: 95.8 / 7500 rpm Nm: 100.5 / 6300 rpm Nm: 100.9 / 6350 rpm Weight: 12.4 lbs Weight: 9.3 lbs ADVERTISEMENT The Honda CRF1100L exhaust system is EC/ECE type-approved and has a simple plug-and-play installation, with no remapping needed. For more information go to akrapovic.com Shopping Options:
  3. Published on 08.07.2020 [embedded content] [embedded content]There aren’t many people who can put a KTM 1290 Super Adventure R through its paces off-road. At 160 horsepower and 529 pounds wet, it’s a lot of bike, to put it mildly. It has a host of modes and computer assists to help Average Joe turn in a competent performance, but to really make the bike sing in the dirt you’d almost need to be super human. Like Chris Birch. In a recent video, “12 Hours With the 1290 Super Adventure R,” Birch flogs the rip-snorting KTM through the glorious scenery of his native New Zealand. For us lesser beings stuck at home, it’s two minutes and 34 seconds of pure, escapist joy. It begins where many of these sorts of videos begin: early in the morning, pulling out of the garage. We follow Birch down a dirt path and out on the asphalt twisties along the coast on a sun-kissed morning. Then comes a dirt road, a high-speed hop over a tree limb, powerslides and more incredible coastal scenery. ADVERTISEMENT Things get serious with a couple hillclimbs that would give pause to a good rider on a dual sport of half the weight, Birch ripping wheelies and throwing a roost the all the way to the top. Add more log hops, stream crossings, single track and a chasm-spanning jump, shake well and enjoy. In one particularly memorable shot, Birch shoots over the crest of a steep hill, lands the 1290 on its back wheel and wheelies out of the frame as if he were on a trials bike. Don’t try that at home, as they say. Of course, Birch has the Dakar Rally, Red Bull Romaniacs, the Erzberg Rodeo and a slew of other world-class hard enduros and rallies on his resume. He also travels the globe as a dirt- and adventure-riding coach, and posts cool how-to and big-bike videos on YouTube. You probably can’t ride a 1290 the way he does. But there’s no harm in dreaming. Author: Bob Whitby Bob has been riding motorcycles since age 19 and working as a journalist since he was 24, which was a long time ago, let’s put it that way. He quit for the better part of a decade to raise a family, then rediscovered adventure, dual sport and enduro riding in the early 2000s. He lives in Arkansas, America’s best-kept secret when it comes to riding destinations, and travels far and wide in search of dirt roads and trails.
  4. Published on 08.07.2020 [embedded content] [embedded content]There aren’t many people who can put a KTM 1290 Super Adventure R through its paces off-road. At 160 horsepower and 529 pounds wet, it’s a lot of bike, to put it mildly. It has a host of modes and computer assists to help Average Joe turn in a competent performance, but to really make the bike sing in the dirt you’d almost need to be super human. Like Chris Birch. In a recent video, “12 Hours With the 1290 Super Adventure R,” Birch flogs the rip-snorting KTM through the glorious scenery of his native New Zealand. For us lesser beings stuck at home, it’s two minutes and 34 seconds of pure, escapist joy. ADVERTISEMENT It begins where many of these sorts of videos begin: early in the morning, pulling out of the garage. We follow Birch down a dirt path and out on the asphalt twisties along the coast on a sun-kissed morning. Then comes a dirt road, a high-speed hop over a tree limb, powerslides and more incredible coastal scenery. Things get serious with a couple hillclimbs that would give pause to a good rider on a dual sport of half the weight, Birch ripping wheelies and throwing a roost the all the way to the top. Add more log hops, stream crossings, single track and a chasm-spanning jump, shake well and enjoy. In one particularly memorable shot, Birch shoots over the crest of a steep hill, lands the 1290 on its back wheel and wheelies out of the frame as if he were on a trials bike. Don’t try that at home, as they say. Of course, Birch has the Dakar Rally, Red Bull Romaniacs, the Erzberg Rodeo and a slew of other world-class hard enduros and rallies on his resume. He also travels the globe as a dirt- and adventure-riding coach, and posts cool how-to and big-bike videos on YouTube. You probably can’t ride a 1290 the way he does. But there’s no harm in dreaming. Author: Bob Whitby Bob has been riding motorcycles since age 19 and working as a journalist since he was 24, which was a long time ago, let’s put it that way. He quit for the better part of a decade to raise a family, then rediscovered adventure, dual sport and enduro riding in the early 2000s. He lives in Arkansas, America’s best-kept secret when it comes to riding destinations, and travels far and wide in search of dirt roads and trails.
  5. Our Himalayan project bike enters “Phase 2” with mods to improve performance, comfort and convenience.The Himalayan burst onto the scene as a unique offering compared to what Royal Enfield had traditionally built over the past many decades, and a unique bike for the adventure motorcycle segment in general. With a price point of $4,799, it leaves surplus funds for potential aftermarket upgrades to customize the bike to your aesthetic tastes, riding style and journeys as well. Previously, we put our Royal Enfield Himalayan project bike through its paces to suss out modifications and upgrades which would be considered “essential” for the bike, or at least highly recommended for anyone who spends much time off-road. Yet many more upgrade options for this interesting motorcycle are out there. In this next phase of building out our Himalayan, we focus on optional upgrades that improve performance, comfort and convenience. ADVERTISEMENT After a fair amount of trial and error, figuring out what works and what doesn’t, we came up with a list of 10 products to enhance the Himalayan’s capability. Ranking the following bits in terms of importance is left up to the individual rider’s preference and intended use for the motorcycle. Read on for a description of how these products can improve the Himalayan and, of course, you can pick and choose, mix and match, upgrades based on your own personal needs. For most off-road riders, one of the primary upgrades on an adventure bike is tires. Like many bikes in this class, the Himalayan ships with a street-biased dual sport tire, specifically the Pirelli MT60. Given the Himalayan is a smaller and lower horsepower motorcycle for the adventure bike class, Pirelli’s 70/30 (street/dirt) tire does the job in most situations riders will encounter aboard the little single. While grabbing a handful of throttle either on or off-road seldom results in the Himalayan’s back end breaking loose and the bike getting sideways, a set of knobby-style tires will still give the Himilayan more sure-footed grip and better cornering traction in loose terrain. Knobbies will always provide greater traction in the dirt, but the traction offered by a 50/50 dual sport tire seems to match the Himalayan’s character well. In spite of its comparatively lower power and price tag, the Enfield is a capable adventure bike. For a boost in off-road performance, we switched to Mitas’ E-07 50/50 dual sport tires (90/90-21; 120/90-17) to increase grip without sacrificing road-going performance. We noticed a significant improvement in loose terrain where the Mitas tires helped aid forward motion better than the stock stock Pirellis, and extra cornering grip helped us avoid front-end washouts in sandy turns. Good cornering on pavement and improved bite in the dirt are welcome characteristics which enhance the already impressive abilities of this understated motorcycle, but we also appreciated the longevity of the tires. After 3,500+ miles of testing on a range of terrain, the rear E-07 still has a healthy amount of tread left. Where tires are perhaps a “necessary” modification that’s obvious right away, some accessories fall into the category of “I didn’t realize how necessary this was until after using it.” Cyclops’ H4 LED headlight bulb arguably falls into this category. Royal Enfield’s history goes back to the 1950’s, and six-volt electrical systems. While the Himalayan has a modern 12-volt electrical system, the stock headlight’s somewhat anemic quality almost seems to borrow from the early low-power days. Maintaining the cool look of the round headlight, and still using the stock reflector and lens, simply swapping out the stock bulb for Cyclops’ H4 setup massively changes the riding experience at night. While drawing only 38 watts, the color, spread, and throw of light from the front of the motorcycle is drastically changed for the better. One could argue there’s a safety aspect to this modification during daylight hours as well, as rear-view-mirror visibility to other drivers on the road is increased. No modifications are required to the Himalayan’s headlight shroud to install the Cyclops H4, however space is tight, and cutting down the two retaining bolts (or replacing with shorter bolts) on each side of the housing make positioning the driver much easier. Going from a traditional 60-watt filament bulb to four XHP 50 emitters at over 2500 lumens is a worthwhile change. The reduced draw on the charging system (38 watts vs 60 watts) also makes room for adding additional electronic accessories like heated gear and auxiliary lights. Next on the list of “most obvious” changes, the thing you’re sitting on would be near the top of the list. Royal Enfield’s optional touring seat has both performance and aesthetic characteristics. Enfield’s “3D net” technology claims to distribute weight more evenly over the seat. We noticed right away a more contoured fit that seems to eliminate any pressure points. Choice of saddle is a highly personal thing, but most riders will likely find the Himalayan’s touring seat option more comfortable for long days on the bike. The durable non-slip cover featuring the Royal Enfield logo is a cool addition to an already cool looking bike. A matching passenger ‘touring’ seat is also available. The USB port offers ‘quick charge’ power directly from the battery, battery status lights and an on/off switch that shuts off power completely to avoid any parasitic draw. Cell phones and other small electronic devices are as much an appendage as accessory to humans in the modern era, and they require power (constantly it seems). Charging phones and other devices while riding has become commonplace over the past couple decades. The ubiquity of USB devices has led to a shift from old style “cigarette lighter” 12-volt power ports in vehicles to most now featuring more-convenient USB ports instead. While the Himalayan does not include power ports of any type, easy access to the bike’s battery under the seat makes installing one a snap. Motopower’s dual-port USB option provides five volts and 3.1 amps of power, which can quickly charge not only cell phones, but tablets, GPS units, camera batteries, or just about anything else that uses a USB port. Intelligent charging circuitry identifies devices to provide optimal power levels, and the Motopower uniquely features battery status lights and an on/off switch so the unit can shut off power either automatically or manually to prevent parasitic battery drain. It comes with an SAE-style cable that is wired directly to the battery, which makes it compatible with many battery charger plugs and with a direct source of power, you can charge devices overnight without leaving the ignition on. The Antigravity Li-ion battery saves 4.4 lbs and offers three times more cold cranking amps than stock. Its Re-Start technology can also jump-start the bike from a reserve charge.The stock Himalayan battery always felt a little weak to us, even when it was fully charged and load tested fine. If the bike was sitting for a month or so, it would sometimes go flat as well. So we decided it would be a good idea to replace it with something more powerful, like Antigravity’s ATZ10 Lithium-ion battery that provides three times more Cold Cranking Amps (360) than the stock Varta lead-acid battery. Other benefits associated with Lithium-ion batteries can be found in things like form factor and weight. In both cases, Antigravity’s ATZ10 earns big scores here. Most apparent, swapping out the Himalayan’s stock battery for the ATZ10 shaves over four pounds off the machine. Sounds like a small number until you’re holding both batteries at the same time and it quickly becomes apparent the Antigravity weighs less than half what the stock lead-acid power source does. Dual sets of terminals on both sides of the battery provide additional options for how and where wiring harnesses can be routed to the battery box – a convenient feature during install. The standout industry-only feature of the ATZ10 is its “RE-START” technology. Should a power drain for whatever reason render the battery flat, simply press the restart button, and the battery will jump-start itself from a reserve charge. Other advanced internal circuitry allows the ATZ10 to monitor its own status and protect from over-charging by entering a “sleep” mode when necessary. A reusable air filter simplifies maintenance on longer trips and the high-flow design helps the Himalayan’s engine breath better.Moving inside the bike, next in our upgrade list is K&N’s replacement air filter. Freer-flowing by a claimed 50%, the potential for horsepower gains are there. Given the Himalayan isn’t a fire-breathing race machine, power gains might be a secondary consideration here. However, the mellow character of the 410cc single can use any help it can get, and the K&N filter is a worthy upgrade that provides multiple benefits beyond claimed power increases. Durability and reusability are key aspects of what makes this filter an addition to consider. The fact the filter is washable makes for easy maintenance on long trips, and a cost savings over the life of the bike. A tight seal is provided by the clamp-on design, and installation is as easy as swapping out a stock filter. K&N also offers its own proprietary spray-on cleaning and oiling products that are designed to work with their air filters. Deciding on a luggage system to haul gear during your trips is a major consideration for any adventure rider. After testing several different systems on the Himalayan, we went with Wolfman’s next-gen waterproof Rolie soft bags and their Unrack System. The adaptable setup lets you strap different Rolie bags to a base harness in various ways, depending on your storage needs. And as the name suggests, it doesn’t require any luggage racks. Using the B-Base (for big bikes), we strapped two medium Rolie Bags on the sides and one large Rolie on top for 44 liters of capacity. Each Rolie bag is fully waterproof without liners and comes with straps and attachment points that make it easy to add more bags in a stackable configuration. For longer trips, we’d strap on a camp chair and additional small Rolie bag to add more capacity. We also added Wolfman’s Enduro Tank Bag, which offers an additional 4 liters of capacity. Given the Himalayan’s comparatively diminutive size, Wolfman’s minimalist Tank Bag fits the Royal Enfield perfectly. Yet it is still large enough to stash a full-size DSLR camera inside. It features a single heavy-duty zipper and four clips that allow you to quickly remove the bag, leaving the straps on the bike. Additional features include an internal lid pocket that doubles as a fanny pack, a detachable map pocket, and a waterproof shell that doesn’t need a liner. During our rides, we appreciated that the tank bag didn’t interfere with our riding position while standing on the pegs. The system as a whole was rock solid stable on the trail and the bags stayed clear of the exhaust. The carbon risers lift the fender just high enough to let sticky mud pass through, while maintaining the stock appearance.The unique high/low dual fender design on the Himalayan is just one of the quirky characteristics of the bike that give it a unique quality. However, that low fender can become a liability in muddy terrain. Sticky mud can build up on the tire until it begins to touch the fender, and eventually the wheel completely locks up. This can lead to either the front fender ripping off or being sent over the handlebars at an inopportune moment. To help avoid this type of situation, we added a fender riser kit from Enfield Accessories. The kit comes with a set of 15mm tall carbon fiber spacers and longer bolts that add more clearance between the tire and fender. Should you ride in a particularly muddy region, they also offer a 25mm kit to provide even more space for mud to accumulate. It’s an inexpensive upgrade that is easy to install and it can save you a lot of hassle on your next mud ride. The machined aluminum mount utilizes four stainless-steel wire ropes at its base to deaden vibration and reduce impacts.Charging a phone on the road is one thing, where to put it is another. The Perfect Squeeze offers an extremely robust and secure option for bar-mounting a phone, with little fear of an “unplanned” departure. A click wheel-style adjuster moves the rubberized jaws to the appropriate size, and while it takes a few turns to get it there, the grip offered by the Perfect Squeeze is among the most solid of any style mounts available. For off-road or single-cylinder bike riders, the Perfect Squeeze can be mounted to a Buzz-Kill vibration isolator. Where the stock low-profile mount would attach the phone holder directly to the bars, the Buzz-Kill uses a stainless-steel “wire rope” isolation design, mounted to aluminum backing plates. This design offers both vibration and impact resistance, and lack of any rubber parts bodes well for a long service life. PowerTRONIC’s programmable ECU device fits snugly under the seat and can be configured using their R-Tune software. You can use PowerTRONIC’s pre-installed fuel maps, configure your own or download additional ones from their website. Saving the most complex upgrade for last, PowerTRONIC makes a programmable ECU for the Himalayan, which allows you to get into the bike’s electronics and tinker with the fuel mapping. As mentioned earlier, the Himalayan isn’t a fire-breathing race machine, but while you’re not going to turn the docile 410cc single into an R1 by pushing some buttons, there are benefits to be found in changing the characteristics of the Himalayan’s fuel delivery. Plus for those who like to tinker, it’s fun to have this level of control over things. Speed run tests using the Himalayan-specific maps downloaded from the PowerTRONIC website did reveal consistently faster timed results climbing both steep and gentle grades, although by just a few seconds. More noticeable was the improved throttle response, particularly off-the-line “snap,” and a more purposeful feel on acceleration. Fuel Map 1 offers mid-range performance gains while Map 2 has mid and top-end performance gains. Both maps showed an improvement over stock in our speed run tests.The install procedure involves several steps, and initially appears complex, however it’s quite straightforward as you simply swap one connection at a time in the PowerTRONIC’s wiring harness. Once the harness is in place, you have a stock coupler which both verifies the system is installed correctly and serves as a way to quickly revert back to the bike’s factory stock fuel mapping. Once the Piggyback ECU is plugged in, the bike can take advantage of whatever map has been uploaded to the unit, or select between two separate maps via the optional handlebar map switch. Programming the unit is done via PowerTRONIC’s R-Tune software. While the ECU ships with dual pre-installed maps, other maps are downloadable from the PowerTRONIC website, and endless user-customization can be done to create one’s own maps. There’s even a “lock” feature in the software which can prevent a map from being copied from the ECU should you come up with a proprietary configuration you want to keep secret. Let the Himalayan track days begin! More Himalayan Mods To Come… Now going on its fourth year, the Himalayan has options available from numerous aftermarket companies spanning a wide range of forms and functions. Here at ADV Pulse, we’re still seeking out and finding interesting products to add to our Royal Enfield project bike. For the next phase, we’ll be focusing on additional off-road protection and maybe a little bling to give it a more custom look. Stay tuned, the little bike that could will likely see additional tweaks coming before long. Author: Jon Beck Jon Beck is fulfilling a dream of never figuring out what to be when he grows up. Racing mountain bikes, competitive surfing, and touring as a musician are somehow part of what led Jon to travel through over 40 countries so far as an adventure motorcycle photographer, journalist, and guide. From precision riding for cameras in Hollywood, to refilling a fountain pen for travel stories, Jon brings a rare blend of experience to the table. While he seems happiest when lost in a desert someplace, deadlines are met most of the time.
  6. Our Himalayan project bike enters “Phase 2” with mods to improve performance, comfort and convenience.The Himalayan burst onto the scene as a unique offering compared to what Royal Enfield had traditionally built over the past many decades, and a unique bike for the adventure motorcycle segment in general. With a price point of $4,799, it leaves surplus funds for potential aftermarket upgrades to customize the bike to your aesthetic tastes, riding style and journeys as well. Previously, we put our Royal Enfield Himalayan project bike through its paces to suss out modifications and upgrades which would be considered “essential” for the bike, or at least highly recommended for anyone who spends much time off-road. Yet many more upgrade options for this interesting motorcycle are out there. In this next phase of building out our Himalayan, we focus on optional upgrades that improve performance, comfort and convenience. ADVERTISEMENT After a fair amount of trial and error, figuring out what works and what doesn’t, we came up with a list of 10 products to enhance the Himalayan’s capability. Ranking the following bits in terms of importance is left up to the individual rider’s preference and intended use for the motorcycle. Read on for a description of how these products can improve the Himalayan and, of course, you can pick and choose, mix and match, upgrades based on your own personal needs. For most off-road riders, one of the primary upgrades on an adventure bike is tires. Like many bikes in this class, the Himalayan ships with a street-biased dual sport tire, specifically the Pirelli MT60. Given the Himalayan is a smaller and lower horsepower motorcycle for the adventure bike class, Pirelli’s 70/30 (street/dirt) tire does the job in most situations riders will encounter aboard the little single. While grabbing a handful of throttle either on or off-road seldom results in the Himalayan’s back end breaking loose and the bike getting sideways, a set of knobby-style tires will still give the Himilayan more sure-footed grip and better cornering traction in loose terrain. Knobbies will always provide greater traction in the dirt, but the traction offered by a 50/50 dual sport tire seems to match the Himalayan’s character well. In spite of its comparatively lower power and price tag, the Enfield is a capable adventure bike. For a boost in off-road performance, we switched to Mitas’ E-07 50/50 dual sport tires (90/90-21; 120/90-17) to increase grip without sacrificing road-going performance. We noticed a significant improvement in loose terrain where the Mitas tires helped aid forward motion better than the stock stock Pirellis, and extra cornering grip helped us avoid front-end washouts in sandy turns. Good cornering on pavement and improved bite in the dirt are welcome characteristics which enhance the already impressive abilities of this understated motorcycle, but we also appreciated the longevity of the tires. After 3,500+ miles of testing on a range of terrain, the rear E-07 still has a healthy amount of tread left. Where tires are perhaps a “necessary” modification that’s obvious right away, some accessories fall into the category of “I didn’t realize how necessary this was until after using it.” Cyclops’ H4 LED headlight bulb arguably falls into this category. Royal Enfield’s history goes back to the 1950’s, and six-volt electrical systems. While the Himalayan has a modern 12-volt electrical system, the stock headlight’s somewhat anemic quality almost seems to borrow from the early low-power days. Maintaining the cool look of the round headlight, and still using the stock reflector and lens, simply swapping out the stock bulb for Cyclops’ H4 setup massively changes the riding experience at night. While drawing only 38 watts, the color, spread, and throw of light from the front of the motorcycle is drastically changed for the better. One could argue there’s a safety aspect to this modification during daylight hours as well, as rear-view-mirror visibility to other drivers on the road is increased. No modifications are required to the Himalayan’s headlight shroud to install the Cyclops H4, however space is tight, and cutting down the two retaining bolts (or replacing with shorter bolts) on each side of the housing make positioning the driver much easier. Going from a traditional 60-watt filament bulb to four XHP 50 emitters at over 2500 lumens is a worthwhile change. The reduced draw on the charging system (38 watts vs 60 watts) also makes room for adding additional electronic accessories like heated gear and auxiliary lights. Next on the list of “most obvious” changes, the thing you’re sitting on would be near the top of the list. Royal Enfield’s optional touring seat has both performance and aesthetic characteristics. Enfield’s “3D net” technology claims to distribute weight more evenly over the seat. We noticed right away a more contoured fit that seems to eliminate any pressure points. Choice of saddle is a highly personal thing, but most riders will likely find the Himalayan’s touring seat option more comfortable for long days on the bike. The durable non-slip cover featuring the Royal Enfield logo is a cool addition to an already cool looking bike. A matching passenger ‘touring’ seat is also available. The USB port offers ‘quick charge’ power directly from the battery, battery status lights and an on/off switch that shuts off power completely to avoid any parasitic draw. Cell phones and other small electronic devices are as much an appendage as accessory to humans in the modern era, and they require power (constantly it seems). Charging phones and other devices while riding has become commonplace over the past couple decades. The ubiquity of USB devices has led to a shift from old style “cigarette lighter” 12-volt power ports in vehicles to most now featuring more-convenient USB ports instead. While the Himalayan does not include power ports of any type, easy access to the bike’s battery under the seat makes installing one a snap. Motopower’s dual-port USB option provides five volts and 3.1 amps of power, which can quickly charge not only cell phones, but tablets, GPS units, camera batteries, or just about anything else that uses a USB port. Intelligent charging circuitry identifies devices to provide optimal power levels, and the Motopower uniquely features battery status lights and an on/off switch so the unit can shut off power either automatically or manually to prevent parasitic battery drain. It comes with an SAE-style cable that is wired directly to the battery, which makes it compatible with many battery charger plugs and with a direct source of power, you can charge devices overnight without leaving the ignition on. The Antigravity Li-ion battery saves 4.4 lbs and offers three times more cold cranking amps than stock. Its Re-Start technology can also jump-start the bike from a reserve charge.The stock Himalayan battery always felt a little weak to us, even when it was fully charged and load tested fine. If the bike was sitting for a month or so, it would sometimes go flat as well. So we decided it would be a good idea to replace it with something more powerful, like Antigravity’s ATZ10 Lithium-ion battery that provides three times more Cold Cranking Amps (360) than the stock Varta lead-acid battery. Other benefits associated with Lithium-ion batteries can be found in things like form factor and weight. In both cases, Antigravity’s ATZ10 earns big scores here. Most apparent, swapping out the Himalayan’s stock battery for the ATZ10 shaves over four pounds off the machine. Sounds like a small number until you’re holding both batteries at the same time and it quickly becomes apparent the Antigravity weighs less than half what the stock lead-acid power source does. Dual sets of terminals on both sides of the battery provide additional options for how and where wiring harnesses can be routed to the battery box – a convenient feature during install. The standout industry-only feature of the ATZ10 is its “RE-START” technology. Should a power drain for whatever reason render the battery flat, simply press the restart button, and the battery will jump-start itself from a reserve charge. Other advanced internal circuitry allows the ATZ10 to monitor its own status and protect from over-charging by entering a “sleep” mode when necessary. A reusable air filter simplifies maintenance on longer trips and the high-flow design helps the Himalayan’s engine breath better.Moving inside the bike, next in our upgrade list is K&N’s replacement air filter. Freer-flowing by a claimed 50%, the potential for horsepower gains are there. Given the Himalayan isn’t a fire-breathing race machine, power gains might be a secondary consideration here. However, the mellow character of the 410cc single can use any help it can get, and the K&N filter is a worthy upgrade that provides multiple benefits beyond claimed power increases. Durability and reusability are key aspects of what makes this filter an addition to consider. The fact the filter is washable makes for easy maintenance on long trips, and a cost savings over the life of the bike. A tight seal is provided by the clamp-on design, and installation is as easy as swapping out a stock filter. K&N also offers its own proprietary spray-on cleaning and oiling products that are designed to work with their air filters. Deciding on a luggage system to haul gear during your trips is a major consideration for any adventure rider. After testing several different systems on the Himalayan, we went with Wolfman’s next-gen waterproof Rolie soft bags and their Unrack System. The adaptable setup lets you strap different Rolie bags to a base harness in various ways, depending on your storage needs. And as the name suggests, it doesn’t require any luggage racks. Using the B-Base (for big bikes), we strapped two medium Rolie Bags on the sides and one large Rolie on top for 44 liters of capacity. Each Rolie bag is fully waterproof without liners and comes with straps and attachment points that make it easy to add more bags in a stackable configuration. For longer trips, we’d strap on a camp chair and additional small Rolie bag to add more capacity. We also added Wolfman’s Enduro Tank Bag, which offers an additional 4 liters of capacity. Given the Himalayan’s comparatively diminutive size, Wolfman’s minimalist Tank Bag fits the Royal Enfield perfectly. Yet it is still large enough to stash a full-size DSLR camera inside. It features a single heavy-duty zipper and four clips that allow you to quickly remove the bag, leaving the straps on the bike. Additional features include an internal lid pocket that doubles as a fanny pack, a detachable map pocket, and a waterproof shell that doesn’t need a liner. During our rides, we appreciated that the tank bag didn’t interfere with our riding position while standing on the pegs. The system as a whole was rock solid stable on the trail and the bags stayed clear of the exhaust. The carbon risers lift the fender just high enough to let sticky mud pass through, while maintaining the stock appearance.The unique high/low dual fender design on the Himalayan is just one of the quirky characteristics of the bike that give it a unique quality. However, that low fender can become a liability in muddy terrain. Sticky mud can build up on the tire until it begins to touch the fender, and eventually the wheel completely locks up. This can lead to either the front fender ripping off or being sent over the handlebars at an inopportune moment. To help avoid this type of situation, we added a fender riser kit from Enfield Accessories. The kit comes with a set of 15mm tall carbon fiber spacers and longer bolts that add more clearance between the tire and fender. Should you ride in a particularly muddy region, they also offer a 25mm kit to provide even more space for mud to accumulate. It’s an inexpensive upgrade that is easy to install and it can save you a lot of hassle on your next mud ride. The machined aluminum mount utilizes four stainless-steel wire ropes at its base to deaden vibration and reduce impacts.Charging a phone on the road is one thing, where to put it is another. The Perfect Squeeze offers an extremely robust and secure option for bar-mounting a phone, with little fear of an “unplanned” departure. A click wheel-style adjuster moves the rubberized jaws to the appropriate size, and while it takes a few turns to get it there, the grip offered by the Perfect Squeeze is among the most solid of any style mounts available. For off-road or single-cylinder bike riders, the Perfect Squeeze can be mounted to a Buzz-Kill vibration isolator. Where the stock low-profile mount would attach the phone holder directly to the bars, the Buzz-Kill uses a stainless-steel “wire rope” isolation design, mounted to aluminum backing plates. This design offers both vibration and impact resistance, and lack of any rubber parts bodes well for a long service life. PowerTRONIC’s programmable ECU device fits snugly under the seat and can be configured using their R-Tune software. You can use PowerTRONIC’s pre-installed fuel maps, configure your own or download additional ones from their website. Saving the most complex upgrade for last, PowerTRONIC makes a programmable ECU for the Himalayan, which allows you to get into the bike’s electronics and tinker with the fuel mapping. As mentioned earlier, the Himalayan isn’t a fire-breathing race machine, but while you’re not going to turn the docile 410cc single into an R1 by pushing some buttons, there are benefits to be found in changing the characteristics of the Himalayan’s fuel delivery. Plus for those who like to tinker, it’s fun to have this level of control over things. Speed run tests using the Himalayan-specific maps downloaded from the PowerTRONIC website did reveal consistently faster timed results climbing both steep and gentle grades, although by just a few seconds. More noticeable was the improved throttle response, particularly off-the-line “snap,” and a more purposeful feel on acceleration. Fuel Map 1 offers mid-range performance gains while Map 2 has mid and top-end performance gains. Both maps showed an improvement over stock in our speed run tests.The install procedure involves several steps, and initially appears complex, however it’s quite straightforward as you simply swap one connection at a time in the PowerTRONIC’s wiring harness. Once the harness is in place, you have a stock coupler which both verifies the system is installed correctly and serves as a way to quickly revert back to the bike’s factory stock fuel mapping. Once the Piggyback ECU is plugged in, the bike can take advantage of whatever map has been uploaded to the unit, or select between two separate maps via the optional handlebar map switch. Programming the unit is done via PowerTRONIC’s R-Tune software. While the ECU ships with dual pre-installed maps, other maps are downloadable from the PowerTRONIC website, and endless user-customization can be done to create one’s own maps. There’s even a “lock” feature in the software which can prevent a map from being copied from the ECU should you come up with a proprietary configuration you want to keep secret. Let the Himalayan track days begin! More Himalayan Mods To Come… Now going on its fourth year, the Himalayan has options available from numerous aftermarket companies spanning a wide range of forms and functions. Here at ADV Pulse, we’re still seeking out and finding interesting products to add to our Royal Enfield project bike. For the next phase, we’ll be focusing on additional off-road protection and maybe a little bling to give it a more custom look. Stay tuned, the little bike that could will likely see additional tweaks coming before long. Author: Jon Beck Jon Beck is fulfilling a dream of never figuring out what to be when he grows up. Racing mountain bikes, competitive surfing, and touring as a musician are somehow part of what led Jon to travel through over 40 countries so far as an adventure motorcycle photographer, journalist, and guide. From precision riding for cameras in Hollywood, to refilling a fountain pen for travel stories, Jon brings a rare blend of experience to the table. While he seems happiest when lost in a desert someplace, deadlines are met most of the time.
  7. Our Himalayan project bike enters “Phase 2” with mods to improve performance, comfort and convenience.The Himalayan burst onto the scene as a unique offering compared to what Royal Enfield had traditionally built over the past many decades, and a unique bike for the adventure motorcycle segment in general. With a price point of $4,799, it leaves surplus funds for potential aftermarket upgrades to customize the bike to your aesthetic tastes, riding style and journeys as well. Previously, we put our Royal Enfield Himalayan project bike through its paces to suss out modifications and upgrades which would be considered “essential” for the bike, or at least highly recommended for anyone who spends much time off-road. Yet many more upgrade options for this interesting motorcycle are out there. In this next phase of building out our Himalayan, we focus on optional upgrades that improve performance, comfort and convenience. ADVERTISEMENT After a fair amount of trial and error, figuring out what works and what doesn’t, we came up with a list of 10 products to enhance the Himalayan’s capability. Ranking the following bits in terms of importance is left up to the individual rider’s preference and intended use for the motorcycle. Read on for a description of how these products can improve the Himalayan and, of course, you can pick and choose, mix and match, upgrades based on your own personal needs. For most off-road riders, one of the primary upgrades on an adventure bike is tires. Like many bikes in this class, the Himalayan ships with a street-biased dual sport tire, specifically the Pirelli MT60. Given the Himalayan is a smaller and lower horsepower motorcycle for the adventure bike class, Pirelli’s 70/30 (street/dirt) tire does the job in most situations riders will encounter aboard the little single. While grabbing a handful of throttle either on or off-road seldom results in the Himalayan’s back end breaking loose and the bike getting sideways, a set of knobby-style tires will still give the Himilayan more sure-footed grip and better cornering traction in loose terrain. Knobbies will always provide greater traction in the dirt, but the traction offered by a 50/50 dual sport tire seems to match the Himalayan’s character well. In spite of its comparatively lower power and price tag, the Enfield is a capable adventure bike. For a boost in off-road performance, we switched to Mitas’ E-07 50/50 dual sport tires (90/90-21; 120/90-17) to increase grip without sacrificing road-going performance. We noticed a significant improvement in loose terrain where the Mitas tires helped aid forward motion better than the stock stock Pirellis, and extra cornering grip helped us avoid front-end washouts in sandy turns. Good cornering on pavement and improved bite in the dirt are welcome characteristics which enhance the already impressive abilities of this understated motorcycle, but we also appreciated the longevity of the tires. After 3,500+ miles of testing on a range of terrain, the rear E-07 still has a healthy amount of tread left. Where tires are perhaps a “necessary” modification that’s obvious right away, some accessories fall into the category of “I didn’t realize how necessary this was until after using it.” Cyclops’ H4 LED headlight bulb arguably falls into this category. Royal Enfield’s history goes back to the 1950’s, and six-volt electrical systems. While the Himalayan has a modern 12-volt electrical system, the stock headlight’s somewhat anemic quality almost seems to borrow from the early low-power days. Maintaining the cool look of the round headlight, and still using the stock reflector and lens, simply swapping out the stock bulb for Cyclops’ H4 setup massively changes the riding experience at night. While drawing only 38 watts, the color, spread, and throw of light from the front of the motorcycle is drastically changed for the better. One could argue there’s a safety aspect to this modification during daylight hours as well, as rear-view-mirror visibility to other drivers on the road is increased. No modifications are required to the Himalayan’s headlight shroud to install the Cyclops H4, however space is tight, and cutting down the two retaining bolts (or replacing with shorter bolts) on each side of the housing make positioning the driver much easier. Going from a traditional 60-watt filament bulb to four XHP 50 emitters at over 2500 lumens is a worthwhile change. The reduced draw on the charging system (38 watts vs 60 watts) also makes room for adding additional electronic accessories like heated gear and auxiliary lights. Next on the list of “most obvious” changes, the thing you’re sitting on would be near the top of the list. Royal Enfield’s optional touring seat has both performance and aesthetic characteristics. Enfield’s “3D net” technology claims to distribute weight more evenly over the seat. We noticed right away a more contoured fit that seems to eliminate any pressure points. Choice of saddle is a highly personal thing, but most riders will likely find the Himalayan’s touring seat option more comfortable for long days on the bike. The durable non-slip cover featuring the Royal Enfield logo is a cool addition to an already cool looking bike. A matching passenger ‘touring’ seat is also available. The USB port offers ‘quick charge’ power directly from the battery, battery status lights and an on/off switch that shuts off power completely to avoid any parasitic draw. Cell phones and other small electronic devices are as much an appendage as accessory to humans in the modern era, and they require power (constantly it seems). Charging phones and other devices while riding has become commonplace over the past couple decades. The ubiquity of USB devices has led to a shift from old style “cigarette lighter” 12-volt power ports in vehicles to most now featuring more-convenient USB ports instead. While the Himalayan does not include power ports of any type, easy access to the bike’s battery under the seat makes installing one a snap. Motopower’s dual-port USB option provides five volts and 3.1 amps of power, which can quickly charge not only cell phones, but tablets, GPS units, camera batteries, or just about anything else that uses a USB port. Intelligent charging circuitry identifies devices to provide optimal power levels, and the Motopower uniquely features battery status lights and an on/off switch so the unit can shut off power either automatically or manually to prevent parasitic battery drain. It comes with an SAE-style cable that is wired directly to the battery, which makes it compatible with many battery charger plugs and with a direct source of power, you can charge devices overnight without leaving the ignition on. The Antigravity Li-ion battery saves 4.4 lbs and offers three times more cold cranking amps than stock. Its Re-Start technology can also jump-start the bike from a reserve charge.The stock Himalayan battery always felt a little weak to us, even when it was fully charged and load tested fine. If the bike was sitting for a month or so, it would sometimes go flat as well. So we decided it would be a good idea to replace it with something more powerful, like Antigravity’s ATZ10 Lithium-ion battery that provides three times more Cold Cranking Amps (360) than the stock Varta lead-acid battery. Other benefits associated with Lithium-ion batteries can be found in things like form factor and weight. In both cases, Antigravity’s ATZ10 earns big scores here. Most apparent, swapping out the Himalayan’s stock battery for the ATZ10 shaves over four pounds off the machine. Sounds like a small number until you’re holding both batteries at the same time and it quickly becomes apparent the Antigravity weighs less than half what the stock lead-acid power source does. Dual sets of terminals on both sides of the battery provide additional options for how and where wiring harnesses can be routed to the battery box – a convenient feature during install. The standout industry-only feature of the ATZ10 is its “RE-START” technology. Should a power drain for whatever reason render the battery flat, simply press the restart button, and the battery will jump-start itself from a reserve charge. Other advanced internal circuitry allows the ATZ10 to monitor its own status and protect from over-charging by entering a “sleep” mode when necessary. A reusable air filter simplifies maintenance on longer trips and the high-flow design helps the Himalayan’s engine breath better.Moving inside the bike, next in our upgrade list is K&N’s replacement air filter. Freer-flowing by a claimed 50%, the potential for horsepower gains are there. Given the Himalayan isn’t a fire-breathing race machine, power gains might be a secondary consideration here. However, the mellow character of the 410cc single can use any help it can get, and the K&N filter is a worthy upgrade that provides multiple benefits beyond claimed power increases. Durability and reusability are key aspects of what makes this filter an addition to consider. The fact the filter is washable makes for easy maintenance on long trips, and a cost savings over the life of the bike. A tight seal is provided by the clamp-on design, and installation is as easy as swapping out a stock filter. K&N also offers its own proprietary spray-on cleaning and oiling products that are designed to work with their air filters. Deciding on a luggage system to haul gear during your trips is a major consideration for any adventure rider. After testing several different systems on the Himalayan, we went with Wolfman’s next-gen waterproof Rolie soft bags and their Unrack System. The adaptable setup lets you strap different Rolie bags to a base harness in various ways, depending on your storage needs. And as the name suggests, it doesn’t require any luggage racks. Using the B-Base (for big bikes), we strapped two medium Rolie Bags on the sides and one large Rolie on top for 44 liters of capacity. Each Rolie bag is fully waterproof without liners and comes with straps and attachment points that make it easy to add more bags in a stackable configuration. For longer trips, we’d strap on a camp chair and additional small Rolie bag to add more capacity. We also added Wolfman’s Enduro Tank Bag, which offers an additional 4 liters of capacity. Given the Himalayan’s comparatively diminutive size, Wolfman’s minimalist Tank Bag fits the Royal Enfield perfectly. Yet it is still large enough to stash a full-size DSLR camera inside. It features a single heavy-duty zipper and four clips that allow you to quickly remove the bag, leaving the straps on the bike. Additional features include an internal lid pocket that doubles as a fanny pack, a detachable map pocket, and a waterproof shell that doesn’t need a liner. During our rides, we appreciated that the tank bag didn’t interfere with our riding position while standing on the pegs. The system as a whole was rock solid stable on the trail and the bags stayed clear of the exhaust. The carbon risers lift the fender just high enough to let sticky mud pass through, while maintaining the stock appearance.The unique high/low dual fender design on the Himalayan is just one of the quirky characteristics of the bike that give it a unique quality. However, that low fender can become a liability in muddy terrain. Sticky mud can build up on the tire until it begins to touch the fender, and eventually the wheel completely locks up. This can lead to either the front fender ripping off or being sent over the handlebars at an inopportune moment. To help avoid this type of situation, we added a fender riser kit from Enfield Accessories. The kit comes with a set of 15mm tall carbon fiber spacers and longer bolts that add more clearance between the tire and fender. Should you ride in a particularly muddy region, they also offer a 25mm kit to provide even more space for mud to accumulate. It’s an inexpensive upgrade that is easy to install and it can save you a lot of hassle on your next mud ride. The machined aluminum mount utilizes four stainless-steel wire ropes at its base to deaden vibration and reduce impacts.Charging a phone on the road is one thing, where to put it is another. The Perfect Squeeze offers an extremely robust and secure option for bar-mounting a phone, with little fear of an “unplanned” departure. A click wheel-style adjuster moves the rubberized jaws to the appropriate size, and while it takes a few turns to get it there, the grip offered by the Perfect Squeeze is among the most solid of any style mounts available. For off-road or single-cylinder bike riders, the Perfect Squeeze can be mounted to a Buzz-Kill vibration isolator. Where the stock low-profile mount would attach the phone holder directly to the bars, the Buzz-Kill uses a stainless-steel “wire rope” isolation design, mounted to aluminum backing plates. This design offers both vibration and impact resistance, and lack of any rubber parts bodes well for a long service life. PowerTRONIC’s programmable ECU device fits snugly under the seat and can be configured using their R-Tune software. You can use PowerTRONIC’s pre-installed fuel maps, configure your own or download additional ones from their website. Saving the most complex upgrade for last, PowerTRONIC makes a programmable ECU for the Himalayan, which allows you to get into the bike’s electronics and tinker with the fuel mapping. As mentioned earlier, the Himalayan isn’t a fire-breathing race machine, but while you’re not going to turn the docile 410cc single into an R1 by pushing some buttons, there are benefits to be found in changing the characteristics of the Himalayan’s fuel delivery. Plus for those who like to tinker, it’s fun to have this level of control over things. Speed run tests using the Himalayan-specific maps downloaded from the PowerTRONIC website did reveal consistently faster timed results climbing both steep and gentle grades, although by just a few seconds. More noticeable was the improved throttle response, particularly off-the-line “snap,” and a more purposeful feel on acceleration. Fuel Map 1 offers mid-range performance gains while Map 2 has mid and top-end performance gains. Both maps showed an improvement over stock in our speed run tests.The install procedure involves several steps, and initially appears complex, however it’s quite straightforward as you simply swap one connection at a time in the PowerTRONIC’s wiring harness. Once the harness is in place, you have a stock coupler which both verifies the system is installed correctly and serves as a way to quickly revert back to the bike’s factory stock fuel mapping. Once the Piggyback ECU is plugged in, the bike can take advantage of whatever map has been uploaded to the unit, or select between two separate maps via the optional handlebar map switch. Programming the unit is done via PowerTRONIC’s R-Tune software. While the ECU ships with dual pre-installed maps, other maps are downloadable from the PowerTRONIC website, and endless user-customization can be done to create one’s own maps. There’s even a “lock” feature in the software which can prevent a map from being copied from the ECU should you come up with a proprietary configuration you want to keep secret. Let the Himalayan track days begin! More Himalayan Mods To Come… Now going on its fourth year, the Himalayan has options available from numerous aftermarket companies spanning a wide range of forms and functions. Here at ADV Pulse, we’re still seeking out and finding interesting products to add to our Royal Enfield project bike. For the next phase, we’ll be focusing on additional off-road protection and maybe a little bling to give it a more custom look. Stay tuned, the little bike that could will likely see additional tweaks coming before long. Author: Jon Beck Jon Beck is fulfilling a dream of never figuring out what to be when he grows up. Racing mountain bikes, competitive surfing, and touring as a musician are somehow part of what led Jon to travel through over 40 countries so far as an adventure motorcycle photographer, journalist, and guide. From precision riding for cameras in Hollywood, to refilling a fountain pen for travel stories, Jon brings a rare blend of experience to the table. While he seems happiest when lost in a desert someplace, deadlines are met most of the time.
  8. Published on 08.05.2020 [embedded content] [embedded content]Sena has launched the 5S, a next-generation value-packed intercom system designed with ease of use in mind. The 5S is born from the classic Sena SMH5, one of Sena’s original motorcycle headsets that has been keeping riders connected for nearly a decade. The entry-level 5S puts a new spin on the original SMH5, with Bluetooth 5 and a sleek LCD display for visual confirmation of the device’s settings. With the new 5S, you get High Definition in-helmet speakers, High Definition two-way intercom, and integrated LCD screen plus the 5S with Bluetooth 5 keeps you connected to your riding companion or passenger with HD sound quality, music sharing, and audio equalizer profiles built right in. With even more features packed in, it also lets you answer phone calls hands-free, listen to FM Radio, and hear your GPS prompts. The 5S features a Helmet Clamp Kit and Boom Microphone. The Jog Dial makes for an intuitive user interface that is much easier to control while riding, which means you’ll ride safer. Simplified Setup & Operation The LCD screen enables you to quickly verify your connections and settings before you even put your helmet on. Conversely, manage device functions hands-free while riding using the voice commands supported across 8 languages. And the glove-friendly Jog Dial is perfect for changing volume or answering your phone calls while on the go. Updated HD Speakers ADVERTISEMENT The newly redesigned in-helmet speakers are optimized for both physical comfort and great audio performance. These particular speakers have been designed with a beveled taper and easily fit in the speaker pockets of a helmet, giving the rider a comfortable experience. The 5S speakers have a marked increase in volume, bass boost, and clarity. 2-Way Intercom & Smartphone Connectivity The 5S is equipped with an HD 2-way Bluetooth Intercom system that allows for rider to rider communication at nearly a half mile range (0.4 MI, 700 M), almost doubling the range of the SMH5. Pair your smartphone to the 5S to seamlessly listen to music, GPS directions, take calls and more. Sena’s Audio Multitasking™ will allow 5S users to listen to music while simultaneously talking over Bluetooth Intercom. Sena 5S Bluetooth Intercom Features HD Speakers LCD Display Bluetooth® 5 2-Way HD Intercom Audio Multitasking™ Intuitive Jog Dial Smartphone Connectivity Sena Utility App FM Radio Talk time: 7 hours Standby time: 7 days Charging time: 1.5 hours Working distance: up to 700m (0.4mi) in open terrain Universal intercom allows allows pairing to other brands of Bluetooth headsets GPS navigation Water resistant Up to 7 hours talk time, 7 days stand-by time Upgradeable firmware Availability and Price The 5S is now available with an MSRP of $159 USD / €169 EUR (Incl. VAT) for a single pack, and $299 USD / €319 EUR (Incl. VAT) for a dual pack. Like all Sena products, the 5S is firmware upgradeable and comes with a two-year warranty. Shopping Options:
  9. As we reported last month, Ewan McGregor and Charley Boorman’s ‘Long Way Up’ found a home at Apple TV+, who commissioned streaming rights to the new motorcycle series. Now, the streaming platform has revealed the remaining details of when the world will watch the famous duo’s new adventure, along with a preview of official photos from the project. The official word is that the new series, starring and executive produced by Ewan and Charley, will begin rolling out as soon as next month. The first three episodes will premiere globally on Apple TV+ on Friday, September 18, and new episodes will air weekly. Long Way Up – Episode 6The new series will follow Ewan and Charley as they ride Harley-Davidson LiveWire electric motorcycles through Argentina, Chile, Bolivia, Peru, Ecuador, Colombia, Central America, and Mexico up to Los Angeles. Also joining them are their longtime collaborators, directors David Alexanian and Russ Malkin, following them in their electric Rivian trucks. The whole journey covers 13,000 miles over 100 days through 16 border crossings and 13 countries. ADVERTISEMENT So far, details about their trip have been scarce but McGregor revealed, in an interview with Jimmy Fallon, some of the challenges they faced riding electric bikes. “It proved to be amazing, and quite tricky at the same time,” he said of charging the e-bikes along the way. And while they could sometimes charge the bikes at hotels, and restaurants during lunch stops, many times they had to rely on the generosity of locals, knocking on doors and asking to use an outlet. Long Way Up – Episode 4Apple TV+ is available on the Apple TV app on iPhone, iPad, Apple TV, iPod touch, Mac, select Samsung and LG smart TVs, Amazon Fire TV and Roku devices, as well as at tv.apple.com, for $4.99 per month with a seven-day free trial. We’ll bring you more details as they become available. Stay tuned!
  10. It’s only been a few months since Honda put the CT125 Hunter Cub into production, the first bikes are just arriving in showrooms in Asia, and already aftermarket customizers have their hands on Big Red’s newest “adventure” bike, turning it into something even cooler. Can’t say we blame them. In case you hadn’t heard, the Hunter Cub is a scrambler/off-road version of Honda’s C125 Super Cub, which itself is the modern version of the bike that put millions of people on two wheels all over the world. The Hunter Cub’s got more ground clearance, a skid plate, a kick starter, spoke wheels, a bigger fuel tank and a bunch of other off-road savvy stuff. We’re waiting very impatiently for it to show up in North America. Here is what Thailand builder K-Speed came up with: a combat-themed CT125 with a stretched swingarm, beefier wheels, upgraded suspension and a Gatling gun-style exhaust … more on that later. The company built the bike in only 10 days as a showcase for their expanding parts catalog, quite remarkable considering how new the CT125 is. ADVERTISEMENT First and foremost, they added a custom swingarm that’s two-inches longer than stock to allow for a bigger, fatter rear tire. It’s still a 17-incher, but the added h and w really give the bike an off-road stance. Up front, a high fender clears space for a beefy 90/100-17 knobby that should really improve the little bike’s bite. Higher up, K-Speed added a set of their own Diablo enduro-style handlebars mounted on a custom triple clamp and risers, a new LED headlight wrapped in a custom grill, and new grips, switches, mirrors and throttle. They also moved the stock instrument cluster to the left-side crash bar. The seat was fancied up with what K-Speed calls their “mixed pattern” Diablo unit, retaining the cush of the original with possibly more grip. Other touches from the company catalog include a lightened chain guard, LED taillights and turn signals, a larger bash plate, wider footpegs, a larger footprint for the side stand, and finned engine covers. Out back, upgraded Diablo shocks mounted on that longer swingarm add 1.5 inches of suspension lift that should go a long way toward making the Hunter Cub more capable in the dirt. K-Speed ditched the stock mudguard to make way for the bigger rear tire, mounting a smaller replacement higher for clearance. One of the stock CT125’s most useful features is its roomy rear rack for tying on whatever gear or groceries you need on your adventure. K-Speed came up with their own version of the rack, topped with a military-looking toolbox to keep your belongings in place when the road runs out. The whole thing is treated to a black-and-white camo paint job. And then there’s that Gatlin gun-style exhaust, topped by a fully functional, rotating cap that spins faster as you rev the bike. It looks like something you’d find on a Bond Aston Martin, not a 125cc Honda, but you can bet your neighbor doesn’t have one. [embedded content] [embedded content]For more custom projects from K-Speed go to their Instagram or visit their website. Source: BikeExif | Photos by Hipmotography Author: Bob Whitby Bob has been riding motorcycles since age 19 and working as a journalist since he was 24, which was a long time ago, let’s put it that way. He quit for the better part of a decade to raise a family, then rediscovered adventure, dual sport and enduro riding in the early 2000s. He lives in Arkansas, America’s best-kept secret when it comes to riding destinations, and travels far and wide in search of dirt roads and trails.
  11. It’s only been a few months since Honda put the CT125 Hunter Cub into production, the first bikes are just arriving in showrooms in Asia, and already aftermarket customizers have their hands on Big Red’s newest “adventure” bike, turning it into something even cooler. Can’t say we blame them. In case you hadn’t heard, the Hunter Cub is a scrambler/off-road version of Honda’s C125 Super Cub, which itself is the modern version of the bike that put millions of people on two wheels all over the world. The Hunter Cub’s got more ground clearance, a skid plate, a kick starter, spoke wheels, a bigger fuel tank and a bunch of other off-road savvy stuff. We’re waiting very impatiently for it to show up in North America. Here is what Thailand builder K-Speed came up with: a combat-themed CT125 with a stretched swingarm, beefier wheels, upgraded suspension and a Gatling gun-style exhaust … more on that later. The company built the bike in only 10 days as a showcase for their expanding parts catalog, quite remarkable considering how new the CT125 is. ADVERTISEMENT First and foremost, they added a custom swingarm that’s two-inches longer than stock to allow for a bigger, fatter rear tire. It’s still a 17-incher, but the added h and w really give the bike an off-road stance. Up front, a high fender clears space for a beefy 90/100-17 knobby that should really improve the little bike’s bite. Higher up, K-Speed added a set of their own Diablo enduro-style handlebars mounted on a custom triple clamp and risers, a new LED headlight wrapped in a custom grill, and new grips, switches, mirrors and throttle. They also moved the stock instrument cluster to the left-side crash bar. The seat was fancied up with what K-Speed calls their “mixed pattern” Diablo unit, retaining the cush of the original with possibly more grip. Other touches from the company catalog include a lightened chain guard, LED taillights and turn signals, a larger bash plate, wider footpegs, a larger footprint for the side stand, and finned engine covers. Out back, upgraded Diablo shocks mounted on that longer swingarm add 1.5 inches of suspension lift that should go a long way toward making the Hunter Cub more capable in the dirt. K-Speed ditched the stock mudguard to make way for the bigger rear tire, mounting a smaller replacement higher for clearance. One of the stock CT125’s most useful features is its roomy rear rack for tying on whatever gear or groceries you need on your adventure. K-Speed came up with their own version of the rack, topped with a military-looking toolbox to keep your belongings in place when the road runs out. The whole thing is treated to a black-and-white camo paint job. And then there’s that Gatlin gun-style exhaust, topped by a fully functional, rotating cap that spins faster as you rev the bike. It looks like something you’d find on a Bond Aston Martin, not a 125cc Honda, but you can bet your neighbor doesn’t have one. [embedded content] [embedded content]For more custom projects from K-Speed go to their Instagram or visit their website. Source: BikeExif | Photos by Hipmotography Author: Bob Whitby Bob has been riding motorcycles since age 19 and working as a journalist since he was 24, which was a long time ago, let’s put it that way. He quit for the better part of a decade to raise a family, then rediscovered adventure, dual sport and enduro riding in the early 2000s. He lives in Arkansas, America’s best-kept secret when it comes to riding destinations, and travels far and wide in search of dirt roads and trails.
  12. Published on 07.31.2020 Cardo Systems has announced the introduction of a new special-edition model to the Packtalk family called the Packtalk Black. In addition to utilizing Cardo’s proprietary, Dynamic Mesh Communication (DMC) technology, the Packtalk Black offers bigger 45mm JBL speakers (vs the Packtalk Bold’s 40mm), a blacked-out design and an extra year of warranty compared to the Bold’s two-year coverage. Like other Packtalk motorcycle intercom models, the special-edition PackTalk Black’s DMC functions with a self-adjusting network that automatically maintains a connection, thus allowing up to 15 riders to seamlessly join, leave and rejoin at a claimed distance of up to five miles. The Packtalk Black is also waterproof and dustproof, offers 13 hours of battery life, and features the always-on Natural Voice Operation – allowing riders to keep their eyes on the road, hands on the bars, and activate their device by simply saying “Hey, Cardo.” “With the industry first, and only three-year complete warranty, riders can reap the benefits of PACKTALK’s superior, proven technology and unmatched features, but do so with a darker, edgier expression of personal style,” said Dan Emodi, Cardo Systems’ Chief Marketing Officer. ADVERTISEMENT The Packtalk Black special-edition unit also features the bluetooth system of the older models, which allows riders to manage phone calls, stream music from their phone and merge other bluetooth intercom devices with their mesh conversations. Plus the Cardo app allows you to configure the device settings like FM radio presets, VOX sensitivity, phone presets and more. The new Packtalk Black has an MSRP of $389.95 and is available for purchase at cardosystems.com with a ship date starting August 12. [embedded content] [embedded content]Packtalk Black Features DMC Intercom: up to 1.6 km / 1 Mile in open terrain *can extend up to 8.0km (5.0 miles) between a minimum of 6 riders Bluetooth intercom range: up to 1.6 km / 1 Mile Talk time: 13 hours Standby time: 1 week Charging time: 4 hours Fm radio Operating frequencies: 76 -108 MHz RDS equipped – radio data system 6 preset radio station memory AGC – automatic volume control Sound by JBL Multilingual status announcements Waterproof Dustproof
  13. [embedded content] [embedded content]New Zealand-based UBCO started building its first electric utility motorcycle, the 2X2, just a few years ago, but it’s quickly gaining traction around the world. Originally designed for farm use, the lightweight street-legal, go-anywhere e-bike is currently being used for everything from hunting and delivery work to helping rangers patrol the rugged terrain of California’s Catalina Island. In recent news, the 2X2, with its interchangeable power packs and copious accessory mounting points, is being battle-lab tested for military use by the New Zealand Defense Force (NZDF). All branches of the Kiwi military are said to be considering enlistment of the stealthy, sustainable machine, specifically for use in reconnaissance and surveillance missions that would take place in the country’s notoriously rugged territory. And this little bike might have just enough chops to get the job done. A swappable 48Ah, 50V battery powers the two 1kW hub-drive motors, which split power 50/50 between the front and rear wheels. Suspension consists of a custom single-crown MTB-style fork delivering 130mm of travel while dual rear shocks offer 120mm. Preload, compression and rebound are adjustable at both ends. ADVERTISEMENT Electric bicycle-spec hydraulic disk brakes slow the 144-pound (65 kg) machine, which has a step-through style frame like a Honda CT trail bike. With no clutch, transmission or emissions to worry over, one is left to contemplate distance vs. weight and temperature and terrain. UBCO claims the 2X2 offers a 78-mile (120 km) maximum range, though if you’re not swapping batteries, a full charge requires 6-8 hours on household current. There is a governor that imposes a 30 mph limit, so no movie-style chase scenes for these camo-clad Kiwis, but speed is not meant to be this bike’s strong suit. Instead, it’s about the tractability afforded by a 2WD motorcycle that lets a rider make very controlled – and silent – maneuvers. Other advantages the e-utility bike has over a fueled vehicle is it doesn’t give off exhaust or heat and isn’t powered by flammable liquids. They are simple to maintain and onboard computers will be able to record a range of information about how the bike is used. In fact, there’s an app consumers can download that turns their smartphone into a dashboard. “I think technology has changed dramatically over the last five years,” says LtCol Brad Gallop, Land Combat Group Lead, Capability Branch, New Zealand Defence Force. “EV is an emerging technology that we need to look at…to see how applicable it is on the battlefield.” For UBCO’s part, having the armed forces put the 2X2 through its paces is a huge advantage, allowing the company to rapidly learn how the bike operates under extreme conditions. “Globally, defense is a very controlled industry, so this collaboration is hugely valuable” says Timothy Allan, CEO of UBCO. In the meantime, if you want to learn more about how UBCO’s 2X2 works for civilian use, check out this review written by adventure rider and veteran motorcycle journalist, Justin Dawes. Also make sure to check out UBCO’s latest endeavor, the FRX1 Electric Trail Bike, basically a 50-mph mountain bike. Author: Jamie Elvidge Jamie has been a motorcycle journalist for more than 30 years, testing the entire range of bikes for the major print magazines and specializing in adventure-travel related stories. To date she’s written and supplied photography for articles describing what it’s like to ride in all 50 states and 43 foreign countries, receiving two Lowell Thomas Society of American Travel Writer’s Awards along the way. Her most-challenging adventure yet has been riding in the 2018 GS Trophy in Mongolia as Team AusAmerica’s embedded journalist.
  14. [embedded content] [embedded content]New Zealand-based UBCO started building its first electric utility motorcycle, the 2X2, just a few years ago, but it’s quickly gaining traction around the world. Originally designed for farm use, the lightweight street-legal, go-anywhere e-bike is currently being used for everything from hunting and delivery work to helping rangers patrol the rugged terrain of California’s Catalina Island. In recent news, the 2X2, with its interchangeable power packs and copious accessory mounting points, is being battle-lab tested for military use by the New Zealand Defense Force (NZDF). All branches of the Kiwi military are said to be considering enlistment of the stealthy, sustainable machine, specifically for use in reconnaissance and surveillance missions that would take place in the country’s notoriously rugged territory. And this little bike might have just enough chops to get the job done. A swappable 48Ah, 50V battery powers the two 1kW hub-drive motors, which split power 50/50 between the front and rear wheels. Suspension consists of a custom single-crown MTB-style fork delivering 130mm of travel while dual rear shocks offer 120mm. Preload, compression and rebound are adjustable at both ends. ADVERTISEMENT Electric bicycle-spec hydraulic disk brakes slow the 144-pound (65 kg) machine, which has a step-through style frame like a Honda CT trail bike. With no clutch, transmission or emissions to worry over, one is left to contemplate distance vs. weight and temperature and terrain. UBCO claims the 2X2 offers a 78-mile (120 km) maximum range, though if you’re not swapping batteries, a full charge requires 6-8 hours on household current. There is a governor that imposes a 30 mph limit, so no movie-style chase scenes for these camo-clad Kiwis, but speed is not meant to be this bike’s strong suit. Instead, it’s about the tractability afforded by a 2WD motorcycle that lets a rider make very controlled – and silent – maneuvers. Other advantages the e-utility bike has over a fueled vehicle is it doesn’t give off exhaust or heat and isn’t powered by flammable liquids. They are simple to maintain and onboard computers will be able to record a range of information about how the bike is used. In fact, there’s an app consumers can download that turns their smartphone into a dashboard. “I think technology has changed dramatically over the last five years,” says LtCol Brad Gallop, Land Combat Group Lead, Capability Branch, New Zealand Defence Force. “EV is an emerging technology that we need to look at…to see how applicable it is on the battlefield.” For UBCO’s part, having the armed forces put the 2X2 through its paces is a huge advantage, allowing the company to rapidly learn how the bike operates under extreme conditions. “Globally, defense is a very controlled industry, so this collaboration is hugely valuable” says Timothy Allan, CEO of UBCO. In the meantime, if you want to learn more about how UBCO’s 2X2 works for civilian use, check out this review written by adventure rider and veteran motorcycle journalist, Justin Dawes. Also make sure to check out UBCO’s latest endeavor, the FRX1 Electric Trail Bike, basically a 50-mph mountain bike. Author: Jamie Elvidge Jamie has been a motorcycle journalist for more than 30 years, testing the entire range of bikes for the major print magazines and specializing in adventure-travel related stories. To date she’s written and supplied photography for articles describing what it’s like to ride in all 50 states and 43 foreign countries, receiving two Lowell Thomas Society of American Travel Writer’s Awards along the way. Her most-challenging adventure yet has been riding in the 2018 GS Trophy in Mongolia as Team AusAmerica’s embedded journalist.
  15. [embedded content] [embedded content]Yamaha has been teasing US customers with the Tenere 700 for a half-decade. Now that it’s finally here, it has found a sweet spot in the fast-growing adventure segment becoming one of the most sought-after ADV bikes to come along in a while. Touratech has been riding and testing the Tenere 700 for over a year now and is happy to announce a product range for this versatile parallel-twin adventure machine. “We have fallen in love with the long-travel suspension and 21” front wheel for off-road riding. The simplicity of not having a menu of electronic settings to manage is a refreshingly raw motorcycle experience. This bike seems at home off-road and is ready for adventure” — Kimmo Lassila, Vice President, Touratech-USA Touratech Suspension Rear Shocks When riders load up their Tenere 700 with gear for a trip, many will run out of pre-load adjustment while trying to set the sag properly. This is why Touratech shocks come with 15mm of preload adjustment, so riders can get the bike level and handling properly with a load. Touratech shocks are set up with a custom spring to match the rider and have low friction seals and PDS to ensure great performance in demanding conditions. The shocks are designed with heavy-duty components to ensure the Tenere 700 will go the distance. The Explore HP is a great upgrade to the stock shock on the Tenere. For those who want a remote reservoir with floating piston and high and low speed damping adjustment, the Extreme is the choice. Both are available in standard h and a 35mm lowering version. Retail $1,195 – $1,795. Touratech Suspension Cartridge System A complete replacement of the OEM fork leg internals with a high-performance closed cartridge system. The Touratech closed cartridge separates the air and oil to prevent foaming which ensures that your fork will have smooth and consistent performance even in punishing environments. Increased reliability from having the damping oil completely separated from the fork leg lubrication means that a leaking seal will not affect damping performance. Fully adjustable compression, rebound and pre-load allows riders to dial in the performance to meet their preferences. Available in standard h and a 35mm lowering version. Retail $1,795 Progressive Spring Kits & Lowering Kits ADVERTISEMENT Progressive fork and shock springs offer a big improvement to the ride for a relatively modest investment. They allow the ride to be more plush at low speeds then get progressively firmer as the rider pushes the bike in corners or off-road. In addition to improving the handling of the Tenere 700 you can also get your feet closer to the ground with lowering spring kits from Touratech Suspension. Spring upgrades are available for the front, rear, or both ends of the Tenere’s suspension. Fork spring kits include application specific fork oil designed to optimize performance. Retail $149 – $389 Skid Plates Protecting the motor with a robust skid plate is a great way to keep the power-plant out of harm’s way. The RallyeForm provides complete wrap-around protection while hugging the contours of the T700 to maximize ground clearance. If you prefer the understated look, the Expedition Skid Plate is a good option with classic lines. Retail $349.95 – $399.95 Crash Bars Touratech’s lower crash bars are precision crafted from 1” diameter stainless steel tubing and engineered to keep your engine cases safe from hazards. Touratech has created an upper crash bar to protect the body work and fairing which also serve to protect the radiators from side impacts. Built in-house at Touratech, the crash bars offer strong protection while also providing a location to mount accessory lights. Both are available in silver or black finish. Retail $329.95 Quick-Release Headlight Guard Touratech’s headlight guard is designed to protect the lens but also accent the rally styling of the headlight. Riders can quickly remove the black anodized aluminum guard to wipe the dust of the lens and snap it back into place without even taking off their riding gloves. Retail $139.95 Pannier Systems Touratech offers four different pannier systems for the Tenere 700. The Zega Pro is waterproof, lightweight and has been proven reliable the world over for the last 10 years. The racks include all the mounting hardware and the boxes are available in three different finishes. For the budget-minded who want waterproof luggage without all the bells and whistles, the Zega Mundo is a great choice. In the premium category, the Zega Evo offers quick-release convenience and die forged finger-friendly latches, an ergonomic carry handle, and integrated pins for a range of snap on accessories to extend your storage. These same features are also available in the Zega Evo X, which has one box that is cut out to fit tightly around the exhaust keeping the bike narrow and providing symmetry. Retail $1149 – 1999 Extreme Saddle Bags The new Extreme Saddle Bags offer a waterproof soft luggage solution and are constructed using a 3-layer laminate for trail-toughness in harsh environments. The outer layer of rubberized polymer provides abrasion resistance and is backed with a 1000 denier nylon webbing structure for resistance to tearing. The interior is wrapped in a waterproof layer of bright-yellow vinyl for visibility and easy cleaning after the trip. Retail $400 Folding Mirrors The road less traveled often has branches or foliage that can grab OEM mirrors. The Touratech mirrors can be folded inward on-the-fly to eliminate this problem. Once back to the highway, the rider can quickly fold them back out and they are still adjusted properly. They also hold position at highway speeds making them the perfect mirror for adventure riding. You’ll need the M10 x 1.25 version and also the reverse thread adapters to fit the Tenere 700. Retail $99.90 (set of 2) plus $16.95 for the reverse thread adapter set. Enduro Tank Bag The Enduro Tank bag is just the right size to hold what you need, but small enough not to interfere with your body when standing. It also has a robust mounting system designed to keep it secure even during the rigors of off-road riding, and the removable map case on top has a clear window allowing visibility of a map or to see who is calling your phone. Retail $229 Aluminum Chain Guard A robust upgrade to the flimsy OEM plastic guard on the Tenere 700, this laser-cut stainless steel chain guard with black anodized aluminum accents will shield riders from oil fling and chain malfunctions. Retail $114.95 GPS Bracket Adapters Touratech makes multiple GPS bracket adapters to secure GPS devices on the Yamaha Tenere 700. There is an option that locates the GPS above the gauges and two versions that locate it on your handlebar mounts. Retail $79.95 Larger Side Stand Foot A larger sidestand foot helps keep the bike from tipping over when parking in soft terrain. For riders venturing off-road, this wide side-stand is a recommended upgrade to prevent the bike from taking a dirt nap. Retail $69.95 Bar Risers Many riders find that increasing the bar h makes a noticeable improvement to their comfort. Raising the bars results in a more upright position which can relieve neck and back strain. Touratech bar risers for the Tenere 700 increase the bar h 20mm or ¾” which can be done without having to re-route cables, making the installation easy. Retail $89.95
×