Mergi la conţinut

Advpulse

Membri
  • Conţinut

    258
  • Membru din

  • Ultima vizită

    Niciodată
  • Days Won

    1

Tot ce a postat Advpulse

  1. The new 30K Bluetooth Headset features Mesh Network Technology — the future of group intercom communication. For many Adventure Riders, Bluetooth Headsets are indispensable for their journeys. We’ve become accustomed to getting audio GPS directions, being able to take a call from home while riding with clear sound or having our favorite tunes on the road. After more than a decade of development, these devices now include an amazing array of features and house more processing power than your computer did in college. Even so there’s stsill room for improvement, specifically in group intercom functionality. With traditional Bluetooth Headsets, setting up a group intercom is a complicated process of connecting one rider at a time in a virtual chain. Figuring out button sequences, who’s connected to who, and whether everyone can be heard, is a bit like herding cats early in the morning when your riding buddies are raring to go. Keeping everyone riding in the order they were paired is the next hurdle. If one rider gets out of line, the group intercom chain can be broken. If one rider falls out of range using traditional Bluetooth Headsets, other riders may be unable to communicate even if they are staring each other square in the face. Yet, the convenience and safety value of a good Bluetooth intercom system can’t be emphasized enough. Whether you are warning riders behind you about an approaching truck, receiving tips on how to tackle a tricky section of a trail, planning where to stop for gas, or just catching up on the latest with old friends, intercom communication offers real benefits for your group rides. Making Group Intercom Easy After using group intercom features on a dozen different Bluetooth Headsets before, we began to think a little frustration is to be expected. It is sophisticated technology right? Luckily, the folks at Sena Bluetooth didn’t fall into that think trap and focused their engineering resources on removing the hassle out of using group intercom. The result is the new 30K Bluetooth Headset, which features Mesh Network Technology — the future of group intercom communication. With the Sena 30k Bluetooth Headsets, riders can leave the mesh network without disrupting the whole group and reconnect seamlessly when they are back in range. Mesh Network technology differs from the one-by-one paired connections used in standard Bluetooth Headset intercom systems. With mesh, you connect to a group instead of an individual and everyone in the group is connected to everyone else. The advantage is that any rider can drop out of range without affecting anyone else’s communication. Riders don’t have to stick to the specific order their devices were paired and can move around freely without risking a break in the chain. While Sena wasn’t the first to market with a Mesh Network headset, being second has some advantages. It allows you to evaluate the market reaction to a new technology, see what works and what doesn’t, so you can release a more user-friendly, functional design. After announcing plans for the new 30K over a year ago, Sena has been working hard perfecting the device, making sure they get it right the first time. So how easy is it to get connected using the a Sena 30K? All riders need to do is push the Mesh button to turn on Public Mesh Mode and it automatically begins connecting everyone within a one-mile radius. “That’s it?” was our initial reaction during the first test of the 30K. But within seconds, we were all talking to each other on the intercom. One click, it’s that easy! Riding in the Mesh The Sena 30K in Public Mesh Mode is the only Bluetooth Headset on the market that lets you connect to an ‘unlimited’ number or riders, and it allows up to six riders to talk at the same time. While even the most technology challenged riders in your group will find it easy to get connected, Public Mesh Mode does have a few limitations. For one, it works like a radio channel and anyone can listen in on your conversation if they have a 30K. The other limitation is in the range. Everyone must stay within a one-mile radius to maintain communication with every member in the group. We spent much of our first day of testing riding in Public Mesh Mode and it worked well as long as everyone stayed in a tight formation. We noticed that as soon as we started to spread out a bit, riders either at the front or back of the group would begin to drop off. Although as soon as a rider comes back in range, they are seamlessly reconnected. We found the range of Public Mode to be ideal on the street where riders maintain a closer spacing. On the trail, where riders try to stay out of each other’s dust, it’s typical to spread out more. But if you are in a hurry to get rolling, Public Mesh is the easiest way to get everyone connected and just go. The 30K’s Adaptive Mesh-Network technology connects each rider to every member in the group, instead of the linear 1-to-1 pairing of traditional Bluetooth Headsets. To extend range further, Sena has a second mode called ‘Private Mesh’ which allows up to 16 riders (still industry leading) to spread out over a range of five miles. Setting up a private mesh is also easy to do. One rider holds down the mesh button for 5 seconds which sends an audio invitation out to every other rider in range to join the group. Riders click the button once to accept the invitation and are instantly connected. The Range and clarity in Private Mesh mode was noticeably improved. The Sena 30K in Private Mesh Mode has an industry leading 1.2-mile maximum range between any two riders. Like all Bluetooth headsets, range claims are based on line of site communications and performance can drop significantly once you go over a hill or ride through a dense forest. The Mesh Network technology allowed us to maintain our connections more of the time and the range and clarity was as good as any units we’ve tested before. In both Public and Private Mesh Mode, it was by far the easiest time we’ve ever had getting everyone in our group connected. Just like all of Sena’s Bluetooth headsets, the big jog dial and prominent buttons make using the device easy with a gloved hand. Sena 30K Core Technology While the Mesh Network Technology is the centerpiece feature on the new 30K, the new unit also comes packed with tons of other goodies. Essentially, it includes the same feature set as their previous top-of-the-line unit, the 20S: It lets you connect two separate Bluetooth devices like an MP3 player, mobile phone or handheld GPS; It has music sharing capability and an FM Radio; Audio Multitasking dims your music in the background when you take a call or join the intercom; And for those that want to use noise-canceling earbuds, there is a 3.5mm audio jack to plug into and an ‘Ambient Mode’ button to hear sounds outside of your helmet (e.g. talking to an attendant at a toll booth). Just because you’ve upgraded to a 30K doesn’t mean your buddies are going to also. But that’s OK, the 30K has two separate antennae and processors, one for standard Bluetooth and another for Mesh Network. This allows the device to connect in standard Bluetooth only (Sena or non-Sena), or both Bluetooth and Mesh together at the same time! Although, traditional Bluetooth headsets will still have the same connection limitations of linear pairing. The good news is that when your buddies on standard Bluetooth headsets fall out of range, they won’t affect communications of Mesh Network riders in the group. You can still use the Sena 30K with older non-mesh Bluetooth headsets and bring them into an intercom conversation with other 30K headsets on the Mesh Network. Advanced Features For those that want to get more advanced, the 30K can also can be controlled through Voice Commands. Voice Commands aren’t for everyone, but the hands-free option is a real safety feature, and once you get the hang of it, a real convenience. We were happy to discover how easy Sena makes using Vocie Commands on the 30K. There is really only two phrases you need to remember. If you say “Hello Sena” at any time, the device will enter voice command mode and begin to ask you to “Say a Command.” Just ask “What Can I Say?” to get a full list of available commands. It’s a pretty fast learning curve and in no time we were turning on music, changing radio channels, and checking the battery level. To release even more voice command functionality, you can activate your phone’s virtual assistant (e.g. Siri, Google Now, Cortana) by pressing the ‘Phone Button’ once quickly. This gives you have the full range of commands available on your phone like “Call Wife” or “Directions to home.” You also have the option to control the Sena 30K with a mobile phone App which lets you set up private networks, speed-dial numbers, preset radio stations and more. Device settings can easily be configured through the App such as audio multitasking volume, voice command sensitivity or audio quality settings. A convenient App for Apple and Android lets you configure the 30K’s settings quickly. The Sena 30K is also compatible with the Prism Action Camera. You can control the camera using the 30K’s Jog Dial or with Voice Commands, and all of the audio from your headset, including your voice, music and intercom conversations, gets captured in the video. With any new device, a few bugs are to be expected and we did run into a sound issue using the 30K with the Prism in Ultra HD Audio Mode. Sena tends to be good about consistently rolling out fixes for known issues in their firmware updates and we expect this will be addressed in short order. No doubt the Sena 30K is a very sophisticated device, but that doesn’t mean it’s functionality you’ll never use. Fortunately, Sena does a great job providing easy to understand instructions that encourages you to explore the devices advanced functionality. The entire Sena 30K manual is actually a quick read, and there’s also a Quick Start Guide that makes getting up and running even faster. What’s more, they have a full range of “How To” videos available on YouTube outlining usage of each feature of the 30K for those that don’t like to read. [embedded content] Sena 30K Battery Life One drawback of the new Mesh Technology is that it uses more power than standard Bluetooth. A Sena 20S offers 13 hours of Talk Time, while the 30K running in mesh mode provides eight hours. For most riders eight hours is more than enough, but if you are like us, you often end up riding long days. At one point during our testing we did get a “Battery Low” voice prompt. For those times, the new 30K comes with a ‘Quick Charge’ feature. A 20-minute charge during a fuel stop was all it took to boost battery life an extra three hours, plenty of time to make it to camp. If you need to, you can also charge while you ride and continue to use the device. And if you forget to plug-in overnight, a full charge takes just 1.5 hours — the fastest recharge time we’ve seen on any Bluetooth Headset device. For those long days in the saddle, if your battery starts running low, you can always use the 30K’s 20-minute Quick Charge feature to get an extra three hours of talk time. Final Thoughts Bluetooth Headsets have come a long way in the last decade or so, and Mesh Network Technology is one of the biggest advancements in a long time. Sena has incorporated the top-of-the-line feature set found in the 20S, including industry leading range, crystal-clear sound quality and advanced features like Voice Commands. Then improved on the package with the fastest charging system, no limits on rider connections, one-click intercom setup and a self-healing mesh network that seamlessly manages connections in the group. All this with a price increase of just $30 over the 20S. It’s clear the new 30K is a feature-rich device, but what’s more impressive is how Sena made sophisticated technology easy to use. Whether it be intercom setup, voice commands, or configuring settings on the app, everything seems painstakingly thought out to reduce mental effort on the user’s part. Glove-friendly buttons, clear instructions and helpful videos to answer all your burning questions, continues the ‘Ease of Use’ theme. If you ride in groups of four riders or more, whether you are new to Bluetooth Headsets or an old pro, the 30K is worth a look. Even if you’ve been frustrated with Bluetooth Headsets in the past and you think they are too complicated or too much work, the new Sena 30K just might change your mind. Shopping Options Sena 30K Sena 30K Dual Pack
  2. Published on 02.07.2018 Wolfman Luggage has announced the new 303 Duffel and Rolie bags which are an updated version of their classic waterproof roll-top bags. The 303 Bags are named in honor of colorful Colorado’s original telephone area code. Waterproof, colorful and rugged, the new bags in the 303 series come with bunji nets and all the necessary straps that will allow mounting to a rack, or to stack bags on your motorcycle. All Wolfman 303 bags use a roll-top opening that seals out water, dust and muck, and adjusts naturally to smaller or larger loads. The outer layer is constructed of abrasion resistant USA-made 1000 Denier Cordura. In addition, the waterproof liner is seam sealed to keep water, dust and sand out. Bags in the 303 series are versatile to ensure that you can build the kit most suited to you, your bike, your gear and your riding style. The 303 Rolie Bags can be used by themselves, stacked or as a rear bag with the 27-liter 303 Duffel. Mix and match sizes and colors to stay organized and to have the perfect capacity for your next town ride or your next big adventure. The 303 Rolie Bags are available in four sizes (S, M, L, Long) and both the 27-liter Duffel and Rolie bags come in five colors (Red, Yellow, Orange, Royal Blue and Black). The 303 bag series is exclusively available online at wolfmanluggage.com or at the retail WolfStore headquarters in Longmont, CO.
  3. Published on 02.02.2018 The Honda X-End scooter is a real thing and just might be more dirt worthy than your adventure bike. This custom version is based on Honda’s X-ADV, the first Adventure Scooter, and can be traced back to the creative minds at Honda Palace with help from Rollfactory Design. The Napoli dealership won a customization contest put on by Honda for their distributors, and were rewarded for their imaginative rendering by having it displayed at the last EICMA in Milan. Imagine the X-End as the “R” or “Enduro” version of Honda’s X-ADV which is marketed as an adventure worthy scooter. While many people might scoff at the idea of any scooter being capable off-road, the folks at Honda Palace certainly think otherwise. This ADV scooter is outfitted with 19″ and 17″ spoke wheels wrapped in aggressive tubed tires and more attitude than you can shake a stick at. This feet forward means of mobility certainly looks the part with graphics reminiscent of its CRF1000L big brother and HRC decals. Upon closer inspection, it might do more than just look the part. Alterations were made to the stock X-ADV’s steering head angle to allow for the 19’ front and improve stability, several guards including a beefy skid plate were installed, and the whole package is complemented with a Termignoni exhaust. As for what you may assume of the X-End’s lack of performance, you might be surprised. The 745cc parallel-twin engine mated with a Dual Clutch Transmission (DCT) produces a claimed 54 horsepower and 50 ft.-Lbs. of torque. Even if she is a bit chunky at 500+ pounds, that’s still a good enough power-to-weight ratio to get you over some rough road. Stock brake lines were binned in favor of stainless braided ones, and the ABS has an off switch because we all know this thing is spending 90% of its time off-road… The only alteration we found about the X-End to run counter-intuitive to the traditional accessibility of a scooter is the 34-inch seat h. The seat h is unavoidable though, due to the larger wheels, and obvious need for increased suspension travel and ground clearance. With its smallish 3.5-gallon tank, fuel range might also be an issue if you so wish to traverse the Trans European Trail. Which brings me to the unfortunate news that the X-End has no known North American aspirations, as was the case for the X-ADV as well. Don’t let that fact discourage you because despite not being a production model, it’s still available for order from Honda Palace. Price is yet to be determined, but we do know that it will be offered in three different colors (red white and blue please!). While the X-End might not be for everyone, that’s not to say that everyone couldn’t have fun while twisting its grip. We can almost assure you that holding a grimace while riding this scooter is impossible. Besides, imagine the faces of your ADV buddies as you ride up through a dust cloud and skid to a stop on the X-End. After the dust settles and they finish laughing, you can bet they would all be lining up to examine what could be the most dirt-worthy scooter ever created. About the Author: Spencer Hill “The Gear Dude” has been fueling his motorcycle addiction with adventure since first swinging his leg over a bike in 2010. Whether he’s exploring his own backyard in the Pacific Northwest or crisscrossing the United States, Spencer is always in search of scenic off road routes, epic camping locations and the best gear possible. He began writing shortly after taking up two-wheel travel to share his experiences and offer insight with his extensive backpacking, camping and overland background.
  4. Published on 02.02.2018 The Honda X-End scooter is a real thing and just might be more dirt worthy than your adventure bike. This custom version is based on Honda’s X-ADV, the first Adventure Scooter, and can be traced back to the creative minds at Honda Palace with help from Rollfactory Design. The Napoli dealership won a customization contest put on by Honda for their distributors, and were rewarded for their imaginative rendering by having it displayed at the last EICMA in Milan. Imagine the X-End as the “R” or “Enduro” version of Honda’s X-ADV which is marketed as an adventure worthy scooter. While many people might scoff at the idea of any scooter being capable off-road, the folks at Honda Palace certainly think otherwise. This ADV scooter is outfitted with 19″ and 17″ spoke wheels wrapped in aggressive tubed tires and more attitude than you can shake a stick at. This feet forward means of mobility certainly looks the part with graphics reminiscent of its CRF1000L big brother and HRC decals. Upon closer inspection, it might do more than just look the part. Alterations were made to the stock X-ADV’s steering head angle to allow for the 19’ front and improve stability, several guards including a beefy skid plate were installed, and the whole package is complemented with a Termignoni exhaust. As for what you may assume of the X-End’s lack of performance, you might be surprised. The 745cc parallel-twin engine mated with a Dual Clutch Transmission (DCT) produces a claimed 54 horsepower and 50 ft.-Lbs. of torque. Even if she is a bit chunky at 500+ pounds, that’s still a good enough power-to-weight ratio to get you over some rough road. Stock brake lines were binned in favor of stainless braided ones, and the ABS has an off switch because we all know this thing is spending 90% of its time off-road… The only alteration we found about the X-End to run counter-intuitive to the traditional accessibility of a scooter is the 34-inch seat h. The seat h is unavoidable though, due to the larger wheels, and obvious need for increased suspension travel and ground clearance. With its smallish 3.5-gallon tank, fuel range might also be an issue if you so wish to traverse the Trans European Trail. Which brings me to the unfortunate news that the X-End has no known North American aspirations, as was the case for the X-ADV as well. Don’t let that fact discourage you because despite not being a production model, it’s still available for order from Honda Palace. Price is yet to be determined, but we do know that it will be offered in three different colors (red white and blue please!). While the X-End might not be for everyone, that’s not to say that everyone couldn’t have fun while twisting its grip. We can almost assure you that holding a grimace while riding this scooter is impossible. Besides, imagine the faces of your ADV buddies as you ride up through a dust cloud and skid to a stop on the X-End. After the dust settles and they finish laughing, you can bet they would all be lining up to examine what could be the most dirt-worthy scooter ever created. About the Author: Spencer Hill “The Gear Dude” has been fueling his motorcycle addiction with adventure since first swinging his leg over a bike in 2010. Whether he’s exploring his own backyard in the Pacific Northwest or crisscrossing the United States, Spencer is always in search of scenic off road routes, epic camping locations and the best gear possible. He began writing shortly after taking up two-wheel travel to share his experiences and offer insight with his extensive backpacking, camping and overland background.
  5. We hear it all the time when evaluating new motorcycles — “Does it have a Cruise Control?”. It seems now more than ever, Adventure Riders expect new models to come equipped with the popular device. Yet many of the top adventure bikes like the Honda Africa Twin, KTM 1090 Adventure R, BMW F800GS and Suzuki V-Strom 1000 don’t have it. OEMs seem slow to respond to the trend, or perhaps they realize the cost of an electronic cruise control could price their bikes out of the market. Luckily, aftermarket accessory manufactures are happy to step in to fill the void with affordable Throttle Lock devices. An aftermarket Throttle Lock lets you add Cruise Control-like functionality to a bike that wasn’t originally equipped with one from the factory. While it won’t allow you to maintain a specific cruising speed, a Throttle Lock does help relieve strain and fatigue on your wrist and arm by holding the throttle open for you. That’s the bulk of what a Cruise Control does for you anyway. And when you’ve got hundreds of miles of highway ahead of you, it’s a lot nicer to ride with a Throttle Lock than without anything at all. Black Dog Cycle Work Throttle Control is designed for use with KTMs but also works on many other motorcycles that use dirt bike-style handlebars. With several long-distance trips marked on our calendar, a Throttle Lock device was high on the list of upgrades for our KTM 1090 Adventure R test bike. After looking around at various solutions, we decided on the Throttle Control from Black Dog Cycle Works. A clean and streamlined design makes the BDCW Throttle Control an inconspicuous add-on. The BDCW Throttle Control is designed to work with all KTM adventure bike models. It features a clean, streamlined appearance that makes it easy to miss on the handlebar if you weren’t looking for it. It’s designed to handle the abuses of off-road travel with a robust billet aluminum housing that ensures it can take a hit. Better yet, the Throttle Control utilizes a simple on/off ‘click’ mechanism that locks with consistent tension every time, instead of the variable tension of the typical “Spin-to-Tighten” systems out there. How it Performed Riding from Los Angeles to the KTM Rally in Crested Butte, Colorado was the first big test for the BDCW Throttle Control. While we made sure to mix in as much dirt as possible in the allowable time we had, there were several long days when we had to make good time on the highway during the roughly 2,500-mile round-trip journey. Rushing to get a new farkle installed just hours before departing on a long trip is often a stressful experience. Thankfully, the BDCW Throttle Control was easy and intuitive to install, with meticulous instructions and clear color photos outlining each step. If you can install bar-end weights, you can install the BDCW Throttle control. All you need to do is re-position the throttle mechanism about 1/8″ inward on the handlebar to make room for the Throttle Control. The only concern we had during the installation was a warning in the instructions to maintain pressure on the components to ensure the springs and plungers don’t come out of the assembly. Luckily we never had a problem with this. BDCW makes getting the spacing right a no-brainer with the included adjustment shim. It’s not advisable to play with a new throttle lock device for the first time while riding, especially after a hurried install, so we opted to familiarize ourselves with its operation at the shop before heading out the door on our trip. With the BDCW Throttle Control in the ‘off’ position, the throttle operates normally and quickly snaps closed without any drag. With the device on, the throttle stays open in the position you set it. In an emergency, you can always overcome the friction and close the throttle abruptly. To activate the throttle control you simply slide your outer palm over the device, then grip and twist the ring forward one click. Next slide your hand back over to the throttle and fine-tune the RPMs to reach your desired cruising speed. To disengage the Throttle Lock, simply click the BDCW Throttle Control forward or backward one click. Getting on the highway, we had our first opportunity for a true test. The BDCW Throttle Control performed flawlessly with smooth operation and a satisfying on/off click. With some of the other aftermarket throttle locks, you need to tighten the device like a nut until the proper amount of tension is set. If not set right, it may be too tight to quickly chop the throttle, or if too loose, it can begin to slip. The BDCW Throttle Control “click on” mechanism applies the same amount of pressure every time for a consistent feel. The “click on, click off” feature takes the guesswork out of adjusting proper tension on the throttle lock device. During our long highway tests, the device significantly reduced fatigue by allowing us to take our right hand off the throttle for a rest. It also freed up the right hand to do other things like putting sunglasses away, adjusting jacket vents or searching through right-side pockets for items, and all without having to pull over. For those riders with wrist problems, the Throttle Control can also help avoid soreness and cramping. Who’s It For Adventure Riders that travel long distances with a fair amount of highway. Those looking to improve highway comfort by adding cruise control-like functionality to a bike that was not equipped with cruise control at the factory. While the device is officially only designed for KTMs (950 Adventure, 990 Adventure, 1090 Adventure, 1190 Adventure, 950 Super Enduro and 690 Enduro), BDCW claims it also works on many other motorcycles using dirt bike-style handlebars with an inside diameter of roughly 0.57 inches (including FLEXX bars). Our Verdict After riding with the Black Dog Cycle Works Throttle Control on several trips, it has continued to perform without any hiccups. We’ve had more than a few trail tip overs and many hours of usage, but it hasn’t required any adjustment to throttle spacing yet. At $160, the BDCW Throttle Control offers a big upgrade in cruising comfort for the money, while being competitively priced with other throttle lock solutions that aren’t as robust or simple to operate. A simple and affordable upgrade that offers a big improvement in highway cruising comfort for your Adventure Bike. What We Liked Rugged build with smooth consistent operation. Quick and easy to install, even for a the novice mechanic. Takes guesswork out of setting the tension on your throttle lock. What Could Be Improved Make it compatible with more adventure bike models. Eliminate risk of components coming out of the assembly during install. Shopping Options Photos by Rob Dabney | Steve Kamrad
  6. Founder of Jesse Luggage — Al Jesse — is launching an innovative new motorcycle accessory called MirrorLok. MirrorLok is a multi-functional mirror extender that improves visibility, minimizes vibration and offers a safe place to lock a helmet and riding gear on a motorcycle. “Very often, stock motorcycle mirrors don’t offer a perfect view, vibrate at high speeds creating a blur, and are so far in that your view is partially blocked by your own shoulder. MirrorLok solves all of these problems – plus it works as a lock to keep your helmet and riding jacket safe while you’re off the bike”, – explains Al Jesse, founder and inventor at Moto Manufacturing. With the tool installed, your mirrors are re-positioned, increasing the field of vision and giving you a better rear-view perspective as well as minimizing the vibration of the mirror. MirrorLok dampens vibrations and re-positions your mirrors helping you see more of what’s behind you. In addition, MirrorLok also doubles as a helmet lock. An easy push-button lock will keep your helmet in place, protected from falling off or being stolen while you’re enjoying a walk or a coffee off your motorcycle. Worried about your gear? Using an additional cable, you can easily secure your riding jacket to the lock at the same time. MirrorLok also doubles as a lock, keeping items such as your helmet and jacket safe while you are off the bike. The product is made from machined aluminum, making it sturdy and reliable. The device is oval-shaped with smooth, rounded edges, and measures 1″x3″x1″ weighing 3 ounces. Currently, Mirror Lok is being featured on Kickstarter and is up for grabs for those who are looking to get it first at a better price. “We chose a Kickstarter launch because Mirror Lok is a completely new product, and this type of smart, multi-functional tool does really well on crowdfunding platforms. We’re hoping to reach our funding goal soon and start manufacturing MirrorLok in large quantities – but for those who want to get it first, Kickstarter is the best place right now! Show us your support, and get your MirrorLok now”, – says Al Jesse. MirrorLok Kickstarter campaign will run until March 1. For more information and first products click here.
  7. The world’s largest community-based navigation app Waze just became motorcycle friendly. The Google owned app recently released an update that includes motorcycle specific navigation, incorporating HOV lane travel and voice command features. Waze is a community-driven application with similar functionality to Google or Apple Maps, except with real-time user input. Obtaining information from users allows the app to develop realistic travel times, monitor traffic conditions, and most distinctly, notify other drivers of hazards. Helpful notifications include road closures, red light/speed cameras, stalled vehicles and police location. Waze now offers a new “motorcycle mode” with specialized routing for 2-wheels. The popular app also features an option to enable dirt road routing. Every motorcyclist has played the fabled ‘Arrival ETA’ game, the one where a navigation app or GPS unit gives a projected arrival time based on car travel and you proceed to see how much time you can shave off by riding your motorcycle. After taking the commute lane, dashing through traffic and splitting lanes (where available), you arrive at your destination well ahead of the expected drive time, brimming with satisfaction and affirmed with yet another reason why we ride. While it might be nice to beat projected arrival times, it doesn’t do much for planning purposes sometimes giving times that are off by a half hour or more. With the new data gathered by fellow Waze motorcycle users, this will be a thing of the past and projected ETA’s should no longer be wild guesses based on car travel. However, this update has a lot more to offer than just more accurate arrival times. The crowd-sourced nature of this app will allow riders to share the best routes based on their experience. “Motorcycle Mode” also adds routing info for narrow roads that aren’t accessible by car. Over time with more and more rider input, Waze will continue to develop better motorcycle routes and more accurate ride times, not to mention facilitating safer rides by making hazards known. Motorcyclists can now also enjoy the benefits of voice activated commands. The new voice command feature is particularly useful for motorcyclists, considering that typing in an address while driving and distracting yourself can be a death wish. Activating this feature with the simple “OK Waze” command will allow riders to perform functions such as: “drive home,” “drive to…,” “report a traffic jam” and “when will I get there?”. Existing features that motorcyclist can benefit from include the ability to add stops along their route (for fuel or other), navigate to parking near destinations, and in-app use of Spotify. Motorcyclists can also make use of community shared gas prices, roadside assistance, and map alterations. Waze will work anywhere cellphone data service is available, so whether traveling domestically or abroad, riders can save time and effort by letting the app navigate. While in an unfamiliar place this can be invaluable, allowing you to focus more on riding than logistics. This update is an exciting step for motorcyclists and the riding community opening the door for more navigation options and safer riding.
  8. Published on 01.15.2018 BikerBuddy, a new community for bike-minded travelers and hosts, has announced the launch of their BikerBuddy app for iOS and Android operating systems. The BikerBuddy app connects traveling motorcyclists with motorcycle-convenient hosting sites, offering low-rate, convenient lodging and more. BikerBuddy is all about connecting motorcyclists. Co-founder Paul Douglas is sure motorcyclists can offer more than traditional shared economy hosts. “BikerBuddy is more than places to stay on a road trip,” Douglas said. “It’s a tool for connecting bike-minded people. It’s about knowing you can rely on who you’re staying with to have some motorcycle knowledge and there’s a lot of value in that. We have hosts that accept parts and other shipments to their properties for riders and that convenience is a real benefit for travelers. Other hosts set up wash stations or workstations for routine bike maintenance; there is absolutely no denying the power of local riding knowledge. You can’t get that from a hotel or a traditional vacation rental.” Flat-Rate Lodging Wherever You Stop BikerBuddy hosts offer flat-rate lodging. This means trip budgets go further than ever and with a wide range of hosting options, travelers have great choices. Lodging rates are (per night) $20 per tent spot, $30 to stay in an RV or camper on a host’s property, $40 for a private room and $100 for a house. As a rider, you have the flexibility to find a host that meets your needs. As a host, you can earn money by hosting riders and offer amenities such as Wi-Fi, laundry, shower, or cooking areas. To learn more, and to become a BikerBuddy host for FREE, visit their website or download the BikerBuddy app from the iTunes App Store or on Google Play.
  9. The new KTM 450 Rally debuted in all-black at Morocco’s OiLibya Rallye. To understand the all-new KTM 450 Rally you have to understand KTM’s dominance at Dakar. A machine of the Austrian company’s creation has won the bike class every single year since 2001. You read that correctly; for sixteen years in a row they have bested every other motorcycle manufacturer entered in the competition. What’s even more impressive is the fact that they have managed to do it with bikes of all different cylinder capacities. In 2001 they won with a 660cc, then the following year a 950cc, the four years after that they did it with 660’s again, then three 690’s and seven consecutive with the current 450cc regulations. When KTM says “Ready to Race” they mean ready to win! Despite their continued success, KTM has not grown complacent. They continue to strive for excellence in their quest to stay on top. The 2018 450 Rally has been years in the making and aside from some aesthetic similarities to its 450cc predecessors, this bike is a whole new animal. It’s also an integral piece in defending KTM’s legacy at the Dakar Rally. What the specifications don’t tell you is that this 450 has a whole new chassis, engine, suspension, fuel tanks and exhaust system among a host of other improvements. The specs also don’t allude to the fact that the new rally is the most nimble and maneuverable KTM 450 Rally to date. According to reliable sources like Matthias Walkner and Laia Sanz, this is the most stable rally bike KTM has ever produced. This is accredited to measures like moving the swing arm to the inside of the chassis, reworking the suspension to include bigger 52mm forks and completely redesigning the bike’s carbon-fiber subframe. “I think with the input of the younger riders, the bike has progressed a lot and suits the riding style of today. The old bike was a product of the racing as it used to be five or six years ago. Riders like Marc Coma and Jordi Viladoms, who were used to riding the larger capacity machines, perhaps had a different style to how we ride now,” says Matthias Walkner. Another vital upgrade that aids stability is dual electric fuel pumps allowing riders to distribute weight as circumstances require. With all that has changed, KTM still managed to shave 22 pounds (10 kilos) and make the ergonomics more suitable for the rigors of rally. Simply put, this bike was created from the ground up with the sole purpose of aiding the world’s best riders in winning the most extreme race on the planet. “It’s not only lighter and faster but it’s more stable and that makes such a difference on the stages.” – Laia Sanz The new KTM 450 Rally is truly an impressive feat of engineering and a worthy successor to KTM’s dominant Rally Bikes of the past. No doubt, it should be more than capable of bringing the brand their 17th win in a row at Dakar. As of Stage 6, Honda and Yamaha hold the #1 and #2 positions in the overall lead and the 2016 Dakar Champion riding for KTM, Sam Sunderland, went out in Stage 4 with a back injury. Can the Red Bull KTM Factory Team pull it off again this year? [embedded content] 2018 KTM 450 Rally Specifications Engine Type: Single cylinder, 4-stroke, 449.3cc Engine Management: Keihin EMS with electronic fuel injection Transmission: 6 gears, final drive 14:48, wet multi-disc clutch Cooling: Liquid cooled Chassis: Chromium molybdenum trellis steel frame, self-supporting carbon subframe Front Suspension: 52 mm WP USD forks, 11.8 in travel Rear Suspension: WP shock absorber with linkage, 11.8 in travel Brake Rotors: Front 300 mm, rear 240 mm Moto-Master Exhaust Silencer: Akrapovič, titanium Fuel Capacity: Approx. 8.2 gallons (31 liters) Dry Weight: 304 lbs (138 kg) . About the Author: Spencer Hill “The Gear Dude” has been fueling his motorcycle addiction with adventure since first swinging his leg over a bike in 2010. Whether he’s exploring his own backyard in the Pacific Northwest or crisscrossing the United States, Spencer is always in search of scenic off road routes, epic camping locations and the best gear possible. He began writing shortly after taking up two-wheel travel to share his experiences and offer insight with his extensive backpacking, camping and overland background. Photos Courtesy Marcin Kin
  10. The new KTM 450 Rally debuted in all-black at Morocco’s OiLibya Rallye. To understand the all-new KTM 450 Rally you have to understand KTM’s dominance at Dakar. A machine of the Austrian company’s creation has won the bike class every single year since 2001. You read that correctly; for sixteen years in a row they have bested every other motorcycle manufacturer entered in the competition. What’s even more impressive is the fact that they have managed to do it with bikes of all different cylinder capacities. In 2001 they won with a 660cc, then the following year a 950cc, the four years after that they did it with 660’s again, then three 690’s and seven consecutive with the current 450cc regulations. When KTM says “Ready to Race” they mean ready to win! Despite their continued success, KTM has not grown complacent. They continue to strive for excellence in their quest to stay on top. The 2018 450 Rally has been years in the making and aside from some aesthetic similarities to its 450cc predecessors, this bike is a whole new animal. It’s also an integral piece in defending KTM’s legacy at the Dakar Rally. What the specifications don’t tell you is that this 450 has a whole new chassis, engine, suspension, fuel tanks and exhaust system among a host of other improvements. The specs also don’t allude to the fact that the new rally is the most nimble and maneuverable KTM 450 Rally to date. According to reliable sources like Matthias Walkner and Laia Sanz, this is the most stable rally bike KTM has ever produced. This is accredited to measures like moving the swing arm to the inside of the chassis, reworking the suspension to include bigger 52mm forks and completely redesigning the bike’s carbon-fiber subframe. “I think with the input of the younger riders, the bike has progressed a lot and suits the riding style of today. The old bike was a product of the racing as it used to be five or six years ago. Riders like Marc Coma and Jordi Viladoms, who were used to riding the larger capacity machines, perhaps had a different style to how we ride now,” says Matthias Walkner. Another vital upgrade that aids stability is dual electric fuel pumps allowing riders to distribute weight as circumstances require. With all that has changed, KTM still managed to shave 22 pounds (10 kilos) and make the ergonomics more suitable for the rigors of rally. Simply put, this bike was created from the ground up with the sole purpose of aiding the world’s best riders in winning the most extreme race on the planet. “It’s not only lighter and faster but it’s more stable and that makes such a difference on the stages.” – Laia Sanz The new KTM 450 Rally is truly an impressive feat of engineering and a worthy successor to KTM’s dominant Rally Bikes of the past. No doubt, it should be more than capable of bringing the brand their 17th win in a row at Dakar. As of Stage 6, Honda and Yamaha hold the #1 and #2 positions in the overall lead and the 2016 Dakar Champion riding for KTM, Sam Sunderland, went out in Stage 4 with a back injury. Can the Red Bull KTM Factory Team pull it off again this year? [embedded content] 2018 KTM 450 Rally Specifications Engine Type: Single cylinder, 4-stroke, 449.3cc Engine Management: Keihin EMS with electronic fuel injection Transmission: 6 gears, final drive 14:48, wet multi-disc clutch Cooling: Liquid cooled Chassis: Chromium molybdenum trellis steel frame, self-supporting carbon subframe Front Suspension: 52 mm WP USD forks, 11.8 in travel Rear Suspension: WP shock absorber with linkage, 11.8 in travel Brake Rotors: Front 300 mm, rear 240 mm Moto-Master Exhaust Silencer: Akrapovič, titanium Fuel Capacity: Approx. 8.2 gallons (31 liters) Dry Weight: 304 lbs (138 kg) . About the Author: Spencer Hill “The Gear Dude” has been fueling his motorcycle addiction with adventure since first swinging his leg over a bike in 2010. Whether he’s exploring his own backyard in the Pacific Northwest or crisscrossing the United States, Spencer is always in search of scenic off road routes, epic camping locations and the best gear possible. He began writing shortly after taking up two-wheel travel to share his experiences and offer insight with his extensive backpacking, camping and overland background. Photos Courtesy Marcin Kin
  11. The end of the year is typically a time to reflect and start thinking about ambitions for the future. Most people are setting goals like spending more time at the gym or cutting out a bad habit but our only aspiration for 2018 is to ride MORE and knock new routes off our bucket list. With that in mind we assembled this list of epic New Year’s resolution rides. All of these ‘trail system’ rides include GPS navigable routes with well-documented information on fuel stops, lodging and camping options, so planning your trip is almost a non issue. So get out that calendar and start planning a 2018 to remember! Keep in mind that there are seven days in every week and not one of them is “someday,” make 2018 the year you ride as much as you always wished you had. 1. Trans Canada Adventure Trail (TCAT) Photo by GravelTravel.ca The Trans Canada Adventure Trail is a 9,300-mile dual sport route from Newfoundland to British Columbia through some of North America’s most remote expanses. This ambitious ride avoids most major cities along the way, meaning services are sparse and self-sufficiency is key. While not a very technical route, the sheer length alone makes it a challenging and worthy adventure. Traversing the far-reaching landscapes from tundra to forests to prairies, the TCAT is a true ocean-to-ocean endeavor. With a time commitment of an estimated 10 weeks, don’t be afraid to bite off smaller chunks of this surely epic route! GPS tracks and more information: www.GravelTravel.ca 2. Great Continental Divide Adventure Route (CDT) Photo by Rob Dabney The Great Continental Divide Adventure Route is a border-to-border journey that follows closely along the Continental Divide. This scenic trail stretches from the US/Mexico border in Antelope Wells, NM to the US/Canada border in Roosville, MT and covers 3,000 miles of magnificent adventure riding. The CDT passes through some of the most remote and scenic areas of New Mexico, Colorado, Wyoming, Idaho and Montana utilizing dirt and gravel paths. This is more of a scenic ride but much like the TCAT the length of the trip can add a level of difficulty you might not expect. If you needed even more incentive, this route also has the advantage of traveling through Tetons, Yellowstone and Glacier National Parks. Read also: 8 Great Reasons to Ride the Continental Divide Trail Maps, GPS tracks and more information: www.gpskevinadventurerides.com 3. The Trans Euro Trail (TET) Photo by Trans Euro Trail The Trans European Trail is the definition of a bucket list ride, 21,000 miles of dirt through historic and iconic scenery that can’t be matched. This route touches 27 different European countries and thoroughly circumnavigates the continent. Riding from the Straits of Gibraltar to the Arctic Circle in Norway sounds like one hell of an adventure to us! The terrain is obviously varied throughout the thousands of miles but the track was created with small and medium displacement bikes in mind. Numerous accommodations and services are available along with alternative routes. If you were only able to do one overseas moto trip then this is the one! Read also: TET — A Dream Dirt Adventure Thru Europe’s Most Epic Landscapes Maps, GPS tracks and more information: www.transeurotrail.org 4. Backcountry Discovery Routes (BDR’s) Photo by Backcountry Discovery Routes The Backcountry Discovery Route organization has worked tirelessly to develop some of the most easily accessible adventure rides in the United States. These are “plug and play” routes with logistics like fuel and accommodations already sorted for you. The BDR’s are a great way to experience riding in areas that you are unfamiliar with, trusting that the terrain and scenery will be fantastic. A documentary film, detailed Butler map and free GPS tracks accompany each route. Finished BDRs include: Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, New Mexico, Nevada, Oregon, Utah and Washington. For 2018 they are launching the highly anticipated Mid Atlantic BDR and are developing routes for Southern California, Montana and Wyoming in the future. Maps, GPS tracks and more information: www.backcountrydiscoveryroutes.com 5. The Trans America Trail (TAT) Photo by Stephen Gregory The Trans America Trail would not exist if not for the hard work of Sam Correro, he dedicated nearly 12 years and tens of thousands of miles of riding to assemble the core of this route. The TAT is one of the quintessential American adventure rides, incorporating North Carolina, Tennessee, Missouri, Arkansas, Oklahoma, New Mexico, Colorado, Utah, Idaho and Oregon (and that’s if you ignore any of the side treks!) This 5,000-mile odyssey takes you cross-country, on a tour of America that most people will never see. More information, roll charts, maps and GPS tracks: www.transamtrail.com Photo by Alfonse Palaima . About the Author: Spencer Hill “The Gear Dude” has been fueling his motorcycle addiction with adventure since first swinging his leg over a bike in 2010. Whether he’s exploring his own backyard in the Pacific Northwest or crisscrossing the United States, Spencer is always in search of scenic off road routes, epic camping locations and the best gear possible. He began writing shortly after taking up two-wheel travel to share his experiences and offer insight with his extensive backpacking, camping and overland background.
  12. With a lightweight carbon-fiber shell, advanced features and the ability to adapt to various riding styles, the Klim Krios Adventure Helmet challenges the notion that one helmet can’t do it all. A mainstay in the adventure motorcycle community, Klim produces some of the most advanced riding gear available. They have brought to market iconic pieces such as the Badlands Adventure Suit that is now several generations into development. With this commitment to progress, it was no surprise when Klim recently began expanding their existing product lines and branching out to new markets. This new expansion brought us the Klim Krios, which quickly gained a solid footing in the high-end Adventure Helmet market. By focusing on the real-world demands of riders, Klim developed the Krios with versatility and comfort in mind. It features a hand-laid wide carbon weave shell, great acoustics and four configuration options: (ADV/Dirt/Trail/Street). An always open chin vent, open or closed forehead vent and four exhaust ports on the back of the helmet handle ventilation. The Krios offers four different configurations: ADV, Dirt, Trail & Street. Out of the box, you get two different Pinlock-ready shields (Clear and Smoke), a Pinlock lens and accessories to configure the helmet in its different ride “modes.” The Krios also has a two-way adjustable peak that can easily be tweaked on the fly to accommodate different riding styles or the location of the sun. By producing a helmet weighing in at a mere 3¼ pounds (Size Large) that meets both DOT and ECE standards and can hold its own both in the dirt and on the street, Klim strives to reach the “Pinnacle of ADV” with the Krios. [embedded content] How It Performed The first time I picked up a Krios helmet at Klim headquarters in Rigby, Idaho, it was so light that I thought it was a 3D printed sample. Riding with the Krios, its lightweight shell made a noticeable difference and neck fatigue was cut down significantly. Wind noise was also less of a factor thanks to a well thought out aerodynamics. The Krios became my go-to helmet over the last year logging some 10,000 miles. On road it is quiet with a great field of vision and I experienced very little buffering on the highway. Off-road its lightness shines and the big eye port fit even the largest framed goggles (Radius Pro we’re looking at you!). Ventilation was one thing I felt was lacking off-road. The seemingly large chin vent on the Krios actually directs air up to the windscreen instead of directly to the mouth area. Unless the windscreen was removed or in the fully open position, the interior would get pretty stuffy during strenuous riding conditions. I also noticed the windscreen does not fully retract out of view. About an inch of the lower portion of the screen remains in view when riding with goggles, taking away some of the helmet’s generous field of vision. During testing, I used several different SENA Bluetooth units that all fit well on the Krios. The quiet interior made for two-way communication void of wind noise and the ability to listen to music at lower volumes. The helmet is also specifically designed to integrate with the SENA 10U, which offers a flush-mount fit. Despite the quarter-turn quick releases for the windscreen, changing configurations on the Krios was a little less intuitive than you might expect. It took some practice getting the holes lined up when re-installing the windscreen and peak. The Krios lets you smoothly close the windscreen over a goggle strap without bunching it up. The Krios held up well to my long-term testing with the interior feeling just as plush today as it did twelve months ago and no failed parts. It still cleans up nicely even after all the off-road abuse making it a great every-day helmet. From desert terrain in Death Valley to the high peaks of the North Cascades, the Krios always impressed with its functionality and lightness. Who Is It For The Krios is for riders that want a do-it-all helmet without too much compromise. It shines as an everyday dual sport lid or on trips where surface conditions are constantly changing. While certainly in the premium helmet price bracket, it still represents a good value at $550. Our Verdict Klim also offers a variety of different graphic color options for the Krios. The Klim Krios is a great ADV lid, not perfect but an impressive first offering. Weighing in a full pound lighter than some of its direct competitors, the Krios pushes the envelope for this segment. Klim deserves credit for creating one of the lightest, quietest and most comfortable adventure helmets out there, but compromise is unavoidable in an ADV Helmet because of all the different things we ask them to do. Lack of airflow in the chin vent is one area they may have compromised too much in an effort to make the helmet quieter. Although considering what they’ve accomplished on their first try, you can expect the next version of this helmet to be lights out. What We Liked Its light weight really helped cut down on fatigue. We found the Krios to be very quiet for a dual sport helmet. Great field of vision with little to no distortion in the windscreen. Includes Pinlock insert and two screen options (clear and smoke). Plush interior with fast-wicking, anti-microbial liner. Goggle-friendly design with ability to close screen over straps. What Could Be Improved Ventilation didn’t move enough air in warmer climates. Would like to see a quick-release cheek pad system in future. Changing configuration was more difficult than expected. Klim Krios Adventure Helmet Specs Colors: Matte Black, Matte White, Red, Orange and Hi-Viz Sizes: Small – 3XL Shape: Intermediate Oval Weight: 3lbs 4oz (Large) Safety: Meets or exceeds ECE and DOT standards Price: $549.99 (Solid colors and graphics) Shopping Options . About the Author: Spencer Hill “The Gear Dude” has been fueling his motorcycle addiction with adventure since first swinging his leg over a bike in 2010. Whether he’s exploring his own backyard in the Pacific Northwest or crisscrossing the United States, Spencer is always in search of scenic off road routes, epic camping locations and the best gear possible. He began writing shortly after taking up two-wheel travel to share his experiences and offer insight with his extensive backpacking, camping and overland background. Photos by Spencer Hill
  13. Say hello to the 1,037cc version of the 2018 Suzuki V-Strom, and the XT model specifically. If you hadn’t known, you might confuse the V-Strom 1000XT for the 650XT, an easy mistake to make. Alas, the stickers on the fork legs and the Suzuki name emblazoned upon the saddle are about your only clues to tell the liter bike apart at 20 paces; the rest of the differences are hard to pick out or hidden inside. Earlier this year we noted every upgrade the V-Strom 650 (and the 650XT) received since its last great change in 2012. Having added more performance, more comfort, ABS brakes, plus a more modern look for model year 2017, meant its bigger brother was on deck for a refresh in 2018. Let’s take a look. What’s New The V-Strom 1000XT’s optional Champion Yellow paint scheme is a throwback to the legendary Suzuki Dakar Rally race bikes of the early 90’s. Beyond the updated styling, the big news for 2018 is the addition of the more off-road-oriented XT model, sporting oversized aluminum handlebars and a sturdy set of tubeless wire-spoke wheels. Liter-class Stroms also receive a newly-updated ABS braking setup, a taller windscreen and several other refinements. The new Bosch 5-axis IMU (inertial measurement unit), that supplies the bike’s spatial data to the braking system, is the headliner technology upgrade. It’s the basis for what they call “Cornering ABS,” and something they stole from their race-mate GSX-R 1000. The ability to match the braking strength to the availability of traction is the magic in there… giving you the most stopping power possible for the given conditions be they wet, or leaned over. Not something you would notice on a freeway slog, unless you were to encounter a need to make an emergency stop perhaps, but it’s looking out for you 50 times per second. The V-Strom 1000XT’s new IMU tracks motorcycle motion and position in 5 directions: Pitch (down), Yaw (left & right) and Roll (left & right). Tokico mono-block 4-piston calipers are mated with 310mm floating-mount dual discs, and are connected to the new Motion Track Anti-lock & Combination Brake system for strong stopping performance. Suzuki also points out that this is a combined braking system, not a linked system. This allows the rider to continue manually controlling the front and rear brakes independently up until the point either the anti-lock system activates or the system detects a need to adjust braking power to the rear. On the trail however, you’re left to get creative with the braking system, as it isn’t switchable to an off position. So, there’s no need to dust off your old dirt bike braking skillset as you won’t be skidding into corners to point your way towards the next turn. However, it is equipped with three-level traction control (high/low/off) system standard that can be disabled in case you want to power steer your way through turns. The four-stroke, liquid-cooled, DOHC, 1,037cc 90-degree V-twin engine reportedly retains the same 99.23 horsepower and 74.5 ft-lbs of torque found in the previous year’s model, but is now up to EURO4 emissions spec with the aid of a complete redesign of the exhaust system, which now includes a twin catalyzer within the mid-pipe and a lighterweight silencer. Standard Equipment New, large diameter, tapered style handlebars come with handguards and vibration-damping bar end weights. While both the standard V-Strom 1000 and V-Strom 1000XT get you the new Motion Track and Combined ABS braking systems, there are a few details that dictate the difference in pricing. The road-focused bike Suzuki likes to call a “do it all bike” is the base V-Strom 1000, while the V-Strom 1000XT includes adventure-ready, tubeless wire-spoke wheels shod with Bridgestone Battlax tires, a potential for special coloring (Champion yellow No. 2!), and beefier and tapered handlebars with heavier bar end weights to reduce vibrations. Both models get a lower cowl protector, hand guards and a 12-volt accessory charging port on the dash. On the Road After the V-Strom 1000XT arrived at the office, we got our first look at the bike’s updated styling. With its pronounced beak, flashy-yellow heritage paint scheme, the addition of wire-spoke wheels and color-matched rims, the whole package gives the V-Strom 1000XT a much more ‘adventure ready’ look than years past. Eight AM the next day we’re loaded up and running North towards Utah with more than 2,000 miles of travel, both on and off the pavement, ahead of us. On our first stretch of super slab, we’re happy to see the ergonomics and plush-yet-supportive watercraft-like saddle is up to the challenge. The taller, reshaped windscreen, which sits about chin h, is easily adjustable (with three angle positions) with a one-finger push style mechanism and does well to keep the elements off your body while offering a clear sightline over it. Not too big, not too small. While full-flat footing every stop in the city, the XT didn’t feel like a small bike, nor did it feel too low (it has a relatively normal 33.5″ saddle h). Despite its heavily-dished saddle, it wasn’t uncomfortable on long rides. Although it made for some heated inseams after a while, yet standing up to stretch a leg wasn’t an uncomfortable undertaking. Iron butts are possible on this bike! We found it easy to ride in the twisties too with silky smooth fueling and a light clutch pull, perfect for just cruising along at a brisk pace. The V-Strom 1000 is also equipped with an “RPM Assist” system that bumps up the RPMs when the clutch is let out for even smoother starts. Being designed to perform on the lower end of the torque curve, quick starts off the traffic light were a joy. It’s mild power delivery didn’t make us worry about looping it either. The upgraded handlebar and heavier bar end weights cut back on the vibes on the highway and the upgraded braking system simply made for a better road-going experience. The lack of standard cruise control was a bit of a miss for this road-centric machine however. In the Dirt Of course we didn’t ride ONLY on the pavement, we got off it too. And among the numerous sidebar rides we made along the way, was a high-mountain adventure worthy of mentioning, specifically an ATV trail and through some amazing scenery of the Manti-La Sal National Forest; big skies, open ranges, and some truly wild terrain. More akin to a hare and hound trail than the high-speed desert landscape 6,000 feet below us, pace was often dictated by the trees surrounding us. On occasion, the trail narrowed to just millimeters off the bar ends. At other times, the trail was covered by herds of sheep. This is adventure! Our first turn onto a single-track route, across a few creeks—not always with bridges—and into the wild, we got a chance to push the limits of the XT. Lacking any sort of electronically-adjustable “ride modes” for suspension, we were left to make adjustments manually. Also lacking a real skid plate, our primary thought was, “watch out.” Luckily the suspension is well dampened, which helped it manage the rough stuff better than expected. The plush saddle also helped subdue the roughness during the miles spent resting the ankles on fire roads… the street-style pegs aren’t ones for all-day standing. Luckily there’s aftermarket options available there. It was the ruts and roots that put us and the V-Strom’s suspension to the challenge. The front fork is fully adjustable for compression/rebound damping and preload, while the rear shock features preload and rebound damping only. The rear preload knob, hidden behind the rider’s left leg, came in handy at this point. Click, click, click, and in a snap, no more rubbing on the Giant Loop soft bags. While the V-Strom’s range of suspension adjustability may be a bit limited compared to other liter-class “adventure” motorcycles, the ability to easily fine-tune the rear preload with the hand knob helps to make the bike yours. While the V-Strom 1000XT is an adventure motorcycle, keep in mind it leans more toward the street side of the spectrum with only 6.3-inches of wheel travel front and rear. For comparison, the more-dirt-worthy Africa Twin has roughly 9 inches front and rear. If suspension travel is your key purchasing factor, you know already which bike is for you. But if you’re an 80/20 kind of rider, as well as a price-conscious buyer, the V-Strom 1000XT is a practical choice. Final Thoughts The V-Strom 1000XT is relatively light for its class and easy to ride with a soft clutch pull and ample low-end torque. Its horsepower isn’t jaw-dropping, but it does offer plenty of passing speed on the highway. Its powerful braking, long-distance comfort, along with legendary reliability make the V-Strom 1000XT both a versatile and practical adventure bike… at a price WAY less than many of its competitors in the big-bore ADV Class. While slipping in near the bottom end of the price scale, Suzuki uniquely compares itself to the competition as the option with important safety bells and whistles like Cornering ABS and three-level traction control. Yet it lacks the fancy electronics like cruise control, semi-active suspension or ride modes found on the top-shelf Adventure Bikes. Although, matching it up against luxury adventure touring machines like the KTM 1290 Super Adventure T, BMW R1200GS, Yamaha Super Tenene ES, and the Tiger Explorer 1200 isn’t a fair comparison. A large range of factory accessories like heated grips, engine guards, auxiliary lighting, and luggage are available to customize the V-Strom 1000XT to your adventure needs. Assuming you’re going for the XT version of the V-Strom 1000, it’s priced the same as the standard transmission Honda Africa Twin at $13,299. While The Honda is clearly the more trail-ready bike, the V-Strom 1000XT does have the edge on highway comfort with its adjustable windscreen and plusher seat. The reduced suspension travel of the V-Strom XT also provides a more stable feel in the turns for sportier rides. If the similarly-displaced KTM 1090 Adventure R has your attention with 25% more horsepower, advanced ride modes and an even more aggressive demeanor than the Honda, you could have it for $1,400 more than the XT. Literally an orange in your apple cart comparison. But for many, the perceived Japanese reliability and lower cost of maintenance may sway them toward the V-Strom. The V-Strom’s inability to switch off the ABS might put some riders off, but Suzuki doesn’t stand alone in that respect. And we’ve seen some riders travel around the world with the ABS brakes switched on—without complaints—so to call full-time ABS a liability is a personal decision. If you’re a racer—or want to be one—you might want to look away from the Suzuki. The V-Strom 1000XT is a street bike with adventure benefits, benefits that you can actually use once in a while. And given the large range of available factory accessories like heated grips, engine guards, auxiliary lighting, and luggage options which are now unitized to fit older 1000cc models but also the new 650s, adds more pluses in the pro column. Nearly old enough to drive now, the V-Strom 1000 has come a long way since it set foot in the adventure bike market in 2002. Back then it barely had any competition. Now-a-days, the competition in the big-bore category is deep, with steep walls on both features and price. So you’ll really have to know what you want when you start shopping. The V-Strom is just enough bike to deliver big adventures at a price where you can still afford to go on those adventures. What We Liked Smooth torque right off idle. Powerful brakes with cornering ABS. Affordable price tag. What Could Be Improved Always-on ABS. Limited suspension travel off-road. Could use taller bar risers and wider footpegs. 2018 Suzuki V-Strom 1000XT Specifications Engine Type: Liquid-cooled, 4-stroke, DOHC V-Twin Compression Ratio: 11.3:1 Bore x Stroke: 100 x 66 mm (Displacement 1037cc) Fuel System: Fuel injection with 10-hole injectors on each throttle body Horsepower (est): 99.23 hp @ 8,000 rpm Maximum Torque: 74.5 ft.-lbs. of torque @ 4,000 rpm Transmission: 6 speed constant mesh Clutch: Wet, multi-plate type with ‘Clutch Assist’ Lubrication: wet sump Starting System: Electric Final Drive: Sealed chain Front Brakes: Tokico 4-piston mono-block calipers, 310mm twin discs Rear Brakes: Nissin, 2-piston, single disc Front Suspension: 43mm fully-adjustable KYB telescopic fork, 6.3 in travel Rear Suspension: Preload and rebound-adjustable shock, 6.3 in travel Ground Clearance: 6.5 in Seat Height: 33.5 in Frame type: Twin-spar aluminum frame Front Tire: 110/80R-19M/C 59V, tubeless Rear Tire: 150/70R-17M/C 69V, tubeless Fuel Capacity: 5.3 gallons (20 litres) Wet Weight: 514 lbs (233 kg) Colors: Glass Sparkle Black or Champion Yellow No. 2 Price: $13,299 Budget Liter-Class Adventure Tourer Specs Comparo Adventure Bike Models HP Torque (lb.-ft.) Wet Weight (lbs.) Suspension Travel (Fr./Rr.) Seat Height (in.) Fuel Capacity (Gallons) Price USD Honda Africa Twin (Std. Trans) 94 72 511 9.0/8.7 33.5/34.3 4.97 $13,299 Suzuki V-Strom 1000XT 99 75 514 6.3/6.3 33.5 5.3 $13,299 KTM 1090 Adventure R 125 80 507 8.7/8.7 35.0 6.1 $14,699 ADVPulse.com About the Author: When not in Los Angeles hiding from society, Alfonse Palaima is far, far away from home, collecting passport stamps and slicing through traffic on two wheels with a smile on his face. Slowly rounding the world one country at at time, riding countless miles, on countless motorcycles, covering 6 of the 7 continents so far. While he is a rider like you and I, he has also been a moto journalist in the field since 2003. Photos by Alfonse Palaima
  14. Say hello to the 1,037cc version of the 2018 Suzuki V-Strom, and the XT model specifically. If you hadn’t known, you might confuse the V-Strom 1000XT for the 650XT, an easy mistake to make. Alas, the stickers on the fork legs and the Suzuki name emblazoned upon the saddle are about your only clues to tell the liter bike apart at 20 paces; the rest of the differences are hard to pick out or hidden inside. Earlier this year we noted every upgrade the V-Strom 650 (and the 650XT) received since its last great change in 2012. Having added more performance, more comfort, ABS brakes, plus a more modern look for model year 2017, meant its bigger brother was on deck for a refresh in 2018. Let’s take a look. What’s New The V-Strom 1000XT’s optional Champion Yellow paint scheme is a throwback to the legendary Suzuki Dakar Rally race bikes of the early 90’s. Beyond the updated styling, the big news for 2018 is the addition of the more off-road-oriented XT model, sporting oversized aluminum handlebars and a sturdy set of tubeless wire-spoke wheels. Liter-class Stroms also receive a newly-updated ABS braking setup, a taller windscreen and several other refinements. The new Bosch 5-axis IMU (inertial measurement unit), that supplies the bike’s spatial data to the braking system, is the headliner technology upgrade. It’s the basis for what they call “Cornering ABS,” and something they stole from their race-mate GSX-R 1000. The ability to match the braking strength to the availability of traction is the magic in there… giving you the most stopping power possible for the given conditions be they wet, or leaned over. Not something you would notice on a freeway slog, unless you were to encounter a need to make an emergency stop perhaps, but it’s looking out for you 50 times per second. The V-Strom 1000XT’s new IMU tracks motorcycle motion and position in 5 directions: Pitch (down), Yaw (left & right) and Roll (left & right). Tokico mono-block 4-piston calipers are mated with 310mm floating-mount dual discs, and are connected to the new Motion Track Anti-lock & Combination Brake system for strong stopping performance. Suzuki also points out that this is a combined braking system, not a linked system. This allows the rider to continue manually controlling the front and rear brakes independently up until the point either the anti-lock system activates or the system detects a need to adjust braking power to the rear. On the trail however, you’re left to get creative with the braking system, as it isn’t switchable to an off position. So, there’s no need to dust off your old dirt bike braking skillset as you won’t be skidding into corners to point your way towards the next turn. However, it is equipped with three-level traction control (high/low/off) system standard that can be disabled in case you want to power steer your way through turns. The four-stroke, liquid-cooled, DOHC, 1,037cc 90-degree V-twin engine reportedly retains the same 99.23 horsepower and 74.5 ft-lbs of torque found in the previous year’s model, but is now up to EURO4 emissions spec with the aid of a complete redesign of the exhaust system, which now includes a twin catalyzer within the mid-pipe and a lighterweight silencer. Standard Equipment New, large diameter, tapered style handlebars come with handguards and vibration-damping bar end weights. While both the standard V-Strom 1000 and V-Strom 1000XT get you the new Motion Track and Combined ABS braking systems, there are a few details that dictate the difference in pricing. The road-focused bike Suzuki likes to call a “do it all bike” is the base V-Strom 1000, while the V-Strom 1000XT includes adventure-ready, tubeless wire-spoke wheels shod with Bridgestone Battlax tires, a potential for special coloring (Champion yellow No. 2!), and beefier and tapered handlebars with heavier bar end weights to reduce vibrations. Both models get a lower cowl protector, hand guards and a 12-volt accessory charging port on the dash. On the Road After the V-Strom 1000XT arrived at the office, we got our first look at the bike’s updated styling. With its pronounced beak, flashy-yellow heritage paint scheme, the addition of wire-spoke wheels and color-matched rims, the whole package gives the V-Strom 1000XT a much more ‘adventure ready’ look than years past. Eight AM the next day we’re loaded up and running North towards Utah with more than 2,000 miles of travel, both on and off the pavement, ahead of us. On our first stretch of super slab, we’re happy to see the ergonomics and plush-yet-supportive watercraft-like saddle is up to the challenge. The taller, reshaped windscreen, which sits about chin h, is easily adjustable (with three angle positions) with a one-finger push style mechanism and does well to keep the elements off your body while offering a clear sightline over it. Not too big, not too small. While full-flat footing every stop in the city, the XT didn’t feel like a small bike, nor did it feel too low (it has a relatively normal 33.5″ saddle h). Despite its heavily-dished saddle, it wasn’t uncomfortable on long rides. Although it made for some heated inseams after a while, yet standing up to stretch a leg wasn’t an uncomfortable undertaking. Iron butts are possible on this bike! We found it easy to ride in the twisties too with silky smooth fueling and a light clutch pull, perfect for just cruising along at a brisk pace. The V-Strom 1000 is also equipped with an “RPM Assist” system that bumps up the RPMs when the clutch is let out for even smoother starts. Being designed to perform on the lower end of the torque curve, quick starts off the traffic light were a joy. It’s mild power delivery didn’t make us worry about looping it either. The upgraded handlebar and heavier bar end weights cut back on the vibes on the highway and the upgraded braking system simply made for a better road-going experience. The lack of standard cruise control was a bit of a miss for this road-centric machine however. In the Dirt Of course we didn’t ride ONLY on the pavement, we got off it too. And among the numerous sidebar rides we made along the way, was a high-mountain adventure worthy of mentioning, specifically an ATV trail and through some amazing scenery of the Manti-La Sal National Forest; big skies, open ranges, and some truly wild terrain. More akin to a hare and hound trail than the high-speed desert landscape 6,000 feet below us, pace was often dictated by the trees surrounding us. On occasion, the trail narrowed to just millimeters off the bar ends. At other times, the trail was covered by herds of sheep. This is adventure! Our first turn onto a single-track route, across a few creeks—not always with bridges—and into the wild, we got a chance to push the limits of the XT. Lacking any sort of electronically-adjustable “ride modes” for suspension, we were left to make adjustments manually. Also lacking a real skid plate, our primary thought was, “watch out.” Luckily the suspension is well dampened, which helped it manage the rough stuff better than expected. The plush saddle also helped subdue the roughness during the miles spent resting the ankles on fire roads… the street-style pegs aren’t ones for all-day standing. Luckily there’s aftermarket options available there. It was the ruts and roots that put us and the V-Strom’s suspension to the challenge. The front fork is fully adjustable for compression/rebound damping and preload, while the rear shock features preload and rebound damping only. The rear preload knob, hidden behind the rider’s left leg, came in handy at this point. Click, click, click, and in a snap, no more rubbing on the Giant Loop soft bags. While the V-Strom’s range of suspension adjustability may be a bit limited compared to other liter-class “adventure” motorcycles, the ability to easily fine-tune the rear preload with the hand knob helps to make the bike yours. While the V-Strom 1000XT is an adventure motorcycle, keep in mind it leans more toward the street side of the spectrum with only 6.3-inches of wheel travel front and rear. For comparison, the more-dirt-worthy Africa Twin has roughly 9 inches front and rear. If suspension travel is your key purchasing factor, you know already which bike is for you. But if you’re an 80/20 kind of rider, as well as a price-conscious buyer, the V-Strom 1000XT is a practical choice. Final Thoughts The V-Strom 1000XT is relatively light for its class and easy to ride with a soft clutch pull and ample low-end torque. Its horsepower isn’t jaw-dropping, but it does offer plenty of passing speed on the highway. Its powerful braking, long-distance comfort, along with legendary reliability make the V-Strom 1000XT both a versatile and practical adventure bike… at a price WAY less than many of its competitors in the big-bore ADV Class. While slipping in near the bottom end of the price scale, Suzuki uniquely compares itself to the competition as the option with important safety bells and whistles like Cornering ABS and three-level traction control. Yet it lacks the fancy electronics like cruise control, semi-active suspension or ride modes found on the top-shelf Adventure Bikes. Although, matching it up against luxury adventure touring machines like the KTM 1290 Super Adventure T, BMW R1200GS, Yamaha Super Tenene ES, and the Tiger Explorer 1200 isn’t a fair comparison. A large range of factory accessories like heated grips, engine guards, auxiliary lighting, and luggage are available to customize the V-Strom 1000XT to your adventure needs. Assuming you’re going for the XT version of the V-Strom 1000, it’s priced the same as the standard transmission Honda Africa Twin at $13,299. While The Honda is clearly the more trail-ready bike, the V-Strom 1000XT does have the edge on highway comfort with its adjustable windscreen and plusher seat. The reduced suspension travel of the V-Strom XT also provides a more stable feel in the turns for sportier rides. If the similarly-displaced KTM 1090 Adventure R has your attention with 25% more horsepower, advanced ride modes and an even more aggressive demeanor than the Honda, you could have it for $1,400 more than the XT. Literally an orange in your apple cart comparison. But for many, the perceived Japanese reliability and lower cost of maintenance may sway them toward the V-Strom. The V-Strom’s inability to switch off the ABS might put some riders off, but Suzuki doesn’t stand alone in that respect. And we’ve seen some riders travel around the world with the ABS brakes switched on—without complaints—so to call full-time ABS a liability is a personal decision. If you’re a racer—or want to be one—you might want to look away from the Suzuki. The V-Strom 1000XT is a street bike with adventure benefits, benefits that you can actually use once in a while. And given the large range of available factory accessories like heated grips, engine guards, auxiliary lighting, and luggage options which are now unitized to fit older 1000cc models but also the new 650s, adds more pluses in the pro column. Nearly old enough to drive now, the V-Strom 1000 has come a long way since it set foot in the adventure bike market in 2002. Back then it barely had any competition. Now-a-days, the competition in the big-bore category is deep, with steep walls on both features and price. So you’ll really have to know what you want when you start shopping. The V-Strom is just enough bike to deliver big adventures at a price where you can still afford to go on those adventures. What We Liked Smooth torque right off idle. Powerful brakes with cornering ABS. Affordable price tag. What Could Be Improved Always-on ABS. Limited suspension travel off-road. Could use taller bar risers and wider footpegs. 2018 Suzuki V-Strom 1000XT Specifications Engine Type: Liquid-cooled, 4-stroke, DOHC V-Twin Compression Ratio: 11.3:1 Bore x Stroke: 100 x 66 mm (Displacement 1037cc) Fuel System: Fuel injection with 10-hole injectors on each throttle body Horsepower (est): 99.23 hp @ 8,000 rpm Maximum Torque: 74.5 ft.-lbs. of torque @ 4,000 rpm Transmission: 6 speed constant mesh Clutch: Wet, multi-plate type with ‘Clutch Assist’ Lubrication: wet sump Starting System: Electric Final Drive: Sealed chain Front Brakes: Tokico 4-piston mono-block calipers, 310mm twin discs Rear Brakes: Nissin, 2-piston, single disc Front Suspension: 43mm fully-adjustable KYB telescopic fork, 6.3 in travel Rear Suspension: Preload and rebound-adjustable shock, 6.3 in travel Ground Clearance: 6.5 in Seat Height: 33.5 in Frame type: Twin-spar aluminum frame Front Tire: 110/80R-19M/C 59V, tubeless Rear Tire: 150/70R-17M/C 69V, tubeless Fuel Capacity: 5.3 gallons (20 litres) Wet Weight: 514 lbs (233 kg) Colors: Glass Sparkle Black or Champion Yellow No. 2 Price: $13,299 Budget Liter-Class Adventure Tourer Specs Comparo Adventure Bike Models HP Torque (lb.-ft.) Wet Weight (lbs.) Suspension Travel (Fr./Rr.) Seat Height (in.) Fuel Capacity (Gallons) Price USD Honda Africa Twin (Std. Trans) 94 72 511 9.0/8.7 33.5/34.3 4.97 $13,299 Suzuki V-Strom 1000XT 99 75 514 6.3/6.3 33.5 5.3 $13,299 KTM 1090 Adventure R 125 80 507 8.7/8.7 35.0 6.1 $14,699 ADVPulse.com About the Author: When not in Los Angeles hiding from society, Alfonse Palaima is far, far away from home, collecting passport stamps and slicing through traffic on two wheels with a smile on his face. Slowly rounding the world one country at at time, riding countless miles, on countless motorcycles, covering 6 of the 7 continents so far. While he is a rider like you and I, he has also been a moto journalist in the field since 2003. Photos by Alfonse Palaima
  15. [embedded content] Just as many of us have succumbed to the reality of winter and its diminishing riding opportunities, a light can be seen at the end of the tunnel! The American Motorcycle Association has announced dates for their 2018 National Adventure Riding Series. We all know the AMA is committed to growing the sport of motorcycling but what you might not know is that they are dedicated to all facets including the rapidly growing adventure segment. Since 2007 the AMA has hosted this series with the hope of involving as many new ADV Riders as possible. KTM has returned as the primary sponsor bringing with them their industry leading machines and proven commitment to opening people’s minds to the world of adventure. KTM is expanding their support in 2018 by offering exciting opportunities to ride with their pros and on their latest adventure models. “We are proud to provide AMA members with opportunities to get out and ride. And we appreciate KTM’s support for the series and the company’s commitment to the adventure riding segment.” – AMA Recreational Riding Manager Heather Wilson The 2018 National Adventure Riding series consists of 20 events scattered about the country with accessibility in mind. By casting this broad net the AMA hopes to make these events accessible to local riders as well as offering others the opportunity to ride areas that they are not familiar with. Some longtime national adventure riding event organizers remain on the schedule, while other organizers who have been hosting adventure rides for many years have been added. “Without organizers like these, it wouldn’t be as easy for an adventure rider to find other motorcyclists who enjoy this style of riding or to find routes they may not think to travel on their own.” – KTM Event Specialist and Enduro Champion Mike Lafferty Explore New Routes on a Variety of Terrain These events are tailor made for newcomers as well as more experienced riders. Different difficulty and skill options are offered at each event to ensure there is riding to keep everyone entertained. The goal is getting riders to scenic places that they wouldn’t typically get to see so they can understand why this type of riding is so infectious. The ADV Series offers a unique opportunity to meet and ride with like-minded individuals, improve your abilities and conquer new terrain. AMA membership is required for these national-level events. One-event pass may be purchased for $20 (only available for purchase at the event) or a full AMA membership for $49 (online or at the event). If you are not currently an American Motorcycle Association member it is something to seriously consider. The AMA is heavily involved with protecting your rights as a motorcyclist. They also do a staggering amount of work safeguarding the future of motorcycling and keeping our riding areas/trails open. 2018 KTM AMA National ADV Ride Schedule April 14–15: Slate Creek Adventure Ride Appalachian Trail Riders – Bybee, Tenn. April 21–22: Perry Mountain Tour Run Adventure Rally Perry Mountain Motorcycle Club – Stanton, Ala. May 5–6: Yosemite Adventure Tour Family Off–Road Adventures – Buck Meadows, Calif. *KTM East Coast Adventure Rider Rally* May 19–20: Snow Shoe Mountain 500 Pine Barrens Adventures LLC – Snow Shoe, W. Va. June 2–3: Show Me 500 National Adventure Ride Midwest Trail Riders Association – Bixby, Mo. June 2–3: Durty Dabbers Great Adventure Dual Sport Durty Dabbers – Lock Haven, Pa. June 9–10: Ride for Research Wisconsin Dual Sport Riders – Wabeno, Wis. June 22–24: Big Bear Run Big Bear Trail Riders – Big Bear, Calif. June 23–24: PA Grand Canyon 500 Pine Barrens Adventures LLC – Gaines, Pa. June 23–24: Ozark 200 Arkansas Dirt Riders, Inc. – New Blaine, Ark. July 21–22: Copperhead National Adventure Ride Hocking Valley Motorcycle Club – Logan, Ohio August 10–12: Enchanted Circle Adventure Rally *Website Coming Soon* Contact Email: roger@rpimoto.com RPI LLC – Taos Ski Valley, N.M. September 1–3: Wild West Tour High Desert Adventures – Prineville, Ore. September 8–9: Blue Ridge Adventure Ride Appalachian Trail Riders – Pineola, N.C. September 22–23: Big Woods 200 Wisconsin Dual Sport Riders – Wabeno, Wis. September 29–30: Renfro Valley Adventure Ride Appalachian Trail Riders – Mt. Vernon, Ky. October 13–14: Buffaloe 500 National Adventure Ride Stoney Lonesome Motorcycle Club – Columbus, Ind. October 20–21: Howlin’ at the Moon Arizona Trail Riders – Prescott Valley, Ariz. October 26–28: Pine Barrens 500 Pine Barrens Adventures LLC – Hammonton, N.J. November 23–24: L.A. – Barstow to Vegas District 37 Dual Sport – Palmdale, Calif. So while we might just be getting into the thick of winter in most places there is already hope on the horizon. Start planning your 2018 adventures now by visiting www.americanmotorcyclist.com or click here to follow the series’ official Facebook page. About the Author: Spencer Hill “The Gear Dude” has been fueling his motorcycle addiction with adventure since first swinging his leg over a bike in 2010. Whether he’s exploring his own backyard in the Pacific Northwest or crisscrossing the United States, Spencer is always in search of scenic off road routes, epic camping locations and the best gear possible. He began writing shortly after taking up two-wheel travel to share his experiences and offer insight with his extensive backpacking, camping and overland background.
  16. Tis the season of giving! This year give the gift of love for Adventure motorcycling. What could be a better gift than planting the seeds of motorcycling obsession in all your favorite tikes? You’ll thank yourself later when you’ve secured riding buddies for years to come! We’ve compiled a list of holiday gifts perfect for everyone on your list from the pint-sized ADV Addict to your inner child. Kids can explore the iconic BMW R1200GS Adventure Motorcycle with this authentic LEGO Technic replica. The 2-in-1 model includes a standard motorcycle configuration and hoverbike. It was developed in partnership with BMW and incorporates the R1200GS’ distinctive telelever front suspension, boxer engine and shaft drive. A free interactive, 3D digital LEGO Building Instructions app is also available online. (Ages 10 to 16) Shopping Options: Introduce them to the joys of motorcycle camping early. Now they can settle down beneath the stars with cozy sleeping bag and tell stories around the campfire with the Biker at Camp play set. In the morning, roll up the tent and strap it to the back of the motorcycle. Ready to ride! (Ages 4-10) Shopping Options: This large-scale motorcycle series model depicts the Honda CRF1000L Africa Twin. At 1:6 scale, this assembly kit captures the popular adventure bike’s most minute detail in every way. Highly detailed plastic pieces, metal shafts, moving suspension and screw-attached parts give the model a truly realistic feel. With it’s tricolor paint scheme and gold rims, it’s sure to wow the most discerning model or motorcycle enthusiast! (Ages 12 & Up) Shopping Options: Give them a taste for the Orange brand at an early age. The “KTM MINI PRO SILENCER SYSTEM” is based on the simple principle: Mouth open – pacifier in – peace and quiet (well sometimes at least). It’s made of high quality silicone and comes in a 2-pack. (Ages 3 months+) Shopping Options: This 6V battery-powered ride-on motorcycle combines the sporty flair and sleek look of the BMW R1200GS adventure bike for kids. Rubber traction strips and sturdy support wheels offer better balance and performance as miniature motorists get their bearings. With a 2 miles per hour top speed, they’ll get their first of many exhilarating adventures to come on two wheels. Admit it, you wish you’d had one of these when you were a kid! (Ages 3 & Up) Shopping Options: Instill a love of Big KTM Twins in the next generation of adventurer riders by getting them this lifelike 1:12 scale KTM 1190 Adventure. Wheels roll and steer. Made of die cast metal with some plastic parts. Approximate Dimensions: L-7, H-4.25, W-1.75 Inches. (Ages 14 & Up) Shopping Options: The Kawasaki KLR650 is a legendary adventure bike known for its utilitarian go anywhere capabilities. Get them started early dreaming of traveling the world on a motorcycle with this 1:18 scale model of a 2002 Kawasaki KLR 650 Motorcycle. Die cast with some PVC parts. Milk crate is sold separately! (Ages 6 & up) Shopping Options: [embedded content] The powerful 12-Volt Ducati Hypercross provides speed and thrills with a top speed of 5 mph, while still being easy to ride. Removable training wheels and a slow gear (2.5 mph) are included for younger drivers who still need a bit of practice. Young ADV Riders can pack the supplies they need for their adventures in a set of functional panniers and top box. A play toolkit can also be found within the main trunk, which includes screwdriver, hammer, wrench and ratchet. The wheels of the Ducati Hypercross are rubberized, allowing it to take on all types of terrain. (Ages 3-8) Shopping Options: . About the Author: Spencer Hill “The Gear Dude” has been fueling his motorcycle addiction with adventure since first swinging his leg over a bike in 2010. Whether he’s exploring his own backyard in the Pacific Northwest or crisscrossing the United States, Spencer is always in search of scenic off road routes, epic camping locations and the best gear possible. He began writing shortly after taking up two-wheel travel to share his experiences and offer insight with his extensive backpacking, camping and overland background.
  17. They were lined up outside a motorcycle dealership in Southern California, hundreds of them before dawn on the day after Thanksgiving. Not Black Friday shoppers trying to get door buster deals on electronics; these were hard-core dirt riders looking to make it from Los Angeles through Barstow and on to Vegas the hard way. Sleepy eyed enthusiasts were waiting to pass tech inspection and then collect their roll chart for navigating the roughly 400 miles of dirt standing between them and bragging rights on the Las Vegas strip. For the most part, it looked like a KTM/Husqvarna ad but all major brands were represented, including a large number of vintage machines and of course a small army of XR650’s. A fresh set of Continental TKC80 knobbies were spooned on for the deep sand. We rode light carrying just tools and camera gear in GIVI soft bags. District 37 carries the rest of your gear to the hotel. One thing was clear; out of the approximately 600 entrants we were definitely in the minority riding a KTM 1090 and Honda Africa Twin. While both of these bikes are very capable off-road they still tip the scale north of 500 pounds and all that weight can be a handful in deep sand. In fact, sand was the name of the game on this ride and I for one was not looking forward to piloting my Africa Twin through long deep washes but what was my choice? How could we know how difficult the “hard” routes were until we attempted them on these giants? As soon as we said goodbye to pavement in Palmdale, it became clear that this was not a scenic dual sport ride. The LA Barstow to Vegas is a desert race thinly veiled as a non-competitive event for obvious liability reasons. You can hardly fault District 37, I can’t think of any organization capable of corralling hundreds of dust crazed maniacs hell bent on making it to Vegas without touching Interstate 15. Stuck in a Cloud of Dust I felt like I had taken a shot of speed that morning with a steady flow of adrenalin pumping through my veins. There is nothing like the blind hubris of dirt bikes plowing into dust clouds with no end in sight. Riders tore along all around me in zero visibility with little regard for life or limb. The route itself was not entirely treacherous but with no way to see where you were going 75% of the time, it’s a wonder more people weren’t injured. In later days, stories surfaced of broken wrists, legs and floating collarbones. With harsh desert conditions reeking havoc on man and machine, nearly one in six did not make it to the bright lights of Vegas. After about 20 miles the route split and we committed to the first hard section, which turned out to be a seemingly never-ending sand wash. It felt like I was piloting an unruly jet ski in choppy surf as I awkwardly tried to stay afloat. By the time I had made it a few miles in, I was frustrated enough with my slow progress to resort to uncomfortable speeds and the reality that I could crash at any moment. Someone once told me “The faster you go, the faster things happen.” I was keenly aware of this but it wouldn’t save me from a painful reminder in my near future. Things Get a Little Hazy Around 85 miles into the day, my LAB2V experience changed drastically. Earlier I had been tossed from my bike in a sandy corner and tried to become one with some shrubbery but since then things had been looking up. I finally felt I was getting used to sand (we don’t get a lot of sand in the Pacific North West) when I unceremoniously lost the front end of my Africa Twin at speed. Bracing for impact with my shoulder left me unprepared for the whiplash that propelled my head into the ground. I grunted as my shoulder hit and then saw black as the right side of my head bounced off what I hoped would be a much more forgiving surface. After that there’s a flash of someone asking if I was alright and next thing I knew I was riding alone through the desert. It felt like someone had flipped a light switch in my mind but I couldn’t quite put my finger on why. I was separated from my group and unanswered questions started accumulating in my helmet: How long had I been riding? What did I have for lunch? Wait, did I stop for lunch? What really tipped me off that I had sustained a head injury was my inner addict telling me not to forget cigarettes at the next stop even though I haven’t smoked in years. An Early End to My Ride By the time I made it back to pavement outside Helendale for our lunch stop, I wasn’t sure of much except that I had a concussion and I probably shouldn’t be operating a motorcycle. I had ridden the last 15 or so miles in a quizzical state wondering why I could no longer keep up with my group. When I finally caught up with my patiently waiting friends, my first comment was “I fell somewhere back there but I don’t remember doing it.” Big eyes in my buddy’s helmet indicated that this statement coupled with my strange behavior was cause for concern. I also learned that I knocked off the Sena Prism camera attached to my helmet during the fall and apparently called one of my friends asking him to look for it, but this was all news to me. Soon after, a group of District 37 EMT sweep riders stopped to see if everything was copacetic and after a short Q and A urged my compatriots to not let me ride because another blow to the head could have much worse ramifications. Thankfully, we had a support vehicle nearby and my AT was loaded on the trailer and I in the passenger seat within 30 minutes. The other riders in our group carried on while we went ahead to meet them in Barstow. Senior Editor Rob Dabney pushing the KTM 1090 Adventure R through the deep sand. Hunkered down in Barstow for the night, most riders opted for matinee dinners and early dates with motel beds. Some of the more grizzled entrants opted for strong drinks and entertainment on what is probably the wildest night this desert outpost sees all year. Rouge dirt bikes could be heard tearing through the streets and small work parties could be found in any hotel parking lot. Jaywalking across historic route 66 with my head still reeling, I tried to process the days events and make sense of the sheer magnitude of this event and what I would be missing the following day. Ride too slow on a big bike in the soft sand of the LAB2V and this can happen. Free couch anyone? Unfortunately you always have to keep an eye out for garbage dumped on the trail, especially with limited visibility in the dust. Saturday morning the metallic clatter of dirt bike engines before first light made for frantic energy in the air. Knobby tires slapped pavement as riders clamored to get back on dirt. Everyone was moving with purpose because they knew they had a long day ahead. I too was in a bit of a hurry as I had resolved to be a spectator of the highest caliber in lieu of riding. I spent the day chasing dust clouds in the desert intersecting the routes wherever possible. Aside from the head trauma this was a great way to experience the event, I got to see it from both sides as a rider and spectator. Watching dirt bikes move like desert dogs through the terrain in small packs but endless streams made me feel small. I realized that this many people wouldn’t be out here Thanksgiving weekend for 34 years running if the juice wasn’t worth the squeeze. Finish Line on the Vegas Strip! That day Red Rock Canyon just outside Vegas, was easily the highlight with amazing colors and rock formations (and no more sand!). The technical riding that was within the canyon was a highlight for many of the riders as well. I greeted participants exiting the last section of dirt as they did wheelies and snapped their throttles in celebration. Next stop was the big show and everyone bounded for the Orleans Casino and finish line on their knobby tires. Chaos reigned as riders trickled in with different degrees of shell shock on their dust-covered faces. Bikes piled up in the loud smoky parking garage of the Orleans Hotel as motorcycles were abandoned in favor of slot machines and cocktails. Santa and one of his showgirls strolled by as someone kick started a stubborn XR650. At this point it was hard to tell if it was the excessive amounts of exhaust smoke or post concussive side effects that were bending my reality. The Orleans seemed like a fitting location for this ride to culminate. With its off the strip attitude, cheap buffet and low rent entertainment, most of these savages felt right at home. The LA Barstow to Vegas crowd blended seamlessly into the dark, tawdry façade of the casino. Later that night, I was off to McCarran Airport and soon Vegas was just a hazy memory. As we gained elevation, I could see traffic stretching all the way to Los Angeles as holiday travelers tried to make it home in gridlock. I got all warm and fuzzy thinking about things to be thankful for this Thanksgiving: That I got to participate in this fabled dirt circus known as LA Barstow to Vegas, that I didn’t get hurt worse and most importantly that I wouldn’t have to eat that much dust until I was back for redemption next year. Photo Gallery . About the Author: Spencer Hill “The Gear Dude” has been fueling his motorcycle addiction with adventure since first swinging his leg over a bike in 2010. Whether he’s exploring his own backyard in the Pacific Northwest or crisscrossing the United States, Spencer is always in search of scenic off road routes, epic camping locations and the best gear possible. He began writing shortly after taking up two-wheel travel to share his experiences and offer insight with his extensive backpacking, camping and overland background. Photos by Spencer Hill
  18. Known for their forward-thinking approach and innovative efforts, the Redondo Beach, California Police Department has recently added to their fleet a pair of custom police motorcycles based on the Honda CRF1000L platform. The two Africa Twin Police Bikes were donated by American Honda to support the recently launched City of Redondo Beach Police Foundation, which funds new technologies to help advance the vision of the police department. The move to acquire the new bikes started when officers began considering the possibility of transitioning from their current Honda ST1300p bikes to an adventure-bike platform. This with the idea that their relative agility, lighter weight, and increased suspension travel would make them well suited for police work. Enter the Africa Twin, a 998cc adventure bike that is smaller and more nimble than conventional police motorcycles yet still has the power needed for police duties. Police Chief Keith Kauffman approached Honda with the idea, and after officers successfully tested a pair of units, Honda decided to move ahead with the donation. The donated Africa Twins are equipped with automatic Dual Clutch Transmission (DCT), which helps officers to focus more of their attention on riding and police work. In addition, the units have been equipped with a number of Honda Accessories. But that’s not all, with the help of noted bike customizer Roland Sands, the police department has made a number of modifications targeted at increasing the bike’s law-enforcement functionality. The Africa Twin Police Bike is equipped with an AR-15 riffle with locking gun mount. Among the many police-specific enhancements included in the build are a set of U.S. Armor soft saddlebags with level IV rifle plate armor, an HBH AR-15 locking gun mount, an axion police camera, lidar gun, a SoundOff Signal bluePRINT police PA and lighting system, and a quick-release Kevlar ballistic blanket that acts as a bulletproof shield. U.S. Armor customized soft saddlebags include a quick-release bulletproof shield that extends across the bike to provide instant cover for police officers. With the aid of Ohlins suspension, Dunlop D908 tires, Cycra hand guards, AltRider skid plate, crash bars and a high fender kit, the RBPD will also be ready to pursue criminals anywhere they go whether it be the soft sand of the beach, jogging paths, train tracks or stair steps. Seat comfort was improved with a Saddlemen custom Seat cover with gel insert. VIDEO: Honda Africa Twin Police Bike at the Long Beach International Motorcycle Show. The Roland Sands Police Bike will act as a test bed for innovative new law enforcement products and techniques. “One of the things that the police department is really focused on is our vision statement: ‘We are the community, leading the way in law enforcement,” Chief Kauffman said. “That’s why when we look at partnering, we’re going out to the experts. If we want to be one of the most innovative law-enforcement departments in the country, we have to push the needle.” If nothing else, we expect Redondo Beach’s Africa Twin will help make patrolling the streets a more efficient task for the officers. And we wouldn’t be surprised if there is a line of cadets waiting eagerly for a ride on this amazing custom built-police bike — a functional work of art by Roland Sands Designs. RBPD Africa Twin Police Bike Build List · Ohlins complete adventure forks (FFHO 101) · Ohlins rear piggyback shock (STX 46) · Dunlop D908 Rally Raid tires · Talon hubs with Excel rims (by Dubya) · Pro Taper handlebars (Adventure bend) · Cycra Pro Bend CRM Ultra handguards · Saddlemen custom Seat cover with gel insert · K&N air filter · Police wiring harness by HBH · HBH AR-15 locking gun mount · SoundOff Signal Blueprint LED police lighting and PA system · Axiom police camera · PVP wireless push-to-talk radio communication · Yoshimura RS-4 Slip On Exhaust · U.S. Armor locking, quick-release, soft saddlebags with level IV rifle plate armor · Pull out Kevlar ballistic blanket · Trauma kit · Lidar Gun · AltRider Crashbars (custom PA speaker, laser/radar gun mounts by RSD) · AltRider Skidplate · AltRider High front fender mount with Cycra supermoto fender · AltRider Front fork guards · AltRider Front headlight guard · AltRider Rear brake reservoir guard · Altrider Luggage racks (pillion and rear) · Pivot Pegz footpegs · Paint by Airtrix · Powdercoat by Specialized Coatings Photos by Roland Sands Designs and Stephen Gregory
  19. Known for their forward-thinking approach and innovative efforts, the Redondo Beach, California Police Department has recently added to their fleet a pair of custom police motorcycles based on the Honda CRF1000L platform. The two Africa Twin Police Bikes were donated by American Honda to support the recently launched City of Redondo Beach Police Foundation, which funds new technologies to help advance the vision of the police department. The move to acquire the new bikes started when officers began considering the possibility of transitioning from their current Honda ST1300p bikes to an adventure-bike platform. This with the idea that their relative agility, lighter weight, and increased suspension travel would make them well suited for police work. Enter the Africa Twin, a 998cc adventure bike that is smaller and more nimble than conventional police motorcycles yet still has the power needed for police duties. Police Chief Keith Kauffman approached Honda with the idea, and after officers successfully tested a pair of units, Honda decided to move ahead with the donation. The donated Africa Twins are equipped with automatic Dual Clutch Transmission (DCT), which helps officers to focus more of their attention on riding and police work. In addition, the units have been equipped with a number of Honda Accessories. But that’s not all, with the help of noted bike customizer Roland Sands, the police department has made a number of modifications targeted at increasing the bike’s law-enforcement functionality. The Africa Twin Police Bike is equipped with an AR-15 riffle with locking gun mount. Among the many police-specific enhancements included in the build are a set of U.S. Armor soft saddlebags with level IV rifle plate armor, an HBH AR-15 locking gun mount, an axion police camera, lidar gun, a SoundOff Signal bluePRINT police PA and lighting system, and a quick-release Kevlar ballistic blanket that acts as a bulletproof shield. U.S. Armor customized soft saddlebags include a quick-release bulletproof shield that extends across the bike to provide instant cover for police officers. With the aid of Ohlins suspension, Dunlop D908 tires, Cycra hand guards, AltRider skid plate, crash bars and a high fender kit, the RBPD will also be ready to pursue criminals anywhere they go whether it be the soft sand of the beach, jogging paths, train tracks or stair steps. Seat comfort was improved with a Saddlemen custom Seat cover with gel insert. VIDEO: Honda Africa Twin Police Bike at the Long Beach International Motorcycle Show. The Roland Sands Police Bike will act as a test bed for innovative new law enforcement products and techniques. “One of the things that the police department is really focused on is our vision statement: ‘We are the community, leading the way in law enforcement,” Chief Kauffman said. “That’s why when we look at partnering, we’re going out to the experts. If we want to be one of the most innovative law-enforcement departments in the country, we have to push the needle.” If nothing else, we expect Redondo Beach’s Africa Twin will help make patrolling the streets a more efficient task for the officers. And we wouldn’t be surprised if there is a line of cadets waiting eagerly for a ride on this amazing custom built-police bike — a functional work of art by Roland Sands Designs. RBPD Africa Twin Police Bike Build List · Ohlins complete adventure forks (FFHO 101) · Ohlins rear piggyback shock (STX 46) · Dunlop D908 Rally Raid tires · Talon hubs with Excel rims (by Dubya) · Pro Taper handlebars (Adventure bend) · Cycra Pro Bend CRM Ultra handguards · Saddlemen custom Seat cover with gel insert · K&N air filter · Police wiring harness by HBH · HBH AR-15 locking gun mount · SoundOff Signal Blueprint LED police lighting and PA system · Axiom police camera · PVP wireless push-to-talk radio communication · Yoshimura RS-4 Slip On Exhaust · U.S. Armor locking, quick-release, soft saddlebags with level IV rifle plate armor · Pull out Kevlar ballistic blanket · Trauma kit · Lidar Gun · AltRider Crashbars (custom PA speaker, laser/radar gun mounts by RSD) · AltRider Skidplate · AltRider High front fender mount with Cycra supermoto fender · AltRider Front fork guards · AltRider Front headlight guard · AltRider Rear brake reservoir guard · Altrider Luggage racks (pillion and rear) · Pivot Pegz footpegs · Paint by Airtrix · Powdercoat by Specialized Coatings Photos by Roland Sands Designs and Stephen Gregory
  20. The Brits are famous for their sophistication, charm and proclivity for adventure. Those same traits are also evident in the Triumph Tiger line of Adventure Bikes. And here we were, a room full of Moto Journalists, with British Triumph Execs proudly touting their new flagship Adventure Bike during the Tiger 1200 Press Introduction. Their passion for motorcycles was undeniable, but even more apparent, a sense of national pride in being a part of Triumph’s legendary heritage. The Triumph Tiger history can be traced back to 1936 when Tiger 70s, 80s and 90s dominated International Six Days off-road competitions. The Tiger’s Adventure Motorcycling roots began in 1973 when famed explorer Ted Simon set off to travel the world on a Tiger 100 and sparked a movement. And Triumph’s first modern Adventure Bike — the 1993 Tiger 900 — helped define today’s segment with its innovative design. While there are no shortage of retro-styled motorcycles in Triumph’s line up that celebrate the company’s rich history, the new Tiger 1200 is modern in every way. With a major revamp for 2018 that touched everything from styling, electronics, powertrain, chassis, ergonomics and more, the new model is on the cutting edge of technology for the Adventure Class. The Triumph Tiger 1200 comes in two different ranges. The XR range is street focused with cast wheels, while the XC range is optimized for dirt work with wire-spoke wheels and off road protection. Here’s What’s New Changes to the 2017 Tiger Explorer 1200 line start with an official name change. The ‘Explorer’ moniker has been dropped and it is now simply the ‘Tiger 1200.’ The bike has also undergone a significant weight loss program, dropping up to 22 pounds compared to the previous year’s model, with much of the weight coming off the engine’s crank and flywheel to help the powerplant spin up faster for more immediate power delivery. They’ve also found ways to trim weight by utilizing a magnesium cam cover, a lighter silencer, smaller battery and several other lighter-weight components. The engine is now even smoother thanks to refined engine mappings that provide better throttle response for the 139 horsepower 1,215cc triple engine. Peak horsepower remains roughly the same but the motor benefits from a faster revving, more-lively feel caused by reduced inertial forces. The ride-by-throttle system also adds a new rider mode for XC models (off-road wire-spoke wheel models). Now with ‘Off-Road Pro’ mode, advanced riders on knobby tires can push the bike to it’s full potential. Off-Road Pro effectively turns off Traction Control and ABS (both front and rear), while stiffening damping and adjusting preload for a more-aggressive stance. Source: Triumph Motorcycles Another performance enhancement (or convenience) available on the higher-spec XCa and XRt models is the new ‘Shift Assist’ system that lets you downshift or upshift without using the clutch. Shift Assist automatically blips the throttle and engages the clutch to allow you to shift gears faster during high-performance riding. Off-Road riders will also appreciate effortless clutchless shifts in technical terrain when trying to maintain a secure grip on the bars. Comfort has also been enhanced significantly on the new Tiger 1200. Seating has been improved with a new foam compound, while a new handlebar bend reduces the riders stretch to the bars. An all-new 5″ Color TFT display provides an easy-to-use interface. High and Low Contrast settings provide optimal visibility in all light conditions and the display is highly configurable with multiple style themes to choose from. Cruise control refinements, a keyless ignition and new illuminated handlebar switches provide additional enhancements to rider comfort and convenience. The 5″ Color TFT Display offers multiple ‘themes’ that allow you to customize the layout of information linked to riding modes. A bank of LED lights sequentially illuminate according to the bike’s lean angle to light up the rider’s path into the corner. Styling has been improved with distinctive LED lighting all around. Enclosed in the headlight housing is a set of Daytime Running Lights and Adaptive Cornering Lights. As the motorcycle leans over into the turn, a bank of cornering lights sequentially illuminate to shine additional light on the patch of road you are turning into. New LED Auxiliary Lights included on the XCa and XRt models are also 150% brighter than the previous version. LED turn indicators will also be made available on US models. Tiger 1200 Core Technology The old Tiger Explorer was already an advanced machine and many of the technologies were carried over from the previous year’s model. These include Triumph Semi Active Suspension (TSAS) that automatically adjusts damping and preload on-the-fly based on the current rider mode and input from the terrain. Integrated brakes apply a proportional amount of rear braking force when the front brake lever is squeezed. Both ABS and Traction control are lean angle sensitive to ensure the proper amount of brake and power modulation is applied depending on the tire’s contact patch. IMU sensor measures the motorcycle’s status (pitch, yaw, roll, vertical, lateral and longitudinal acceleration) to calculate lean angle and ensure greater stability. When coming to a halt carrying heavy loads or a passenger on a steep incline, Hill Hold Control (HHC) keeps the bike from rolling backwards, automatically applying the rear brake until the rider begins moving forward. A ‘Ride by Throttle’ system enables up to six different ride modes (Rain, Road, Off Road, Sport, Off Road Pro and Rider). Each ride mode has its own pre-selected setting for ABS, TC, throttle maps and suspension settings. Each individual ride mode can be customized further with an option to reset everything back to factory settings. Heated front and rear seats along with an electronically-adjustable windscreen (tall touring screen standard on the XCa and XRt models) provide long-range comfort, while a USB socket and two 12V powerlet sockets (rider and passenger) provide convenient charging power for heated gear and other electronic equipment. First Impressions There was no quibbling about the location Triumph picked for the Tiger 1200 launch — the Andalusian Coast of Southern Spain. Few places in Western Europe still enjoy dry weather in late November but more importantly, the countryside has a wealth of uncongested mountain roads and rugged off-road trails that cut through a desert landscape dotted with quaint villages and medieval castles. I was eager to try out the XCa — the model that comes standard with wire-spoke wheels, off-road protection and all the gadgets. Sitting on the bike for the first time, it both looks and feels smaller than its spec sheet might suggest. I immediately liked the way the tank felt; it’s narrow between the knees and offers plenty of room for longer-legged riders. The length of the fuel tank front-to-back is also fairly short, which allows for a more forward seated position. Additionally, the new handlebars are comfortably placed, putting you naturally upright without stretching you over the tank. Fit and finish of the bike are top notch with well thought out handlebar switches and premium touches like the billet pegs, WP suspension, a large touring windscreen and Brembo brakes. The new TFT screen is eye catching with it’s color display while offering intuitive navigation of a wide range of options. Switching through different ride modes also changes the theme and layout of the tachometer and speedometer, giving you a stronger visual queue of the ride mode currently selected. The bike is also nicely appointed for off-road use with durable hand guards, a set of beefy engine guards and adequate skid plate protection. Asphalt Performance We began the day with a highway cruise along the Mediterranean coast, which provided the perfect opportunity to test the bike’s touring capabilities. The electronically-adjustable windscreen, conveniently controlled with a thumb joystick, offered excellent wind protection and the updated saddle remained comfortable throughout the journey. The heated grips and seat were appreciated in the cooler temperatures and the cruise control worked flawlessly. Only a small tingle in the bars could be felt at highway speeds, and the ergos felt just right for long-haul miles. Once at the base of the mountain, we were greeted by a beautiful set of s-turns that took us all the way up to the snow line. Asphalt was smooth and clean of debris with everything from long sweeping turns to tight hairpins. Being a Monday, there were few other vehicles on the road and the pace picked up quickly as we followed lead rider, and Isle of Man racer, Garrett Johnson up the hill. With the Tiger in Sport Mode, the suspension damping stiffens up and sag is adjusted front and rear to provide optimal stability for aggressive riding. The TSAS is always calculating and adjusting the suspension based on the current load and road conditions as well. Sport mode also gives a more aggressive throttle response and reduces traction control intervention to allow a small amount of rear tire spin. With the Metzeler Tourance NEXT tires heated up, it was hard to upset the chassis in Sport Mode. Only with traction control ‘Off’ could I initiate a rear-wheel slide, yet the tractable power of the Tiger always felt under control. The Tiger gets excellent grip under acceleration partially because its triple engine has a softer hit down low than the torquey big-bore twins common in the class. Another reason is a perfectly-tuned fuel map that allows it to smoothly accelerate under load. Although, there is no shortage of low-end torque on tap. You can put it in 4th gear at 15 mph, crack the throttle wide open, and it will pull away smoothly without a bog. The motor loves to rev too. So you can leave it in 3rd gear most of the time and it rarely requires a shift. Getting the bike leaned over in a turn is easier than you might expect for a 547-pound dry weight adventure bike, and the Tiger allows you to make lean angle adjustments mid-turn without a fuss. On a few occasions, I got into a turn hotter than I anticipated but the forgiving Tiger 1200 gave me that extra lean angle I needed to tighten my turn with room to spare. Shift assist was entertaining to play with on the mountain road, providing fast clutchless up and down shifts. And if you accidentally downshift too high in the revs, Torque Assist ensures the rear wheel doesn’t start skipping across the pavement. The Brembo brakes also didn’t disappoint, requiring just one finger and a gentle pull to bring the bike to a halt. Off-Road Performance Our Day Two consisted of all dirt and the Tiger 1200 XCa got fitted with a set of optional Pirelli Scorpion Dual Sport knobby tires to better handle the soft sandy trails of Southern Spain. We were led by Dakar Rally Racer Nick Plumb and Charley Boorman of ‘Long Way Round’ fame who also raced the Dakar Rally in 2006. Getting familiar with the bike was easy on the Southern California-like terrain and while I was concerned about the new bars being too far back for stand up riding, they felt surprisingly good. Bar h also felt about right even with my 34″ inseam, although I would have liked to roll them forward a tad. A shorter tank with a forward seated position also gave the bike a balanced feel sitting down in turns. The Scorpion Rally tires offered excellent grip in the soft terrain and the bike maintained good traction accelerating out of turns even with Traction Control off. With the Tiger’s tractable power, you have to grab a handful of throttle to get the tail kicked out. The power delivery is so controllable that both off-road modes maintain full power in the dirt (only rain mode has a small power reduction). A narrow tank allows riders to get in a more natural stand up riding position and makes it easier to grip the tank with your knees. After previously testing the 2015 Tiger Explorer 1200 (before the move to WP Suspension), I was left unimpressed with its off-road capability. The new Tiger feels nimble for a big-bore Adventure Bike and its tight turning radius lets you turn around on a dime. The suspension is also much more lively and agile on the trail. Soon I was feeling comfortable leaning it deep into turns while getting both tires sliding. And whenever the bike got a bit unsettled, the forgiving chassis made it easy to quickly regain composure. While the terrain we rode wasn’t technical, there were several opportunities to get both wheels off the ground and push the suspension in a few rocky washes. With the bike in Off-Road Pro mode the suspension is stiffened, giving the bike extra stability to hold a clean line through choppy terrain and to resist bottoming. The Tiger likes to be ridden fast and goes where you point it, but if you slow down you will notice more the heft of the bike. The soft throttle hit and the weight also make it a challenge to lift the front wheel over obstacles. Clearly it’s no KTM 1090R or Africa Twin, but it can hold its own off-road with any of the other 19″ front wheel Adventure Bikes in the category. The Bottom Line Triumph has been refining the Tiger 1200 platform since it was first introduced in 2011. This year’s updated version marks a major improvement that should not be disregarded. The significant weight loss offers improved agility on both the street and dirt, giving the Tiger 1200 a performance edge the previous model lacked. At the same time, the bike comes fully-loaded with all the luxury accouterments and a cozy seat to make it a comfortable long-distance touring mount. Although with only a 5.3 gallon fuel capacity, its range is somewhat limited. Even so, the smallish fuel tank helps give the bike a more nimble feel that pays big dividends for performance riding. What sets the Tiger 1200 apart is its triple engine that offers smooth, tractable power and an ear-pleasing howl from its Titanium Arrow exhaust. It doesn’t have the low-end punch of a big-bore twin, but it is easier to control the power and a forgiving chassis allows riders to push their limits safely. While versatility is the Tiger’s greatest strength, its performance envelope will still keep advanced riders entertained on both the street and dirt. All the new equipment and performance updates do come at a cost. MSRP for the 2018 Triumph Tiger 1200 XCa increases from $20,700 to $21,750. Considering all the upgrades, it seems like a reasonable increase and still puts the Tiger competitively priced with other offerings in the Luxury Adventure Touring Segment. Look for the new Tiger 1200 to start arriving on US showroom floors around mid-February 2018. 2018 Triumph Tiger 1200 XCa Specs Engine Type: Liquid-cooled 12 valve, DOHC, in-line 3-cylinder Displacement: 1215cc Bore & Stroke: 85 x 71.4mm Max. Power Output: 139 HP @ 9,350rpm Max. Torque: 90 ft-lbs @ 7,600rpm Compression: 11.0:1 Fuel System: Ride by Wire, fuel injection Exhaust: Stainless steel 3 into 1 header system, stainless steel silencer Clutch: Wet, multi-plate hydraulically operated, torque assist Gearbox: 6 speed Final Drive: Shaft drive Frame Type: Tubular steel trellis Suspension (front): WP 48mm upside down forks, rebouand and compression manual damping adjustment Suspension Travel (front): 7.48 in. Suspension (rear): Cast aluminium swing arm with shaft drive, WP mono-shock, rebound damping and hydraulic preload adjustment Suspension Travel (rear): 7.59 in. Brakes Front: Twin 305mm floating discs radially mounted monoblock Brembo 4-piston calipers, Switchable ABS Brakes Rear: Single 282mm disc, Nissin 2-piston sliding caliper, Switchable ABS Tires Front: 120/70-19 Tires Rear: 170/60-17 Wheels Front: Wire spoke 19 x 3.0 in. Wheels Rear: Wire spoke 17 x 4.5 in. Seat Height (STD/Low): 32.9/33.7 in. Height (without mirrors): 57.8 in. Rake: 23.2º Trail: 3.93 in. Length: 87.2 in. Wheelbase: 87.8 in. Dry Weight: 547 lbs. Fuel Capacity: 5.3 US Gallons Fuel consumption: 40.6 mpg Color Options: Crystal White, Marine MSRP Pricing USD: $21,750 GEAR WE USED • Helmet: Shoei Hornet X2 • Jacket: Rukka Rough Road • Pants: Rukka Rough Road • Gloves: Racer Guide Glove • Boots: REV’IT! Discovery Outdry • Bluetooth Headset: Sena 10c
  21. With a TPMS (Tire Pressure Monitoring System) on the dash, potential tire hazards can be brought to the forefront of your attention before you experience a problem. Most Adventure Riders already know the importance of running proper tire pressure. Over the years, I’ve had countless tire pressure mishaps that have put me in precarious situations. Whether it be a slow leak, pinch flat, puncture, defective tire or simply forgetting to check the tires, tire pressure-related accidents are a danger we as motorcyclists all face at some time or another. Using a TPMS (Tire Pressure Monitoring System) is one way to help improve your safety in many of these situations. A TPMS device can alert you when you begin running low on pressure or when there is a sudden drop, often giving you enough warning to pull over before you experience a loss of control. TPMS devices are more commonly found on high-end European Adventure Bike models but if dropping $15,000 or more on a new motorcycle isn’t in the cards, there are affordable aftermarket TPMS kits you can install on your existing bike. Searching For an Aftermarket TPMS One thing we missed on our KTM 1090 Adventure R long-term test bike was the factory TPMS that came standard on its predecessor, the 1190 Adventure R. Searching through motorcycle TPMS solutions, we came across a new product from Cyclops Adventure Sports. The Cyclops aftermarket TPMS gives you real-time air pressure and tire temperature readouts through a compact display that can be conveniently mounted on your dash or handlebar. The system uses replacement valve stem caps with sensors inside that send data to a display for independent front and rear tire measurements. When tire pressure suddenly drops or falls out of range, an audible alarm and red flashing light immediately warns you. The TPMS kit can be quickly installed on virtually any motorcycle with either tube or tubeless tires, and has configurable high and low pressure warning thresholds for each tire. Replacement valve stem caps with sensors inside send data to the TPMS display providing independent front and rear tire air temperature and pressure readings. Yet there’s more to a TPMS than just low tire pressure warnings. Running optimal tire pressure to match the terrain can improve both performance and tire longevity. Being able to see your tire pressure at a glance eliminates unnecessary stops to manually check tires with a gauge. Temperature and elevation changes can also cause big fluctuations in tire pressure that are important to monitor. You loose roughly 1 Psi for every 2,000 feet of elevation drop and another 1 Psi for every drop of 10°F. For example, if you started your ride at high elevation with hot mid-day temperatures then rode to sea level arriving in cool evening temperatures, the loss of air pressure could be significant enough to cause speed wobbles on the highway or potentially a bent rim from a pothole. With a TPMS on the dash, potential tire hazards can be brought to the forefront of our attention before they become a problem. All too often, we don’t remember to stop and check our tire pressure until after we get ourselves into a bad situation. The Cyclops TPMS provides real-time tire pressure readings and alerts you instantly if there’s a problem. Cyclops TPMS Installation Considering the safety and time saving benefits of a Tire Pressure Monitoring System, we were eager to try out the new Cyclops aftermarket TPMS. Installation is fairly simple with the option to either clamp the device onto your handle bars (7/8″ or 1 1/8″) or use a 3M sticky pad to attach it to the bike’s dash. We chose the sticky pad option, placing it conveniently on the left side dash. Installing the device does include wiring it up to a power supply but that was easy on the 1090 Adventure R. An accessory power and ground wire are just underneath the 12-volt charging port cover (wires marked ‘ACC2’), and you can access them without pulling apart the dash. For a cleaner installation, we drilled a small hole adjacent to the 12-volt charging port to run the wires into the dash. The ‘ACC2’ accessory power and ground wire can be found just underneath the 12-volt charging port cover on the KTM 1090 Adventure R. Next we replaced the stock valve stem caps with the tire pressure sensing caps included in the kit. The valve stem cap marked ‘A’ goes on the front tire and ‘B’ goes on the rear, with a locking nut to ensure they stay in place. Each valve stem cap weighs just 0.3 ounces, so it’s not heavy enough to require re-balancing the tires. Cyclops recommends using metal valve stems, but also reports that problems with rubber valve stems are rare. The KTM 1090 Adventure R already comes with metal valve stems (as do most inner tubes) so it wasn’t a concern for us. Tire pressure alarm settings on the device are pre-set at 26 Psi (low)/41 Psi (high) for the front and 29 Psi (low)/43 Psi (high) for the rear. The system is also pre-configured to set off an alarm if the tire’s air temperature exceeds 154°F (68°C) or if there is a sudden air leak. For many riders, the stock settings are adequate but we opted to drop the low pressure alarm down to 22 Psi on the front tire and 20 Psi on the rear to account for off-road riding pressures. Changing settings was fairly easy with a few clicks of the menu buttons. Cyclops TPMS Testing [embedded content]Demonstration of low pressure tire alarm activating after front tire drops below our custom minimum warning setting (22 Psi). After a quick ride around the block, the system was up and running with readouts for both tire temperature and air pressure toggling on the screen. Heading out of the garage on the first ride, I thought about how I’d normally be thinking “when was the last time I checked my tire pressure?”. It was also nice to have the TPMS clearly visible on the dash, separate from the bike’s digital display. On bikes with a factory TPMS, the tire pressure readouts are often buried in layers of menus and can get lost in the clutter. After testing the Cyclops TPMS over several thousands of miles, we never had any problems with the valve stem caps loosening and the tire pressure readings always proved accurate. The display on the TPMS is easy to read in direct sunlight or at night and remained waterproof in wet weather. With the TPMS clearly visible on the dash, I was always surprised to see how much tire pressure fluctuates with elevation, temperature and riding aggressiveness. We missed the factory TPMS that came standard on the 1090’s predecessor, the 1190 Adventure R. Yet our new Cyclops aftermarket TPMS works even better with it clearly visible on the dash, separated from the clutter of the digital display. While I never experienced a flat tire during our testing, on one occasion an impact with a big rock caused the tubless front tire to lose its seal around the bead for a split second. The hard impact pushed out about 7 Psi of air and triggered the alarm. The audible warning was loud enough to hear and the flashing light got my attention immediately. This early warning allowed me to pull over to appraise the damage and fill the tire back up with air. If it were not for the Cyclops TPMS, I probably would have kept riding unaware of the situation and the next big rock could have caused a puncture or bent rim. Several times when a loss of traction in a soft patch of dirt had me convinced I was getting a flat, a quick look at the TPMS let me know right away that all was well with the tires. One small snag we noticed with the Cyclops aftermarket TPMS was that when you first start the bike after it has been sitting in the garage for awhile, the tire pressure shows the measurement from your last ride. An accurate reading is measured once you ride the bike about 100 yards. Apparently, this is by design to save battery life. The sensors are motion activated, set to go to sleep when not in use. Batteries are said to last at least one year and a spare set are included in the kit. If you find you need a replacement set while on the road, common watch-type batteries are used that can typically be sourced from a hardware store or supermarket. Final Thoughts For Adventure Riders who regularly transition between street and dirt, a TPMS becomes all the more important to maintain optimal tire pressure for the terrain. It’s rare to find an aftermarket upgrade that can significantly improve safety and convenience for a relatively small amount of money. At just $130, the Cyclops TPMS offers a lot of bang for the buck. And for Adventure Riders who regularly adjust tire pressures when transitioning between street and dirt, a TPMS is all the more important to have. Cyclops developed their motorcycle TPMS kit specifically for Adventure Riders and the product underwent many months of rigorous testing and several renditions before they considered it ‘ready’ to bring to market. Whether you ride a KTM 990 Adventure, V-Strom, KLR650, F800GS or DR650, its nice knowing your bike doesn’t have to be state-of-the-art to get the benefits of a TPMS. And the fact that it’s simple, lightweight and easy to install makes the idea of adding the Cyclops TPMS to your machine all the more worthwhile. Shopping Options . Photos by Steve Kamrad and Karla Robleto
  22. The product of extensive research and crowd-sourced feedback from a deep pool of female adventure riders, the all-new Artemis combines KLIM’s renowned apparel technology and functionality into a custom-engineered piece for women. Robust and equipped for intercontinental travel, and comfortable enough for day-trip explorations, the Artemis features absolute weatherproofness, great durability, excellent cargo capacity and a custom-engineered, female-specific comfort-mapped ventilation system featuring ten (10) adjustable ventilation ports. Guaranteed to Keep You Dry The KLIM Artemis utilizes KLIM’s GORE-TEX Fabric laminate technology to seal out external elements without complicating the apparel system with cumbersome “waterproof” liners. GORE-TEX laminated to the external performance shell guarantees 100% waterproofness via its proprietary breathable membrane. Take It To The Dirt Artemis was designed to extend your riding options and inspire confidence when tackling variable terrain. Its inherent durability ensures it will perform through it all. Starting with KLIM’s exclusive KARBONITE™ ripstop overlays on the elbows, shoulders and knees, this gear set is serious about resisting wear. Add in genuine goat leather inner-knees, and the system is clearly off-road oriented and dirt worthy. Intelligent Comfort Systems As a world travel-worthy gear set, the Artemis is engineered to extend comfort despite external factors. That’s why the KLIM engineering team worked hard to custom comfort-map the Artemis’ intelligent ventilation system to work in concert with the female form. Ten custom ventilation port locations in the jacket and four in the pant ensure adequate airflow throughout the combo with premium KLIMATEK™ cooling mesh backing the armor pockets. This ensures the most efficient airflow and cooling effect possible when the riding action or temperatures heat up. When it comes to comfort, fit can be as important as ventilation, and without proper fit no garment is going to perform, as it should. That’s why KLIM’s product development team engineered adjustment systems into the Artemis pieces. Each jacket enjoys four arm and two waist quick-adjust straps and zippered hip gussets to fit different body types or accommodate for layering options. Artemis pants feature adjustable snap hem closures to fit varying boot and leg shapes and an adjustable waist cinch helps you dial in the right fit. A soft collar liner keeps you in the jacket longer and the upgraded polygiene anti-odor liner means both pieces can go for months without smelling like it. Armor Up KLIM utilizes the best armor systems in the world. And the Artemis enjoys this standard with a full suite of D3O level 1 shoulder, elbow, back, hip and knee armor pieces to provide coverage across the board. To keep riders more comfortable, KLIM includes KLIMATEK cooling fabric technology in the mesh armor pockets throughout. This enhances D3O’s ventilation significantly. Also, unique pad retention systems on the upper calf of the Artemis pant keep knee armor in place throughout riding movements. Cargo Capacity There are ten different pocket choices in the Artemis jacket alone, providing quick-access, large volume or discreet storage options for all your travel needs. From concealed document pockets to a massive rear storage area, the Artemis is engineered to contain everything you could need. The Artemis Adventure Suit is set to launch February 2018. MSRP for the Artemis Jacket is $699.99 and $549.99 for the Pant. . KLIM Artemis Suit Features ARTEMIS JACKET • GORE-TEX PERFORMANCE SHELL • GUARANTEED TO KEEP YOU DRY • KARBONITE™ RIPSTOP OVERLAYS IN THE ELBOWS AND SHOULDERS • ADJUSTABLE VELCRO CUFF CLOSURES • COMFORT MAPPED VENTILATION FOR WOMEN • KLIMATEK™ COOLING MESH IN THE PAD POCKETS • 2 CHEST VENT POCKETS • 2 CROSS-CORE VENTS • 2 ARTICULATED FOREARM VENTS • 2 BICEP VENTS • 2 VERTICAL BACK EXHAUST VENTS • 1 STAT CARD / HIDDEN STASH POCKET • COLLAR TAB BACK FOR IMPROVED VENTILATION • INTEGRATED D3O LEVEL 1 SHOULDER AND ELBOW / VIPER 1 BACKPAD • IMPROVED VENTILATION THROUGH THE BACK PAD • 2 CHEST VENT POCKETS • 2 ZIPPERED HAND POCKETS • 1 REAR LARGE POCKET • 1 UPPER ARM STASH POCKET • 2 LOWER INTERNAL ZIPPERED STASH POCKETS • 1 VERTICAL INSIDE STASH POCKET • 1 CONCEALED DOCUMENT POCKET BEHIND BACK PAD • ACTION BACK FOR COMFORT AND MOBILITY • UPGRADED POLYGIENE ANTI-ODOR LINER • SOFT COLLAR LINER • 2 QUICK ADJUST BICEP STRAPS • 2 QUICK ADJUST FOREARM STRAPS • 2 QUICK ADJUST WAIST ADJUSTERS • 2 ZIPPERED HIP GUSSETS ARTEMIS PANT • GORE-TEX • GUARANTEED TO KEEP YOU DRY • KARBONITE™ RIPSTOP OVERLAYS IN THE KNEES • GOAT LEATHER ON INSIDE OF KNEES • ADJUSTABLE SNAP HEM CLOSURES • ADJUSTABLE WAIST CINCH • 2 THIGH INTAKE VENT • 2 BACK THIGH EXHAUST VENT • KLIMATEK™ COOLING MESH IN THE PAD POCKETS • D3O LEVEL 1 HIP AND KNEE • 2 ZIPPERED CARGO POCKETS • QUICK ADJUST STRAPS ON UPPER CALF KEEP ARMOR IN PLACE • UPGRADED POLYGIENE ANTI-ODOR LINER
  23. When the Badlands Pro was released to the Adventure Riding population over five years ago, it became a popular global travel companion for riders. And travel the world it did. Now, KLIM has announced an all-new Badlands Pro, engineered with proprietary ride-enhancing tech that is more user friendly and more comfortable, while providing higher levels of strength and safety. From the inside out, KLIM has engineered the core of Badlands Pro DNA for the next epic trip. The new suit incorporate breakthroughs in; armor impact, armor coverage, and armor comfort performance, ventilation, storage, all-weather functionality, abrasion resistance, durability, and visibility. Introducing KLIM D3O AERO PRO Armor The new D3O AERO armor offers more coverage, better comfort and now meets Level 2 even at temperatures greater than 95° F. KLIM D3O AERO PRO offers the most coverage and highest performance of any rider armor technology offered —passing CE Level 2 testing criteria across the gamut of temperature and moisture conditions. And it does this while ventilating 5X as much as the next best performing D3O with 44% more coverage. KLIM D3O AERO PRO is the most ergonomically correct, highest performing, most well ventilated and widest covering Adventure Riding-specific impact armor available. It was designed by KLIM for one purpose — to serve the needs of world-class adventures. The new Badlands Pro jacket gets a new collar with improved comfort and increased venting on the chest and shoulders. Abrasion Invasion Movement is an inherent part of the motorcycle experience and KLIM’s engineered exterior shell specifications intended to enhance this important component. For the Badlands Pro, one of the largest investments has been with Superfabric extreme abrasion panels placed on the highest abrasion zones. These custom-engineered, variable density fabric hybrids provide a combination of free movement and ironclad resistance. This is the tip-of-the-spear for off-the bike environmental contact and Superfabric® is placed in strategic locations to shed unwanted abrasion with absolute resilience. Next, KLIM’s exclusive KARBONITE™ Ripstop panels back up Superfabric® in key impact and wear areas to provide high-mobility, yet extremely tough active fit patterning for a great combination of comfort and durability. To enhance movement and on-the-bike comfort in the face of the most durable exterior shell, KLIM engineers worked hard to incorporate user-friendly flexibility and intuitive ergonomic access to things like pockets and ventilation zippers. The high-spec fabric combinations, combined with articulated patterning bring a major upgrade to the comfort of the new Badlands Pro. Guaranteed to Keep You Dry This promise is backed by the proven performance of KLIM’s use of motorsports-exclusive GORE-TEX® 3-Layer Pro Shell technology. According to the company, “only KLIM bonds the world’s most breathable and durable waterproof apparel technology directly to the outside of the most durable shell materials available. ” KLIM’s GORE-TEX® integration ensures a dry, breathable and comfortable ride regardless of exterior conditions or how hard you work. Ventus Maximus External weather conditions are only half of the comfort story on a ride. After all, when Adventure Riders encounter technical terrain, they heat up regardless of what the thermometer says. That’s why KLIM’s goal was to develop the most intelligent ventilation and comfort system for the all-new Badlands Pro. Starting with the dynamic D3O AERO PRO armor’s open structure, airflow can now move completely through the best armor in the industry, cooling protected limbs in high exertion riding by expelling heat at newfound speeds. “We’re talking about a five time increase in ventilation potential in the highest-rated armor available,” says KLIM. Further, KLIM engineered KLIMATEK COOL base layer fabric into the armor pockets of the Badlands Pro. This innovative cooling fabric utilizes chemical-free moisture transfer and cool evaporation technology that does not wear out over time. The result is a fabric with hyper-wicking properties and cooling your skin will feel next to jacket and pant armor. Now there is a new stash pocket behind the backpad that is even more hidden. Day to Day Function Living in your gear day in and day out gives you a very intimate experience of all its attributes and nuances. Traversing the globe – deserts, mountain ranges, and foreign cities bring unique challenges both on and off the bike. With that in mind, the new Badlands Pro incorporates a design with a day-to-day function to work intuitively with the rider. The Badlands Pro also incorporates more hidden stash pockets and anti-odor properties. To combat foul odors and sweaty residue buildup, KLIM now incorporates Polygiene technology to the entire interior finish fabrics of the new Badlands Pro. This permanently bound fabric tech applies naturally occurring bacteria eliminating properties to fabrics, to eliminate the month-long riding stench before it starts. [embedded content] Badlands Pro will be available in Spring 2018 with 5 new jacket colorways and 3 new pant colorways. Pants will also come in expanded size ranges: Regular 30-44, Tall 32-40 Short 34-44. Badlands Pro Jacket MSRP: $999.99 (3XL $1029.99); Badlands Pro Pant MSRP: $699.99 (Tall sizes $719.99)
×