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  1. Published on 09.16.2019 [embedded content] Has 30-seconds of video ever been more seductive? Wait, don’t answer that because we’re concentrating on bike porn here, specifically Honda’s teaser for the new 2020 Africa Twin — giving a quick peek of the front of the new bike. At first all we see is inky black until a key light begins to caress the front of the Africa Twin’s re-sculpted fairing, revealing a smoother, broader surface area. The h of the windshield and outline of crash bars let us know we’re glimpsing the Adventure Sports version of the AT. Then a dramatic pop to light up the bike’s striking, new round LED irises, followed by low beams and then auxiliary lights. Photos from the certification filings show the 2020 Honda Africa Twin Adventure Sports with cross-spoked tubeless-tires, a deeper seat and what appears to be cornering lights. Logo with the stylized map of Africa can also be seen.23.09.19 jumps into frame as a climax, letting us know the teaser is teasing the actual reveal date of new Africa Twin. And judging by the way the two logos split during the video — one the text-only standard Africa Twin logo and the other, the Adventure Sports logo, with its stylized outline of the African continent, means we’re likely to see both bikes drop simultaneously. ADVERTISEMENT An interesting asset that slips out in the shadowy scene is the hint of an extra pair of lights glimmering below the main headlamp module. We presume these are lean-angle activated cornering lights, shown in more detail in the official filing photos we recently reported on. Other changes we’ve previously reported include a displacement bump of 86cc, increased fuel capacity, new frame and bolt-on subframe, TFT display, reworked exhaust and new tail section and hand guards. The Adventure Sports version additionally receives cross-spoked tubeless wheels, a deeper saddle, crash bars, and the auxiliary lighting. We’re likely to see both models announced simultaneously on September 23rd.Sadly, there is no hint of whether those silhouetted hand guards hide the one button everyone is talking about. Yes. Cruise control. Even our friends at American Honda refuse to confirm or deny the addition of this sorely missed touring feature. Okay Honda, we’re worn out after watching this teaser a couple dozen times. Enough with the seduction. Show us your Twins! Author: Jamie Elvidge Jamie has been a motorcycle journalist for more than 30 years, testing the entire range of bikes for the major print magazines and specializing in adventure-travel related stories. To date she’s written and supplied photography for articles describing what it’s like to ride in all 50 states and 43 foreign countries, receiving two Lowell Thomas Society of American Travel Writer’s Awards along the way. Her most-challenging adventure yet has been riding in the 2018 GS Trophy in Mongolia as Team AusAmerica’s embedded journalist.
  2. Things are getting real in Patagonia for the Long Way Up cast and crew as photos posted to Instagram this weekend show Ewan McGregor leaving Ushuaia on an already muddied-up blue Harley-Davidson LiveWire. Two of the photos were taken alongside the Perito Francisco Moreno, the low road that departs Ushuaia heading east, a location we were able to pinpoint exactly thanks to the magic of google maps. Presumably the crew had pulled over to set up for footage with the city in the background before the road joins Highway 3, which is the main route out of town. We’ve confirmed a third shot going around the internet showing Ewan with Charley and cameraman Claudio von Planta in the background was taken outside the Hotel Lagos del Calafate, 540 miles north of Ushuaia. The photo in El Calafate was snapped by a local who supplied ADV Pulse with additional angles. The fact the team was in El Calafate late last week suggests they are moving at a fast pace. ADVERTISEMENT The only thing offbeat about these photos are the LiveWires, brand new and totally unproven zero-emission electric bikes from Harley-Davidson. We can see they are kitted with wire-spoked wheels, windscreens, engine guards, highway pegs, skidplates and auxiliary lights, as well as Wolfman’s Rocky Mountain saddlebags and Enduro Fender Bags. The tail sections also appear to be reworked in order to accomodate luggage racks and a higher rear fender. Up front, the stock fenders have been swapped for ones with more coverage. Ewan is sporting an Arai XD4 crossover helmet equipped with a Sena 30k communicator and flush-mounted video camera that might be a Sena Prism in an aftermarket cradle. Another camera, a GoPro, is mounted next to the headlight. His jacket is a waxed-leather Turner from Belstaff and gloves are Gore-Tex Universe from Dianese. And those huge handlebar muffs! Being at the bottom of the Southern Hemisphere, winter is just turning to spring in Argentina with temperatures in the region this week ranging from just below freezing to a high of 41°F. Brrr is right, and on those electric bikes that give them less than 100 highway miles per charge, any electric gear will need to be independently charged. No problem though, since as previous spy shots showed, their chase crew includes two 4×4 Mercedes-Benz Sprinter vans and a single Ford F350 (as well as two electric-powered Rivian pickups). Many adventure riders scoffed at the news McGregor and Boorman would be riding e-bikes (especially Harley-Davidson models) on their Long Way Up from Tierra del Fuego to Los Angeles, assuming it was all about the financial sponsorship. But when you think about it, any brand would be foolish not to invest in supporting this project, so the choice likely has less to do with cash than it does McGregor’s fascination with the future of EV technology. While there may be a lack of off-road antics, this new Long Way installment is certain to be rife with the calamity and candor we’ve come to expect from this duo. Stayed tuned for additional celebrity sightings as their curious journey north continues. Author: Jamie Elvidge Jamie has been a motorcycle journalist for more than 30 years, testing the entire range of bikes for the major print magazines and specializing in adventure-travel related stories. To date she’s written and supplied photography for articles describing what it’s like to ride in all 50 states and 43 foreign countries, receiving two Lowell Thomas Society of American Travel Writer’s Awards along the way. Her most-challenging adventure yet has been riding in the 2018 GS Trophy in Mongolia as Team AusAmerica’s embedded journalist.
  3. So it’s true. There is indeed a new Honda CRF1100L Africa Twin and Africa Twin Adventure Sports headed our way for 2020, and thanks to newly-published vehicle certification filings discovered by Motorcycle.com we know several new, key details. The documents filed confirm the existing 998cc mill has received a capacity bump from 998cc to 1084cc, which will increase horsepower from 94 to 101 @ 7500 rpm. And while not yet confirmed, peak torque is expected to rise from 73 to 79 ft-lbs @ 6000 rpm. This measured expansion is one way Honda is getting ahead of looming EU 5 and 6 emissions restrictions, which would potentially decrease output in the existing engine by roughly as much as is being gained here. Don’t be surprised to see similar compensatory bumps in displacement across brands. Close inspection of the low-resolution black-and-white photos filed with the documents reveal many additional changes to the Africa Twin, including upgrades to its chassis, electronics suite, and bodywork. Photos filed show the 2020 Honda Africa Twin Adventure Sports will feature cross-spoked tubeless-tires and what appears to be cornering lights. ADVERTISEMENT There is a new (presumably still steel) frame and detachable subframe for the Africa Twin that houses an unchanged drivetrain, still available in both models as either standard or DCT. Beefier plating protects the new twin’s bottom end and reworked exhaust. A generously-sized TFT display will now summon all of the bike’s readouts, while its electronic assets are accessed via the high-resolution touchscreen. The display is nestled atop a more streamlined fairing, which incorporates intake channels that appear smaller and lower than those on the previous design. The AT’s distinctive twin headlights look to be slightly larger and instead of bulging, both are flush to the fairing. Both models show a TFT screen and redesigned hand guards.The windscreen on the standard model is quite a bit shorter than on the original, giving it a more-aggressive off-road look. The shield on the AS version is much larger by comparison. Both models are equipped with redesigned hand guards that appear more substantial than the flimsy issue on the original ATs. By all accounts the standard Africa Twin’s fuel tank is larger for 2020. It was assumed it would utilize the more voluminous 6.4-gallon tank already in use on the Adventure model, but in the photos it appears the Adventure Sports tank is still larger. The standard model features a more off-road oriented short windscreen and a larger tank.Out back, the tail section of the bike has been trimmed, and while the standard version features tidier grab rails, the AS edition wears a more substantial tail rack than previous. The AS version also receives cross-spoke tubeless wheels and a deeper, more comfortable-looking seat than the tall, flat original design. We can’t tell for sure, but there might be cornering lights beneath the headlamps on this pricier edition, though any stock crash guards are notably missing, at least in these design certification photos. We don’t believe the 2020 engine will feature the DOHC system slated to replace the AT’s existing Unicam, or the revolutionary Direct Fuel Injection Honda has patented to manage the 1100cc mill more efficiently. We do expect Honda, with its involvement in highly-sophisticated automobile racing technology, to lead the motorcycle industry with this feature and that we’ll see the more precise DI on the Africa Twin no later than 2022. The next level of reveal for the 2020 Africa Twin and Africa Twin Adventure Sports is likely to be the Tokyo Motor Show in late October. We’ll keep you up on all the details here. Photos: Motorcycle.com Author: Jamie Elvidge Jamie has been a motorcycle journalist for more than 30 years, testing the entire range of bikes for the major print magazines and specializing in adventure-travel related stories. To date she’s written and supplied photography for articles describing what it’s like to ride in all 50 states and 43 foreign countries, receiving two Lowell Thomas Society of American Travel Writer’s Awards along the way. Her most-challenging adventure yet has been riding in the 2018 GS Trophy in Mongolia as Team AusAmerica’s embedded journalist.
  4. So it’s true. There is indeed a new Honda CRF1100L Africa Twin and Africa Twin Adventure Sports headed our way for 2020, and thanks to newly-published vehicle certification filings discovered by Motorcycle.com we know several new, key details. The documents filed confirm the existing 998cc mill has received a capacity bump from 998cc to 1084cc, which will increase horsepower from 94 to 101 @ 7500 rpm. And while not yet confirmed, peak torque is expected to rise from 73 to 79 ft-lbs @ 6000 rpm. This measured expansion is one way Honda is getting ahead of looming EU 5 and 6 emissions restrictions, which would potentially decrease output in the existing engine by roughly as much as is being gained here. Don’t be surprised to see similar compensatory bumps in displacement across brands. Close inspection of the low-resolution black-and-white photos filed with the documents reveal many additional changes to the Africa Twin, including upgrades to its chassis, electronics suite, and bodywork. Photos filed show the 2020 Honda Africa Twin Adventure Sports will feature cross-spoked tubeless-tires and what appears to be cornering lights. ADVERTISEMENT There is a new (presumably still steel) frame and detachable subframe for the Africa Twin that houses an unchanged drivetrain, still available in both models as either standard or DCT. Beefier plating protects the new twin’s bottom end and reworked exhaust. A generously-sized TFT display will now summon all of the bike’s readouts, while its electronic assets are accessed via the high-resolution touchscreen. The display is nestled atop a more streamlined fairing, which incorporates intake channels that appear smaller and lower than those on the previous design. The AT’s distinctive twin headlights look to be slightly larger and instead of bulging, both are flush to the fairing. Both models show a TFT screen and redesigned hand guards.The windscreen on the standard model is quite a bit shorter than on the original, giving it a more-aggressive off-road look. The shield on the AS version is much larger by comparison. Both models are equipped with redesigned hand guards that appear more substantial than the flimsy issue on the original ATs. By all accounts the standard Africa Twin’s fuel tank is larger for 2020. It was assumed it would utilize the more voluminous 6.4-gallon tank already in use on the Adventure model, but in the photos it appears the Adventure Sports tank is still larger. The standard model features a more off-road oriented short windscreen and a larger tank.Out back, the tail section of the bike has been trimmed, and while the standard version features tidier grab rails, the AS edition wears a more substantial tail rack than previous. The AS version also receives cross-spoke tubeless wheels and a deeper, more comfortable-looking seat than the tall, flat original design. We can’t tell for sure, but there might be cornering lights beneath the headlamps on this pricier edition, though any stock crash guards are notably missing, at least in these design certification photos. We don’t believe the 2020 engine will feature the DOHC system slated to replace the AT’s existing Unicam, or the revolutionary Direct Fuel Injection Honda has patented to manage the 1100cc mill more efficiently. We do expect Honda, with its involvement in highly-sophisticated automobile racing technology, to lead the motorcycle industry with this feature and that we’ll see the more precise DI on the Africa Twin no later than 2022. The next level of reveal for the 2020 Africa Twin and Africa Twin Adventure Sports is likely to be the Tokyo Motor Show in late October. We’ll keep you up on all the details here. Photos: Motorcycle.com Author: Jamie Elvidge Jamie has been a motorcycle journalist for more than 30 years, testing the entire range of bikes for the major print magazines and specializing in adventure-travel related stories. To date she’s written and supplied photography for articles describing what it’s like to ride in all 50 states and 43 foreign countries, receiving two Lowell Thomas Society of American Travel Writer’s Awards along the way. Her most-challenging adventure yet has been riding in the 2018 GS Trophy in Mongolia as Team AusAmerica’s embedded journalist.
  5. We get it. You’re out there working up a good sweat sowing the last of your summer-season oats and the last thing you want to think about is the impending cold, wet fall season. Luckily, FirstGear has been worrying about the turn of seasons for us, queuing up new gear selections to stay warm and dry during those chilly rides to come. When FirstGear says it has a complete line of heated gear for men and women, we’re talking everything short of heated undies. This year all of the controls for its socks, gloves, glove liners, pants, vests and jackets powered by your bike’s 12V battery have been revised to streamline their operation. In addition, each garment in a chain can now be dialed up or down independently for targeted heat, say, if want to crank up the socks but leave your vest on low. Prices range from a suggested $99.95 for socks to $299.95 for a sleeved jacket, with men’s and women’s pricing the same across the line. Also new this year is a 5V jacket and puffy vest that can be powered using those rechargeable handheld USB-friendly power banks we already carry off-grid to recharge our phones. As adventure riders we find this option especially interesting as a means to keep the chill off around camp. The 5V jackets are priced a bit steeper than the bike-powered variety at $375.95 for a full jacket, while vests are $179.95 and neither come with battery packs, though they are compatible with portable Li-ion battery packs that use a USB input connector. We’ve seen very compact 30,000mAh li-ion packs on Amazon for around $40. ADVERTISEMENT FirstGear has been a leader in the rain protection game for decades and this year its upping the ante with extensive new offerings from men and women. But why, you ask, do you want to carry a separate rain suit when your expensive technical suit has a waterproof membrane? Easy: No one likes a heavy, soggy suit, especially when you’re in the middle of a long tour. This year you can choose from two new men’s rain jackets, the Rainman in black or black with hi-vis for $99.95 or the Splash in black or full hi-vis for $89.95. The main difference appears to be use of a heavier nylon in the Rainman, as well as integrated hood and adjustable wrist closures. Matching pant options are unisex and come in black only for $89.95 and $79.95 respectively. New rain jackets for women are the Triton at $99.95 (black with hi-viz or black with purple piping), and the Delphin in black or full hi-viz for $89.95. Similar differences as seen in the men’s versions, with the slightly pricier suit being made of a more rugged nylon, plus the addition of a hood, which comes in handy when you reach your destination. (Keep in mind a lighter nylon will pack much smaller.) Women also enjoy a new touring/adventure suit option in the Voyage jacket and pants. The black or grey/black three-quarter length jacket ($249.95) consists of a 600 denier shell with impact panels covering CE-approved Knox armor. For comfort, sleeves are pre-curved, while Spandex through the hip area ensures a flexible fit and intake and exhaust vents keep you cool. The pants, at $189.95, are black only and feature articulated knees, thigh vents and Knox knee armor. Both products are lined with FirstGear’s waterproof, breathable z-liner. FirstGear has additionally released five new touring gloves for men: the Heated Outrider, Navigator, Kinetic, Kinetic Short Cuff, and Tech Liner, as well as five new women’s gloves: Heated Outrider, Bancroft, Electra, Voyage and Tech Liner. There is also one new boot offering for 2020, the men’s Kilimanjaro ($199.95), which as the name implies is intended for tromping in far-off places. However, judging by the look of the boots the roads that get you there are likely to be paved. Features include a full leather upper, Hipora waterproof/breathable lining and Boa-style retention. This concludes our cold-weather gear bulletin. Please commence squeezing the last few drops of your summer riding season. New Fall Collection: Complete heated line for both men and women – Battery powered vests, battery powered heated jackets, vehicle powered heated jackets, heated pants, heated, socks, heated gloves and heated glove liners. Two new women’s rain jackets – Delphin and Triton Two new men’s rain jackets – Rainman and Splash Two new unisex rain pants – Rainman and Splash One new Women’s jacket – Voyage One new Women’s pant – Voyage Five new Men’s gloves – Heated Outrider, Navigator, Kinetic, Kinetic Short, and a Tech Liner. Five new Women’s gloves – Heated Outrider, Bancroft, Electra, Voyage, and a Tech Liner. One new Men’s boot – Kilimanjaro For more information go to firstgear.com Author: Jamie Elvidge Jamie has been a motorcycle journalist for more than 30 years, testing the entire range of bikes for the major print magazines and specializing in adventure-travel related stories. To date she’s written and supplied photography for articles describing what it’s like to ride in all 50 states and 43 foreign countries, receiving two Lowell Thomas Society of American Travel Writer’s Awards along the way. Her most-challenging adventure yet has been riding in the 2018 GS Trophy in Mongolia as Team AusAmerica’s embedded journalist.
  6. Whether you dig it or not, new autonomous technology is on the way for our bikes. As motorcyclists we can all appreciate the advances in AI for cars, especially assets like blind spot detection that might just save our hide. But how do we feel about it on our adventure bikes? Well, we’re about to discover its usefulness or lack of as KTM and Ducati fight to be the first to equip their 2020 Flagship adventure touring models with adaptive cruise control and blind spot detection. KTM previously showed the world how its radar-based system will work during a demonstration in Austria and recently the next-gen KTM 1290 Adventure R was spied during testing, featuring this technology. Now new spy photos obtained by MCN show that Ducati will apply similar technology to its forthcoming 1260 Multistrada GT, a top-shelf touring-spec’d version of the existing 1260 (it appears it won’t premiere on the rumored V4 Multistrada). A rear radar helps modulate speed and distance by detecting surrounding rear traffic in addition to warning of vehicles in the blind spot. Radio-wave based systems are the most common and so-far most reliable means of detecting and measuring the presence and speed of surrounding traffic, and certainly it’s radar technology we’ll see as this popular safety feature is adapted to motorcycles. It will require units mounted both front and rear on the bike, and as you can see in the photos of the crudely mounted devices Ducati isn’t giving up how they will integrate the mechanicals into the Multistrada aesthetic. Recent photos of the KTM on the other hand show a gaping hole in the Super Adventure R’s headlight module giving us a clear idea of the finished result. ADVERTISEMENT Many riders will question the advantage of having a computer pace us and possibly encourage complacency, but keep in mind the gaping technology is only cruise control activated and evidently can react faster than is humanly possible, not just in regulating gaps via engine speed, but by engaging initial braking in more abrupt variations. As with systems already common in autos, there will likely be custom gaps settings, traditionally “close, medium and long.” Recent spy shots of the next-gen KTM 1290 Adventure R show a large hole below the headlights where KTM is apparently fitting the Bosch-made adaptive cruise control. Blind spot detection, typically evidenced by a warning light in the side mirror as well as an audible beep, is an easier sell to riders as a useful way to confirm an open lane on the highway. No matter how limber our necks, the standard head-turn check has its pitfalls, especially in dicey, fast-moving traffic. Certainly this isn’t the beginning of AI infiltrating the very machines we use to express our freedom from regulation and constraint, it’s just that most of us have gotten so used to the presence of assistance features like anti-lock braking, traction moderation and injection mapping that we would object if they weren’t included on expensive, new bikes. If Ducati’s previously announced “Safety Road Map 2025,” a complex plan to implement safety systems such as Cornering ABS and Advanced Rider Assistance Systems like radar cruise control is any example, more assistance features are just around the corner. Front and Rear radars provide feedback on the surrounding environment – helping to prevent possible collisions with obstacles or other vehicles.The good news about all of these computerized checks and balances, including aids like Shift Assist and DCT, is that the newer riders so valued by the manufacturers can enjoy a less intimidating learning curve. The only bad news perhaps, is the devaluation of actual skill. How do you feel about autonomous technology in relation to your adventure riding? Which elements are assets and which do you find unnecessary? Photos: MCN and Ducati Author: Jamie Elvidge Jamie has been a motorcycle journalist for more than 30 years, testing the entire range of bikes for the major print magazines and specializing in adventure-travel related stories. To date she’s written and supplied photography for articles describing what it’s like to ride in all 50 states and 43 foreign countries, receiving two Lowell Thomas Society of American Travel Writer’s Awards along the way. Her most-challenging adventure yet has been riding in the 2018 GS Trophy in Mongolia as Team AusAmerica’s embedded journalist.
  7. Whether you dig it or not, new autonomous technology is on the way for our bikes. As motorcyclists we can all appreciate the advances in AI for cars, especially assets like blind spot detection that might just save our hide. But how do we feel about it on our adventure bikes? Well, we’re about to discover its usefulness or lack of as KTM and Ducati fight to be the first to equip their 2020 Flagship adventure touring models with adaptive cruise control and blind spot detection. KTM previously showed the world how its radar-based system will work during a demonstration in Austria and recently the next-gen KTM 1290 Adventure R was spied during testing, featuring this technology. Now new spy photos obtained by MCN show that Ducati will apply similar technology to its forthcoming 1260 Multistrada GT, a top-shelf touring-spec’d version of the existing 1260 (it appears it won’t premiere on the rumored V4 Multistrada). A rear radar helps modulate speed and distance by detecting surrounding rear traffic in addition to warning of vehicles in the blind spot. Radio-wave based systems are the most common and so-far most reliable means of detecting and measuring the presence and speed of surrounding traffic, and certainly it’s radar technology we’ll see as this popular safety feature is adapted to motorcycles. It will require units mounted both front and rear on the bike, and as you can see in the photos of the crudely mounted devices Ducati isn’t giving up how they will integrate the mechanicals into the Multistrada aesthetic. Recent photos of the KTM on the other hand show a gaping hole in the Super Adventure R’s headlight module giving us a clear idea of the finished result. ADVERTISEMENT Many riders will question the advantage of having a computer pace us and possibly encourage complacency, but keep in mind the gaping technology is only cruise control activated and evidently can react faster than is humanly possible, not just in regulating gaps via engine speed, but by engaging initial braking in more abrupt variations. As with systems already common in autos, there will likely be custom gaps settings, traditionally “close, medium and long.” Recent spy shots of the next-gen KTM 1290 Adventure R show a large hole below the headlights where KTM is apparently fitting the Bosch-made adaptive cruise control. Blind spot detection, typically evidenced by a warning light in the side mirror as well as an audible beep, is an easier sell to riders as a useful way to confirm an open lane on the highway. No matter how limber our necks, the standard head-turn check has its pitfalls, especially in dicey, fast-moving traffic. Certainly this isn’t the beginning of AI infiltrating the very machines we use to express our freedom from regulation and constraint, it’s just that most of us have gotten so used to the presence of assistance features like anti-lock braking, traction moderation and injection mapping that we would object if they weren’t included on expensive, new bikes. If Ducati’s previously announced “Safety Road Map 2025,” a complex plan to implement safety systems such as Cornering ABS and Advanced Rider Assistance Systems like radar cruise control is any example, more assistance features are just around the corner. Front and Rear radars provide feedback on the surrounding environment – helping to prevent possible collisions with obstacles or other vehicles.The good news about all of these computerized checks and balances, including aids like Shift Assist and DCT, is that the newer riders so valued by the manufacturers can enjoy a less intimidating learning curve. The only bad news perhaps, is the devaluation of actual skill. How do you feel about autonomous technology in relation to your adventure riding? Which elements are assets and which do you find unnecessary? Photos: MCN and Ducati Author: Jamie Elvidge Jamie has been a motorcycle journalist for more than 30 years, testing the entire range of bikes for the major print magazines and specializing in adventure-travel related stories. To date she’s written and supplied photography for articles describing what it’s like to ride in all 50 states and 43 foreign countries, receiving two Lowell Thomas Society of American Travel Writer’s Awards along the way. Her most-challenging adventure yet has been riding in the 2018 GS Trophy in Mongolia as Team AusAmerica’s embedded journalist.
  8. When Ewan McGregor said there would be a “twist” to his and Charley Bloorman’s new adventure documentary “Long Way Up,” we’ll bet zero among us guessed the duo would be riding electric bikes, far less that those e-machines would be manufactured by Harley-Davidson. But Argentinian outlets have reported that McGregor arrived in Buenos Aires, Argentina with David Alexanian, director and producer of Long Way Round/Down, shortly before the arrival of four factory-crated LiveWires — presumably two for riding, one for a cameraman and one as a backup. So yeah, no BMWs this time, or Triumphs, or even the quirkier Moto Guzzi V85 TTs McGregor promotes, the bike many guessed would be the “twist.” Also arriving in Buenos Aires alongside the Harleys were two cutting-edge electric pickup trucks manufactured in Illinois by Rivian, a company devoted to building “Electric Adventure Vehicles.” These trucks are said to deliver up to 400 miles on a full charge, while the Harley LiveWire is claimed to provide 146 miles of stop-and-go travel per charge or roughly 95 miles of combined city/highway. ADVERTISEMENT It would be tough enough to travel coast-to-coast on backroads in the U.S. without a struggle to charge up this collection of e-vehicles, so we’re assuming the additional vehicles that landed, two 4×4 Mercedes-Benz Sprinter vans and a single Ford F350 (V8 6.2), will carry some mobile DC fast chargers as well as crew members, spare parts and the spare bike. A little about the 2020 LiveWire, the flagship of a forthcoming series of EVs from Harley-Davidson: Only a handful of journalists have tested this machine so far and then only during a Portland-based press launch limited mostly to city streets. Cycle World called the LiveWire “impressive and very refined,” with light handling and tons of torque of the line. In keeping with a street fighter theme, its Showa suspension is reported to ride firm. The LiveWire weighs in just over 500 pounds and costs a bundle: $29,999. While this surprising choice of mounts will mean we’ll watch a very different adventure unfold along the windy coast of Patagonia — certainly one with fewer off-road antics — fans of McGregor won’t be surprised by his choice to showcase electric vehicles. In an interview out today in Scotland’s sundaypost.com, McGregor explains he’s been obsessed with electric vehicles for a long time. While the interview concentrates on a vintage VW bug he’s converted to e-power, he also mentions his “fascination” with Harley’s LiveWire and the future it represents: “It is exciting, and for sure it is the future. In 20 years we won’t be burning petrol in our engines any more, we will be plugging them into the wall.” [embedded content] We’ll keep you posted on the progress of the e-powered posse as it presumably takes a shakedown run south along the east coast of Argentina to Tierra del Fuego and the obvious launchpad of Ushuaia. Route details have not been announced yet but Charley previously reported the journey will start in South America and continue North to Los Angeles. On the other hand, since this new journey’s first “twist” is about environmental consciousness, maybe they’ll head north toward Brazil and the vanishing Amazon. Whatever turn it takes, the resulting adventure is sure to be interesting. Photos: Autoblog Author: Jamie Elvidge Jamie has been a motorcycle journalist for more than 30 years, testing the entire range of bikes for the major print magazines and specializing in adventure-travel related stories. To date she’s written and supplied photography for articles describing what it’s like to ride in all 50 states and 43 foreign countries, receiving two Lowell Thomas Society of American Travel Writer’s Awards along the way. Her most-challenging adventure yet has been riding in the 2018 GS Trophy in Mongolia as Team AusAmerica’s embedded journalist.
  9. Hand-made in Derbyshire England, the red-accented Scorpion Serket Parallel slip-on exhaust option for the KTM 1090 Adventure R is a svelte upgrade, with both aesthetic and practical benefits. Primary reasons to modify a motorcycle’s exhaust system are power, weight, sound, and aesthetics. Power delivery is most affected when the full system, including header, is replaced and the engine is re-mapped (or re-jetted) to work with the new setup. When only replacing the silencer with a new slip-on, or “half system”, power differences are typically minimal, but the other three characteristics of weight, sound, and looks apply. First Impressions Unpacking the Serket Parallel slip-on, its light weight and high build quality are immediately noticeable. Install procedure on the 1090 Adventure R is seamless, with the pipe’s connecting points perfectly lining up with the bikes hardware. Where the 1090R’s stock silencer is directly connected to the header, the Scorpion incorporates a short connecting pipe, attached to the header with the factory ring clamp and to the silencer using two retaining springs. “Estimated fitting time” shown on the parts diagram indicates 60 minutes. Once familiar with the system and its mounting procedure, that time can easily be cut roughly in half. ADVERTISEMENT Doing away with the factory pipe hanger, the Scorpion features a triangular bracket which is bolted directly to the pipe. Lacking a cage style bracket, there’s nothing to interrupt the look of the pipe. Once mounted, the smaller and thinner design opens up the lines of the bike, and the black finish of the ceramic version echoes the black plastics of the bike. A heat shield mounted with two screws and red fibre washers hides the connector pipe, resulting in an overall design that arguably looks more stock than the factory setup. How It Performed While Scorpion has yet to do dyno testing of the Serket Parallel slip-on installed on the KTM 1090R, they have run tests on both the 1190 Adventure and 790 Duke. Those tests saw a claimed 7.7 and 5.1 horsepower increase, respectively. Given the 1090 Adventure R falls between these two bikes in terms of displacement, a similar power gain hovering around 6% should be expected. Perhaps the most important and practical consideration of upgrading the 1090R’s exhaust, is weight savings. Tipping the scales at 12 pounds, 2 ounces, the KTM’s stock silencer weight is more than 50% over the Scorpion. At 5 pounds, 9 ounces, the Serket Parallel slip on sheds roughly the weight equivalent of carrying an extra lead-acid motorcycle battery strapped to the back of the bike. We measured a weight reduction of 6 pounds, 9 ounces after switching from the Stock silencer to the Scorpion slip-on exhaust.Aside from how that pendulum affects handling when redirecting the motorcycle, in extreme riding situations the stock silencer can strain the KTM’s mounting brackets to their design limits. While exceedingly rare, I have broken multiple exhaust brackets on the 1090 Adventure R with the stock system. The Scorpion exhaust’s significantly lighter weight, and bolt-on style bracket should prove to be a solution for this problem. Hidden Feature Oddly missing from the documentation included in Scorpion’s packaging, was mention of the “racing baffle.” Neither depicted in the fitment diagram nor appearing in the parts list, the only hint of this feature is a vague reference to “dB Killer” at the top of the instructions. Just inside the pipe’s exhaust outlet opening, is a small allen head screw towards the bottom of the circumference. Removing this screw allows one to extract the dB Killer or “racing baffle.” While no information appears on the UK Scorpion website regarding this feature, some online motorcycle retailers mention a removable baffle for ‘track day use’ and there are YouTube videos floating around out there depicting removal and installation of this baffle. Scorpion’s dyno testing of the KTM 1190 and 790 were done with the baffle installed. While power gains with it removed are an unknown, the exhaust note change is easily heard. The Serket Parallel slip-on gives the 1090R a deeper, more “rowdy” exhaust note, without being obnoxiously loud. Removing the racing baffle definitely increases volume, but not by much. Where the change from the stock exhaust to the Scorpion is a huge difference, the sound characteristics of the Serket Parallel with or without the racing baffle are more subtle. [embedded content] Sound Test: Stock vs Scorpion Slip-On Exhaust with baffle in and baffle out.Who Is It For? In the vast majority of instances, I run stock exhaust systems on modern bikes. Without a pressing need to swap a factory setup, the big twins in general have ample power for my needs. In the “heavyweight” class of off-road motorcycles, the additional weight of stock exhaust systems could be considered nominal in the context of adventure travel. Given the stresses which can be experienced by the 1090 Adventure R’s stock exhaust mounting setup, this is a bike which benefits greatly from a more lightweight exhaust system, especially for those who regularly hammer through enduro-style terrain on the big twin. Achieving a weight reduction, with a handmade silencer that improves the look and sound of the bike, will also be an added bonus for many. Our Verdict A small power gain, cool look, handmade build, and most importantly, significant weight reduction, make the Scorpion Serket Parallel slip-on exhaust system a good aftermarket choice for most any compatible bike. And on the KTM 1090 Adventure R, potential issues with the large stock can under extreme riding conditions bump the Serket Parallel pipe from “cool mod” to “necessary upgrade.” What We Liked Handmade build. Improves look of bike. Drastic weight reduction. What Could Be Improved Include information about the dB killer in the supporting documentation.Scorpion Slip-On Exhaust Specs Finish: Black Ceramic, Stainless Steel, Titanium Weight: 5 lbs 9 oz MSRP: starts at $597.91 Shopping Options Author: Jon Beck Jon Beck is fulfilling a dream of never figuring out what to be when he grows up. Racing mountain bikes, competitive surfing, and touring as a musician are somehow part of what led Jon to travel through over 40 countries so far as an adventure motorcycle photographer, journalist, and guide. From precision riding for cameras in Hollywood, to refilling a fountain pen for travel stories, Jon brings a rare blend of experience to the table. While he seems happiest when lost in a desert someplace, deadlines are met most of the time.
  10. The blog post on Mosko Moto’s website announcing themselves as a company and declaring that they planned to produce “better moto luggage” is dated September 20, 2013. That means they went from being two guys in a garage with a vision, to one of the leading motorcycle luggage companies in just about five years. Let that sink in, and as if their luggage aspirations weren’t enough, they decided to tackle an apparel line as well simultaneously. When you’ve already revolutionized one facet of the motorsports establishment, why not do it again, right? Apparel was something Mosko started talking about as early as 2014, candidly cataloging their journey (as with their other products) in the form of regular blog posts. What they expected to be a complicated project proved to be even more arduous than anticipated. Countless rounds of samples, factory changes, and design overhauls pocked the process but never dissuaded their resolve. The Basilisk jacket and pants use a material called eVent that is highly abrasion-resistant, breathable and waterproof up to 100 feet of water pressure. Now, several years later, they finally have something to show for their efforts, and they are rightfully excited. I was eager to get my hands on the new Basilisk Jacket & Pants combo to see what the first offering from this young company would look like and to find out how it would stack up against offerings from established competitors. First Impressions As soon as I opened the box containing the Basilisk Jacket & pants I knew that it was a different breed from the riding gear I was accustomed to. The jacket came with a custom hanger, and it was packaged in an actual garment bag emblazon with the Mosko Moto logo. The finish of the suit reminded me of a high-end mountaineering piece with all of the minute attention to detail I’ve come to expect from this brand. The bodies of both garments are comprised of a waterproof/breathable fabric called eVent Expedition with SuperFabric abrasion-resistant overlays in impact zones, laced together with YKK Vislon zippers. The jacket’s large mesh-lined vents on the chest, shoulders and back flow air directly to and from the body.Features that I’d never seen on any motorcycle garments included a “Dirt Skirt” which was obviously inspired by a powder skirt in a snow sport jacket, hook & loop adjustments in the love handle region of the jacket to account for layering up/down, and built-in extensions on the pant legs that when unzipped add an additional two inches of length (not that I needed it). Other uncommon but useful features came in the form of a thick leather belt, adjustable closure at the waist with clasps instead of a button or snaps, and quick release cinch strap adjustment at the hem & collar. ADVERTISEMENT To understand The Basilisk, you need to realize that it is a system, not an ordinary riding jacket or pants. Both top and bottom were designed to be worn over independent body armor – the kind typically used by enduro riders. This is Mosko’s solution to altogether remove integrated armor that doesn’t always stay in place when you fall. A way to secure the collar open for more airflow to the neck and chest would be a welcome feature on warm days.The recipe starts with a base layer of your choosing, and then you add body armor in whatever flavor or quantity you prefer, a jersey goes on the torso with the option of a mid-layer, and finally the Basilisk Jacket & Pants complete the dish. The advantage of this method is adaptability; being able to fine-tune your temperature with several stages of layering. To begin with, the Basilisk Jacket has six large mesh-lined vents along the chest, shoulders and back that move significant air (excluding the forearms). The pants include six direct vents as well, with the inclusion of big thigh vents, exhaust vents that extend from the waist to the knee, and ingenious inside knee vents that did a great job of cooling armor-clad legs. Big thigh vents, exhaust vents, and inside knee vents did a great job of keeping the lower extremities cool.Then, of course, when things heat up considerably or get strenuous off-road, you can lose the jacket altogether and ride with just an armored jersey. Since the jacket isn’t as bulky as most moto jackets, it stores easily in the top of a pannier or under the beavertail of Mosko Moto bags. As a whole, the design is clean with no fat on the bone and functionality put front & center. How they performed While testing the Basilisk in the famously unpredictable weather of the Pacific Northwest, conditions did not disappoint. On any given day it wasn’t uncommon to start riding in the morning with temperatures hovering in the 40’s, cresting 80 degrees in the mid-afternoon with a possible mercury landslide and ensuing deluge, before finally sinking into the 50’s by the evening. This was the perfect environment for this suit, and it shined with every swing of the weather pendulum. With all the vents open, top & bottom, airflow was substantial and enough to keep comfortable in the heat as long as you were in motion. But I did notice that there was no feature to secure the jacket collar open for airflow to the neck, and no venting on the forearms. Although, whenever the surface wasn’t paved and the temps were warm, the jacket was coming off to enjoy uninhibited airflow. Conversely, if temperatures were cooler, partially or fully closing all vents worked sufficiently for stopping airflow until I would finally add a mid-layer to maintain comfort. When things got cold, wet, & windy (And they certainly did!), the fully seam-sealed eVent Expedition material performed as advertised maintaining watertight integrity. Velcro flaps along the sides of the jacket let you customize the fit to match the bulk of your armor and base layersMosko Moto claims that the Basilisk is the only air-permeable waterproof motorcycle jacket on the market.Without trying to substantiate or discredit those claims, I can only comment that the climate inside the jacket never felt clammy when exposed to internal (sweat) or external (precipitation). I imagine designing these pieces around an entire range of armor was a living nightmare -, taking that into consideration the fit is good. They addressed a wide range of fitment with hook & loop adjustments at the sides, length extensions on the legs and large openings at the ankle with adjustable hook & loop (aka Velcro) closures. At 5’ 10’’ with a 32” waist & 30” inseam and athletic build both pieces fit better than they rightfully should, partially because I don’t have to contend with floating armor. The Basilisk pants come with a belt to ensure a comfortable fit around the waist.The Basilisk pants are long on me even by moto standards, but with the combination of their deep crotch and practical leather belt, the fit was great compared to most other over the boot pants I’ve tested. The jacket is made for bulky armor and a wide spectrum of layering, but with the love handle adjustments and hem cinches, it felt like I could achieve a custom fit no matter what I was wearing underneath. Both jacket and pant have ample space for activities and unobstructed range of motion that never impeded my riding. When it came time for crash testing, I didn’t have to wait long (regularly pushing the limits on KTM’s new 790 Adventure R, I often come up short on talent and pay the price). The front end came out from under me in a gravel corner traveling at approximately 35mph and I proceeded to use my elbow as an anchor while the bike spun 180 degrees with me in tow. After I stood up and the dust cleared, I was amazed that I hadn’t put a hole in any area of the jacket and pants I slid on. The same thing happened after going over the handlebars in a silty rain rut. That time I landed in rocks but still no significant signs of wear. Both times my Leatt body armor did precisely what it was supposed to, exactly where it was supposed to, which might not have been the case with floating armor. After logging 3,000 miles in a short period while testing this suit, it greatly exceeded my expectations. Mosko did a great job with their initial apparel offering and the promise shown here in version 1.0 has us excited for what could be coming in the future. Who are they for? The Basilisk is truly an enduro TOURING setup, perfect for dedicated rides but maybe not the best solution for commuting or mobbing around town. Most riders would likely prefer to throw on a jacket with baked in armor on a day-to-day basis instead of taking the extra steps of armoring up with a jersey just for a quick trip to the grocery store. Enduro-style armor also isn’t the most comfortable to wear for long-range travel on the highway. You can take the jacket off on hot days and easily stash it away, and still be protected off-road by body armor underneath.If that’s not the riding you do, as in my case, then this could be an ideal system. For more aggressive riders, the benefits of The Basilisk are significant: always knowing that your armor will be right where it’s supposed to be in the event of a get-off and being able to better regulate the temperature in ever-changing conditions. For the adventure rider that spends a lot of time in challenging terrain, and is privy to a wide spectrum of weather & temperatures, this setup is ideal. Our verdict It’s hard not to be impressed by this initial apparel offering by Mosko Moto. They approach everything from an outsider’s angle and are willing to take risks with an unapologetic attitude that allows them to develop products that are often ahead of the curve. This isn’t just another jacket and pants, it’s a new way of thinking. While some might consider the $1,100 price tag a bit steep for an Enduro Jacket and Pants, you have to consider the premium abrasion protection the Basilisk suit includes that you don’t normally find in enduro gear. In fact, enduro gear typically doesn’t include any kind of abrasion protection that will protect you in a high-speed slide on the street. Some may also be skeptical about paying this much for a waterproof suit that doesn’t carry the Gore-Tex brand, but there are other high-performance waterproof materials out there that don’t get the same attention. Mosko Moto’s new take on venting and fit adjustment is also very effective at optimizing comfort. The Basilisk’s value lies in its versatility and simplicity. Riding gear is like motorcycle selection in that you can’t possibly be perfectly comfortable in every scenario, but The Basilisk is just about as close as it comes to being a universal fit. What we liked The versatility of being able to regulate body temperature in a wide range of conditions. Simplistic styling reminiscent of a high-end mountaineering garment. Use of robust products like YKK Vislon zippers, SuperFabric panels, and eVent material. What could be improved? Lower arm venting would complete the airflow on the jacket. A fit adjustment feature that would allow you to reduce some of the bagginess in the arms. Pant legs run a little long even when leg extensions are not used. Some way of securing the collar open would aid in airflow to the neck and chest. Mosko Moto Basilisk Specs COLORS: Jacket (Sage Green or Charcoal), Pant (Black) SIZES: Jacket (SM-XXL), Pant (30-38 waist) PRICE: Jacket ($599), Pant ($499) Shopping Options Author: Spencer Hill “The Gear Dude” has been fueling his motorcycle addiction with adventure since first swinging his leg over a bike in 2010. Whether he’s exploring his own backyard in the Pacific Northwest or crisscrossing the United States, Spencer is always in search of scenic off-road routes, epic camping locations and the best gear possible. He began writing shortly after taking up two-wheel travel to share his experiences and offer insight with his extensive backpacking, camping and overland background.
  11. Suzuki has debuted a new V-Strom 650 model variant for 2020 – the V-Strom 650XT Adventure. The new Adventure model starts out as a 650XT with the same versatility, reliability, and value the V-Strom is renowned for. Next Suzuki adds a range of adventure-ready extras to make it an even more effective mount for touring, commuting or exploring the back of beyond. Equipped with additional touring and off-road equipment, the V-Strom 650XT Adventure is ready to take on long-distance journeys right off the showroom floor. The latest addition to the V-Strom family arrives with adventure-ready tubeless-spoke wheels, a handlebar cross-brace that’s an excellent foundation to mount accessories like a GPS, a rugged accessory bar, plus a center stand that makes chain service and tire changes easier. The new model variant is also ready to carry the gear you need as it is equipped with Suzuki’s 37-liter aluminum panniers that attach to powder-coated, stainless steel carriers. Fashioned out of 1.5mm thick aluminum plate with strong, no-pierce rivet technology, these panniers offer a number of features, including hinged lids that stay in place when open, internal and external tie-down points, plus keyed stainless steel latches and quick-release hardware. Built to be waterproof with rubber-sealing lids, these panniers have powder-coated interiors that avoid aluminum stains on cargo. ADVERTISEMENT The V-Strom 650XT Adventure also comes with hand guards, a protective lower engine cowl, and mirror extensions so you see less of you and more of what’s behind you. All these extras come with a $1,100 increase in price over the base V-Strom 650XT and it features unique Pearl Vigor Blue bodywork. • MSRP: $10,399 • Colors: Pearl Vigor Blue • Availability: Arriving November 2019 Suzuki will also return with two other V-Strom 650 models for 2020 – the standard V-Strom 650 and V-Strom 650XT. No major changes in the platform have been announced but the V-Strom 650 has become a mainstay in the Adventure Segment thanks to its natural riding position, comfortable seating and character-filled 645cc v-twin engine that are perfect for high-mile adventures. 2020 Suzuki V-Strom 650XT Once again, Suzuki will offer the V-Strom 650XT with its tubeless, wire-spoke wheels and gold-anodized rims. It comes equipped with off-road protection like hand guards and a sump guard standard. Available in a new color for 2020 – Glass Sparkle Black. • MSRP: $9,299 • Colors: Glass Sparkle Black • Availability: Arriving October 2019 2020 Suzuki V-Strom 650 Back for 2020, the standard V-Strom 650 steps in with a new Solid Iron Gray paint scheme. The standard V-Strom 650 features cast wheels and no off-road protection for a more street-oriented rider and also comes in at $500 less than the XT. • MSRP $8,799 • Colors: Solid Iron Gray • Availability: Arriving October 2019 Suzuki V-Strom 650 XT Adventure engine 645cc, 4-stroke, liquid-cooled, DOHC 90˚, V-twin Fuel System Fuel injection, SDTV-equipped Lubrication Wet sump Transmission 6-speed constant mesh Final Drive Chain, RK525SMOZ8, 118 links Suspension Front Telescopic, coil spring, oil damped Suspension Rear Link type, single shock, coil spring, oil damped Brakes Front Tokico, 2-piston calipers, twin disc, ABS-equipped Brakes Rear Nissin, 1-piston, single disc, ABS-equipped Tires Front 110/80R19 M/C (59V), tubeless Tires Rear 150/70R17 M/C (69V), tubeless Fuel Tank Capacity 20.0 L (5.3 US gal.) Wheelbase 1560 mm (61.4 in.) Ground Clearance 170 mm (6.7 in.) Seat Height 835 mm (32.9 in.) Curb Weight TBA (std. XT: 216 kg; 476 lb) Color Pearl Vigor Blue
  12. Suzuki has debuted a new V-Strom 650 model variant for 2020 – the V-Strom 650XT Adventure. The new Adventure model starts out as a 650XT with the same versatility, reliability, and value the V-Strom is renowned for. Next Suzuki adds a range of adventure-ready extras to make it an even more effective mount for touring, commuting or exploring the back of beyond. Equipped with additional touring and off-road equipment, the V-Strom 650XT Adventure is ready to take on long-distance journeys right off the showroom floor. The latest addition to the V-Strom family arrives with adventure-ready tubeless-spoke wheels, a handlebar cross-brace that’s an excellent foundation to mount accessories like a GPS, a rugged accessory bar, plus a center stand that makes chain service and tire changes easier. The new model variant is also ready to carry the gear you need as it is equipped with Suzuki’s 37-liter aluminum panniers that attach to powder-coated, stainless steel carriers. Fashioned out of 1.5mm thick aluminum plate with strong, no-pierce rivet technology, these panniers offer a number of features, including hinged lids that stay in place when open, internal and external tie-down points, plus keyed stainless steel latches and quick-release hardware. Built to be waterproof with rubber-sealing lids, these panniers have powder-coated interiors that avoid aluminum stains on cargo. ADVERTISEMENT The V-Strom 650XT Adventure also comes with hand guards, a protective lower engine cowl, and mirror extensions so you see less of you and more of what’s behind you. All these extras come with a $1,100 increase in price over the base V-Strom 650XT and it features unique Pearl Vigor Blue bodywork. • MSRP: $10,399 • Colors: Pearl Vigor Blue • Availability: Arriving November 2019 Suzuki will also return with two other V-Strom 650 models for 2020 – the standard V-Strom 650 and V-Strom 650XT. No major changes in the platform have been announced but the V-Strom 650 has become a mainstay in the Adventure Segment thanks to its natural riding position, comfortable seating and character-filled 645cc v-twin engine that are perfect for high-mile adventures. 2020 Suzuki V-Strom 650XT Once again, Suzuki will offer the V-Strom 650XT with its tubeless, wire-spoke wheels and gold-anodized rims. It comes equipped with off-road protection like hand guards and a sump guard standard. Available in a new color for 2020 – Glass Sparkle Black. • MSRP: $9,299 • Colors: Glass Sparkle Black • Availability: Arriving October 2019 2020 Suzuki V-Strom 650 Back for 2020, the standard V-Strom 650 steps in with a new Solid Iron Gray paint scheme. The standard V-Strom 650 features cast wheels and no off-road protection for a more street-oriented rider and also comes in at $500 less than the XT. • MSRP $8,799 • Colors: Solid Iron Gray • Availability: Arriving October 2019 Suzuki V-Strom 650 XT Adventure engine 645cc, 4-stroke, liquid-cooled, DOHC 90˚, V-twin Fuel System Fuel injection, SDTV-equipped Lubrication Wet sump Transmission 6-speed constant mesh Final Drive Chain, RK525SMOZ8, 118 links Suspension Front Telescopic, coil spring, oil damped Suspension Rear Link type, single shock, coil spring, oil damped Brakes Front Tokico, 2-piston calipers, twin disc, ABS-equipped Brakes Rear Nissin, 1-piston, single disc, ABS-equipped Tires Front 110/80R19 M/C (59V), tubeless Tires Rear 150/70R17 M/C (69V), tubeless Fuel Tank Capacity 20.0 L (5.3 US gal.) Wheelbase 1560 mm (61.4 in.) Ground Clearance 170 mm (6.7 in.) Seat Height 835 mm (32.9 in.) Curb Weight TBA (std. XT: 216 kg; 476 lb) Color Pearl Vigor Blue
  13. Published on 08.29.2019 [embedded content] It’s almost a law of nature: If you ride a dual sport or adventure bike off road, you will eventually snap off a turn signal. A tree, a rock, your buddy’s handlebar… something will leave your blinkers dangling, or missing. When it happens, you will be introduced to the sticker shock of OEM parts pricing. And then, if you’re like most people, you’ll resort to duct tape or search the aftermarket for a more durable, cheaper solution. There are plenty of them out there, but the CLICKnRIDE from Australia is a “why didn’t I think of that?” kind of alternative. A quick-release plug lets you remove the signal lights in seconds. No tools – simply click them out by hand and stash them safely in your backpack while you go off-road. It’s a simple idea: You can’t break your turn signals if they aren’t there in the first place. You ride to a trail, stop for a moment and pull the signals off without any tools. Then stash them in a safe place while you channel your inner Graham Jarvis, and click them back in place when you’re ready to hit the highway again. Safe, quick and legal. ADVERTISEMENT The signal unit is a dust-, water- and vibration-proof bayonet design featuring Philips amber LEDs and an ultrasonically sealed lens. It snaps into a socket that’s permanently attached to the bike and wired into the turn signal circuit. A rubber cap keeps dirt and water out of the socket when the signals are off the bike and incorporates a locking tab to help secure the signals when they are in place. The quick-release blinkers have no moving parts to wear out and each part is securely fastened and sealed to withstand the harshest environments. The current version of the product is the second generation. Reports are that it’s much improved over the original design, and cheaper too. Not as cheap as a couple wraps of duct tape, but definitely cleaner looking. A set of two with sockets and spacers is $79.95. Depending on your bike, you may also need resistors to make the LEDs work correctly. CLICKnRIDE’s plug-and-play resistors are $12 a pair and you need one for each individual signal, or two pairs for four lights. If you know your way around a RadioShack and a wiring diagram, there are cheaper options. CLICKnRIDE also sells a handy storage pouch for $18 to keep the dismounted signals from bouncing around when you are on the trail. Components are also sold separately should you lose a signal or break a socket. Author: Bob Whitby Bob has been riding motorcycles since age 19 and working as a journalist since he was 24, which was a long time ago, let’s put it that way. He quit for the better part of a decade to raise a family, then rediscovered adventure, dual sport and enduro riding in the early 2000s. He lives in Arkansas, America’s best-kept secret when it comes to riding destinations, and travels far and wide in search of dirt roads and trails.
  14. Published on 08.28.2019 BMW Motorrad has issued a recall on a total of 2,781 G310GS models for potential braking issues. All model year 2018–2020 BMW G310GS motorcycles are affected by the recall issued through the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. A safety recall has also been issued on other BMW motorcycles and scooters sharing similar parts (i.e. G310R and C400X) bringing the total number of motorcycles affected to 5,938. According to the defect report, after long-term exposure to certain environmental and winter-time road-treatment conditions, corrosion can occur on the surface of the unanodized brake caliper piston bore. Both front and rear brake caliper pistons may corrode and possibly cause the piston to stick or drag in the caliper bore. What Can Happen If corrosion impairs the piston’s clearance within the bore, the piston can drag or stick leading to poor braking performance and increased risk of a crash. Other signs of the problem include noisy brakes, difficulting pushing the bike, visible signs of corrosion on the calipers, reduced performance when accelerating, or an unusual odor emanating from the brakes. ADVERTISEMENT All models affected by the recall: MAKE MODEL MODEL YEAR (S) BMW G310GS 2018-2020 BMW G310R 2017-2020 BMW C400X 2019 How To Get It Fixed BMW Motorrad will notify owners and dealers will replace the front and rear brake calipers free of charge. The recall is expected to begin October 4, 2019. Owners may contact BMW customer service at 1-800-525-7417. Owners may also contact the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Vehicle Safety Hotline at 1-888-327-4236 (TTY 1-800-424-9153), or check your VIN to see if you are affected by the recall at www.nhtsa.gov.
  15. Published on 08.28.2019 BMW Motorrad has issued a recall on a total of 2,781 G310GS models for potential braking issues. All model year 2018–2020 BMW G310GS motorcycles are affected by the recall issued through the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. A safety recall has also been issued on other BMW motorcycles and scooters sharing similar parts (i.e. G310R and C400X) bringing the total number of motorcycles affected to 5,938. According to the defect report, after long-term exposure to certain environmental and winter-time road-treatment conditions, corrosion can occur on the surface of the unanodized brake caliper piston bore. Both front and rear brake caliper pistons may corrode and possibly cause the piston to stick or drag in the caliper bore. What Can Happen If corrosion impairs the piston’s clearance within the bore, the piston can drag or stick leading to poor braking performance and increased risk of a crash. Other signs of the problem include noisy brakes, difficulting pushing the bike, visible signs of corrosion on the calipers, reduced performance when accelerating, or an unusual odor emanating from the brakes. ADVERTISEMENT All models affected by the recall: MAKE MODEL MODEL YEAR (S) BMW G310GS 2018-2020 BMW G310R 2017-2020 BMW C400X 2019 How To Get It Fixed BMW Motorrad will notify owners and dealers will replace the front and rear brake calipers free of charge. The recall is expected to begin October 4, 2019. Owners may contact BMW customer service at 1-800-525-7417. Owners may also contact the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Vehicle Safety Hotline at 1-888-327-4236 (TTY 1-800-424-9153), or check your VIN to see if you are affected by the recall at www.nhtsa.gov.
  16. Published on 08.26.2019 GMAX has announced their all-new AT-21 Adventure Helmet for 2019. This budget-friendly helmet is constructed with a lightweight Polycarbonate shell offering superior comfort and protection that exceeds DOT and ECE safety standards. Three shell sizes ensure an optimal fit, from youth to adult, and less weight for those long adventures. It comes with lots of features for an adventure helmet in this price range, including an inner sun shield, quick-release chin strap buckle, SpaSoft interior and recessed speaker pockets for adding aftermarket communication systems. The removable interior with COOLMAX CORE Technology wicks moisture away from the body and is designed to keep you dry and comfortable during your journey. The AT-21 was designed to let adventure riders explore the unknown with safety, comfort and convenience, while offering many of the features you’d expect from a more expensive dual sport helmet. Available in youth and adult sizes, weighing only 3.0 pounds (size large) in multiple colors and graphics. MSRP pricing starts at $159.95 for solid colors and $169.95 for graphics. AT-21S: Cold Weather Variant ADVERTISEMENT GMAX is also releasing a cold-weather version of the AT-21 – the AT-21S. The all-new AT-21S has been designed for maximum performance in demanding weather for those adventure riders who travel in colder climates. The standard AT-21 helmet gets upgraded with features like a clear dual-lens shield, a cold weather breath box, and chin curtain for when the weather takes a turn. Available in youth and adult sizes, weighing only 3.2 pounds (size large) in multiple colors and graphics. MSRP pricing ranges from $174.95 to $284.95. GMAX AT-21/AT-21S Features: ECE / DOT Approved Quick release buckle Lightweight Polycarbonate shell offering superior protection Removable, adjustable, and washable antimicrobial SpaSoft™ interior Lightweight shell with 3 sizes Drop down sun shade with anti-fog coating Built in speaker pockets for communication systems Clear anti-fog dual lens (AT-21S only) Cold-weather breath box (AT-21S only) Chin curtain (AT-21S only) Shopping Options
  17. [embedded content] The appearance of a flesh-and-blood Pan America adventure bike at Harley-Davidson’s Annual Dealer Show in Milwaukee is reigniting debates across the globe with squabbles spanning from its polarizing aesthetic to its intended road surface. There seems no middle ground when it comes to this mind-bending addition to what’s otherwise been motorcycling’s most predictable lineup. And that’s because the Pan America is a big ask. While Harley-Davidson is arguably America’s most effective brand, it’s a success story rooted more in its legendary subculture than regard for its machines. And while anyone can understand the Motor Company’s urge to invest in thriving markets, throwing its skull cap into the performance-first adventure bike ring, well, that’s a dubious endeavor indeed. The bike on display in Milwaukee appears much the same as its renderings, instantly recognizable for that unique nacelle, so ghastly and huge it’s strangely cool. A brand-new liquid-cooled DOHC 60-degree 1250cc V-twin dominates the Pan America’s architecture, and appears to be a stressed frame member, which would help keep weight down. Many features hint of off-road intentions, including chain-and-sprocket drive, a rear shock attached to the double-sided swing arm via linkage and cross-spoked wheels with a 19-incher up front. ADVERTISEMENT Of course those spoked wheels as well as several other adventure-minded goodies including engine guards, skid plate and most definitely the meaty Michelin Anakee Wild tires are likely to disappear from the base model scheduled for release late in 2020. The brush guards look as if they’ll stay, though hopefully not as housings for the front turn signals as we saw in earlier images because, well, that would be plain silly. What we see in the video that’s new on the prototype in Milwaukee is the appearance of Harley’s new integrated on-board LCD computer, similar in structure to BMW’s analog-eliminating TFT design, and likely to employ a host of electronics including the Motor Company’s new Reflex Defensive Rider System (RDRS) a.k.a. traction control. Also on display at the show was Harley’s new Street Fighter bearing a 795cc version of the new liquid-cooled V-twin Harley says will eventually come in four variations, ranging from 500cc to the 1250cc found in the Pan America. While it’s easy to see the logic in Harley kicking off with a large displacement ADV bike, one likely to compete with more street-leaning offerings from Moto Guzzi and Ducati than KTM’s racy 1290 Super Adventure R or BMW’s world-travel ready 1250GSA, many think a mid-level entry would have been a wiser choice. It’s tough to predict the fate of a 1250cc liquid-cooled adventure bike from Harley-Davidson because even a sentence pondering the question sounds all wrong. But maybe that’s because we’re all stuck in our thinking. What if mid-life crisis bikes are no longer big, bling-laden cruisers? With the current workforce more in tune with Ewan McGregor than Marlon Brando, doesn’t it make sense that there will be a mainstream shift in aspiration? For now, let’s give this Harley the benefit of the doubt. While it’s very unlikely the Pan America will be a super-capable off-road bike, it does appear well-equipped for some serious exploration. It also comes with a vast dealer network and a ticket to the largest factory-sponsored club in the world. And yeah, most of you want zero sips of that KoolAid, but there are plenty of Harley enthusiasts who aspire to rise above black-shirted tide. Take ADV Pulse reader and Harley loyalist “Eazy” for example, with ambitions to ride to the Arctic Circle. “I absolutely cannot wait for this bike” he commented. “I love adventure bikers. I have intense respect for your breed, and I’m excited at the opportunity to join your ranks while still maintaining my loyalty to my brand.” Aw! Author: Jamie Elvidge Jamie has been a motorcycle journalist for more than 30 years, testing the entire range of bikes for the major print magazines and specializing in adventure-travel related stories. To date she’s written and supplied photography for articles describing what it’s like to ride in all 50 states and 43 foreign countries, receiving two Lowell Thomas Society of American Travel Writer’s Awards along the way. Her most-challenging adventure yet has been riding in the 2018 GS Trophy in Mongolia as Team AusAmerica’s embedded journalist.
  18. [embedded content] The appearance of a flesh-and-blood Pan America adventure bike at Harley-Davidson’s Annual Dealer Show in Milwaukee is reigniting debates across the globe with squabbles spanning from its polarizing aesthetic to its intended road surface. There seems no middle ground when it comes to this mind-bending addition to what’s otherwise been motorcycling’s most predictable lineup. And that’s because the Pan America is a big ask. While Harley-Davidson is arguably America’s most effective brand, it’s a success story rooted more in its legendary subculture than regard for its machines. And while anyone can understand the Motor Company’s urge to invest in thriving markets, throwing its skull cap into the performance-first adventure bike ring, well, that’s a dubious endeavor indeed. The bike on display in Milwaukee appears much the same as its renderings, instantly recognizable for that unique nacelle, so ghastly and huge it’s strangely cool. A brand-new liquid-cooled DOHC 60-degree 1250cc V-twin dominates the Pan America’s architecture, and appears to be a stressed frame member, which would help keep weight down. Many features hint of off-road intentions, including chain-and-sprocket drive, a rear shock attached to the double-sided swing arm via linkage and cross-spoked wheels with a 19-incher up front. ADVERTISEMENT Of course those spoked wheels as well as several other adventure-minded goodies including engine guards, skid plate and most definitely the meaty Michelin Anakee Wild tires are likely to disappear from the base model scheduled for release late in 2020. The brush guards look as if they’ll stay, though hopefully not as housings for the front turn signals as we saw in earlier images because, well, that would be plain silly. What we see in the video that’s new on the prototype in Milwaukee is the appearance of Harley’s new integrated on-board LCD computer, similar in structure to BMW’s analog-eliminating TFT design, and likely to employ a host of electronics including the Motor Company’s new Reflex Defensive Rider System (RDRS) a.k.a. traction control. Also on display at the show was Harley’s new Street Fighter bearing a 795cc version of the new liquid-cooled V-twin Harley says will eventually come in four variations, ranging from 500cc to the 1250cc found in the Pan America. While it’s easy to see the logic in Harley kicking off with a large displacement ADV bike, one likely to compete with more street-leaning offerings from Triumph and Ducati than KTM’s racy 1290 Super Adventure R or BMW’s world-travel ready 1250GSA, many think a mid-level entry would have been a wiser choice. It’s tough to predict the fate of a 1250cc liquid-cooled adventure bike from Harley-Davidson because even a sentence pondering the question sounds all wrong. But maybe that’s because we’re all stuck in our thinking. What if mid-life crisis bikes are no longer big, bling-laden cruisers? With the current workforce more in tune with Ewan McGregor than Marlon Brando, doesn’t it make sense that there will be a mainstream shift in aspiration? For now, let’s give this Harley the benefit of the doubt. While it’s very unlikely the Pan America will be a super-capable off-road bike, it does appear well-equipped for some serious exploration. It also comes with a vast dealer network and a ticket to the largest factory-sponsored club in the world. And yeah, most of you want zero sips of that KoolAid, but there are plenty of Harley enthusiasts who aspire to rise above black-shirted tide. Take ADV Pulse reader and Harley loyalist “Eazy” for example, with ambitions to ride to the Arctic Circle. “I absolutely cannot wait for this bike” he commented. “I love adventure bikers. I have intense respect for your breed, and I’m excited at the opportunity to join your ranks while still maintaining my loyalty to my brand.” Aw! Author: Jamie Elvidge Jamie has been a motorcycle journalist for more than 30 years, testing the entire range of bikes for the major print magazines and specializing in adventure-travel related stories. To date she’s written and supplied photography for articles describing what it’s like to ride in all 50 states and 43 foreign countries, receiving two Lowell Thomas Society of American Travel Writer’s Awards along the way. Her most-challenging adventure yet has been riding in the 2018 GS Trophy in Mongolia as Team AusAmerica’s embedded journalist.
  19. Spy shots of KTM’s revamped 1290 Super Adventure are popping up and it looks like KTM has significant changes coming for the 2020/2021 model year. Photos indicate exciting new technology coming down the pipe, and new bodywork points to both visual and functional improvements for the next-generation Super Adventure. First off, there’s a big hunk of new fairing covering almost all the otherwise familiar 1301cc LC8 V-twin engine. The angular lines give the new bodywork a more modern look and there’s some family resemblance to the 790 Adventure series. The reason for that is because this revamped 1290 carries its fuel down low on each side of the bike, just like the 790 Adventure R. Doing it this way makes sense for mass centralization and a lower center of gravity. It also appears there may be more fuel capacity than the 6.1 gallons available on the current 1290 Super Adventures Another thing that’s hard to miss: the larger twin headlights, which buck the trend of LED headlights becoming smaller and more integrated into a bike’s bodywork. Of course this is KTM’s premium adventure touring bike, so the increased size may be because they are incorporating more-powerful cornering lights. ADVERTISEMENT Also note the large gap between and below those giant headlights – that’s where the big news is for 2020. It’s where KTM is apparently fitting the Bosch-made black box that’s the heart of a new adaptive cruise control, one of the high-tech features KTM demonstrated for journalists a year ago. That hole may eventually be covered with material invisible to radar, as it is on similarly equipped cars, but for now it’s on display for all the world to see. This isn’t an emergency braking system; its purpose is to maintain a preset distance from a vehicle in front. The rider sets a speed and distance – the unit can sense a vehicle as small as another motorcycle – and the radar adjusts the speed slightly by applying throttle or brakes to maintain the gap. It is supposed to react faster than you could, and if you’ve ever been on the highway behind someone who can’t seem to pick a speed and stick with it, you’ll understand the reasoning behind this feature. Spy photos from the Austrian publication Motorrad Magazin also reveal a redesigned windshield that offers a little more wind protection, at least on the street-oriented S model, and looks to maintain adjustability. There’s no radiator visible behind the front wheel, a hint that KTM is using a split design with the dual units incorporated into the fairing. That means more cooling capacity, critical for engines that have to run leaner to meet strict Euro 5 emissions standards for 2020. Emissions rules, noise suppression and possibly a small bump in horsepower are probably the reason for the redesigned exhaust system, which features a massive stainless steel silencer minus the black end cap, at least on this pre-production version. While much of the frame is hidden by the new bodywork, it’s clear that it is still a trellis design featuring a new, possibly detachable, aluminum subframe. The swingarm is still a beefy lattice unit, similar to what’s found on the current model. We’d bet that that suspension is still electronically adjustable WP equipment at both ends, and that 1290 Super Adventures will still come in two flavors: the S model, shown in the spy shots, wearing 19-inch front and 17-inch rear cast wheels; and the off-road oriented R model, with a 21/18 wire-spoked combination. Photos by Motorrad Magazin Author: Bob Whitby Bob has been riding motorcycles since age 19 and working as a journalist since he was 24, which was a long time ago, let’s put it that way. He quit for the better part of a decade to raise a family, then rediscovered adventure, dual sport and enduro riding in the early 2000s. He lives in Arkansas, America’s best-kept secret when it comes to riding destinations, and travels far and wide in search of dirt roads and trails.
  20. Spy shots of KTM’s revamped 1290 Super Adventure are popping up and it looks like KTM has significant changes coming for the 2020/2021 model year. Photos indicate exciting new technology coming down the pipe, and new bodywork points to both visual and functional improvements for the next-generation Super Adventure. First off, there’s a big hunk of new fairing covering almost all the otherwise familiar 1301cc LC8 V-twin engine. The angular lines give the new bodywork a more modern look and there’s some family resemblance to the 790 Adventure series. The reason for that is because this revamped 1290 carries its fuel down low on each side of the bike, just like the 790 Adventure R. Doing it this way makes sense for mass centralization and a lower center of gravity. It also appears there may be more fuel capacity than the 6.1 gallons available on the current 1290 Super Adventures Another thing that’s hard to miss: the larger twin headlights, which buck the trend of LED headlights becoming smaller and more integrated into a bike’s bodywork. Of course this is KTM’s premium adventure touring bike, so the increased size may be because they are incorporating more-powerful cornering lights. ADVERTISEMENT Also note the large gap between and below those giant headlights – that’s where the big news is for 2020. It’s where KTM is apparently fitting the Bosch-made black box that’s the heart of a new adaptive cruise control, one of the high-tech features KTM demonstrated for journalists a year ago. That hole may eventually be covered with material invisible to radar, as it is on similarly equipped cars, but for now it’s on display for all the world to see. This isn’t an emergency braking system; its purpose is to maintain a preset distance from a vehicle in front. The rider sets a speed and distance – the unit can sense a vehicle as small as another motorcycle – and the radar adjusts the speed slightly by applying throttle or brakes to maintain the gap. It is supposed to react faster than you could, and if you’ve ever been on the highway behind someone who can’t seem to pick a speed and stick with it, you’ll understand the reasoning behind this feature. Spy photos from the Austrian publication Motorrad Magazin also reveal a redesigned windshield that offers a little more wind protection, at least on the street-oriented S model, and looks to maintain adjustability. There’s no radiator visible behind the front wheel, a hint that KTM is using a split design with the dual units incorporated into the fairing. That means more cooling capacity, critical for engines that have to run leaner to meet strict Euro 5 emissions standards for 2020. Emissions rules, noise suppression and possibly a small bump in horsepower are probably the reason for the redesigned exhaust system, which features a massive stainless steel silencer minus the black end cap, at least on this pre-production version. While much of the frame is hidden by the new bodywork, it’s clear that it is still a trellis design featuring a new, possibly detachable, aluminum subframe. The swingarm is still a beefy lattice unit, similar to what’s found on the current model. We’d bet that that suspension is still electronically adjustable WP equipment at both ends, and that 1290 Super Adventures will still come in two flavors: the S model, shown in the spy shots, wearing 19-inch front and 17-inch rear cast wheels; and the off-road oriented R model, with a 21/18 wire-spoked combination. Photos by Motorrad Magazin Author: Bob Whitby Bob has been riding motorcycles since age 19 and working as a journalist since he was 24, which was a long time ago, let’s put it that way. He quit for the better part of a decade to raise a family, then rediscovered adventure, dual sport and enduro riding in the early 2000s. He lives in Arkansas, America’s best-kept secret when it comes to riding destinations, and travels far and wide in search of dirt roads and trails.
  21. Published on 08.20.2019 [embedded content] After getting our first ride on the 2018 Honda Africa Twin CRF1000L2 Adventure Sports at the press launch event, we were eager to get some extended seat time on the new model. Honda made significant changes to the Africa Twin to create the Adventure Sports, so we wanted to get a more in-depth feeling for its capabilities, in more challenging terrain, to determine if the improvements made it a better all-around adventure machine. The Africa Twin Adventure Sports fits the mold of a true overlander with increased touring range, a longer-travel suspension, along with more off-road protection and comfort than the standard AT. It’s prepped to take you on longer adventures in remote areas, yet all that extra equipment adds a significant amount of weight and bulk that could affect performance on the trail. To find out if the CRF1000L2 takes the Africa Twin to the next level, we took it on several of our adventures and gave it a proper flogging over a variety of terrain. In this video, we give a rundown of the major differences between the standard Africa Twin and the Adventure Sports model. We describe major improvements the new model offers, and features Honda still needs to address. In addition, the analysis covers how the Adventure Sports version of the Africa Twin gives riders advantages and disadvantages on the trail, and ways you can customize it to better suit your needs. ADVERTISEMENT
  22. Published on 08.20.2019 [embedded content] After getting our first ride on the 2018 Honda Africa Twin CRF1000L2 Adventure Sports at the press launch event, we were eager to get some extended seat time on the new model. Honda made significant changes to the Africa Twin to create the Adventure Sports, so we wanted to get a more in-depth feeling for its capabilities, in more challenging terrain, to determine if the improvements made it a better all-around adventure machine. The Africa Twin Adventure Sports fits the mold of a true overlander with increased touring range, a longer-travel suspension, along with more off-road protection and comfort than the standard AT. It’s prepped to take you on longer adventures in remote areas, yet all that extra equipment adds a significant amount of weight and bulk that could affect performance on the trail. To find out if the CRF1000L2 takes the Africa Twin to the next level, we took it on several of our adventures and gave it a proper flogging over a variety of terrain. In this video, we give a rundown of the major differences between the standard Africa Twin and the Adventure Sports model. We describe major improvements the new model offers, and features Honda still needs to address. In addition, the analysis covers how the Adventure Sports version of the Africa Twin gives riders advantages and disadvantages on the trail, and ways you can customize it to better suit your needs. ADVERTISEMENT
  23. Published on 08.18.2019 After 8 months of development and testing, Rebel X Sports is finally making their new Street-Legal Rally Kit for the KTM 790 Adventure available for purchase. Entirely designed and manufactured in Italy near the shores of the Garda Lake, the new kit will increase the versatility of the KTM 790 Adventure by adding useful features for both Adventure Riders and Rally Racers. This Rally Kit can be pre-ordered now on the Rebel X website or through their Distributors/Resellers at a discounted price. The first deliveries will begin around September 15th and shipping will be worldwide. With a goal of developing the most versatile rally kit for the KTM 790 Adventure, Rebel X Sports partnered with a professional rally race team – Team Kapriony – who performed real race testing with the kit. To give the kit a proper test, the team went to MXGP Motocross Tracks where Ex KTM Factory Dakar rider Giovanni Sala put the whole bike under major stress during final pre-release testing. Last but not least, Malles Moto Dakar rider Manuel Lucchese helped design a completely plug&play system that would give easier access to wiring than the OEM tower/fairing and make it more ‘Rally Friendly’ for those planning on long adventure rides or rally races. Street-legal LED high/low beam lighting from Hella is provided in the kit. With their new kit, Rebel X Sports wanted to provide a wider range of options for mounting devices than the OEM KTM 790 Adventure Nav Tower. Adventure Riders and racers alike will have the ability to install many different device configurations including Smartphones, Tablets, GPS systems, GoPros, Ram or Quad Lock mounted hardware, Roadbook holders, Tripmasters, Speedocaps, Stella, GPS antennas and more. The main instruments bracket can also be further customized with an area left open for drilling in case a specific device does not fit the standard holes. The Rebel X Sports Rally Kit for the KTM 790 Adventure offers a wide range of options for mounting devices on the dash. Main Features Full Plug&Play Nav Tower KTM Rally Replica Fairing Fairing Quick Release Buckles Fiberglass Side Panels (available in White or Black) Street Legal Hella LED High Beam Light Street Legal Hella LED Low Beam Light Headlight Mask Headlight Stone Guard Customizable Instruments Bracket (RAM mounts, Quad Lock and Garmin GPS mounts can be fitted) Toolbag/Rain Gear/Iritrack Bracket 6 Way Fuse Box with error led indicator (wiring of devices can be done directly on the nav tower) OEM Dashboard Bracket CNC Machined 7075 Plug&Play Frame Clamp Rally seat cover developed in collaboration with Sella Dalla ValleKit Options Roadbook / Tripmaster / Speedocap / GPS Antennas Bracket Factory Rally Seat Cover by Selle dalla Valle Handlebar Upper Riser to install extra Tablet, Garmin, Ram mount or Quad Lock and ERTF GPS Unik 2 Carbon Fiber Bashplate (Work in Progress) Street Legal Exhaust Race Exhaust (Not Street Legal) Featured in the photos Full Sticker Kit (Work in Progress) Baja Design Squadron Light (Work in Progress) Plug&Play Dual USB Quick Charging Port with Voltmeter Display Rebel X Sports Rally Kit First Aid Kit Rebel X Sports Rally Kit windscreen for the KTM 790 Adventure Rebel X Sports Nav Tower for the KTM 790 Adventure Rally Kit Rebel X Sports LED headlights for the KTM 790 Adventure Rally Kit Rebel X Sports fairing for the KTM 790 Adventure Rally Kit ADVERTISEMENT Pre-order pricing for the base kit will be €2,549 euros, or about $2,800 USD, then it will go up to €2,690 euros, or about $2,980 USD, after September 15th. For more info visit: www.rebelxsports.com
  24. Since 2010, the adventure motorcycling non-profit Backcountry Discovery Routes (BDR) organization has created nine trans-state routes for dual sport and adventure motorcycle travel. Having recently published the Southern California route, the BDR is heading back east with the announcement of the North East Backcountry Discovery Route (NEBDR) now under development. The BDR’s first east coast route, the Mid Atlantic BDR, wound up being one of the most successful route-launches in the organization’s history. There are a few factors that predisposed this success. The first one being the sheer density of population in a region hungry for a backcountry adventure route, and of course the fact that it was the first BDR that east coasters didn’t have to actually fly or ride across the country to get to. The route also turned out to be a total blast to ride for all skill levels. Now their ready to set new records with the North East BDR. The NEBDR development team is currently hard at work putting together even more exciting East Coast routes that will amp-up the technical riding opportunities. This route will pass through more states, cover more miles, reach higher elevations, and contain a lot more gnarly tracks. Go-arounds for the “expert only” sections will be provided, so the entire route can be enjoyed by riders of all skill levels. ADVERTISEMENT BDR reps are tight lipped about where the route starts, where it ends, and where it passes through. But they did reveal the route will start in the general area of the top of the MABDR and end 1,100 plus miles away at the Canadian border in Maine. It will pass through a half dozen or so states and include state forest roads, seasonal roads, and class IV roads throughout. There will be some asphalt sections but they are trying to keep it to a minimum, and keep it interesting. More details will be revealed in the coming months after they complete the scouting of the route this summer. NEBDR-South will be the tenth route developed by the Backcountry Discovery Routes organization. While few details about the NEBDR route are available at this time, it is set for release in February of 2020. Like all the BDRs, the NEBDR project will include a full-length movie documentary DVD, a waterproof Butler Motorcycle Map, and free GPS tracks and travel resources for the adventure motorcycle community. The BDR will also organize NEBDR movie premieres and training seminars at theaters and motorcycle dealers across the U.S. to promote the routes. Keep an eye out for more updates, teasers and trailers leading up to the full release dates. For up-to-date information on the North East Backcountry Discovery Route visit ridebdr.com. Completed Backcountry Discovery Routes • Utah Backcountry Discovery Route • Colorado Backcountry Discovery Route • Arizona Backcountry Discovery Route • New Mexico Backcountry Discovery Route • Idaho Backcountry Discovery Route • Washington Backcountry Discovery Route • Nevada Backcountry Discovery Route • Mid Atlantic Backcountry Discovery Route • Southern California Backcountry Discovery Route
  25. Published on 08.14.2019 Dunlop continues to expand its line of DOT street-legal knobby tires with the addition of the Geomax Enduro EN91. Designed to tackle a wide variety of off-road terrain, the EN91 was originally created for European Enduro racing, and is now available in the U.S. with significant improvements. According to Dunlop, the Geomax EN91 offers great performance and durability for long-distance rides and races. The EN91 features a new tread pattern designed to enhance sand and mud traction and offer nimble handling. Tilt Crown Block (TCB) technology was developed for the rear tire to help provide higher grip on rocky terrain by alternating the angle of the knobs on a singular row to offer multiple biting edges. HEX Shape Block design increases traction while the central blocks of the Tilt Crown Block bend in the direction of movement ensuring reliable contact. Dunlop also adjusted the shape of the blocks on the front tire to create a staggered stair-step pattern of blocks to improve grip on rocky surfaces. ADVERTISEMENT The front and rear tires are equipped with Dunlop’s patented Block-In-A-Block technology to improve flex of the knobs, resulting in more durability; as well as increasing the size of the contact area of each knob for greater traction control. Finally, a new compound has been introduced, designed to provide maximum grip as well as provide longer tread life. The Geomax Enduro EN91 is DOT approved for highway use and is applicable for FIM Enduro races. The U.S. team competing in the 2019 International Six-Day event just chose the Enduro EN91 as the official team tire. Front: 90/90-21 54R TT 45242081 Rear: 140/80-18 70R TT 45242351 120/90-18 65R TT. 45242467 For more information visit dunlopmotorcycletires.com
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