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  1. Indian-motorcycles-ftr-1200-rally-1024x6

    Ever wonder if there’s any truth to the idiom “Too much of a good thing?” Well, if you think 2020’s adventure bike market is whirling with enough choices to make a buyer’s head spin, wait until this time next year when we unpack 2021.

    So far we know for sure Harley-Davidson’s Pan America will hit the trails next season and now, according to recent reports, it appears America’s other purveyor of V-twin heavyweight cruisers, Indian Motorcycles, will also throw a hat into the lucrative ADV bike ring. 


    ADVERTISEMENT

    Yup. But wait, this isn’t as corny as it sounds. Somehow, every other outlet reporting on this future machine failed to consider that Indian’s parent company since 2003, Polaris Industries, is a world leader in off-road performance vehicles. Not only is it dominant in the snowmobile market, it’s also famous for its performance ATV/UTVs and side-by-sides. Who are you sharing the sand dunes and slick rock with? A bunch of Yahoos in Polaris RZRs. 

    This is a company that gets it. That understands the dynamics of off-road adventure. 

    Leaked document of Indian motorcycles future projects.Leaked Indian motorcycles planning document showing an adventure bike, under project name ‘Apollo’, is in the works for MY21.

    So, at the very least, let’s give Indian the benefit of the doubt as we await its ADV entry. All we know so far, based on a leaked planning document, is that it will be a cornerstone of the FTR1200 flat track-inspired platform, which so far includes a standard, Sport and new-for-2020 Rally edition with knobbies and wire-spoked wheels. As with its siblings, the reported ADV model will feature a 1203cc V-twin engine, which pumps out a claimed 120 Horsepower and 85 ft-lbs of low-end torque. 

    According to the leaked document, Indian’s adventure bike will launch as a 2021 model. Most likely, an ADV version will require a completely different chassis and performance systems that compete crank to crank with nemesis Harley-Davidson’s Pan America, and at least approach the capabilities and amenities of steadfast Big Twin ADV class leader, the venerable BMW R1250GS. 

    Indian Motorcycles FTR RallyThe newly released FTR Rally moves the lineup one step closer towards the planned adventure model.

    So far, we’ve been impressed by the machine seen ripping around in Harley’s Pan America teaser videos, and being able to walk around the bike at the recent IMS kick-off in Long Beach, California, albeit a glass-encased prototype, went a long way to further the excitement. 

    We’ve heard from many riders who would welcome an ‘American’ ADV-alternative, a corner of the market Harley-Davidson would own outright if not for its #1 rival bringing an alternative to the game. 

    However, both American brands have more to worry about than how many buyers each can hook with an adventure bike fishing expedition. With overall sales figures spiraling by double digits each quarter, both iconic national brands, weighed down by their heavy cruiser heritage, will have to fight using every available resource. 

    Harley Davidson PanamericaHarley Davidson’s Panamerica is set to hit dealers next year. With overall sales figures spiraling down, both iconic national brands, weighed down by their heavy cruiser heritage, will have to fight using every available resource. 

    Luckily for Indian, a brand roughed up in the 90s and early 2000s by failed resurrections, parent company Polaris has the means to keep it in new rubber as it rumbles down some untried avenues in search of prosperity.

    And unlike Harley, Indian also stands to gain from the high-performance off-road expertise of its benefactor. No matter what it brings to the ring, this is sure to be an interesting match. 

    If 2020 is any indication, 2021 will reveal an even richer range of adventure bike choices. Too much of a good thing? What an awesome problem to have. 

    0bc894185f6dd616aca74fab9a6acee5?s=80&r=

    Author: Jamie Elvidge

    Jamie has been a motorcycle journalist for more than 30 years, testing the entire range of bikes for the major print magazines and specializing in adventure-travel related stories. To date she’s written and supplied photography for articles describing what it’s like to ride in all 50 states and 43 foreign countries, receiving two Lowell Thomas Society of American Travel Writer’s Awards along the way. Her most-challenging adventure yet has been riding in the 2018 GS Trophy in Mongolia as Team AusAmerica’s embedded journalist.

  2. Indian-motorcycles-ftr-1200-rally-1024x6

    Ever wonder if there’s any truth to the idiom “Too much of a good thing?” Well, if you think 2020’s adventure bike market is whirling with enough choices to make a buyer’s head spin, wait until this time next year when we unpack 2021.

    So far we know for sure Harley-Davidson’s Pan America will hit the trails next season and now, according to recent reports, it appears America’s other purveyor of V-twin heavyweight cruisers, Indian Motorcycles, will also throw a hat into the lucrative ADV bike ring. 


    ADVERTISEMENT

    Yup. But wait, this isn’t as corny as it sounds. Somehow, every other outlet reporting on this future machine failed to consider that Indian’s parent company since 2003, Polaris Industries, is a world leader in off-road performance vehicles. Not only is it dominant in the snowmobile market, it’s also famous for its performance ATV/UTVs and side-by-sides. Who are you sharing the sand dunes and slick rock with? A bunch of Yahoos in Polaris RZRs. 

    This is a company that gets it. That understands the dynamics of off-road adventure. 

    Leaked document of Indian motorcycles future projects.Leaked Indian motorcycles planning document showing an adventure bike, under project name ‘Apollo’, is in the works for MY21.

    So, at the very least, let’s give Indian the benefit of the doubt as we await its ADV entry. All we know so far, based on a leaked planning document, is that it will be a cornerstone of the FTR1200 flat track-inspired platform, which so far includes a standard, Sport and new-for-2020 Rally edition with knobbies and wire-spoked wheels. As with its siblings, the reported ADV model will feature a 1203cc V-twin engine, which pumps out a claimed 120 Horsepower and 85 ft-lbs of low-end torque. 

    According to the leaked document, Indian’s adventure bike will launch as a 2021 model. Most likely, an ADV version will require a completely different chassis and performance systems that compete crank to crank with nemesis Harley-Davidson’s Pan America, and at least approach the capabilities and amenities of steadfast Big Twin ADV class leader, the venerable BMW R1250GS. 

    Indian Motorcycles FTR RallyThe newly released FTR Rally moves the lineup one step closer towards the planned adventure model.

    So far, we’ve been impressed by the machine seen ripping around in Harley’s Pan America teaser videos, and being able to walk around the bike at the recent IMS kick-off in Long Beach, California, albeit a glass-encased prototype, went a long way to further the excitement. 

    We’ve heard from many riders who would welcome an ‘American’ ADV-alternative, a corner of the market Harley-Davidson would own outright if not for its #1 rival bringing an alternative to the game. 

    However, both American brands have more to worry about than how many buyers each can hook with an adventure bike fishing expedition. With overall sales figures spiraling by double digits each quarter, both iconic national brands, weighed down by their heavy cruiser heritage, will have to fight using every available resource. 

    Harley Davidson PanamericaHarley Davidson’s Panamerica is set to hit dealers next year. With overall sales figures spiraling down, both iconic national brands, weighed down by their heavy cruiser heritage, will have to fight using every available resource. 

    Luckily for Indian, a brand roughed up in the 90s and early 2000s by failed resurrections, parent company Polaris has the means to keep it in new rubber as it rumbles down some untried avenues in search of prosperity.

    And unlike Harley, Indian also stands to gain from the high-performance off-road expertise of its benefactor. No matter what it brings to the ring, this is sure to be an interesting match. 

    If 2020 is any indication, 2021 will reveal an even richer range of adventure bike choices. Too much of a good thing? What an awesome problem to have. 

    0bc894185f6dd616aca74fab9a6acee5?s=80&r=

    Author: Jamie Elvidge

    Jamie has been a motorcycle journalist for more than 30 years, testing the entire range of bikes for the major print magazines and specializing in adventure-travel related stories. To date she’s written and supplied photography for articles describing what it’s like to ride in all 50 states and 43 foreign countries, receiving two Lowell Thomas Society of American Travel Writer’s Awards along the way. Her most-challenging adventure yet has been riding in the 2018 GS Trophy in Mongolia as Team AusAmerica’s embedded journalist.

  3. Published on 12.12.2019

    Protection innovators Leatt have just released their all-new 5.5 FlexLock Boots as part of their Twenty/Twenty GPX range. The new boot is designed for fluid and seamless movement on the bike with the ability to shrug off debris and impacts with ease. 

    When it comes to your riding kit, a quality pair of off-road boots is one of the top pieces of gear you can invest in. As key points of contact to your bike, it’s essential that your feet, as well as your ankles and shins, stay comfortable and protected. 

    Leatt-flexlock-moto-boots-3a.jpg

    Three years of development and testing with Leatt’s pro athletes from all over the world has resulted in the creation of the 5.5 FlexLock moto boot. Offered in three attention-grabbing color schemes, the boots are available in white and black, red and blue, or plain black.

    Leatt 5.5 Flexlock boots walkingLeatt 5.5 Flexlock boots lockout ankle technology
    ADVERTISEMENT

    Leatt’s brand-new 5.5 FlexLock boots are designed for maximum durability and support, featuring a SlideLock Velcro cuff system for a great fit and a low-profile toebox for easy gear shifts. 

    Leatt-flexlock-moto-boots-2.jpgLeatt-flexlock-moto-boots.jpg

    Designed to optimize grip and maneuverability, while keeping you connected to your bike during aggressive riding. CE tested and certified, the interior is cushioned with impact foam for a protective yet snug, soft and comfortable feel. And with their unique FlexLock system, you can adjust the boot’s flex and ankle lockout movement. Leatt claims their FlexLock system reduces ankle forces by up to 37% and knee forces by up to 35% upon impact when compared to an industry leading competitor boot.

    • timthumb.php?src=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.advpu

    In the last year or so, Leatt has released a Helmet,  Goggles and now with their 5.5 FlexLock boots, the company truly offers  head-to-toe protection! Retail pricing is $389.99 US, €389.00 in Europe and £330.00 in the UK. Available sizes are US 7-13 and EU 40.5-48.

    Features

    • FlexLock System: Adjustable boot flex, LockOut of the ankle movement
    • Force Reduction: LockOut ankle movement gives up to 37% reduction of ankle forces and 35% reduction of forces to the knee
    • Great fit even for wide feet
    • 3D-shaped impact foam over ankles, Heel grip ankle design
    • Low-profile, gear shift friendly toe box shape
    • DualZone hardness sole with extended foot peg riding zone for arch and on the blade riding style
    • Steel shank reinforced and CE certified
    • SlideLock cuff system is auto-locking with one-way sliding closure
    • Flat and grippy bike side of the boots for great bike feel
    • Forged aluminum buckles with over-locking function
    • Breathable mesh 3D inner liner with anti-slip reinforcement for zero heel lift
    • CE tested and certified as: prEN 13634: 2017

    Shopping Options


  4. As we reported earlier this week, Triumph Motorcycles has partnered with the Bond franchise for their latest thriller, No Time To Die, supplying not only Scrambler 1200 XE models, but also Tiger 900s, the all-new, mid-weight model that replaces the Tiger 800 range for 2020.

    The newly released movie trailer promises the high-adrenaline action we’ve come to expect from the franchise with plenty of stunts and jumps for motorcycle fans. One of the scenes that has grabbed attention is the jaw-dropping motorcycle jump using an arch as a ramp. When you watch the trailer, you fully accept that Bond is sailing off the top of the massive stone arch and over a wall in ancient Matera, Italy, on the Triumph Scrambler 1200 XE we’d just seen him mount seconds before.

    Intellectually, however, you’d probably assume the impossible-seeming jump was produced in a computer lab. 

    New James Bond Movie Motorcycle JumpBehind-the-scenes footage shot by locals reveal the bike jumped is actually a dirtbike, not the Triumph Scrambler 1200 the official trailer seems to suggest.
    ADVERTISEMENT

    Well, it turns out the only element of the scene that was computer-generated is the stone arch itself, which in reality was a steep ramp used to launch four-time enduro champion, Paul “Fast Eddie” Edmondson, rightly a Brit, over the wall in realtime. 

    Behind-the-scenes clips shot by locals and crew members show Edmondson doing some practice leaps ahead of the actual takes where he would need to land just feet away from dozens of unsuspecting and also very real processioners. Some angles show him clearing the edge of the actual stone wall by seeming inches. A spotter is shown during the practice takes, though you wonder how much good he’d do if things went awry. 

    Amazingly, Edmondson appears in complete control at all times, making the tricky jump look effortless, as of course it would be for beloved sport suit-clad James Bond. 

    James Bond No Time To Die heroic bike jump

    We also learn in the behind-the-scenes footage that what appears at a distance to be a Triumph Scrambler leaping from the arch is actually a dirt bike dressed to look the part. Totally fair, considering the 1200 XE that stars in No Time To Die weighs in at nearly 500 lbs. 

    Watching these gripping footage come to life you cannot help being awed by the bravado and physical genius of the stunt crew and moto-camera pilots on No Time To Die. 

    This goes to prove not every mind-blowing sequence in today’s action films is generated with the aid of computers. At least in this new Bond film, the time-honored spy chase scenes seem to remain the work of flesh-and-blood heroism.

    0bc894185f6dd616aca74fab9a6acee5?s=80&r=

    Author: Jamie Elvidge

    Jamie has been a motorcycle journalist for more than 30 years, testing the entire range of bikes for the major print magazines and specializing in adventure-travel related stories. To date she’s written and supplied photography for articles describing what it’s like to ride in all 50 states and 43 foreign countries, receiving two Lowell Thomas Society of American Travel Writer’s Awards along the way. Her most-challenging adventure yet has been riding in the 2018 GS Trophy in Mongolia as Team AusAmerica’s embedded journalist.

  5. As we reported earlier this week, Triumph Motorcycles has partnered with the Bond franchise for their latest thriller, No Time To Die, supplying not only Scrambler 1200 XE models, but also Tiger 900s, the all-new, mid-weight model that replaces the Tiger 800 range for 2020.

    The newly released movie trailer promises the high-adrenaline action we’ve come to expect from the franchise with plenty of stunts and jumps for motorcycle fans. One of the scenes that has grabbed attention is the jaw-dropping motorcycle jump using an arch as a ramp. When you watch the trailer, you fully accept that Bond is sailing off the top of the massive stone arch and over a wall in ancient Matera, Italy, on the Triumph Scrambler 1200 XE we’d just seen him mount seconds before.

    Intellectually, however, you’d probably assume the impossible-seeming jump was produced in a computer lab. 

    New James Bond Movie Motorcycle JumpBehind-the-scenes footage shot by locals reveal the bike jumped is actually a dirtbike, not the Triumph Scrambler 1200 the official trailer seems to suggest.
    ADVERTISEMENT

    Well, it turns out the only element of the scene that was computer-generated is the stone arch itself, which in reality was a steep ramp used to launch four-time enduro champion, Paul “Fast Eddie” Edmondson, rightly a Brit, over the wall in realtime. 

    Behind-the-scenes clips shot by locals and crew members show Edmondson doing some practice leaps ahead of the actual takes where he would need to land just feet away from dozens of unsuspecting and also very real processioners. Some angles show him clearing the edge of the actual stone wall by seeming inches. A spotter is shown during the practice takes, though you wonder how much good he’d do if things went awry. 

    Amazingly, Edmondson appears in complete control at all times, making the tricky jump look effortless, as of course it would be for beloved sport suit-clad James Bond. 

    James Bond No Time To Die heroic bike jump

    We also learn in the behind-the-scenes footage that what appears at a distance to be a Triumph Scrambler leaping from the arch is actually a dirt bike dressed to look the part. Totally fair, considering the 1200 XE that stars in No Time To Die weighs in at nearly 500 lbs. 

    Watching these gripping footage come to life you cannot help being awed by the bravado and physical genius of the stunt crew and moto-camera pilots on No Time To Die. 

    This goes to prove not every mind-blowing sequence in today’s action films is generated with the aid of computers. At least in this new Bond film, the time-honored spy chase scenes seem to remain the work of flesh-and-blood heroism.

    0bc894185f6dd616aca74fab9a6acee5?s=80&r=

    Author: Jamie Elvidge

    Jamie has been a motorcycle journalist for more than 30 years, testing the entire range of bikes for the major print magazines and specializing in adventure-travel related stories. To date she’s written and supplied photography for articles describing what it’s like to ride in all 50 states and 43 foreign countries, receiving two Lowell Thomas Society of American Travel Writer’s Awards along the way. Her most-challenging adventure yet has been riding in the 2018 GS Trophy in Mongolia as Team AusAmerica’s embedded journalist.

  6. Triumph-Tiger-900-adventure-motorcycle-1

    James Bond and countless villains who chase and get chased by him have been through a lot of cars, boats, planes and motorcycles since Dr. No was released in 1962. Nearly 60 years later the parade of vehicular carnage is set to continue in No Time To Die, the 25th 007-franchise film, due in April 2020. 

    While Bond usually prefers to race around intriguing locales in exotic cars we’ve seen an uptick in two-wheeled appearances lately, most notably during the opening scene of Skyfall where Daniel Craig’s stunt double and his villain du jour tear across a Turkish backdrop on costumed Honda CRF250Rs (In total 25 units where sacrificed for that one scene!). 

    WATCH: James Bond stunt riders introduce the 2020 Triumph Tiger 900 in style!

    As revealed in the first official trailer for No Time To Die, a couple of fresh models from Triumph — the Scrambler 1200 XE and the all-new Tiger 900 — will spice up the chase sequences. 


    ADVERTISEMENT

    Shot over the spring and early summer of 2019, the No Time To Die sets served as a proving ground for the Tiger 900 series unveiled to the public last week. The film’s stunt coordinator Lee Morrison said prototypes supplied by Triumph worked flawlessly during demanding sequences shot across three key locations. 

    “We have literally thrown everything at them,” he says of conditions that sound like the most challenging of adventure tours: “Big craggy sharp rocks, deep, boggy mud, high speeds, big jumps and huge climbs and descents.” After the extended shakedown across a variety of conditions Morrison reported there were zero mechanical issues with the Tigers, which in his words “really proves their go-anywhere credentials.”  

    Triumph Scrambler 1200 XE on set James Bond movieTriumph Scrambler 1200 on location for the new James Bond movie “No Time To Die”. Photo: Jasin BolandTriumph Tiger 900 for James Bond movieTriumph Tiger 900 motorcycle used on set.

    As we reported last week, the 2020 Tiger 900 range has been completely redesigned, with an all-new, more powerful triple, new bodywork, chassis, suspension and brakes, more fuel capacity, optimized ergonomics, a huge TFT display and class-leading rider aid technology. There is also new nomenclature: GT for four on-road oriented versions (Base, GT, Low and GT Pro), and Rally for the two adventure-kitted options (Rally and Rally Pro). While prices have yet to be announced for the Pro editions, Triumph has confirmed the entry-level Tiger 900 will start at $12,500, while the GT and GT Low are $14,300 (just $500 more than comparable 2019 versions). The adventure-ready Rally at $15,000 is $600 more than its predecessor. 

    The new Tigers are due at dealerships in spring, just about the same time James Bond, with a Gatling gun-equipped Aston Martin DB5 and a reinstated license to kill, returns to the big screen to show us how to use them. 

    0bc894185f6dd616aca74fab9a6acee5?s=80&r=

    Author: Jamie Elvidge

    Jamie has been a motorcycle journalist for more than 30 years, testing the entire range of bikes for the major print magazines and specializing in adventure-travel related stories. To date she’s written and supplied photography for articles describing what it’s like to ride in all 50 states and 43 foreign countries, receiving two Lowell Thomas Society of American Travel Writer’s Awards along the way. Her most-challenging adventure yet has been riding in the 2018 GS Trophy in Mongolia as Team AusAmerica’s embedded journalist.

  7. Triumph-Tiger-900-adventure-motorcycle-1

    James Bond and countless villains who chase and get chased by him have been through a lot of cars, boats, planes and motorcycles since Dr. No was released in 1962. Nearly 60 years later the parade of vehicular carnage is set to continue in No Time To Die, the 25th 007-franchise film, due in April 2020. 

    While Bond usually prefers to race around intriguing locales in exotic cars we’ve seen an uptick in two-wheeled appearances lately, most notably during the opening scene of Skyfall where Daniel Craig’s stunt double and his villain du jour tear across a Turkish backdrop on costumed Honda CRF250Rs (In total 25 units where sacrificed for that one scene!). 

    WATCH: James Bond stunt riders introduce the 2020 Triumph Tiger 900 in style!

    As revealed in the first official trailer for No Time To Die, a couple of fresh models from Triumph — the Scrambler 1200 XE and the all-new Tiger 900 — will spice up the chase sequences. 


    ADVERTISEMENT

    Shot over the spring and early summer of 2019, the No Time To Die sets served as a proving ground for the Tiger 900 series unveiled to the public last week. The film’s stunt coordinator Lee Morrison said prototypes supplied by Triumph worked flawlessly during demanding sequences shot across three key locations. 

    “We have literally thrown everything at them,” he says of conditions that sound like the most challenging of adventure tours: “Big craggy sharp rocks, deep, boggy mud, high speeds, big jumps and huge climbs and descents.” After the extended shakedown across a variety of conditions Morrison reported there were zero mechanical issues with the Tigers, which in his words “really proves their go-anywhere credentials.”  

    Triumph Scrambler 1200 XE on set James Bond movieTriumph Scrambler 1200 on location for the new James Bond movie “No Time To Die”. Photo: Jasin BolandTriumph Tiger 900 for James Bond movieTriumph Tiger 900 motorcycle used on set.

    As we reported last week, the 2020 Tiger 900 range has been completely redesigned, with an all-new, more powerful triple, new bodywork, chassis, suspension and brakes, more fuel capacity, optimized ergonomics, a huge TFT display and class-leading rider aid technology. There is also new nomenclature: GT for four on-road oriented versions (Base, GT, Low and GT Pro), and Rally for the two adventure-kitted options (Rally and Rally Pro). While prices have yet to be announced for the Pro editions, Triumph has confirmed the entry-level Tiger 900 will start at $12,500, while the GT and GT Low are $14,300 (just $500 more than comparable 2019 versions). The adventure-ready Rally at $15,000 is $600 more than its predecessor. 

    The new Tigers are due at dealerships in spring, just about the same time James Bond, with a Gatling gun-equipped Aston Martin DB5 and a reinstated license to kill, returns to the big screen to show us how to use them. 

    0bc894185f6dd616aca74fab9a6acee5?s=80&r=

    Author: Jamie Elvidge

    Jamie has been a motorcycle journalist for more than 30 years, testing the entire range of bikes for the major print magazines and specializing in adventure-travel related stories. To date she’s written and supplied photography for articles describing what it’s like to ride in all 50 states and 43 foreign countries, receiving two Lowell Thomas Society of American Travel Writer’s Awards along the way. Her most-challenging adventure yet has been riding in the 2018 GS Trophy in Mongolia as Team AusAmerica’s embedded journalist.

  8. Published on 12.04.2019

    It was less than a month ago when Husqvarna first peeled back the cover on their exciting new Adventure Touring concept bike, the Norden 901. With its distinctive blend of modern design and classic lines, it’s one of the adventure bike concepts that has captured the most attention this year. According to the Swedish brand, “the NORDEN 901 received high levels of interest” from the press and public during an EICMA unveiling that was “extremely successful.” The response online has been overwhelmingly positive too, which may be why we are receiving this good news so soon.

    If the Norden 901 concept was one of your favorite bikes launched at EICMA, you’ll be happy to hear Husqvarna has announced they will be turning it into a production model. We could already tell from the concept’s advanced state of development that it was likely to make it to the showroom floor. Small details like a USB port, integrated LED tail lights and a functional tank rack gave us hints that it wouldn’t take much to put it into production. The bike had been captured out testing on the road in Spy Shots as well. But we have to admit, green lighting of the project came faster than we guessed.

    Husqvarna Norden 901 conceptNorden 901 dash

    Only a few details about the bike have been released so far about Husqvarna’s first Adventure Touring bike. What we do know is that it’s based on KTM’s 790 Adventure platform, sharing the same chassis. But it gets a larger parallel-twin motor from the KTM 890 Duke, which has been “tuned for adventure usage.” The Norden is designed to be slim and is said to offer “class-leading lightness” so we can assume it should be at least as light as the 417-pound (dry) KTM 790 Adventure. It will also ride on a 21″ front wheel and 18″ rear, along with high-spec WP suspension components.

    Husqvarna-norden-701-adventure-motorcycl

    Norden 901 Technical Highlights

    • Designed to be a slim and light explorer motorcycle 
    • 889.5 cc parallel twin engine specifically tuned for adventure usage 
    • Versatile for both off-road performance and touring ability 
    • Rides on 21” front and 18” rear wire-spoke wheels
    • High quality WP suspension components 

    What will be interesting to see is how Husqvarna plans to differentiate the Norden 901 from the KTM 790 models. KTM and Husqvarna already share platforms between several models, like the FE 501/500 EXC or 701 Enduro/690 Enduro. KTM provides a solid foundation and Husqvarna puts their own unique spin on it. They also tend to target the premium segment of the market with their street line, so there may be upscale touring features and aesthetic treatments that help set Husqvarn’s first Adventure Tourer apart. 

    Husqvarna Norden 901 luggageHusqvarna-norden-701-adventure-motorcycl
    ADVERTISEMENT

    Husqvarna has mentioned they want to put an emphasis on “practical accessibility and comfort” and provide “effortless rideability and high-end modern equipment,” which signals a touring focus. A bike that riders can use for “daily commutes, extended adventures and everything in between,” says Husqvarna. Perhaps it will be something that combines the touring features of the standard 790 Adventure with the off-road suspension of the R, while adding a larger fuel capacity, increased engine size, more amenities, and Husqvarna aesthetic details.

    Norden 901 goes to production

    Hopefully, the news will continue to flow in quickly. Husqvarna says, “Further information related to the NORDEN 901 will be released as it nears market launch.” Expect the production version to be revealed at either EICMA or Intermot next year as a 2021 model and stay tuned for more details!

    1011496a47237e824cabca59676a3789?s=80&r=

    Author: Rob Dabney

    Rob Dabney started a lifelong obsession with motorcycles at the age of 15 when he purchased his first bike – a 1982 Honda MB5. Through his 20’s and 30’s he competed in off-road desert races, including the Baja 250, 500 and 1000. Eventually, his proclivity for exploration led him to dual sport and adventure riding. Rob’s never-ending quest to discover what’s around the next bend has taken him on Adventures in Mexico, North Africa, Europe, and throughout the American West. As a moto journalist, he enjoys inspiring others to seek adventure across horizons both near and far.

  9. Published on 12.04.2019

    It was less than a month ago when Husqvarna first peeled back the cover on their exciting new Adventure Touring concept bike, the Norden 901. With its distinctive blend of modern design and classic lines, it’s one of the adventure bike concepts that has captured the most attention this year. According to the Swedish brand, “the NORDEN 901 received high levels of interest” from the press and public during an EICMA unveiling that was “extremely successful.” The response online has been overwhelmingly positive too, which may be why we are receiving this good news so soon.

    If the Norden 901 concept was one of your favorite bikes launched at EICMA, you’ll be happy to hear Husqvarna has announced they will be turning it into a production model. We could already tell from the concept’s advanced state of development that it was likely to make it to the showroom floor. Small details like a USB port, integrated LED tail lights and a functional tank rack gave us hints that it wouldn’t take much to put it into production. The bike had been captured out testing on the road in Spy Shots as well. But we have to admit, green lighting of the project came faster than we guessed.

    Husqvarna Norden 901 conceptNorden 901 dash

    Only a few details about the bike have been released so far about Husqvarna’s first Adventure Touring bike. What we do know is that it’s based on KTM’s 790 Adventure platform, sharing the same chassis. But it gets a larger parallel-twin motor from the KTM 890 Duke, which has been “tuned for adventure usage.” The Norden is designed to be slim and is said to offer “class-leading lightness” so we can assume it should be at least as light as the 417-pound (dry) KTM 790 Adventure. It will also ride on a 21″ front wheel and 18″ rear, along with high-spec WP suspension components.

    Husqvarna-norden-701-adventure-motorcycl

    Norden 901 Technical Highlights

    • Designed to be a slim and light explorer motorcycle 
    • 889.5 cc parallel twin engine specifically tuned for adventure usage 
    • Versatile for both off-road performance and touring ability 
    • Rides on 21” front and 18” rear wire-spoke wheels
    • High quality WP suspension components 

    What will be interesting to see is how Husqvarna plans to differentiate the Norden 901 from the KTM 790 models. KTM and Husqvarna already share platforms between several models, like the FE 501/500 EXC or 701 Enduro/690 Enduro. KTM provides a solid foundation and Husqvarna puts their own unique spin on it. They also tend to target the premium segment of the market with their street line, so there may be upscale touring features and aesthetic treatments that help set Husqvarn’s first Adventure Tourer apart. 

    Husqvarna Norden 901 luggageHusqvarna-norden-701-adventure-motorcycl
    ADVERTISEMENT

    Husqvarna has mentioned they want to put an emphasis on “practical accessibility and comfort” and provide “effortless rideability and high-end modern equipment,” which signals a touring focus. A bike that riders can use for “daily commutes, extended adventures and everything in between,” says Husqvarna. Perhaps it will be something that combines the touring features of the standard 790 Adventure with the off-road suspension of the R, while adding a larger fuel capacity, increased engine size, more amenities, and Husqvarna aesthetic details.

    Norden 901 goes to production

    Hopefully, the news will continue to flow in quickly. Husqvarna says, “Further information related to the NORDEN 901 will be released as it nears market launch.” Expect the production version to be revealed at either EICMA or Intermot next year as a 2021 model and stay tuned for more details!

    1011496a47237e824cabca59676a3789?s=80&r=

    Author: Rob Dabney

    Rob Dabney started a lifelong obsession with motorcycles at the age of 15 when he purchased his first bike – a 1982 Honda MB5. Through his 20’s and 30’s he competed in off-road desert races, including the Baja 250, 500 and 1000. Eventually, his proclivity for exploration led him to dual sport and adventure riding. Rob’s never-ending quest to discover what’s around the next bend has taken him on Adventures in Mexico, North Africa, Europe, and throughout the American West. As a moto journalist, he enjoys inspiring others to seek adventure across horizons both near and far.

  10. Triumph-Tiger-900-adventure-motorcycle-5

    After months of spy shots and teaser clips, Triumph has finally unveiled their new Tiger 900 with sweeping changes to the range for 2020. The new machine is completely transformed with an all-new 900cc triple engine, higher-spec equipment, more fuel capacity, optimized ergos, and state-of-the-art rider tech. The Tiger 900 range now makes more power and torque, yet it’s lighter than the previous Tiger 800. Additionally, the off road focused ‘Rally’ model receives tubeless spoked wheels and features more suspension travel than its predecessor – the Tiger 800 XC. Read on for more details about all the new upgrades:

    New Tiger Range

    The new Tiger 900 marks the end of the old naming convention for the Tigers ( XC, XR, etc.), with the launch of 5 new models:

    • Tiger 900 – The new road-focused Tiger, with a major step forward in capability and style.
    • Tiger 900 GT and GT Pro – Tuned for even more urban adventure and genuine long-distance travel. 
    • Tiger 900 Rally and Rally Pro – Transformed for maximum off-road adventure and road-focused capability and comfort.

    More Powerful 900cc Triple Engine

    The all-new higher performance 900cc engine has a unique 1, 3, 2 firing order for greater character and feel. The result is more feedback from the engine to the rider, an incredibly distinctive engine sound, and improved tractability and throttle feel, pulling harder, lower down. The result is a much closer association to the throttle character, sound and feel of a twin lower in the rev range, all the while maintaining the distinctive mid-range and top-end of a triple.

    Tiger 900 more powerful and lighter

    The new engine delivers a significant 10% more peak torque than the previous Tiger 800 models, now 64 LB-FT at 7,250 rpm, with improved torque low down and across the rev range. Power is also up across the entire rev range, with 9% more in the mid-range, and 94 peak horsepower at 8,750rpm.


    ADVERTISEMENT

    Combined, this delivers more responsive acceleration, with 0-60 mph, 0-110 mph and 6th gear roll-on times all significantly quicker than the previous generation Tiger. Additionally, it gives the new Tiger 900 a much more aggressive, raspy and engaging triple soundtrack.

    New Tiger 900 engineThe new 900cc engine is lighter yet pumps out 10% more torque and delivers more power across the entire rev range.

    An all-new twin radiator setup is mass optimized with a reduced coolant volume. This improves cooling performance and reduces the ambient heat felt by the rider. Its shape and position enable a further forward engine position resulting in a more optimized center of gravity (1.6 in forward and 0.80 in lower). This improves weight distribution for better handling and low speed balance, while other improvements to the sump and cooling system ensure it has no impact on ground clearance.

    There’s also an all-new air box with a more easily accessible new air filter, plus a slip and assist clutch for added rider comfort.

    Lighter, All-New Chassis

    Now between 10 and 20 pounds lighter than the previous generation depending on the model, the new Tiger 900 delivers a commanding and agile ride. The steel trellis frame is not only lighter, but now has a modular construction with bolt-on aluminum rear subframe and bolt-on pillion hangers to help deliver an adventure-centric setup for off-road focused riding.

    off road focused Triumph Tiger 900 Rally ProOff-road focused Tiger 900 Rally Pro in Matte Khaki. Both Rally models have received increased suspension and tubeless spoked wheels.

    There is high specification suspension across the new 900 range with premium Marzocchi or Showa components tailored to deliver greater capability. In addition, Rally Models have received increased suspension in both front and rear. For maximum rider convenience and comfort, the GT Pro model features electronically adjustable rear suspension, allowing the rider to adjust the rear preload and damping settings via a dedicated menu in the TFT instruments. Riders can select from nine levels of damping control, ranging from Comfort (softest) to Sport (firmest), and four preload setups.

    • timthumb.php?src=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.advpu

    All of the new Tiger 900 models now feature Brembo Stylema® brakes for superior stopping power. These are lightweight, compact, carefully sculpted and high performing calipers, with reduced volume around the pistons and brake pads, creating less internal space occupied by brake fluid for more immediate braking response. Increased airflow around the brake pads also helps the calipers to cool quicker.

    Triumph Tiger 900 new LED lights

    This combination of the new lightweight modular frame, lighter engine, high specification suspension and premium Brembo brakes delivers a notable improvement in agility and capability, designed to deliver exceptional handling in all riding scenarios.

    Long-distance travel has been improved on the new Tiger 900 range, with a new larger 5.3- gallon fuel tank and new adjustable screen, delivering superior wind protection with a simple single-handed adjustment.

    • timthumb.php?src=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.advpu
    • timthumb.php?src=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.advpu
    Tiger 900 improved ergos and bigger tankAll models receive a larger 5.3 gallon fuel tank and improved ergos.

    Ergonomics are also improved for the new models, optimized for rider comfort when touring, off-roading and anything in between. The seat w is narrower, and the handlebars are 0.39 in closer, giving a more comfortable, upright riding position and a greater level of rider control.

    Additionally, each model has a dedicated and unique footrest position to suit the expected style of riding as well as a built-in, easily adjustable two-position seat h mechanism. This enables the rider to adjust the seat h by 0.79 in to their preferred set-up.

    Packed With Technology

    The new Tiger 900 range features a significant step forward in its ride-enhancing technology, with state-of-the-art features including:

    Tiger 900 larger TFT display
    • New 7-inch TFT instruments (GT & GT Pro, Rally & Rally Pro only) – The new larger TFT instruments present rider information in four different styles and colors along with high/low contrast versions for great visibility in all lights. The 7-inch TFT screen is now bonded to the glass for a crisper image with no reflective layer. (The entry-level Tiger 900 model features 5-inch TFT high contrast instruments)
    • New My Triumph connectivity system and app (GT Pro & Rally Pro only) – The integrated My Triumph connectivity system and app seamlessly enable phone call and music operation, turn-by-turn navigation, and GoPro control — all accessed via the switch cubes and displayed on the TFT screen. (available as an accessory option on the GT and Rally models, including a dedicated Bluetooth® connectivity module)
    • New optimized cornering ABS and traction control with IMU (GT & GT Pro, Rally & Rally Pro only) – Comes as standard on the mid- and top-spec Tiger 900s and is enabled via an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) developed in conjunction with Continental. This supports the automatic selection of the appropriate level of ABS and traction control intervention by constantly measuring roll, pitch, yaw and acceleration rates in order to calculate the lean angle. This system ensures greater riding stability at all times.
    • Up to six riding modes – Riding modes adjust throttle response, ABS and traction control settings for maximum rider control in all riding conditions. The new anti-stall feature on the Off-Road and Off-Road Pro modes automatically increases the idle revs to prevent stalling. The Off-Road Pro riding mode, exclusive to the Rally Pro model, is Triumph’s most extreme off-road set-up for advanced off-road adventure, with ABS and traction control turned off, and an off-road throttle map.
    • TIGER 900 RALLY PRO: Rain, Road, Sport, Off-Road, Rider-configurable & Off-Road Pro
    • TIGER 900 GT PRO : Rain, Road, Sport, Off-Road & Rider-configurable
    • TIGER 900 RALLY & GT: Rain, Road, Sport & Off-Road
    • TIGER 900: Rain & Road
    • New all-LED lighting with distinctive light pattern – The headlight, tail light and indicators on all new Tiger 900 models are now full LEDs for maintenance-free active safety. The GT Pro and Rally Pro models also feature LED auxiliary fog lights for additional long distance capability.
    • New Triumph Shift Assist, up and down quickshifter (GT Pro & Rally Pro only) – Enabling smooth, comfortable clutchless up and down gear changes while maintaining the accelerator position, the Triumph Shift Assist reduces rider fatigue and improves the ride. (Available as an accessory on the base and mid-spec Tiger 900 models)
    • New secure mobile phone storage and USB charging (GT & GT Pro, Rally & Rally Pro only) – A secure compartment under the seat houses a handy 5V USB power socket to enable uninterrupted use of the My Triumph connectivity system.
    • Highest level of standard technology specification (GT & GT Pro, Rally & Rally Pro only) – Fitted as standard for maximum rider comfort and convenience, the mid- and top-spec Tiger 900 models feature illuminated switches with a 5-way joystick, electronic cruise control and heated grips.
    • Fully loaded GT Pro and Rally Pro technology – Exclusive to the top-spec Tiger 900 models are the unique-in-segment heated seats (with separate pillion control) and the tire pressure monitoring system (TPMS).

    Accessible and Adaptable

    Triumph Tiger 900 GT in Sapphire BlackTriumph Tiger 900 GT in Sapphire Black. The model offers a 29.9 in. low seat option.

    The Tiger 900 GT is also available in a dedicated Low Ride Height variant, which is 2.0 in lower than the standard GT model, achieved by a dedicated suspension set-up and a lower seat. This variant also features the built-in additional seat h adjustment of 0.79 in, giving a seat h of between 29.9 – 30.7 in.

    2020 Triumph Tiger 900 Key Changes

    More Powerful Powerplant

    • New higher-capacity 900cc triple engine.
    • 10% more torque than the Tiger 800 model, peaking at 64 LB-FT at 7,250rpm.
    • More power across the entire rev range, with 9% more in the mid-range.
    • New unique 1, 3, 2 firing order for greater character and feel.
    • Improved acceleration.
    • More characterful and distinctive soundtrack.
    Triumph-Tiger-900-adventure-motorcycle-1

    Now Even Lighter

    • New lightweight modular frame with bolt-on rear subframe and pillion hangers.
    • New engine is lighter despite boost in displacement.
    • Weight has been reduced between 10 and 20 pounds depending on the model.

    Major Chassis Updates

    • Rally models get new fully-adjustable Showa suspension with increased travel.
    • GT models retain the same suspension travel but switch from Showa to Marzocchi.
    • The GT Pro gets an all-new electronic rear shock adjustable for both preload and damping.
    • All models get a new frame with different geometry, along with a subframe that is bolted on rather than welded.
    • Passenger pegs are also now removable.
    • Engine positioning in the frame has been optimized for better weight distribution and a lower center of gravity, without reducing ground clearance.
    Tiger 900 Rally Pro Tubeless spoked wheels

    State-of-the-Art Electronics

    • Larger 7-inch TFT instruments (GT & GT Pro, Rally & Rally Pro only).
    • New integrated My Triumph connectivity system (GT Pro & Rally Pro only).
    • New optimized cornering ABS and optimized cornering traction control, controlled by an Inertial Measurement Unit (GT & GT Pro, Rally & Rally Pro only).
    • Up to six riding modes: Rain, Road, Sport, Rider, Off-Road and Off-Road Pro.
    • New Triumph Shift Assist, Triumph’s proprietary up and down quickshifter (GT Pro & Rally Pro only).
    • New all-LED lighting with distinctive light pattern.
    • New secure mobile phone storage with USB charging.
    Triumph 900 technology

    Additional Upgrades

    • New top-specification Brembo Stylema monobloc brakes.
    • Larger 5.3-gallon fuel tank for advanced touring capability.
    • New premium bodywork with new colors and graphics.
    • Tubeless wire-spoke wheels on Rally and Rally Pro models.
    • New slip and assist clutch for all models.

    Accessible and Adaptable

    • Available Tiger 900 GT Low Ride Height version with unique suspension and lower seat.
    • Adjustable seat h (0.78 in) on all Tiger 900 models.
    • 65+ dedicated Tiger 900 accessories to complement your adventure.
    • Accessories for added comfort, protection and capability, plus all-new luggage.
    • Two new inspiration kits: Trekker (Touring) and Expedition (off-road).

    Accessory Range

    Tiger 900 accessories

    A range of over 65 genuine Triumph accessories are available for the new Tiger 900 models including 2 kits:

    The fully loaded Trekker inspiration kit showcases the Tiger’s even greater touring capability with GIVI Trekker panniers  plus powder coated mild steel mounting kit, Trekker top box and backrest, the sliding carriage kit, tank pad and screen deflector.

    Alternatively, the Expedition inspiration kit showcases the more overt off-road focused accessories available with the GIVI Expedition panniers and stainless steel mounting kit, 40-liter roll bag, headlight guard, fork protectors, aluminum radiator guard, upper engine bars and LED fog lights.

    New Styling and Bodywork

    All-new aggressive styling, re-designed smaller-scale bodywork, revised finishes and cleaner lines give the new Tiger 900 a more distinctive stance. This is supported by the narrow stand over w, the visually lighter front end and the dominant fuel tank design and size.

    • timthumb.php?src=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.advpu

    The all-new bodywork has a more focused and aggressive adventure style, and includes fuel tank, tank end panel, high mudguard, seat panel, radiator cowl and radiator duct exit. The finish and detailing is also improved to its highest-ever level.

    Colors, Pricing & Availability

    Tiger 900 Rally & Rally Pro: Matte Khaki, Sapphire Black and Pure White, all featuring contemporary new decals and a distinctive white frame inspired by the Tiger Tramontana rally bike

    Tiger 900 GT & GT Pro: Korosi Red, Sapphire Black and Pure White, all featuring premium tank badges and contemporary new decals

    Tiger 900: Pure White

    Triumph Tiger 900 in Karosi RedTriumph Tiger 900 GT Pro in Karosi Red.

    Tiger 900 Rally and Rally Pro will be available by March 2020, while the Tiger 900, Tiger 900 GT and GT Pro will be available in April of 2020. The entry-level Tiger 900 starts at $12,500, GT at $14,300 and the Rally at $15,000. Pro models get prices after January 2020.

    Triumph Tiger 900 Specs

    ENGINE TYPE: Liquid-cooled, 12-valve, DOHC, inline 3-cylinder
    CAPACITY: 888cc
    BORE X STROKE: 78×61.9 mm
    COMPRESSION: 11.27:1
    MAX POWER: 93.9 HP (70kW) @ 8,750 rpm
    MAX TORQUE: 64 ft-lbs (87 Nm) @ 7,250 rpm
    SYSTEM: Multi-point sequential electronic FI
    EXHAUST: Stainless steel 3-into-1 header system
    FINAL DRIVE: O-ring chain
    CLUTCH: Wet, multi-plate
    GEARBOX: 6 speed
    FRAME: Tubular steel frame, bolt-on subframe
    SWINGARM: Twin-sided, cast aluminum alloy
    FRONT WHEEL: STD/GT Cast alloy, 19″ x 2.5″; RALLY Tubeless spoke, 21″ x 2.15″
    REAR WHEELS: STD/GT Cast alloy, 17″ x 4.25″; RALLY Tubeless spoke, 18″ x 4.25″
    FRONT TIRE: STD/GT 100/90-19; RALLY 90/90-21
    REAR TIRE: STD/GT 150/70R17; RALLY 150/70R-17
    FRONT SUSPENSION: STD Marzocchi 45mm USD non-adjustable; GT Marzocchi 45mm USD rebound and compression; RALLY Showa 45mm USD rebound, compression and preload
    FRONT SUSP. TRAVEL: LRH 5.51″; STD/GT 7.1″; RALLY 9.45″
    REAR SUSPENSION: STD Marzocchi preload; GT Marzocchi preload and rebound; GT PRO Marzocchi electronic preload and rebound; RALLY Showa preload and rebound
    REAR SUSP. TRAVEL: LRH 5.95″; STD/GT 6.7″; RALLY 9.06″
    FRONT BRAKE: Twin 12.6 in floating discs, Brembo Stylema 4-piston monobloc calipers. Radial front master cylinder
    REAR BRAKE: Single 10 in disc. Brembo singlepiston sliding caliper
    ABS BRAKING STD ‘standard’ ABS; GT/RALLY optimized cornering ABS
    WIDTH HANDLEBARS STD 32.7″; GT 36.6″; RALLY 36.8″
    HEIGHT (W/O MIRRORS): LRH 54.5″-56.5″; STD/GT 55.5″-57.5″; RALLY 57.2″59.1″
    SEAT HEIGHT: LRH 29.9″-30.7″; STD/GT 31.9″-32.7″; RALLY 33.5″-34.3″
    WHEELBASE: STD/GT 61.3″; RALLY 61.1″
    RAKE: STD/GT 24.6º; RALLY 24.4º
    TRAIL: STD/GT 5.25″; RALLY 5.74″
    DRY WEIGHT: STD 423.3 lb; GT 427.7 lb; GT Pro 436.5 lb; RALLY 432.1 lb; RALLY Pro 443.1 lb
    TANK CAPACITY: 5.3 US Gallons
    FUEL CONSUMPTION: 55.4 MPG

  11. Triumph-Tiger-900-adventure-motorcycle-5

    After months of spy shots and teaser clips, Triumph has finally unveiled their new Tiger 900 with sweeping changes to the range for 2020. The new machine is completely transformed with an all-new 900cc triple engine, higher-spec equipment, more fuel capacity, optimized ergos, and state-of-the-art rider tech. The Tiger 900 range now makes more power and torque, yet it’s lighter than the previous Tiger 800. Additionally, the off road focused ‘Rally’ model receives tubeless spoked wheels and features more suspension travel than its predecessor – the Tiger 800 XC. Read on for more details about all the new upgrades:

    New Tiger Range

    The new Tiger 900 marks the end of the old naming convention for the Tigers ( XC, XR, etc.), with the launch of 5 new models:

    • Tiger 900 – The new road-focused Tiger, with a major step forward in capability and style.
    • Tiger 900 GT and GT Pro – Tuned for even more urban adventure and genuine long-distance travel. 
    • Tiger 900 Rally and Rally Pro – Transformed for maximum off-road adventure and road-focused capability and comfort.

    More Powerful 900cc Triple Engine

    The all-new higher performance 900cc engine has a unique 1, 3, 2 firing order for greater character and feel. The result is more feedback from the engine to the rider, an incredibly distinctive engine sound, and improved tractability and throttle feel, pulling harder, lower down. The result is a much closer association to the throttle character, sound and feel of a twin lower in the rev range, all the while maintaining the distinctive mid-range and top-end of a triple.

    Tiger 900 more powerful and lighter

    The new engine delivers a significant 10% more peak torque than the previous Tiger 800 models, now 64 LB-FT at 7,250 rpm, with improved torque low down and across the rev range. Power is also up across the entire rev range, with 9% more in the mid-range, and 94 peak horsepower at 8,750rpm.


    ADVERTISEMENT

    Combined, this delivers more responsive acceleration, with 0-60 mph, 0-110 mph and 6th gear roll-on times all significantly quicker than the previous generation Tiger. Additionally, it gives the new Tiger 900 a much more aggressive, raspy an engaging triple soundtrack.

    New Tiger 900 engineThe new 900cc engine is lighter yet pumps out 10% more torque and delivers more power across the entire rev range.

    An all-new twin radiator set up is mass optimized with a reduced coolant volume. This improves cooling performance and reduces the ambient heat felt by the rider. Its shape and position enable a further forward engine position resulting in a more optimized center of gravity (1.6 in forward and 0.80 in lower). This improves weight distribution for better handling and low speed balance, while other improvements to the sump and cooling system ensure it has no impact on ground clearance.

    There’s also an all-new air box with a more easily accessible new air filter, plus a slip and assist clutch for added rider comfort.

    Lighter, All-New Chassis

    Now between 10 and 20 pounds lighter than the previous generation depending on the model, the new Tiger 900 delivers a commanding and agile ride. The steel trellis frame is not only lighter, but now has a modular construction with bolt-on aluminum rear subframe and bolt-on pillion hangers to help deliver an adventure-centric set-up for off-road focused riding.

    off road focused Triumph Tiger 900 Rally ProOff-road focused Tiger 900 Rally Pro in Matte Khaki. Both Rally models have received increased suspension and tubeless spoked wheels.

    There is high specification suspension across the new 900 range with premium Marzocchi or Showa components tailored to deliver greater capability. In addition, Rally Models have received increased suspension in both front and rear. For maximum rider convenience and comfort, the GT Pro model features electronically adjustable rear suspension allowing the rider to adjust the rear preload and damping settings via a dedicated menu in the TFT instruments. Riders can select from nine levels of damping control, ranging from Comfort (softest) to Sport (firmest), and four preload set-ups.

    • timthumb.php?src=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.advpu

    All of the new Tiger 900 models now feature Brembo Stylema® brakes for superior stopping power. These are lightweight, compact, carefully sculpted and high performing calipers, with reduced volume around the pistons and brake pads, creating less internal space occupied by brake fluid for more immediate braking response. Increased airflow around the brake pads also helps the calipers to cool quicker.

    Triumph Tiger 900 new LED lights

    This combination of the new lightweight modular frame, lighter engine, high specification suspension and premium Brembo brakes delivers a notable improvement in agility and capability, designed to deliver exceptional handling in all riding scenarios.

    Long-distance travel has been improved on the new Tiger 900 range, with a new larger 5.3- gallon fuel tank and new adjustable screen, delivering superior wind protection with a simple single-handed adjustment.

    • timthumb.php?src=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.advpu
    • timthumb.php?src=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.advpu
    Tiger 900 improved ergos and bigger tankAll models receive a larger 5.3 gallon fuel tank and improved ergos.

    Ergonomics are also improved for the new models, optimized for rider comfort when touring, off-roading and anything in between. The seat w is narrower, and the handlebars are 0.39 in closer, giving a more comfortable, upright riding position and a greater level of rider control.

    Additionally, each model has a dedicated and unique footrest position to suit the expected style of riding as well as a built-in, easily adjustable two-position seat h mechanism. This enables the rider to adjust the seat h by 0.79 in to their preferred set-up.

    Packed With Technology

    The new Tiger 900 range features a significant step forward in its ride-enhancing technology, with state-of-the-art features including:

    Tiger 900 larger TFT display
    • New 7-inch TFT instruments (GT & GT Pro, Rally & Rally Pro only) – The new larger TFT instruments present rider information in four different styles and colors along with high/low contrast versions for great visibility in all lights. The 7-inch TFT screen is now bonded to the glass for a crisper image with no reflective layer. (The entry-level Tiger 900 model features 5-inch TFT high contrast instruments)
    • New My Triumph connectivity system and app (GT Pro & Rally Pro only) – The integrated My Triumph connectivity system and app seamlessly enable phone call and music operation, turn-by-turn navigation, and GoPro control – all accessed via the switch cubes and displayed on the TFT screen. (available as an accessory option on the GT and Rally models, including a dedicated Bluetooth® connectivity module)
    • New optimized cornering ABS and traction control with IMU (GT & GT Pro, Rally & Rally Pro only) – Comes as standard on the mid- and top-spec Tiger 900s and is enabled via an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) developed in conjunction with Continental. This supports the automatic selection of the appropriate level of ABS and traction control intervention by constantly measuring roll, pitch, yaw and acceleration rates in order to calculate the lean angle. This system ensures greater riding stability at all times.
    • Up to six riding modes – Riding modes adjust throttle response, ABS and traction control settings for maximum rider control in all riding conditions. The new anti-stall feature on the Off-Road and Off-Road Pro modes automatically increases the idle revs to prevent stalling. The Off-Road Pro riding mode, exclusive to the Rally Pro model, is Triumph’s most extreme off-road set-up for advanced off-road adventure, with ABS and traction control turned off, and an off-road throttle map.
    • TIGER 900 RALLY PRO: Rain, Road, Sport, Off-Road, Rider-configurable & Off-Road Pro
    • TIGER 900 GT PRO : Rain, Road, Sport, Off-Road & Rider-configurable
    • TIGER 900 RALLY & GT: Rain, Road, Sport & Off-Road
    • TIGER 900: Rain & Road
    • New all-LED lighting with distinctive light pattern – The headlight, tail light and indicators on all new Tiger 900 models are now full LEDs for maintenance-free active safety. The GT Pro and Rally Pro models also feature LED auxiliary fog lights for additional long distance capability.
    • New Triumph Shift Assist, up and down quickshifter (GT Pro & Rally Pro only) – Enabling smooth, comfortable clutchless up and down gear changes while maintaining the accelerator position, the Triumph Shift Assist reduces rider fatigue and improves the ride. (Available as an accessory on the base and mid-spec Tiger 900 models)
    • New secure mobile phone storage and USB charging (GT & GT Pro, Rally & Rally Pro only) – A secure compartment under the seat houses a handy 5V USB power socket to enable uninterrupted use of the My Triumph connectivity system.
    • Highest level of standard technology specification (GT & GT Pro, Rally & Rally Pro only) – Fitted as standard for maximum rider comfort and convenience, the mid- and top-spec Tiger 900 models feature illuminated switches with a 5-way joystick, electronic cruise control and heated grips.
    • Fully loaded GT Pro and Rally Pro technology – Exclusive to the top-spec Tiger 900 models are the unique-in-segment heated seats (with separate pillion control) and the tire pressure monitoring system (TPMS).

    Accessible and Adaptable

    Triumph Tiger 900 GT in Sapphire BlackTriumph Tiger 900 GT in Sapphire Black. The model offers a 29.9 in. low seat option.

    The Tiger 900 GT is also available in a dedicated Low Ride Height variant, which is 2.0 in lower than the standard GT model, achieved by a dedicated suspension set-up and a lower seat. This variant also features the built-in additional seat h adjustment of 0.79 in, giving a seat h of between 29.9 – 30.7 in.

    2020 Triumph Tiger 900 Key Changes

    More Powerful Powerplant

    • New higher-capacity 900cc triple engine.
    • 10% more torque than the Tiger 800 model, peaking at 64 LB-FT at 7,250rpm.
    • More power across the entire rev range, with 9% more in the mid-range.
    • New unique 1, 3, 2 firing order for greater character and feel.
    • Improved acceleration.
    • More characterful and distinctive soundtrack.
    Triumph-Tiger-900-adventure-motorcycle-1

    Now Even Lighter

    • New lightweight modular frame with bolt-on rear subframe and pillion hangers.
    • New engine is lighter despite boost in displacement.
    • Weight has been reduced between 10 and 20 pounds depending on the model.

    Major Chassis Updates

    • Rally models get new fully-adjustable Showa suspension with increased travel.
    • GT models retain the same suspension travel but switch from Showa to Marzocchi.
    • The GT Pro gets an all-new electronic rear shock adjustable for both preload and damping.
    • All models get a new frame with different geometry, along with a subframe that is bolted on rather than welded.
    • Passenger pegs are also now removable.
    • Engine positioning in the frame has been optimized for better weight distribution and a lower center of gravity, without reducing ground clearance.
    Tiger 900 Rally Pro Tubeless spoked wheels

    State-of-the-Art Electronics

    • Larger 7-inch TFT instruments (GT & GT Pro, Rally & Rally Pro only).
    • New integrated My Triumph connectivity system (GT Pro & Rally Pro only).
    • New optimized cornering ABS and optimized cornering traction control, controlled by an Inertial Measurement Unit (GT & GT Pro, Rally & Rally Pro only).
    • Up to six riding modes: Rain, Road, Sport, Rider, Off-Road and Off-Road Pro.
    • New Triumph Shift Assist, Triumph’s proprietary up and down quickshifter (GT Pro & Rally Pro only).
    • New all-LED lighting with distinctive light pattern.
    • New secure mobile phone storage with USB charging.
    Triumph 900 technology

    Additional Upgrades

    • New top-specification Brembo Stylema monobloc brakes.
    • Larger 5.3-gallon fuel tank for advanced touring capability.
    • New premium bodywork with new colors and graphics.
    • Tubeless wire-spoke wheels on Rally and Rally Pro models.
    • New slip and assist clutch for all models.

    Accessible and Adaptable

    • Available Tiger 900 GT Low Ride Height version with unique suspension and lower seat.
    • Adjustable seat h (0.78 in) on all Tiger 900 models.
    • 65+ dedicated Tiger 900 accessories to complement your adventure.
    • Accessories for added comfort, protection and capability, plus all-new luggage.
    • Two new inspiration kits: Trekker (Touring) and Expedition (off-road).

    Accessory Range

    Tiger 900 accessories

    A range of over 65 genuine Triumph accessories are available for the new Tiger 900 models including 2 kits:

    The fully loaded Trekker inspiration kit showcases the Tiger’s even greater touring capability with GIVI Trekker panniers  plus powder coated mild steel mounting kit, Trekker top box and backrest, the sliding carriage kit, tank pad and screen deflector.

    Alternatively, the Expedition inspiration kit showcases the more overt off-road focused accessories available with the GIVI Expedition panniers and stainless steel mounting kit, 40-liter roll bag, headlight guard, fork protectors, aluminum radiator guard, upper engine bars and LED fog lights.

    New Styling and Bodywork

    All-new aggressive styling, re-designed smaller-scale bodywork, revised finishes and cleaner lines give the new Tiger 900 a more distinctive stance. This is supported by the narrow stand over w, the visually lighter front end and the dominant fuel tank design and size.

    • timthumb.php?src=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.advpu

    The all-new bodywork has a more focused and aggressive adventure style, and includes fuel tank, tank end panel, high mudguard, seat panel, radiator cowl and radiator duct exit. The finish and detailing is also improved to its highest-ever level.

    Colors, Pricing & Availability

    Tiger 900 Rally & Rally Pro: Matte Khaki, Sapphire Black and Pure White, all featuring contemporary new decals and a distinctive white frame inspired by the Tiger Tramontana rally bike

    Tiger 900 GT & GT Pro: Korosi Red, Sapphire Black and Pure White, all featuring premium tank badges and contemporary new decals

    Tiger 900: Pure White

    Triumph Tiger 900 in Karosi RedTriumph Tiger 900 GT Pro in Karosi Red.

    Tiger 900 Rally and Rally Pro will be available by March 2020, while the Tiger 900, Tiger 900 GT and GT Pro will be available in April of 2020. The entry-level Tiger 900 starts at $12,500, GT at $14,300 and the Rally at $15,000. Pro models get prices after January 2020.

    Triumph Tiger 900 Specs

    ENGINE TYPE: Liquid-cooled, 12-valve, DOHC, inline 3-cylinder
    CAPACITY: 888cc
    BORE X STROKE: 78×61.9 mm
    COMPRESSION: 11.27:1
    MAX POWER: 93.9 HP (70kW) @ 8,750 rpm
    MAX TORQUE: 64 ft-lbs (87 Nm) @ 7,250 rpm
    SYSTEM: Multi-point sequential electronic FI
    EXHAUST: Stainless steel 3-into-1 header system
    FINAL DRIVE: O-ring chain
    CLUTCH: Wet, multi-plate
    GEARBOX: 6 speed
    FRAME: Tubular steel frame, bolt-on subframe
    SWINGARM: Twin-sided, cast aluminum alloy
    FRONT WHEEL: STD/GT Cast alloy, 19″ x 2.5″; RALLY Tubeless spoke, 21″ x 2.15″
    REAR WHEELS: STD/GT Cast alloy, 17″ x 4.25″; RALLY Tubeless spoke, 18″ x 4.25″
    FRONT TIRE: STD/GT 100/90-19; RALLY 90/90-21
    REAR TIRE: STD/GT 150/70R17; RALLY 150/70R-17
    FRONT SUSPENSION: STD Marzocchi 45mm USD non-adjustable; GT Marzocchi 45mm USD rebound and compression; RALLY Showa 45mm USD rebound, compression and preload
    FRONT SUSP. TRAVEL: LRH 5.51″; STD/GT 7.1″; RALLY 9.45″
    REAR SUSPENSION: STD Marzocchi preload; GT Marzocchi preload and rebound; GT PRO Marzocchi electronic preload and rebound; RALLY Showa preload and rebound
    REAR SUSP. TRAVEL: LRH 5.95″; STD/GT 6.7″; RALLY 9.06″
    FRONT BRAKE: Twin 12.6 in floating discs, Brembo Stylema 4-piston monobloc calipers. Radial front master cylinder
    REAR BRAKE: Single 10 in disc. Brembo singlepiston sliding caliper
    ABS BRAKING STD ‘standard’ ABS; GT/RALLY optimized cornering ABS
    WIDTH HANDLEBARS STD 32.7″; GT 36.6″; RALLY 36.8″
    HEIGHT (W/O MIRRORS): LRH 54.5″-56.5″; STD/GT 55.5″-57.5″; RALLY 57.2″59.1″
    SEAT HEIGHT: LRH 29.9″-30.7″; STD/GT 31.9″-32.7″; RALLY 33.5″-34.3″
    WHEELBASE: STD/GT 61.3″; RALLY 61.1″
    RAKE: STD/GT 24.6º; RALLY 24.4º
    TRAIL: STD/GT 5.25″; RALLY 5.74″
    DRY WEIGHT: STD 423.3 lb; GT 427.7 lb; GT Pro 436.5 lb; RALLY 432.1 lb; RALLY Pro 443.1 lb
    TANK CAPACITY: 5.3 US Gallons
    FUEL CONSUMPTION: 55.4 MPG

  12. Published on 12.02.2019

    sidi-adventure-2-gore-tex-mid-h-boots-10

    Based on Sidi’s best-selling adventure boot, the Adventure 2 GORE-TEX, the new mid-h version strikes a balance between off-road protection and improved comfort on or off the bike. With its medium h, it’s lighter and more comfortable than the standard Adventure 2 Gore-Tex boot while still providing excellent protection in the foot and ankle area. 


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    The lower boot h offers riders greater ankle articulation making the Adventure 2 GORE-TEX Mid Boots easier to walk in, plus a slim profile promises better feel and dexterity on the bike. In addition, a waterproof Gore-Tex membrane provides superior protection from the elements, while remaining highly breathable.

    • timthumb.php?src=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.advpu
    • Equipped with Gore-Tex highly breathable and waterproof membrane to add a waterproof yet highly breathable barrier between the elements and the rider’s feet.
    • Bonded non-slip lug type sole.
    • Replaceable micro adjustable cam-lock buckle system with memory retention straps.
    • Sidi’s Full Grain Microfiber material is used for the upper’s construction along with Cordura.
    • Nylon inner sole with removable arch support pad
    • Lined with anti-abrasion Cambrelle® in the foot area for comfort, the upper is lined with Teflon mesh which prevents complete absorption of water and sweat. These materials will not retain water or sweat on the inside of the boot.
    • Slim, cool non-bootie design. Rigid, shock resistant, anatomically shaped heel cup for maximum protection.
    • Velcro upper closure
    • CE approved
    • Reflective panel placed above the heel for night riding visibility.

    Sidi Adventure 2 Gore-Tex Mid Boots are now available in sizes 42-48 with an MSRP of $349.99 USD.

    Shopping Options


  13. ARC-Battle-Born-Wind-Gloves-4-1024x683.j

    A few years ago, A.R.C. released the first iteration of their Battle Born gloves and they were pretty decent for dual sport and adventure riding, considering it was their first attempt. Instead of resting on their laurels though, the company analyzed input from customer reviews and their own riding experiences, then went back to the drawing board in an attempt to make them even better.  After all was said and done, they ended up with two different glove designs — one made with breathable material for warmer weather and another with wind blocking material. Both models are considered to be three-season gloves designed to work well in most conditions, except bitter cold and wet weather. We tested the wind blocking version, the Battle Born Wind Block Gloves, to see how they perform in a range of conditions. 

    Battle Born Wind Block gloves

    The biggest upgrade for this new glove compared to the original is the addition of D3O molecular padding to the knuckles. D3O is designed to absorb and dissipate energy in an impact, which will help save your knuckles in an accident or from banging into obstacles on tight trails. D3O is also soft and compliant, so it’s more comfortable than hard knuckle protectors.

    Wind Block gloves featuring D30 protection

    The Battle Born Wind Block is built with a goatskin leather palm that extends to the area between the fingers for increased abrasion protection. Goatskin can also be found on the fingertips, across the knuckles and the back of the thumbs. Neoprene with reflective accents makes up the back of the hand, while Velcro wrist closures help secure them. Additionally, a moisture wicking fleece inner liner offers comfort for a wide variety of temperatures, and riders with touchscreen devices will appreciate the touch-tech leather on the index fingers. 

    Features:

    • Constructed with goat skin leather and other performance materials for comfort and impact and wind protection.
    • D3O knuckle protection which offers the thinnest and most advanced protection against impacts.
    • Features Touch-Tech leather at forefingers to allow easy use with smartphones and navigation systems.
    • Polyester fleece inner liner for moisture wicking and wind blocking.
    • Velcro wrist closure.
    • Accordion leather stretch panels on the fingers for added comfort.
    • Silver reflective piping for added look and safety.

    How They Performed

    A.R.C. Battle Born gloves according leather

    A.R.C. is known for making affordable riding gear and these gloves are no different. Often times, sacrifices have to be made to hit a low price point though and that can result in a less durable or lower quality product. Sizing was spot on and considering the price tag, these gloves have proved more durable than expected. We have put them through all types of riding terrain, from deserts to alpine trails with temperatures from freezing to nearly triple digits. The only time I have been let down by the Battle Born Wind Block gloves was during wet weather. They are not designed to be waterproof, which is one reason why they are less expensive. 

    Battle Born gloves with goat skin

    One negative with these gloves is that if you do get caught in the rain, the fleece liner will cause them to take a long time to dry.  I have gotten these gloves wet while riding through a short rain and it has taken several days for them to completely dry out. On the plus side, these are very comfortable gloves and stay that way for most riding conditions. It would seem that the fleece liner and wind block material would make them incredibly hot during the summer, but they actually felt fine except on the hottest and most humid days.


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    Construction has proved to be top notch so far and they are showing very little signs of wear after a full summer of riding. The only noticeable wear is in the fingertips where the grippy texture of the palm and fingers is getting a bit smoother than when they were new and some slight wear on the palm where the neoprene thumb meets the goatskin. 

    The old versions of the Battle Born gloves touch screen index fingers just didn’t seem to work all that well.  While the new gloves touch-tech isn’t perfect, it is much improved and works pretty good most of the time. I usually have no trouble unlocking my phone and snapping photos without taking my gloves off.

    Battle Born gloves with touchscreen fingertips

    While comfort and features are important for day-to-day use, we also have to talk about how well the Battle Born Wind Block gloves protect you in a crash. Since these are intended for dual sport and adventure riding, you don’t get the hardcore abrasion resistance and armor of a full on street glove. They are designed to offer good feel and breathability during off-road riding like a motocross glove but with some additional protection for the street.

    Fortunately, we didn’t do crash tests with these gloves but they do feel like they would hold up well in most falls. They aren’t designed for high-speed slides, but the goatskin feels durable and should handle light abrasion in a lower speed accidents, especially on dirt, while the D3O offers good padding to keep the knuckles safe from impacts.

    Who Are They For

    Adventure riders that are looking for a no-nonsense glove that is comfortable and offers good protection at an affordable price will have a hard time finding a better deal than the Battle Born Wind Block gloves. If your rides include a lot of pavement riding then a more-robust street glove would be a better choice. On the other hand, those who ride a lot off-pavement, especially in drier climates, will find the Wind Block offers plenty of protection in the dirt with basic abrasion resistance for slower speeds on asphalt.

    Our Verdict

    The A.R.C. Battle Born gloves have continued to evolve and get better with this latest iteration, offering more features, improved comfort, and better protection. If your rides are more dirt oriented and you either don’t need waterproof gloves or plan on carrying an extra set of rain gloves, then these are well worth considering. Don’t let the low price tag fool you, these aren’t cheaply made gloves. But they are comfortable, durable, functional and work well for most riding conditions.

    ARC-Battle-Born-Wind-Gloves-5.jpg

    What We Liked

    • Low price for a great glove.
    • Proved comfortable over longer journeys.
    • Well made and excellent durability.

    What Could Be Improved

    • Use a quicker drying material for the inner liner.
    • Make a waterproof version.
    • Touch screen compatibility works decent but could be better.

    Battle Born Wind Block Specs

    Color: Black
    Sizes: Small to XXX-Large
    Price: $34.99

    Shopping Options

    8502e0c9c5070c3230f8c91c91a52983?s=80&r=

    Author: Chad Berger

    He’s a freelance journalist, photographer and tour guide from Wisconsin. Since 2004, Chad has been riding dual sport and adventure bikes all over the Midwest, the Black Hills of South Dakota, Moab, Baja, Alaska and many other places in between. He shares his experiences through the photography, videos and stories he produces from his trips. In 2008, Chad created a 600-mile dual sport route called the Trans Wisconsin Adventure Trail (TWAT), which eventually led to his becoming a tour guide for RIDE Adventures.

  14. yamaha-super-tenere-750-18-1024x719.jpg

    It seems to be the trend lately for manufacturers to release new adventure bike models with retro styling that pay tribute to the Dakar-replica adventure bikes of the early 90s. Colombian adventure rider, Dakar racer, bike builder, and adventure-parts maker Marco Saldarriaga, decided to take the opposite approach, restoring and upgrading an older Adventure Bike from that golden era, to bring it up to modern standards of performance. 

    He started with a well-used 1991 Yamaha XTZ 750 Super Ténéré, a bike with firm roots in the Paris-Dakar Rally being based on the race-winning YZE750T. He then stripped it down to the frame and improved or renewed virtually everything about the bike. The result is this incredible piece of eye candy — the Yamaha T7.5 Super Ténéré.

    Yamaha XTZ 750 Super Tenere

    North American readers are excused for not knowing that Yamaha ever made a sub-liter, parallel twin Super Ténéré because the bike was never sold here. Everyone else will recognize the machine as an homage to Yamaha’s golden days of desert racing.

    Yamaha-XTZ-750-Super-T%C3%A9n%C3%A9r%C3%Original 1991 Yamaha XTZ 750 Super Ténéré Marco Saldarriaga started with.
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    After acquiring the bike, Saldarriaga fired up the recently-overhauled engine to make sure everything was in order. Then he quickly reduced the whole bike to a pile of parts. Some were replaced, some were sent off to be powder coated. He repainted the engine and after fitting new carburetor intake boots, oil lines and other hardware, it looks like a zero-mile unit from 1991. 

    Yamaha XTZ 750 Super Tenereyamaha-super-tenere-750-2b-1024x683.jpg

    Yamaha has long since stopped supporting the bike, so some parts just aren’t available. That meant Saldarriaga, who owns a dual sport parts manufacturer in Colombia called Mastech, had to make things like wheel spacers, pistons for the brake calipers and a replacement cooling pipe. In fact, his custom bits are found all over the bike: radiator guard, bash plate, engine guard and luggage racks designed to work with his company’s own hard luggage.

    Rear wheel on the XTZ 750 Super Tenere

    He binned the stock rear shock and replaced it with an Ohlins S46DR1 unit custom valved for the application, and laser cut a set of custom dog bones to raise the rear of the bike 20mm. Of course a top-shelf rear suspension demands an equivalent set up in the front, so on went a set of Ohlins RXF 48 forks. He sourced an aftermarket triple clamp, intended for the more common XTZ 660 Tenere, from the German company OTR. The only adaptation needed to make it work was the addition of a 5mm spacer in the lower bearing. 

    yamaha-super-tenere-750-16.jpgyamaha-super-tenere-750-17-1024x719.jpg

    The front wheel is from a KTM 450 Rally replica Saldarriaga ran in 2014 Dakar, updated with a new 300mm disc and Brembo calipers sourced from a KTM 690 Enduro.  Keeping the mud in check, is a carbon-fiber front fender from Perfect Fairings. And an Arrow aftermarket exhaust system helps the weight significantly.

    yamaha-super-tenere-750-8-1024x683.jpg

    By building a custom mount, he was able to add an Ohlins steering stabilizer to the package. But one change up front necessitated another, as is usually the case, and soon he found himself designing new ways to mount the ignition switch, choke cable and steering stops. It’s a testament to his skills that they all look stock.

    T7.5 Super Tenere LED lights

    He also upgraded the lights to 5.75-inch twin LED units, but you know those didn’t just bolt in to a 28-year-old bike without some fabrication work. The same is true for the dash. Marco wanted to keep the clean, classic look while integrating modern digital instruments, which he accomplished by building a new dash and incorporating a digital tach and water temp display, along with a GPS-based speedometer/odometer. Larger Yamaha handlebars, carbon-fiber handguards with integrated signals and new mirrors finished the cockpit.

    yamaha-super-tenere-750-12-1024x683.jpgyamaha-super-tenere-750-19.jpg

    Bodywork was the final step. After making sure the the parts were perfect, Saldarriaga chose a classic white paint scheme with black and gold accents. The result is a bike that looks like a classic Paris-Dakra-era bike, yet modern and capable. As he said on his website when unveiling the result of countless hours wrenching, “Now you have to hold your breath and see the final bike.” It’s a stunning blend of old and new, form and function.

    To see the detailed build process and evolution go to perfect-fairings.com

    Photos by TwentySixColombia

    4604c6c362dda161ae1a7cee811096a6?s=80&r=

    Author: Bob Whitby

    Bob has been riding motorcycles since age 19 and working as a journalist since he was 24, which was a long time ago, let’s put it that way. He quit for the better part of a decade to raise a family, then rediscovered adventure, dual sport and enduro riding in the early 2000s. He lives in Arkansas, America’s best-kept secret when it comes to riding destinations, and travels far and wide in search of dirt roads and trails.

  15. yamaha-super-tenere-750-18-1024x719.jpg

    It seems to be the trend lately for manufacturers to release new adventure bike models with retro styling that pay tribute to the Dakar-replica adventure bikes of the early 90s. Colombian adventure rider, Dakar racer, bike builder, and adventure-parts maker Marco Saldarriaga, decided to take the opposite approach, restoring and upgrading an older Adventure Bike from that golden era, to bring it up to modern standards of performance. 

    He started with a well-used 1991 Yamaha XTZ 750 Super Ténéré, a bike with firm roots in the Paris-Dakar Rally being based on the race-winning YZE750T. He then stripped it down to the frame and improved or renewed virtually everything about the bike. The result is this incredible piece of eye candy — the Yamaha T7.5 Super Ténéré.

    Yamaha XTZ 750 Super Tenere

    North American readers are excused for not knowing that Yamaha ever made a sub-liter, parallel twin Super Ténéré because the bike was never sold here. Everyone else will recognize the machine as an homage to Yamaha’s golden days of desert racing.

    Yamaha-XTZ-750-Super-T%C3%A9n%C3%A9r%C3%Original 1991 Yamaha XTZ 750 Super Ténéré Marco Saldarriaga started with.
    ADVERTISEMENT

    After acquiring the bike, Saldarriaga fired up the recently-overhauled engine to make sure everything was in order. Then he quickly reduced the whole bike to a pile of parts. Some were replaced, some were sent off to be powder coated. He repainted the engine and after fitting new carburetor intake boots, oil lines and other hardware, it looks like a zero-mile unit from 1991. 

    Yamaha XTZ 750 Super Tenereyamaha-super-tenere-750-2b-1024x683.jpg

    Yamaha has long since stopped supporting the bike, so some parts just aren’t available. That meant Saldarriaga, who owns a dual sport parts manufacturer in Colombia called Mastech, had to make things like wheel spacers, pistons for the brake calipers and a replacement cooling pipe. In fact, his custom bits are found all over the bike: radiator guard, bash plate, engine guard and luggage racks designed to work with his company’s own hard luggage.

    Rear wheel on the XTZ 750 Super Tenere

    He binned the stock rear shock and replaced it with an Ohlins S46DR1 unit custom valved for the application, and laser cut a set of custom dog bones to raise the rear of the bike 20mm. Of course a top-shelf rear suspension demands an equivalent set up in the front, so on went a set of Ohlins RXF 48 forks. He sourced an aftermarket triple clamp, intended for the more common XTZ 660 Tenere, from the German company OTR. The only adaptation needed to make it work was the addition of a 5mm spacer in the lower bearing. 

    yamaha-super-tenere-750-16.jpgyamaha-super-tenere-750-17-1024x719.jpg

    The front wheel is from a KTM 450 Rally replica Saldarriaga ran in 2014 Dakar, updated with a new 300mm disc and Brembo calipers sourced from a KTM 690 Enduro.  Keeping the mud in check, is a carbon-fiber front fender from Perfect Fairings. And an Arrow aftermarket exhaust system helps the weight significantly.

    yamaha-super-tenere-750-8-1024x683.jpg

    By building a custom mount, he was able to add an Ohlins steering stabilizer to the package. But one change up front necessitated another, as is usually the case, and soon he found himself designing new ways to mount the ignition switch, choke cable and steering stops. It’s a testament to his skills that they all look stock.

    T7.5 Super Tenere LED lights

    He also upgraded the lights to 5.75-inch twin LED units, but you know those didn’t just bolt in to a 28-year-old bike without some fabrication work. The same is true for the dash. Marco wanted to keep the clean, classic look while integrating modern digital instruments, which he accomplished by building a new dash and incorporating a digital tach and water temp display, along with a GPS-based speedometer/odometer. Larger Yamaha handlebars, carbon-fiber handguards with integrated signals and new mirrors finished the cockpit.

    yamaha-super-tenere-750-12-1024x683.jpgyamaha-super-tenere-750-19.jpg

    Bodywork was the final step. After making sure the the parts were perfect, Saldarriaga chose a classic white paint scheme with black and gold accents. The result is a bike that looks like a classic Paris-Dakra-era bike, yet modern and capable. As he said on his website when unveiling the result of countless hours wrenching, “Now you have to hold your breath and see the final bike.” It’s a stunning blend of old and new, form and function.

    To see the detailed build process and evolution go to perfect-fairings.com

    Photos by TwentySixColombia

    4604c6c362dda161ae1a7cee811096a6?s=80&r=

    Author: Bob Whitby

    Bob has been riding motorcycles since age 19 and working as a journalist since he was 24, which was a long time ago, let’s put it that way. He quit for the better part of a decade to raise a family, then rediscovered adventure, dual sport and enduro riding in the early 2000s. He lives in Arkansas, America’s best-kept secret when it comes to riding destinations, and travels far and wide in search of dirt roads and trails.

  16. 2020-Africa-Twin-CRF1100l-1024x683.jpg

    Occurring just a few weeks after the EICMA motorcycle show in Milan, the International Motorcycle Show in Long Beach is the first opportunity for the US motorcycling public to get a look at the some of the latest and greatest two-wheeled wonders. Southern California is also where a large portion of the US motorcycle publications are centered, so manufacturers come in full strength aware a higher saturation of press will be in attendance.

    This year, top manufacturers showed off their wares to the press during Media Day, Friday morning before the doors opened to the crowds. Several new adventure motorcycles were on display. Noticeably absent though was KTM with their new 390 Adventure, as well as Husqvarna’s Norden 901 concept bike, and we were only given a glimpse on the big screen of Ducati’s tantalizing Desert X concept bike. Yet there was still plenty to feast our eyes on and receive more details about. Read on for a quick rundown and close-up look at the new Adventure Bike models displayed at the Long Beach IMS 2019.

    Honda CRF1100L Africa Twin

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    Both Africa Twin models receive increased power (10%) and weight reductions, along with Cruise Control and a TFT display as standard equipment. The standard model is now more streamlined with rear racks removed and a shorty windscreen. Just lifting it off the kickstand it felt noticeably lighter than the previous design. US pricing is $14,399 for the standard model and $15,199 for DCT.

    Honda Africa Twin Adventure Sports

    2020-Africa-Twin-CRF1100l-adventure-spor
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    The Adventure Sports model now features lean-angle sensitive LED cornering lights and a scooped-out touring seat for better long-range comfort. Both suspension travel and ground clearance have also been lowered on the Adventure Sports model to match the standard Africa Twin for 2020. US Pricing is $17,199 for the standard model and $17,999 for DCT.

    Harley-Davidson Pan America

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    Harley-Davidson showed off their first Adventure Bike with its bold, distinctive look – still undergoing the final development touches before a late 2020 release. Unfortunately, they put it in a glass box so we apologize for the reflection. The Pan America will be powered by an all-new, liquid-cooled, 60-degree 1250cc V-twin engine dubbed the Revolution Max. The new powerplant is said to pump out more than 145 horsepower and 90 ft-lbs of torque. Seeing it up close for the first time, it appeared more compact than we imagined. Details are still yet to be announced but expect the full-range of advanced electronic rider aids and touring accessories.

    Suzuki V-Strom 1050

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    suzuki-v-strom-1050-xt-5-1-1024x683.jpg

    For 2020, Suzuki bumped up performance on their liter-class V-Strom from 99.23 horsepower to 106 horsepower. Also new is re-styled bodywork with a neo-retro look that pays homage to the famous DR-Big from the early 90s. Other improvements include a host of new electronics like ride-by-wire, cruise control, updated linked ABS, Hill Hold control, refined 4-mode traction control, and more. Pricing for the standard V-Strom 1050 is $13,399 for the base model, $14,799 for the ‘XT’ with tubeless wire-spoke wheels, and $16,999 for the accessory-loaded ‘XT Adventure’ model.

    Suzuki V-Strom 1050 Concept

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    suzuki-v-strom-1050-concept-bike-5-1024x

    Suzuki also brought a concept bike they were showing off to the public for the first time. It’s still a work in progress and mainly cosmetic upgrades for now, but it shows Suzuki is taking the off-road potential of the V-Strom more seriously. Upgrades include unique graphics, engine guards, knobby tires, a real aluminum skidplate, yoshimura pipe, streamlined yoshimura LED turn signals, platform foot pegs, and auxiliary lights. Let’s hope the project has more mods to come.

    Yamaha Tenere 700

    2021-Yamaha-Tenere-700-3.jpg

    After a long wait, Americans are finally receiving the Tenere 700. The off-road-focused middleweight is designed to be light and simple with an LCD display and no electronic aids other than switchable on/off ABS. It’s also relatively inexpensive for its class with an introductory price announced at the show of just $9,999 USD. We’ve already gotten some testing on a European model and we are pretty sure this will be the hot bike in 2020 for North American adventure enthusiasts. Availability is expected to be Summer of 2020 and dealers are taking pre-orders.

    Moto Guzzi V85 TT Travel

    moto-guzzi-v85-tt-travel-3-1024x683.jpg

    Following a successful launch of their V85 TT adventure bike last year, Moto Guzzi presented the Travel version prepared with a selection of essential touring accessories. Equipment, made up of accessories from their catalogue, includes a higher Touring windshield, as well as a set of large-capacity panniers which can swallow a full-face helmet on the right side. Also included as standard are heated hand grips and LED Auxiliary lights. The Moto Guzzi V85 TT Travel is offered in an exclusive Sabbia Namib graphics for a distinctive look. Pricing is still TBA.

    Ducati Multistrada 1260S Grand Tour

    2021-Ducati-Multistrada-1260S-Grand-Tour

    The Ducati Multistrada Grand Tour is a special version of the 1260 S, with a dedicated color scheme and a range of premium touring equipment included standard. As the name suggests, the model was designed for long-distance travelling and features a center stand, panniers and a special-edition seat. Heated grips, additional LED auxiliary lights, a hands free gas cap, and tire pressure monitoring are also standard. Pricing is $23,295 allowing you to get all the factory equipment for just $2,000 more than the standard 1260 S.

    Zero Black Forest Edition

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    It may look somewhat subdued but the Zero silently churns out 70 horsepower and a whopping 116 ft-lb of torque available from a standstill! Zero’s most adventurous electric dual sport is equipped with three lockable cases, a touring seat, hand guards, crash bars, LED auxiliary lights and a headlight protector for off-road use. And with the optional Power Tank Battery, Zero claims it’s capable of 196 miles in the city or 110 miles on the highway. The DSR Black Forest Edition starts at $18,995.

    Triumph Bonneville Bud Ekins Special Edition

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    Unfortunately, Triumph didn’t bring its new Tiger 900 to the show, but we will be seeing it soon on December 3rd. While not an adventure bike, Triumph did display a new special edition ‘Bud Ekins’ Bonneville scrambler that pays tribute to the 1960s-era desert racer and stunt man to Steve McQueen. Bud was the rider who completed the famous fence jump in the movie “The Great Escape.” Styled after the 1959 Bonneville, the top dual sport of its day, the new model features vintage Triumph logos and Bud Ekins badges that celebrate the life and achievements of one of motorcycling’s off-road icons. Available in either 900cc (T100) or 1200cc (T120) versions with price tags of $10,950 and $12,350 respectively.

    Photos by Stephen Gregory

    1011496a47237e824cabca59676a3789?s=80&r=

    Author: Rob Dabney

    Rob Dabney started a lifelong obsession with motorcycles at the age of 15 when he purchased his first bike – a 1982 Honda MB5. Through his 20’s and 30’s he competed in off-road desert races, including the Baja 250, 500 and 1000. Eventually, his proclivity for exploration led him to dual sport and adventure riding. Rob’s never-ending quest to discover what’s around the next bend has taken him on Adventures in Mexico, North Africa, Europe, and throughout the American West. As a moto journalist, he enjoys inspiring others to seek adventure across horizons both near and far.

  17. 2020-Africa-Twin-CRF1100l-1024x683.jpg

    Occurring just a few weeks after the EICMA motorcycle show in Milan, the International Motorcycle Show in Long Beach is the first opportunity for the US motorcycling public to get a look at the some of the latest and greatest two-wheeled wonders. Southern California is also where a large portion of the US motorcycle publications are centered, so manufacturers come in full strength aware a higher saturation of press will be in attendance.

    This year, top manufacturers showed off their wares to the press during Media Day, Friday morning before the doors opened to the crowds. Several new adventure motorcycles were on display. Noticeably absent though was KTM with their new 390 Adventure, as well as Husqvarna’s Norden 901 concept bike, and we were only given a glimpse on the big screen of Ducati’s tantalizing Desert X concept bike. Yet there was still plenty to feast our eyes on and receive more details about. Read on for a quick rundown and close-up look at the new Adventure Bike models displayed at the Long Beach IMS 2019.

    Honda CRF1100L Africa Twin

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    Both Africa Twin models receive increased power (10%) and weight reductions, along with Cruise Control and a TFT display as standard equipment. The standard model is now more streamlined with rear racks removed and a shorty windscreen. Just lifting it off the kickstand it felt noticeably lighter than the previous design. US pricing is $14,399 for the standard model and $15,199 for DCT.

    Honda Africa Twin Adventure Sports

    2020-Africa-Twin-CRF1100l-adventure-spor
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    The Adventure Sports model now features lean-angle sensitive LED cornering lights and a scooped-out touring seat for better long-range comfort. Both suspension travel and ground clearance have also been lowered on the Adventure Sports model to match the standard Africa Twin for 2020. US Pricing is $17,199 for the standard model and $17,999 for DCT.

    Harley-Davidson Pan America

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    Harley-Davidson showed off their first Adventure Bike with its bold, distinctive look – still undergoing the final development touches before a late 2020 release. Unfortunately, they put it in a glass box so we apologize for the reflection. The Pan America will be powered by an all-new, liquid-cooled, 60-degree 1250cc V-twin engine dubbed the Revolution Max. The new powerplant is said to pump out more than 145 horsepower and 90 ft-lbs of torque. Seeing it up close for the first time, it appeared more compact than we imagined. Details are still yet to be announced but expect the full-range of advanced electronic rider aids and touring accessories.

    Suzuki V-Strom 1050

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    For 2020, Suzuki bumped up performance on their liter-class V-Strom from 99.23 horsepower to 106 horsepower. Also new is re-styled bodywork with a neo-retro look that pays homage to the famous DR-Big from the early 90s. Other improvements include a host of new electronics like ride-by-wire, cruise control, updated linked ABS, Hill Hold control, refined 4-mode traction control, and more. Pricing for the standard V-Strom 1050 is $13,399 for the base model, $14,799 for the ‘XT’ with tubeless wire-spoke wheels, and $16,999 for the accessory-loaded ‘XT Adventure’ model.

    Suzuki V-Strom 1050 Concept

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    Suzuki also brought a concept bike they were showing off to the public for the first time. It’s still a work in progress and mainly cosmetic upgrades for now, but it shows Suzuki is taking the off-road potential of the V-Strom more seriously. Upgrades include unique graphics, engine guards, knobby tires, a real aluminum skidplate, yoshimura pipe, streamlined yoshimura LED turn signals, platform foot pegs, and auxiliary lights. Let’s hope the project has more mods to come.

    Yamaha Tenere 700

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    After a long wait, Americans are finally receiving the Tenere 700. The off-road-focused middleweight is designed to be light and simple with an LCD display and no electronic aids other than switchable on/off ABS. It’s also relatively inexpensive for its class with an introductory price announced at the show of just $9,999 USD. We’ve already gotten some testing on a European model and we are pretty sure this will be the hot bike in 2020 for North American adventure enthusiasts. Availability is expected to be Summer of 2020 and dealers are taking pre-orders.

    Moto Guzzi V85 TT Travel

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    Following a successful launch of their V85 TT adventure bike last year, Moto Guzzi presented the Travel version prepared with a selection of essential touring accessories. Equipment, made up of accessories from their catalogue, includes a higher Touring windshield, as well as a set of large-capacity panniers which can swallow a full-face helmet on the right side. Also included as standard are heated hand grips and LED Auxiliary lights. The Moto Guzzi V85 TT Travel is offered in an exclusive Sabbia Namib graphics for a distinctive look. Pricing is still TBA.

    Ducati Multistrada 1260S Grand Tour

    2021-Ducati-Multistrada-1260S-Grand-Tour

    The Ducati Multistrada Grand Tour is a special version of the 1260 S, with a dedicated color scheme and a range of premium touring equipment included standard. As the name suggests, the model was designed for long-distance travelling and features a center stand, panniers and a special-edition seat. Heated grips, additional LED auxiliary lights, a hands free gas cap, and tire pressure monitoring are also standard. Pricing is $23,295 allowing you to get all the factory equipment for just $2,000 more than the standard 1260 S.

    Zero Black Forest Edition

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    It may look somewhat subdued but the Zero silently churns out 70 horsepower and a whopping 116 ft-lb of torque available from a standstill! Zero’s most adventurous electric dual sport is equipped with three lockable cases, a touring seat, hand guards, crash bars, LED auxiliary lights and a headlight protector for off-road use. And with the optional Power Tank Battery, Zero claims it’s capable of 196 miles in the city or 110 miles on the highway. The DSR Black Forest Edition starts at $18,995.

    Triumph Bonneville Bud Ekins Special Edition

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    Unfortunately, Triumph didn’t bring its new Tiger 900 to the show, but we will be seeing it soon on December 3rd. While not an adventure bike, Triumph did display a new special edition ‘Bud Ekins’ Bonneville scrambler that pays tribute to the 1960s-era desert racer and stunt man to Steve McQueen. Bud was the rider who completed the famous fence jump in the movie “The Great Escape.” Styled after the 1959 Bonneville, the top dual sport of its day, the new model features vintage Triumph logos and Bud Ekins badges that celebrate the life and achievements of one of motorcycling’s off-road icons. Available in either 900cc (T100) or 1200cc (T120) versions with price tags of $10,950 and $12,350 respectively.

    Photos by Stephen Gregory

    1011496a47237e824cabca59676a3789?s=80&r=

    Author: Rob Dabney

    Rob Dabney started a lifelong obsession with motorcycles at the age of 15 when he purchased his first bike – a 1982 Honda MB5. Through his 20’s and 30’s he competed in off-road desert races, including the Baja 250, 500 and 1000. Eventually, his proclivity for exploration led him to dual sport and adventure riding. Rob’s never-ending quest to discover what’s around the next bend has taken him on Adventures in Mexico, North Africa, Europe, and throughout the American West. As a moto journalist, he enjoys inspiring others to seek adventure across horizons both near and far.

  18. Published on 11.22.2019

    Tenere 700 intensive white color scheme Yamaha Tenere 700 in Intensity White color scheme.

    It’s been a long wait for the U.S. but Yamaha has finally announced pricing and expected delivery of the 2021 Tenere 700 for America, along with two more model colors. In addition to the previously announced Ceramic Ice color, Matte Black and Intensity White color schemes will be available, with all three models carrying an MSRP of $9,999 USD.

    With this announcement, the Tenere 700 enters the middleweight adventure segment at a very competitive price, a sure point in favor of the new machine before it hits our shores. Just for reference, the KTM 790 Adventure starts at $12,499, the Triumph Tiger 800 starts at $12,000 and the KTM 690 Enduro R sells for $11,699.

    Yamaha Tenere 700 in Ceramic IceYamaha Tenere in Ceramic Ice, the only color scheme previously announced for the US.

    As far as when we’ll see the new machine in the flesh, Yamaha has confirmed it will hit dealer floors in the early Summer of 2020 (around May/June). To offer riders a more customized experience, Yamaha is also developing a complete lineup of accessories that give customers the freedom to create their very own motorcycle to suit their riding style and personal preferences. The accessories are set to be received by Yamaha dealers at the same time as the Tenere 700.

    Yamaha Tenere 700 in Matte BlackYamaha Tenere 700 in Matte Black with accessories.
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    Powered by a CP2 689cc parallel-twin engine and equipped with a compact chassis, the rally-bred Tenere 700 is claimed by Yamaha to be one of the most versatile motorcycles in the class. Anyone interested in purchasing the much-anticipated Ténéré 700 can register to receive more information and updates from Yamaha by visiting yamahamotorsports.com  


  19. Published on 11.22.2019

    Tenere 700 intensive white color scheme Yamaha Tenere 700 in Intensity White color scheme.

    It’s been a long wait for the U.S. but Yamaha has finally announced pricing and expected delivery of the 2021 Tenere 700 for America, along with two more model colors. In addition to the previously announced Ceramic Ice color, Matte Black and Intensity White color schemes will be available, with all three models carrying an MSRP of $9,999 USD.

    With this announcement, the Tenere 700 enters the middleweight adventure segment at a very competitive price, a sure point in favor of the new machine before it hits our shores. Just for reference, the KTM 790 Adventure starts at $12,499, the Triumph Tiger 800 starts at $12,000 and the KTM 690 Enduro R sells for $11,699.

    Yamaha Tenere 700 in Ceramic IceYamaha Tenere in Ceramic Ice, the only color scheme previously announced for the US.

    As far as when we’ll see the new machine in the flesh, Yamaha has confirmed it will hit dealer floors in the early Summer of 2020 (around May/June). To offer riders a more customized experience, Yamaha is also developing a complete lineup of accessories that give customers the freedom to create their very own motorcycle to suit their riding style and personal preferences. The accessories are set to be received by Yamaha dealers at the same time as the Tenere 700.

    Yamaha Tenere 700 in Matte BlackYamaha Tenere 700 in Matte Black with accessories.
    ADVERTISEMENT

    Powered by a CP2 689cc parallel-twin engine and equipped with a compact chassis, the rally-bred Tenere 700 is claimed by Yamaha to be one of the most versatile motorcycles in the class. Anyone interested in purchasing the much-anticipated Ténéré 700 can register to receive more information and updates from Yamaha by visiting yamahamotorsports.com  


  20. Dunlop-Trailmax-Mission-review-1024x683.

    Scurrying across the parking lot about as gracefully as one can wearing a pair of moto boots, I wondered to myself “why am I always the last one ready?”. I was a minute or three late for the test ride of the new Dunlop Trailmax Mission dual sport tires and I could see most of the other journalists raring to go.

    I arrived at a long row of the latest and greatest adventure bikes, ranging from the Honda CB500X to the BMW R1250GS – all there for the taking and I’m the last to pick. One bike that didn’t already have a helmet on it was a KTM 1290 Super Adventure R. I coyly asked, “Is anyone on this?” Since no one answered, I eagerly hopped on.

    Dunlop Trailmax Mission Front Tire

    The 1290 Super Adventure R is one of my favorites – wicked power, long-range capable (except for the stupid little windscreen) and amazing off-road suspension that is head and shoulders above anything in the Liter+ Class. And what better bike to test a set of tires with than a 1290 Super Adventure? With 160 horsepower and 103 ft-lbs of torque, its roost can be lethal and it does power wheelies in 4th gear. Plus its tall suspension can achieve sportbike-like lean angles on asphalt making it punishing on a set of tires.

    KTM 1290 Super Adventure R shod with Dunlop Trailmax Mission 50/50 dual sport tires.

    Soon we were off for a full-day of riding in the mountains around Lake Arrowhead, California – an ideal testing ground with hundreds of miles of dirt roads, trails and twisty asphalt. Dunlop reps spoke confidently about their new Trailmax Mission dual sport tire’s versatility and performance in the previous evening’s presentation, marketed as a 50/50 tire and claiming it “delivers knobby-like performance off-road, has impressive grip on the street, plus great ride quality and stability everywhere it goes.” A bold statement, especially after getting a first look at them. They appear fairly smooth, more like the tires that come on your adventure bike from the factory than a proper set of knobs.

    Aiming High

    Just based on appearances, I had a feeling the Trailmax Mission tires wouldn’t be great in the dirt but I was willing to give them the benefit of the doubt and keep an open mind. This was Dunlop right? One of the largest manufacturers of tires in the world, who’ve been putting rubber on vehicles since the 1800s. And they were ‘all in’ with this project, starting with a ton of consumer research, rider surveys, meeting folks face to face at ADV Rallys to gather requirements… That all led to two years of development and no less than 30 prototype tires before coming up with the final design.

    Dunlop's lineup of dual sport tires.
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    Dunlop Tire Design Engineer, Ron Winkelman, admitted this was the most challenging project of his career, and one of the most rewarding. He fondly reminisced about hand cutting tires on the trail during testing to get immediate feedback from riders on different tread patterns. You could feel the sense of pride, dare I say ‘mission’ in this project.

    For many years Dunlop has been absent from the premium 50/50 dual sport tire segment. With the healthy growth of dual sports, scramblers and adventure bikes in the market, it was clear they needed to get into the game.. And when you are late to the game, you’ve got to get it right. But you also have the advantage of seeing what everyone has been doing wrong. Their goal was to reinvent the 50/50 tire, with a primary focus of delivering longevity and durability above all.

    Dunlop Trailmax Mission different front tire designs.The front uses a symmetrical tread for more even wear. The 17” and 19” diameter tires use a coffered out area on the knobs for greater traction to compensate for the smaller tread blocks compared to the 21″.

    “We developed a product that reaches both sides equally [street and dirt]. A product customers can run with confidence, and not feel like they have to compromise, and oh by the way, they are going to get that killer mileage they’ve been looking for,” said Mike Buckley, Senior VP, Sales and Marketing. With 50/50 dual sport tires typically lasting between 2500 to 4000 miles, some ‘killer mileage’ would be greatly appreciated.

    Dunlop confidently claims their new Trailmax Mission is able to rack up 8,000 miles on a rear and even more on the front. That is based on an independent test on a 250-mile mountain loop with mixed terrain on a 2017 Suzuki V-Strom 1000. They say even if you are aggressive on the throttle, those numbers should still be within reach. If true, that’s something we can all get excited about, especially with the high cost of tire changes at your local dealer.

    Trailmax Mission Technology

    So what could Dunlop do that hasn’t been done before to achieve this next-level performance and versatility? Reps claim they used all of their years of knowledge and experience in building both high-performance street and dirt tires to come up with the ideal 50/50 dual sport tire. They even integrated technology from their Falken tire division that makes off-road tires for light trucks.

    Dunlop Trailmax Mission staggered step technology.The Missions use ‘staggered step’ technology to increase rigidity and create additional edge grip surface area.

    Front and rear tires have distinctly different patterns and you might think they are two different tires at first glance. The front uses a symmetrical tread for more even wear, and 17” and 19” diameter tires use a coffered out area on the knobs for greater traction.

    Both front and rear tires use ‘staggered step’ technology on specific knobs to increase rigidity and create additional edge grip surface area. Like shark teeth, as one edge wears, there’s another one that steps in behind it to take its place. And deep tread grooves with connector blocks help the Missions grip in loose terrain while keeping lugs stabilized.

    Dunlop motorcycle tire technology.Dunlop used all of their bags of tricks to help ensure the Trailmax Missions punch above their weight.

    One of the most distinctive tire characteristics is the use of wraparound sidewall lugs to increase durability, allow lower tire pressures off-road, and keep the tire tracking straight in muddy or sandy conditions. The sidewall tread is even said to assist in steering out of ruts by providing extra side grip. Interestingly, the final design of the Trailmax Mission was so different from anything Dunlop has created before, that it required retooling of their existing machinery to build them.

    Street Test

    So with my interest piqued, it was time to put rubber to the road. We started off with a street test on a brisk spring morning. After getting warmed up (where’s that heated grips button again?), we eased into a relaxed pace on tight twisty roads. Not quite fast enough to push the tires though, so I backed off the rider in front of me a bit so I could get enough space to ride more aggressively through the next set of bends.

    Dunlop Trailmax Mission on the street.

    Some knobby-style tires like the Continental TKC 80 are pretty good in the twisties, so I expected the Dunlops would perform at least as well on the road portion of our test based on their smooth appearance. And perform well they did. As I turned up the pace a notch, I was not acclimated to the powerful front calipers on the KTM 1290 Adventure R quite yet. I ended up grabbing more brake than I should have while entering the turn, causing the front end to dive. A lesser tire, might have tucked the front but the Trailmax Mission was unfazed by my mistake.

    As the tires heated up, I was able to get the bike leaned deeper and deeper into turns. To my surprise, they gripped more like a sport bike tire than any dual sport tire I have been on before. And this was with a somewhat compromised 30psi in the tires for mixed on- and off-road testing.

    Dunlop Trailmax Mission rear and front differences.Front and rear tires have distinctly different patterns and you might think they are two different tires at first glance.

    During a quick break, we were told that we had a photo stop coming up. Normally, photographers setup for a shot in ideal conditions, but sometimes they aren’t thinking about the riders and pick a turn based on what looks good for their photos.  As I came in fast for a tight 25mph turn, wanting to get that awesome shot, I noticed the road was covered with pine needles. With eyes wide open, I delicately tried to keep the bike upright as I maneuvered it toward a less furry section of road. The tires didn’t seem to notice any lack of traction though and I was able to precisely change my line on the slippery surface.

    With such smooth riding, I began to wonder if it was the KTM’s sophisticated ABS and Traction Control systems keeping this beast in check. So with a big gulp, I turned off all the rider aids and threw it into ‘Sport’ mode. Normally that’s a recipe for disaster on a bike with this much power, but we’ve got to test these tires right?

    Dunlop Trailmax Mission asphalt test.

    Riding other 1290s unleashed, I’ve come out of turns blistering the tires on pavement with handlebars near full lock. Yet somehow on this day, my power slides were significantly subdued riding on the Trailmax Missions. These things just hook up! And if you do get a power slide going, it’s gradual and controllable. Without any abrupt slides to worry about, I could ride faster with a lot more confidence. But after testing full steam for a bit, I was relieved to put my electronic parachute back on again.

    We didn’t get on any highway stretches during the day but some long straights had us clocking well over highway speeds. There was no discernable whirring noise typical of dual sport knobbies. I also tried to ride in all the cracks and tar snakes I could find but the Missions remained as stable as any street tire. Even though I was expecting these tires to be good on the street, they still managed to exceed my expectations.

    Off-Road Test

    The off-road portion of our test was where I was less confident these tires were going to impress based on their appearance. But keeping an open mind, we set out on some flowing dirt roads and jeep trails that were a blast on the 1290 Super Adventure R. These were primo big bike roads with just enough rocks, whoops and the occasional soft spot to keep things fun and interesting. For the average big-bike rider who ventures off-road, this is the typical terrain they ride – staying clear of the technical rocky sections, mud and deep sand. 

    Dunlop Trailmax Mission dirt test.

    To make sure I was testing the tires and not the electronics, I turned off traction control and ABS, then selected ‘offroad’ mode throttle response to keep it at a usable 100 horsepower. On the mostly hard-packed terrain, the Dunlops gripped at a high level and offered a stable twitch-free ride. Just like on asphalt, they have a predictable slide once they break loose and overall good traction on anything from mild to medium off-road terrain. 

    Since we had a mixed group of riders with varying skills, we didn’t get into anything too challenging other than a short stretch of sand, so I got creative to push the limits of the tires. During a short break, I found a nice steep hill climb and descent for a quick test. The 1290 SAR had no problem powering up the hill and gripped slip-free like a tractor on the way up. Big bikes on smooth tires get good traction on hill climbs as long as it’s not soft, so I wasn’t all that impressed. But a heavy bike on a steep downhill running smooth tires is less graceful.

    During the descent, I anticipated a premature slide to kick in at any moment while delicately modulating the front and rear brakes. I could feel my rear tire start to get unweighted but the Trailmax Mission rear held on for dear life and it gripped far better than a smooth tire should. It will require further testing before I can be sure about its downhill performance, but for this particular descent it was better than expected.

    Dunlop-Trailmax-Mission-adventure-tire-r

    Scouring the terrain for the rough stuff, I found a stretch of side trail that was filled with soft sand and rocks. I headed into the chunky dirt you normally avoid like the plague during a ride, to see how much I could challenge the Trailmax Missions. To my surprise, the front tire tracked straight and didn’t wander, tuck or dive. I rode through the muck with good feel in the front end and it stayed up on top of it all. The rear tire was another story though. It began to spin and lost traction as soon as the soft stuff was more than a few inches thick. Repeating this experiment a few different times resulted in similar behavior. Not as bad as other smooth rear tires I’ve tested but ‘knobby-like’ it wasn’t.

    Dunlop Trailmax Mission riding in sand.

    Emergency braking, on dirt covered with a thin film of soft sand, was another test I performed. Grabbing a handful of front brake with ABS disabled, I was able to slow down the big 1290 Super Adventure to a rapid halt without tucking the front – a testament to the front tire’s exceptional grip. Overall, both tires offered confidence on the tracks we rode. Yet it was the front tire that excelled the most, while the rear tire revealed its limitations in loose terrain. 

    Who Are They For?

    The Mission’s excellent street performance and good control in most off-road terrain, make them a nice option for Adventure riders who love eating twisties and opt for less technical off-road routes. Assuming the 8,000-mile longevity is true, they would be a strong contender for long-range adventure travelers that don’t want to be burdened with changing tires on the road. They’d also make a great tire for most BDR routes, with enough longevity and versatility to link up several different states.  However, if you are looking for the hard routes at your local dual sport ride, you’d be better off with something more aggressive.

    The Bottom Line

    Is the Dunlop Trailmax Mission a 50/50 tire? Just as good on asphalt as they are in the dirt? Unfortunately no. Partly because they are so good on the street that they’d have to perform like a full-on DOT knobby to be equal in the dirt, and that wasn’t the case.

    dual sport tire ratings

    We know of some dual sport tires that are just as bad on the street as they are in the dirt, so are those more of a true 50/50 tire than the Trailmax Missions under that rating system? Some view the rating from a perspective of how much you ride street vs. dirt but that depends a lot on ‘how’ you ride. The point is, the whole dual sport tire rating system is flawed because the math assumes the higher the tire is rated at one end of the spectrum, takes away equally from the other. Can we get a new rating system please?

    We don’t blame Dunlop for rating these as a 50/50 tire though, following in the footsteps of other tire makers in the industry. While they do look fairly smooth, they wouldn’t appear out of place next to other tires rated 50/50 by their manufacturer like the Metzeler Karoo 3, Heidenau K60, Motoz Tractionator GPS, or Mitas E-07.

    Do the Missions offer knobby-like performance? Not quite. Using the popular TKC 80 as a benchmark though, I’d say the Missions have a significant advantage on the street where they are grippy, quiet and stable. Off-road they were a close match for traction, up until you got into softer, looser terrain. The Missions have no problem handling any trails in the typical “Adventure” range though. And if you are able to get roughly 3x the mileage out of a set of Trailmax Missions as Dunlop claims, then that is a major selling point.

    Dunlop Trailmax Mission wet pavement.

    While some riders might be disappointed they don’t offer more grip off-road, the engineers at Dunlop seemed to be focused on achieving their mileage goals as first priority based on consumer research. Personally, I was pleased with the front tire grip but wouldn’t have minded sacrificing 2,000 of that 8,000 miles of longevity on the rear for a little more traction in the dirt. Then again, I was testing on a 160 horsepower, 530-pound monster of a bike. On a lighter, less powerful machine, the Mission rear might feel significantly better. Clearly more testing is needed.

    The jury is still out on wet asphalt, deeper sand, mud, and rocky terrain, not to mention longevity. Luckily, we’ve got a fresh set of Dunlop Trailmax Mission tires sitting at the office ready to spoon on for a long-term test. And if claims are anywhere near accurate, we’ll have roughly 8,000 miles of great riding to fully analyze them. We’ll report back after giving them a proper test, including the gnarly stuff. Stay tuned!

    Gear We Used

    •  Helmet: Arai XD-4
    •  Jacket: Alpinestars Valparaiso 2
    •  Pants: Alpinestars Valparaiso 2
    •  Boots: Alpinestars Tech 10
    •  Gloves: A.R.C Battle Born Air

    1011496a47237e824cabca59676a3789?s=80&r=

    Author: Rob Dabney

    Rob Dabney started a lifelong obsession with motorcycles at the age of 15 when he purchased his first bike – a 1982 Honda MB5. Through his 20’s and 30’s he competed in off-road desert races, including the Baja 250, 500 and 1000. Eventually, his proclivity for exploration led him to dual sport and adventure riding. Rob’s never-ending quest to discover what’s around the next bend has taken him on Adventures in Mexico, North Africa, Europe, and throughout the American West. As a moto journalist, he enjoys inspiring others to seek adventure across horizons both near and far.

  21. Dunlop-Trailmax-Mission-review-1024x683.

    Scurrying across the parking lot about as gracefully as one can wearing a pair of moto boots, I wondered to myself “why am I always the last one ready?”. I was a minute or three late for the test ride of the new Dunlop Trailmax Mission dual sport tires and I could see most of the other journalists raring to go.

    I arrived at a long row of the latest and greatest adventure bikes, ranging from the Honda CB500X to the BMW R1250GS – all there for the taking and I’m the last to pick. One bike that didn’t already have a helmet on it was a KTM 1290 Super Adventure R. I coyly asked, “Is anyone on this?” Since no one answered, I eagerly hopped on.

    Dunlop Trailmax Mission Front Tire

    The 1290 Super Adventure R is one of my favorites – wicked power, long-range capable (except for the stupid little windscreen) and amazing off-road suspension that is head and shoulders above anything in the Liter+ Class. And what better bike to test a set of tires with than a 1290 Super Adventure? With 160 horsepower and 103 ft-lbs of torque, its roost can be lethal and it does power wheelies in 4th gear. Plus its tall suspension can achieve sportbike-like lean angles on asphalt making it punishing on a set of tires.

    KTM 1290 Super Adventure R shod with Dunlop Trailmax Mission 50/50 dual sport tires.

    Soon we were off for a full-day of riding in the mountains around Lake Arrowhead, California – an ideal testing ground with hundreds of miles of dirt roads, trails and twisty asphalt. Dunlop reps spoke confidently about their new Trailmax Mission dual sport tire’s versatility and performance in the previous evening’s presentation, marketed as a 50/50 tire and claiming it “delivers knobby-like performance off-road, has impressive grip on the street, plus great ride quality and stability everywhere it goes.” A bold statement, especially after getting a first look at them. They appear fairly smooth, more like the tires that come on your adventure bike from the factory than a proper set of knobs.

    Aiming High

    Just based on appearances, I had a feeling the Trailmax Mission tires wouldn’t be great in the dirt but I was willing to give them the benefit of the doubt and keep an open mind. This was Dunlop right? One of the largest manufacturers of tires in the world, who’ve been putting rubber on vehicles since the 1800s. And they were ‘all in’ with this project, starting with a ton of consumer research, rider surveys, meeting folks face to face at ADV Rallys to gather requirements… That all led to two years of development and no less than 30 prototype tires before coming up with the final design.

    Dunlop's lineup of dual sport tires.
    ADVERTISEMENT

    Dunlop Tire Design Engineer, Ron Winkelman, admitted this was the most challenging project of his career, and one of the most rewarding. He fondly reminisced about hand cutting tires on the trail during testing to get immediate feedback from riders on different tread patterns. You could feel the sense of pride, dare I say ‘mission’ in this project.

    For many years Dunlop has been absent from the premium 50/50 dual sport tire segment. With the healthy growth of dual sports, scramblers and adventure bikes in the market, it was clear they needed to get into the game.. And when you are late to the game, you’ve got to get it right. But you also have the advantage of seeing what everyone has been doing wrong. Their goal was to reinvent the 50/50 tire, with a primary focus of delivering longevity and durability above all.

    Dunlop Trailmax Mission different front tire designs.The front uses a symmetrical tread for more even wear. The 17” and 19” diameter tires use a coffered out area on the knobs for greater traction to compensate for the smaller tread blocks compared to the 21″.

    “We developed a product that reaches both sides equally [street and dirt]. A product customers can run with confidence, and not feel like they have to compromise, and oh by the way, they are going to get that killer mileage they’ve been looking for,” said Mike Buckley, Senior VP, Sales and Marketing. With 50/50 dual sport tires typically lasting between 2500 to 4000 miles, some ‘killer mileage’ would be greatly appreciated.

    Dunlop confidently claims their new Trailmax Mission is able to rack up 8,000 miles on a rear and even more on the front. That is based on an independent test on a 250-mile mountain loop with mixed terrain on a 2017 Suzuki V-Strom 1000. They say even if you are aggressive on the throttle, those numbers should still be within reach. If true, that’s something we can all get excited about, especially with the high cost of tire changes at your local dealer.

    Trailmax Mission Technology

    So what could Dunlop do that hasn’t been done before to achieve this next-level performance and versatility? Reps claim they used all of their years of knowledge and experience in building both high-performance street and dirt tires to come up with the ideal 50/50 dual sport tire. They even integrated technology from their Falken tire division that makes off-road tires for light trucks.

    Dunlop Trailmax Mission staggered step technology.The Missions use ‘staggered step’ technology to increase rigidity and create additional edge grip surface area.

    Front and rear tires have distinctly different patterns and you might think they are two different tires at first glance. The front uses a symmetrical tread for more even wear, and 17” and 19” diameter tires use a coffered out area on the knobs for greater traction.

    Both front and rear tires use ‘staggered step’ technology on specific knobs to increase rigidity and create additional edge grip surface area. Like shark teeth, as one edge wears, there’s another one that steps in behind it to take its place. And deep tread grooves with connector blocks help the Missions grip in loose terrain while keeping lugs stabilized.

    Dunlop motorcycle tire technology.Dunlop used all of their bags of tricks to help ensure the Trailmax Missions punch above their weight.

    One of the most distinctive tire characteristics is the use of wraparound sidewall lugs to increase durability, allow lower tire pressures off-road, and keep the tire tracking straight in muddy or sandy conditions. The sidewall tread is even said to assist in steering out of ruts by providing extra side grip. Interestingly, the final design of the Trailmax Mission was so different from anything Dunlop has created before, that it required retooling of their existing machinery to build them.

    Street Test

    So with my interest piqued, it was time to put rubber to the road. We started off with a street test on a brisk spring morning. After getting warmed up (where’s that heated grips button again?), we eased into a relaxed pace on tight twisty roads. Not quite fast enough to push the tires though, so I backed off the rider in front of me a bit so I could get enough space to ride more aggressively through the next set of bends.

    Dunlop Trailmax Mission on the street.

    Some knobby-style tires like the Continental TKC 80 are pretty good in the twisties, so I expected the Dunlops would perform at least as well on the road portion of our test based on their smooth appearance. And perform well they did. As I turned up the pace a notch, I was not acclimated to the powerful front calipers on the KTM 1290 Adventure R quite yet. I ended up grabbing more brake than I should have while entering the turn, causing the front end to dive. A lesser tire, might have tucked the front but the Trailmax Mission was unfazed by my mistake.

    As the tires heated up, I was able to get the bike leaned deeper and deeper into turns. To my surprise, they gripped more like a sport bike tire than any dual sport tire I have been on before. And this was with a somewhat compromised 30psi in the tires for mixed on- and off-road testing.

    Dunlop Trailmax Mission rear and front differences.Front and rear tires have distinctly different patterns and you might think they are two different tires at first glance.

    During a quick break, we were told that we had a photo stop coming up. Normally, photographers setup for a shot in ideal conditions, but sometimes they aren’t thinking about the riders and pick a turn based on what looks good for their photos.  As I came in fast for a tight 25mph turn, wanting to get that awesome shot, I noticed the road was covered with pine needles. With eyes wide open, I delicately tried to keep the bike upright as I maneuvered it toward a less furry section of road. The tires didn’t seem to notice any lack of traction though and I was able to precisely change my line on the slippery surface.

    With such smooth riding, I began to wonder if it was the KTM’s sophisticated ABS and Traction Control systems keeping this beast in check. So with a big gulp, I turned off all the rider aids and threw it into ‘Sport’ mode. Normally that’s a recipe for disaster on a bike with this much power, but we’ve got to test these tires right?

    Dunlop Trailmax Mission asphalt test.

    Riding other 1290s unleashed, I’ve come out of turns blistering the tires on pavement with handlebars near full lock. Yet somehow on this day, my power slides were significantly subdued riding on the Trailmax Missions. These things just hook up! And if you do get a power slide going, it’s gradual and controllable. Without any abrupt slides to worry about, I could ride faster with a lot more confidence. But after testing full steam for a bit, I was relieved to put my electronic parachute back on again.

    We didn’t get on any highway stretches during the day but some long straights had us clocking well over highway speeds. There was no discernable whirring noise typical of dual sport knobbies. I also tried to ride in all the cracks and tar snakes I could find but the Missions remained as stable as any street tire. Even though I was expecting these tires to be good on the street, they still managed to exceed my expectations.

    Off-Road Test

    The off-road portion of our test was where I was less confident these tires were going to impress based on their appearance. But keeping an open mind, we set out on some flowing dirt roads and jeep trails that were a blast on the 1290 Super Adventure R. These were primo big bike roads with just enough rocks, whoops and the occasional soft spot to keep things fun and interesting. For the average big-bike rider who ventures off-road, this is the typical terrain they ride – staying clear of the technical rocky sections, mud and deep sand. 

    Dunlop Trailmax Mission dirt test.

    To make sure I was testing the tires and not the electronics, I turned off traction control and ABS, then selected ‘offroad’ mode throttle response to keep it at a usable 100 horsepower. On the mostly hard-packed terrain, the Dunlops gripped at a high level and offered a stable twitch-free ride. Just like on asphalt, they have a predictable slide once they break loose and overall good traction on anything from mild to medium off-road terrain. 

    Since we had a mixed group of riders with varying skills, we didn’t get into anything too challenging other than a short stretch of sand, so I got creative to push the limits of the tires. During a short break, I found a nice steep hill climb and descent for a quick test. The 1290 SAR had no problem powering up the hill and gripped slip-free like a tractor on the way up. Big bikes on smooth tires get good traction on hill climbs as long as it’s not soft, so I wasn’t all that impressed. But a heavy bike on a steep downhill running smooth tires is less graceful.

    During the descent, I anticipated a premature slide to kick in at any moment while delicately modulating the front and rear brakes. I could feel my rear tire start to get unweighted but the Trailmax Mission rear held on for dear life and it gripped far better than a smooth tire should. It will require further testing before I can be sure about its downhill performance, but for this particular descent it was better than expected.

    Dunlop-Trailmax-Mission-adventure-tire-r

    Scouring the terrain for the rough stuff, I found a stretch of side trail that was filled with soft sand and rocks. I headed into the chunky dirt you normally avoid like the plague during a ride, to see how much I could challenge the Trailmax Missions. To my surprise, the front tire tracked straight and didn’t wander, tuck or dive. I rode through the muck with good feel in the front end and it stayed up on top of it all. The rear tire was another story though. It began to spin and lost traction as soon as the soft stuff was more than a few inches thick. Repeating this experiment a few different times resulted in similar behavior. Not as bad as other smooth rear tires I’ve tested but ‘knobby-like’ it wasn’t.

    Dunlop Trailmax Mission riding in sand.

    Emergency braking, on dirt covered with a thin film of soft sand, was another test I performed. Grabbing a handful of front brake with ABS disabled, I was able to slow down the big 1290 Super Adventure to a rapid halt without tucking the front – a testament to the front tire’s exceptional grip. Overall, both tires offered confidence on the tracks we rode. Yet it was the front tire that excelled the most, while the rear tire revealed its limitations in loose terrain. 

    Who Are They For?

    The Mission’s excellent street performance and good control in most off-road terrain, make them a nice option for Adventure riders who love eating twisties and opt for less technical off-road routes. Assuming the 8,000-mile longevity is true, they would be a strong contender for long-range adventure travelers that don’t want to be burdened with changing tires on the road. They’d also make a great tire for most BDR routes, with enough longevity and versatility to link up several different states.  However, if you are looking for the hard routes at your local dual sport ride, you’d be better off with something more aggressive.

    The Bottom Line

    Is the Dunlop Trailmax Mission a 50/50 tire? Just as good on asphalt as they are in the dirt? Unfortunately no. Partly because they are so good on the street that they’d have to perform like a full-on DOT knobby to be equal in the dirt, and that wasn’t the case.

    dual sport tire ratings

    We know of some dual sport tires that are just as bad on the street as they are in the dirt, so are those more of a true 50/50 tire than the Trailmax Missions under that rating system? Some view the rating from a perspective of how much you ride street vs. dirt but that depends a lot on ‘how’ you ride. The point is, the whole dual sport tire rating system is flawed because the math assumes the higher the tire is rated at one end of the spectrum, takes away equally from the other. Can we get a new rating system please?

    We don’t blame Dunlop for rating these as a 50/50 tire though, following in the footsteps of other tire makers in the industry. While they do look fairly smooth, they wouldn’t appear out of place next to other tires rated 50/50 by their manufacturer like the Metzeler Karoo 3, Heidenau K60, Motoz Tractionator GPS, or Mitas E-07.

    Do the Missions offer knobby-like performance? Not quite. Using the popular TKC 80 as a benchmark though, I’d say the Missions have a significant advantage on the street where they are grippy, quiet and stable. Off-road they were a close match for traction, up until you got into softer, looser terrain. The Missions have no problem handling any trails in the typical “Adventure” range though. And if you are able to get roughly 3x the mileage out of a set of Trailmax Missions as Dunlop claims, then that is a major selling point.

    Dunlop Trailmax Mission wet pavement.

    While some riders might be disappointed they don’t offer more grip off-road, the engineers at Dunlop seemed to be focused on achieving their mileage goals as first priority based on consumer research. Personally, I was pleased with the front tire grip but wouldn’t have minded sacrificing 2,000 of that 8,000 miles of longevity on the rear for a little more traction in the dirt. Then again, I was testing on a 160 horsepower, 530-pound monster of a bike. On a lighter, less powerful machine, the Mission rear might feel significantly better. Clearly more testing is needed.

    The jury is still out on wet asphalt, deeper sand, mud, and rocky terrain, not to mention longevity. Luckily, we’ve got a fresh set of Dunlop Trailmax Mission tires sitting at the office ready to spoon on for a long-term test. And if claims are anywhere near accurate, we’ll have roughly 8,000 miles of great riding to fully analyze them. We’ll report back after giving them a proper test, including the gnarly stuff. Stay tuned!

    Gear We Used

    •  Helmet: Arai XD-4
    •  Jacket: Alpinestars Valparaiso 2
    •  Pants: Alpinestars Valparaiso 2
    •  Boots: Alpinestars Tech 10
    •  Gloves: A.R.C Battle Born Air

    1011496a47237e824cabca59676a3789?s=80&r=

    Author: Rob Dabney

    Rob Dabney started a lifelong obsession with motorcycles at the age of 15 when he purchased his first bike – a 1982 Honda MB5. Through his 20’s and 30’s he competed in off-road desert races, including the Baja 250, 500 and 1000. Eventually, his proclivity for exploration led him to dual sport and adventure riding. Rob’s never-ending quest to discover what’s around the next bend has taken him on Adventures in Mexico, North Africa, Europe, and throughout the American West. As a moto journalist, he enjoys inspiring others to seek adventure across horizons both near and far.

  22. Dunlop-Trailmax-Mission-review-1024x683.

    Scurrying across the parking lot about as gracefully as one can wearing a pair of moto boots, I wondered to myself “why am I always the last one ready?”. I was a minute or three late for the test ride of the new Dunlop Trailmax Mission dual sport tires and I could see most of the other journalists raring to go.

    I arrived at a long row of the latest and greatest adventure bikes, ranging from the Honda CB500X to the BMW R1250GS – all there for the taking and I’m the last to pick. One bike that didn’t already have a helmet on it was a KTM 1290 Super Adventure R. I coyly asked, “Is anyone on this?” Since no one answered, I eagerly hopped on.

    Dunlop Trailmax Mission Front Tire

    The 1290 Super Adventure R is one of my favorites – wicked power, long-range capable (except for the stupid little windscreen) and amazing off-road suspension that is head and shoulders above anything in the Liter+ Class. And what better bike to test a set of tires with than a 1290 Super Adventure? With 160 horsepower and 103 ft-lbs of torque, its roost can be lethal and it does power wheelies in 4th gear. Plus its tall suspension can achieve sportbike-like lean angles on asphalt making it punishing on a set of tires.

    KTM 1290 Super Adventure R shod with Dunlop Trailmax Mission 50/50 dual sport tires.

    Soon we were off for a full-day of riding in the mountains around Lake Arrowhead, California – an ideal testing ground with hundreds of miles of dirt roads, trails and twisty asphalt. Dunlop reps spoke confidently about their new Trailmax Mission dual sport tire’s versatility and performance in the previous evening’s presentation, marketed as a 50/50 tire and claiming it “delivers knobby-like performance off-road, has impressive grip on the street, plus great ride quality and stability everywhere it goes.” A bold statement, especially after getting a first look at them. They appear fairly smooth, more like the tires that come on your adventure bike from the factory than a proper set of knobs.

    Aiming High

    Just based on appearances, I had a feeling the Trailmax Mission tires wouldn’t be great in the dirt but I was willing to give them the benefit of the doubt and keep an open mind. This was Dunlop right? One of the largest manufacturers of tires in the world, who’ve been putting rubber on vehicles since the 1800s. And they were ‘all in’ with this project, starting with a ton of consumer research, rider surveys, meeting folks face to face at ADV Rallys to gather requirements… That all led to two years of development and no less than 30 prototype tires before coming up with the final design.

    Dunlop's lineup of dual sport tires.
    ADVERTISEMENT

    Dunlop Tire Design Engineer, Ron Winkelman, admitted this was the most challenging project of his career, and one of the most rewarding. He fondly reminisced about hand cutting tires on the trail during testing to get immediate feedback from riders on different tread patterns. You could feel the sense of pride, dare I say ‘mission’ in this project.

    For many years Dunlop has been absent from the premium 50/50 dual sport tire segment. With the healthy growth of dual sports, scramblers and adventure bikes in the market, it was clear they needed to get into the game.. And when you are late to the game, you’ve got to get it right. But you also have the advantage of seeing what everyone has been doing wrong. Their goal was to reinvent the 50/50 tire, with a primary focus of delivering longevity and durability above all.

    Dunlop Trailmax Mission different front tire designs.The front uses a symmetrical tread for more even wear. The 17” and 19” diameter tires use a coffered out area on the knobs for greater traction to compensate for the smaller tread blocks compared to the 21″.

    “We developed a product that reaches both sides equally [street and dirt]. A product customers can run with confidence, and not feel like they have to compromise, and oh by the way, they are going to get that killer mileage they’ve been looking for,” said Mike Buckley, Senior VP, Sales and Marketing. With 50/50 dual sport tires typically lasting between 2500 to 4000 miles, some ‘killer mileage’ would be greatly appreciated.

    Dunlop confidently claims their new Trailmax Mission is able to rack up 8,000 miles on a rear and even more on the front. That is based on an independent test on a 250-mile mountain loop with mixed terrain on a 2017 Suzuki V-Strom 1000. They say even if you are aggressive on the throttle, those numbers should still be within reach. If true, that’s something we can all get excited about, especially with the high cost of tire changes at your local dealer.

    Trailmax Mission Technology

    So what could Dunlop do that hasn’t been done before to achieve this next-level performance and versatility? Reps claim they used all of their years of knowledge and experience in building both high-performance street and dirt tires to come up with the ideal 50/50 dual sport tire. They even integrated technology from their Falken tire division that makes off-road tires for light trucks.

    Dunlop Trailmax Mission staggered step technology.The Missions use ‘staggered step’ technology to increase rigidity and create additional edge grip surface area.

    Front and rear tires have distinctly different patterns and you might think they are two different tires at first glance. The front uses a symmetrical tread for more even wear, and 17” and 19” diameter tires use a coffered out area on the knobs for greater traction.

    Both front and rear tires use ‘staggered step’ technology on specific knobs to increase rigidity and create additional edge grip surface area. Like shark teeth, as one edge wears, there’s another one that steps in behind it to take its place. And deep tread grooves with connector blocks help the Missions grip in loose terrain while keeping lugs stabilized.

    Dunlop motorcycle tire technology.Dunlop used all of their bags of tricks to help ensure the Trailmax Missions punch above their weight.

    One of the most distinctive tire characteristics is the use of wraparound sidewall lugs to increase durability, allow lower tire pressures off-road, and keep the tire tracking straight in muddy or sandy conditions. The sidewall tread is even said to assist in steering out of ruts by providing extra side grip. Interestingly, the final design of the Trailmax Mission was so different from anything Dunlop has created before, that it required retooling of their existing machinery to build them.

    Street Test

    So with my interest piqued, it was time to put rubber to the road. We started off with a street test on a brisk spring morning. After getting warmed up (where’s that heated grips button again?), we eased into a relaxed pace on tight twisty roads. Not quite fast enough to push the tires though, so I backed off the rider in front of me a bit so I could get enough space to ride more aggressively through the next set of bends.

    Dunlop Trailmax Mission on the street.

    Some knobby-style tires like the Continental TKC 80 are pretty good in the twisties, so I expected the Dunlops would perform at least as well on the road portion of our test based on their smooth appearance. And perform well they did. As I turned up the pace a notch, I was not acclimated to the powerful front calipers on the KTM 1290 Adventure R quite yet. I ended up grabbing more brake than I should have while entering the turn, causing the front end to dive. A lesser tire, might have tucked the front but the Trailmax Mission was unfazed by my mistake.

    As the tires heated up, I was able to get the bike leaned deeper and deeper into turns. To my surprise, they gripped more like a sport bike tire than any dual sport tire I have been on before. And this was with a somewhat compromised 30psi in the tires for mixed on- and off-road testing.

    Dunlop Trailmax Mission rear and front differences.Front and rear tires have distinctly different patterns and you might think they are two different tires at first glance.

    During a quick break, we were told that we had a photo stop coming up. Normally, photographers setup for a shot in ideal conditions, but sometimes they aren’t thinking about the riders and pick a turn based on what looks good for their photos.  As I came in fast for a tight 25mph turn, wanting to get that awesome shot, I noticed the road was covered with pine needles. With eyes wide open, I delicately tried to keep the bike upright as I maneuvered it toward a less furry section of road. The tires didn’t seem to notice any lack of traction though and I was able to precisely change my line on the slippery surface.

    With such smooth riding, I began to wonder if it was the KTM’s sophisticated ABS and Traction Control systems keeping this beast in check. So with a big gulp, I turned off all the rider aids and threw it into ‘Sport’ mode. Normally that’s a recipe for disaster on a bike with this much power, but we’ve got to test these tires right?

    Dunlop Trailmax Mission asphalt test.

    Riding other 1290s unleashed, I’ve come out of turns blistering the tires on pavement with handlebars near full lock. Yet somehow on this day, my power slides were significantly subdued riding on the Trailmax Missions. These things just hook up! And if you do get a power slide going, it’s gradual and controllable. Without any abrupt slides to worry about, I could ride faster with a lot more confidence. But after testing full steam for a bit, I was relieved to put my electronic parachute back on again.

    We didn’t get on any highway stretches during the day but some long straights had us clocking well over highway speeds. There was no discernable whirring noise typical of dual sport knobbies. I also tried to ride in all the cracks and tar snakes I could find but the Missions remained as stable as any street tire. Even though I was expecting these tires to be good on the street, they still managed to exceed my expectations.

    Off-Road Test

    The off-road portion of our test was where I was less confident these tires were going to impress based on their appearance. But keeping an open mind, we set out on some flowing dirt roads and jeep trails that were a blast on the 1290 Super Adventure R. These were primo big bike roads with just enough rocks, whoops and the occasional soft spot to keep things fun and interesting. For the average big-bike rider who ventures off-road, this is the typical terrain they ride – staying clear of the technical rocky sections, mud and deep sand. 

    Dunlop Trailmax Mission dirt test.

    To make sure I was testing the tires and not the electronics, I turned off traction control and ABS, then selected ‘offroad’ mode throttle response to keep it at a usable 100 horsepower. On the mostly hard-packed terrain, the Dunlops gripped at a high level and offered a stable twitch-free ride. Just like on asphalt, they have a predictable slide once they break loose and overall good traction on anything from mild to medium off-road terrain. 

    Since we had a mixed group of riders with varying skills, we didn’t get into anything too challenging other than a short stretch of sand, so I got creative to push the limits of the tires. During a short break, I found a nice steep hill climb and descent for a quick test. The 1290 SAR had no problem powering up the hill and gripped slip-free like a tractor on the way up. Big bikes on smooth tires get good traction on hill climbs as long as it’s not soft, so I wasn’t all that impressed. But a heavy bike on a steep downhill running smooth tires is less graceful.

    During the descent, I anticipated a premature slide to kick in at any moment while delicately modulating the front and rear brakes. I could feel my rear tire start to get unweighted but the Trailmax Mission rear held on for dear life and it gripped far better than a smooth tire should. It will require further testing before I can be sure about its downhill performance, but for this particular descent it was better than expected.

    Dunlop-Trailmax-Mission-adventure-tire-r

    Scouring the terrain for the rough stuff, I found a stretch of side trail that was filled with soft sand and rocks. I headed into the chunky dirt you normally avoid like the plague during a ride, to see how much I could challenge the Trailmax Missions. To my surprise, the front tire tracked straight and didn’t wander, tuck or dive. I rode through the muck with good feel in the front end and it stayed up on top of it all. The rear tire was another story though. It began to spin and lost traction as soon as the soft stuff was more than a few inches thick. Repeating this experiment a few different times resulted in similar behavior. Not as bad as other smooth rear tires I’ve tested but ‘knobby-like’ it wasn’t.

    Dunlop Trailmax Mission riding in sand.

    Emergency braking, on dirt covered with a thin film of soft sand, was another test I performed. Grabbing a handful of front brake with ABS disabled, I was able to slow down the big 1290 Super Adventure to a rapid halt without tucking the front – a testament to the front tire’s exceptional grip. Overall, both tires offered confidence on the tracks we rode. Yet it was the front tire that excelled the most, while the rear tire revealed its limitations in loose terrain. 

    Who Are They For?

    The Mission’s excellent street performance and good control in most off-road terrain, make them a nice option for Adventure riders who love eating twisties and opt for less technical off-road routes. Assuming the 8,000-mile longevity is true, they would be a strong contender for long-range adventure travelers that don’t want to be burdened with changing tires on the road. They’d also make a great tire for most BDR routes, with enough longevity and versatility to link up several different states.  However, if you are looking for the hard routes at your local dual sport ride, you’d be better off with something more aggressive.

    The Bottom Line

    Is the Dunlop Trailmax Mission a 50/50 tire? Just as good on asphalt as they are in the dirt? Unfortunately no. Partly because they are so good on the street that they’d have to perform like a full-on DOT knobby to be equal in the dirt, and that wasn’t the case.

    dual sport tire ratings

    We know of some dual sport tires that are just as bad on the street as they are in the dirt, so are those more of a true 50/50 tire than the Trailmax Missions under that rating system? Some view the rating from a perspective of how much you ride street vs. dirt but that depends a lot on ‘how’ you ride. The point is, the whole dual sport tire rating system is flawed because the math assumes the higher the tire is rated at one end of the spectrum, takes away equally from the other. Can we get a new rating system please?

    We don’t blame Dunlop for rating these as a 50/50 tire though, following in the footsteps of other tire makers in the industry. While they do look fairly smooth, they wouldn’t appear out of place next to other tires rated 50/50 by their manufacturer like the Metzeler Karoo 3, Heidenau K60, Motoz Tractionator GPS, or Mitas E-07.

    Do the Missions offer knobby-like performance? Not quite. Using the popular TKC 80 as a benchmark though, I’d say the Missions have a significant advantage on the street where they are grippy, quiet and stable. Off-road they were a close match for traction, up until you got into softer, looser terrain. The Missions have no problem handling any trails in the typical “Adventure” range though. And if you are able to get roughly 3x the mileage out of a set of Trailmax Missions as Dunlop claims, then that is a major selling point.

    Dunlop Trailmax Mission wet pavement.

    While some riders might be disappointed they don’t offer more grip off-road, the engineers at Dunlop seemed to be focused on achieving their mileage goals as first priority based on consumer research. Personally, I was pleased with the front tire grip but wouldn’t have minded sacrificing 2,000 of that 8,000 miles of longevity on the rear for a little more traction in the dirt. Then again, I was testing on a 160 horsepower, 530-pound monster of a bike. On a lighter, less powerful machine, the Mission rear might feel significantly better. Clearly more testing is needed.

    The jury is still out on wet asphalt, deeper sand, mud, and rocky terrain, not to mention longevity. Luckily, we’ve got a fresh set of Dunlop Trailmax Mission tires sitting at the office ready to spoon on for a long-term test. And if claims are anywhere near accurate, we’ll have roughly 8,000 miles of great riding to fully analyze them. We’ll report back after giving them a proper test, including the gnarly stuff. Stay tuned!

    Gear We Used

    •  Helmet: Arai XD-4
    •  Jacket: Alpinestars Valparaiso 2
    •  Pants: Alpinestars Valparaiso 2
    •  Boots: Alpinestars Tech 10
    •  Gloves: A.R.C Battle Born Air

    1011496a47237e824cabca59676a3789?s=80&r=

    Author: Rob Dabney

    Rob Dabney started a lifelong obsession with motorcycles at the age of 15 when he purchased his first bike – a 1982 Honda MB5. Through his 20’s and 30’s he competed in off-road desert races, including the Baja 250, 500 and 1000. Eventually, his proclivity for exploration led him to dual sport and adventure riding. Rob’s never-ending quest to discover what’s around the next bend has taken him on Adventures in Mexico, North Africa, Europe, and throughout the American West. As a moto journalist, he enjoys inspiring others to seek adventure across horizons both near and far.

  23. Touratech Aventuro Traveller Modular Helmet Launched

    Touratech is launching an all-new modular adventure helmet, the Aventuro Traveller, which replaces the outgoing Aventuro Mod in their lineup. The new Aventuro Traveller features a flip-up design with huge airflow, yet Touratech says it is designed to remain quiet on the highway. It offers the communication convenience that only a modular helmet can provide, while still being lightweight for all-day comfort.

    A helmet’s job is to keep you protected. A side effect of this protection is often excessive heat for the rider. The Aventuro Traveller solves this problem with a peak design that directs airflow into the oversized vent on the forehead, which distributes air through the liner keeping the rider’s head cool. In fact, Touratech claims the flow is so great that the helmet liner comes with a ‘low-flow’ flap that can be closed to reduce airflow for riding in cooler weather. Further airflow cools the rider’s face by entering through the large chin vent. The glove-friendly vents are easy to open and close while riding.

    Touratech Aventuro Traveller carbon fiber version

    The Aventuro Traveller is lighter than its predecessor, the Aventuro Mod, and most other modular helmets on the market. The carbon version is a half-pound lighter than the previous model and the multi-fiber version is a third-of-a-pound lighter. The benefit is reduced neck strain and improved rider comfort for long days in the saddle.


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    “We expect this helmet to hit the sweet spot for many travelers and adventure riders because it has the flip-up feature we love for interacting with people at the gas station or communicating with our riding buddies, but it’s lightweight and has lots of airflow like a good off-road helmet should. It’s the best of both worlds.” — Paul Guillien, CEO, Touratech-USA

    An innovative double seal on the shield and chin bar closure keeps rain and dust out while reducing sound levels for a comfortable ride. A large opening provides better peripheral vision and accommodates goggles & glasses. It also features an integrated sun visor that quickly flips down with a glove friendly control to reduce glare while riding.

    The shield is easy to open with either hand using grip tabs located on both sides and it stays open in 4 positions with strong detents and comes with a Pinlock© insert to prevent fogging. The ‘no-grab’ peak design cuts through the wind minimizing neck strain and includes an optional extension with two length settings.

    Weight Comparison

    Touratech Helmet Model Weight (lbs)
    Aventuro MOD 4.14
    Aventuro Traveller (Fiberglass) 3.82
    Aventuro Traveller (Carbon Fiber) 3.65

    A gravity-defying chin bar stays in the up position without surprise closings like other modular helmets. A quick-ratchet buckle with stainless steel mechanism provides quick closure of the chinstrap and reliable performance for years.

    The helmet, manufactured by Nexx, is set up to accommodate most communication systems including SENA, Scala Rider and more. Cavities for speakers and microphone and easy routing paths for wires make communication installation a snap.

    Price & Styles

    The Aventuro Traveller is available in 3 graphics styles for the carbon fiber version which retails for $749, and 2 solid colors for the Multi-fiber version which retails for $649. Sizes range from XS to 3XL. They are available for pre-order now and will be in the USA in early 2020. The Aventuro Traveller will be on display at Touratech’s booth during the Long Beach IMS show November 22nd to the 24th. For more information go to touratech-usa.com

    Aventuro Traveller Features

    • Peak & vents work together to maximize cooling airflow around head
    • Offers 40% more airflow than the Aventuro Mod it replaces
    • Large closeable chin vent for cooling rider’s face
    • Easy-open & easy-close, glove-friendly vent controls
    • Lightweight design for reduced neck strain and all-day comfort
    • ‘No-grab’ peak design cuts through wind cleanly
    • Anti-gravity chin bar stays up with no surprise closures
    • Double seals keep rain and dust out while reducing sound levels
    • Wide field of vision to take in sights and boost safety
    • Eyeglasses friendly, with opening large enough for goggles
    • Quick-ratchet chinstrap for easy action and smooth operation
    • COOLMAX liners for moisture wicking dry comfort
    • One-piece liner & neck-roll for easy removal for cleaning
    • Internal sunshade that flips down
    • Includes Pinlock© shield and insert to minimize fogging
    • Intercom system ready, with speaker cavities, wire routing paths, clamp-on mount
    • Camera mount for top included
    • Made in Portugal
    • DOT and ECE certified

  24. Sidi has announced an all-new flagship motocross boot for for 2020 – the Sidi Atojo SR.  The Atojo is designed to be light, sleek for excellent bike control, and sits above the Crossfire 3 in Sidi”s motocross boot line.

    When designing the Atojo SR with input from professional riders, Sidi wanted to create a boot that was lighter in the upper area while still offering the ankle protection and replaceable parts the Italian bootmaker is known for.  Nine-time MXGP World Champion Antonio Cairoli, two-time MX2 champion Jorge Prado, and long-time MXGP racer Alessandro Lupino worked with Sidi’s technicians to finalize every detail on the Atojo. The riders were so essential in the development of the boot that Sidi named it after them in recognition of their efforts – A (Alessandro Lupino)  TO (Tony Cairoli) JO (Jorge Prado).

    Sidi Atojo SR motocross boot

    The Atojo has a unique ‘dual’ ankle pivot design, with one hinge above the ankle and one below.  There is also support bracing inside the boot that is designed to prevent hyperextension of the ankle, instep and Achilles tendon. Three hyperextension systems are built into the boot, including a replaceable insert on the front of the boot that allows a specific amount of tibia movement but freezes if bending becomes excessive. Rubber inserts along the suede and plastic inner shin provide grip on the bike and the sole is easily replaceable via four bolts. 


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    The overall h of the Atojo is 1-cm lower than the Crossfire 3 and the sole base is thicker for greater engagement with the upper boot. In addition, the dual hinge system improves fluidity of movement in the ankle without compromising rigidity and lateral protection. Better yet, the new Atojo boot is over one pound lighter ‘per boot’ than the Crossfire 3.

    ATOJO SR Hinge System

    Atojo SR has two flex points: the first hinge is positioned under the ankle, to reduce thickness and make the boot smoother on the inside and more aerodynamic overall. Ankle support bracing inside the boot allows for only a limited range of movement to prevent hyper-extension of the ankle, of the instep and of the back tendon. This technology gives the rider greater security. The second joint, above the ankle, working in sync with the lower hinge, improves the flexibility of the boot, making the bending movement fluid without compromising rigidity and lateral protection.

    Sidi Atojo SR features 2 flex points

    There are three anti hyperextension systems for the foot. The first is located on the first hinge, the second on the back of the boot (the bootleg leans on the ankle avoiding extra bending backwards), the third is frontal and is made up of an innovative system that, through a screw on replaceable insert, allows a specific tibia flexion range and freezes if bending is excessive. A bootleg in PU, connected to the ankle strap through the second hinge, protects the back of the boot and is positioned between the upper and the lining.

    SRS SOLE: SR Dovetail Sole

    SRS sole has an innovative replacement system
    • The SR (Sole Replacement System) interchangeable sole has an innovative design and replacement system. Design and technology are patented by Sidi. 
    • The central part of the sole is made up of a rubber insert with a new interlocking Dovetail system and 4 screws for easy replacement. 
    • The sole base is slightly higher than the Crossfire 3 for greater engagement with the upper.
    • The tip, with traction grooves, and heel are fixed for race level use. An enduro lug sole is also available.
    • The heel area has a fixed insert in soft PU that makes the boot more stable and offers grip against the bike.

    The new Sidi Atojo SR MX boots will be available March 2020 with an MSRP of $599.99. For more details go to the Motonation website.

    Atojo SR Technical Data

    • The ATOJO SR’s upper uses proven “TECHNOMICRO” microfiber panels equipped with high impact plastic protection. The tongue and front and rear joints are padded with materials resistant to water and the absorption of sweat, dust and mud.
    • The boots toe area outer surface is entirely wrapped in high impact plastic with a grip enhancing surface.
    • The Atojo is equipped with a rigid and replaceable nylon insert for metatarsus protection which protects the inside of the boot in case the rider’s foot slips off the footpeg.
    • The Atojo SR plastics have an all new design. The high impact plastic heel is shaped and specially molded to improve foot safety in case of torsional twists and is shaped to ensure comfort and stability.
    • On the inner shin, the boot leg is built of protective suede with embossed rubber inserts which, in addition to providing good grip on the bike, protect the leg from engine heat. Rubber inserts for a smoother surface area, greater grip and control are strategically located on the inside of the ankle.
    • The high impact plastic shin plate is anatomically shaped, its structure also extends under the upper to increase protection.
    • The ATOJO SR uses a 3-buckle closure system. Each buckle works independently of the other. The buckle, micrometric memory adjustment strap and hook are user replaceable.
    • The buckles have only one fixed point at the attachment screw which ensures easy closing allowing the boot to adapt to the leg of the rider and to provide greater comfort.
    • A spoiler has been added to the lower buckle to deflect debris away from the buckle.
    • Cambrelle is used to line the foot contact surface. The polyamide structure of Cambrelle has a high resistance to abrasion and a great degree of moisture absorption, thus ensuring a rapid drying of the fabric and preventing the onset of mold. From the ankle to mid-calf the Atojo is lined with a jersey treated material with a Teflon fabric protector. The Teflon treatment prevents absorption of water and sweat.
    • The malleolus area is protected by ergonomic padding with memory.
    • Around the calf there’s an elastic gaiter with an anti-heat protection panel/calf plate. The gaiter is closed with a Velcro flap to prevent the entry of rocks and dirt and features a wide adjustment.
    • The ankle panel with the central strap is replaceable using 4 screws that connect it to the boot
    • The shin plate is anatomically shaped PU and extends under the upper for extra protection
    Sidi Atojo SR motocross boots in different colors.

  25. It’s beginning to feel a lot like Christmas for adventure bike fans, especially those looking for a mid-range ADV with all the fixings: off-road chops, on-road performance and touring-friendly amenities. 

    Of course we’d already had a sneak peek at Triumph’s new Tiger, set to replace the Tiger 800 range, via spy photos taken in Germany back in August. The prototype revealed a raft of revisions including a new frame, tubeless wire-spoke wheels, and what appears to be new suspension components. 

    Triumph teases launch of new Tiger 900

    These changes also appear in the latest teaser video showing a Tiger 900 honed for adventure, tearing up landscapes ranging from snowy fields, to steep, loose trails and a bit of highway to boot. The only text on the teaser page promises that the two new Tiger models, a Rally and GT, have been transformed in every possible way: “Off-road, on road, technology, specification, handling, performance and character.”


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    Yup, that’s a lot. What we are sure about is that in addition to new chassis and suspension, there will be a new larger TFT likely to display an array of IMU-based e-goodies on-point with the inertial-metrics offered on the KTM 790 ADV and BMW F850GS. 

    2020 Triumph Tiger 900 Rally and GTThe new Tiger 900 in action

    Triumph’s famously smooth liquid-cooled 800cc, 12-valve triple, which already offered an impressive 95 horsepower for its size, will undoubtedly see a bump in power, though most of the new Tiger 900’s transformation appears to center around new suspension likely to offer more travel, as well as other nods to off-road use such as a new bolt-on subframe and passenger footpegs.

    As we reported in August after reviewing spy shots of the bike, attention has been paid to the undercarriage of the now-900cc Tiger, including the addition of a beefy, new skip plate. Routing the header pipe to the left side of the bike will likely improve ground clearance, while new, radial-mounted, four-piston calipers for the dual front discs are sure to improve braking feel.

    Spy photo of the upcoming Tiger 900Spy photos back in August seem to have caught a completely revised Tiger 800. Assumed to be the new 900 adventure bike teased by Triumph. (Photo by Motorrad)

    The new 900cc Tiger’s looks are definitely more streamlined and distinctive, with a sharpened beak and narrowed twin headlamp arrangement that flows down into front fairing shrouds that are lower than the current model’s. The windscreen appears unchanged, but we can see a new handlebar and auxiliary lights. The bike’s tail section, edged by an all-new exhaust, is much slimmer than previous, adding to the impression this Tiger might be lighter than the XC’s near 500 pounds.  

    We’ll know soon enough, as we’ll be attending the official launch of Triumph’s new Tiger 900 Rally and GT on December 3rd and will fill you in on its details straight away. Christmas or no, you’ll want to keep space on your wish list for this promising, new machine.

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    Author: Jamie Elvidge

    Jamie has been a motorcycle journalist for more than 30 years, testing the entire range of bikes for the major print magazines and specializing in adventure-travel related stories. To date she’s written and supplied photography for articles describing what it’s like to ride in all 50 states and 43 foreign countries, receiving two Lowell Thomas Society of American Travel Writer’s Awards along the way. Her most-challenging adventure yet has been riding in the 2018 GS Trophy in Mongolia as Team AusAmerica’s embedded journalist.
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