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  1. Forget the big-bore machines from Europe and Japan—one of the most-hyped adventure motorcycles this season is the Honda CT125. First it was teased on the 2019 fall show circuit, then it was unveiled in production form this spring. Now, we’ve got video of it in action. The clip here comes from Honda’s subsidiary in Thailand. The video’s description, when you run it through Google Translate, has lots of talk about searching for a new destination, going where nobody can reach, deviating from the route, and opening the door to a new world. Clearly, this isn’t a farm bike, aimed at utilitarian transport; it’s a machine designed to take people with disposable income and let them explore the countryside. The Honda CT125 may be a new-for-2020 model, but it’s based on a very old concept. Honda’s original CT line was strongest through the 1970s and 1980s, mixing the convenience of a step-through scooter with the rugged practicality of a dirt bike. It catered to an audience that didn’t necessarily need speed, or even want it. They just wanted to travel on bad roads, and be able to haul a load with them. Even after the bikes disappeared from the European and North American markets, they soldiered on in Africa and Australia, serving as the iconic “postie bike” Down Under for many years. The new CT125 is built along the same lines as the CT90 and CT110, but with ABS and fuel injection, and the air-cooled 125 cc engine from the Honda Grom minibike. It will hit the market in Asia first, but expect it to be a global release. Vezi sursa
  2. Want a Suzuki Katana 650?

    Wanna buy a Suzuki Katana 650? Some of you might say yes, but unless you’re talking about the shaft-driven model from the 1980s, good luck. Suzuki currently sells the 1000cc Katana, and it seems that’s it—the company isn’t exactly rushing new models to market these days. No worries, though! Japanese aftermarket outfit Webike realizes there’s a demand for smaller neo-retro bikes, and has put together a Katana lookalike kit for the SV650 (cheekily named the Tanto kit, after another famous Japanese cutting tool …). Neo-retro machines are Hot Stuff right now. In a world that seems hellbent on a dystopian future, motorcycle designers have dusted off the angular cyberpunk visuals of the early 1980s. Take a classic design like the Hans Muth Katana, mix in some LED lighting and smooth out the fairing a bit, and you’ve got something perfect for the post-modern present. Honda’s CB line pulls this off perfectly, and so do Husqvarna’s Svartpilen and Vitpilen lines. As for Suzuki, the company that arguably revolutionized superbike design with the original Katana design in 1981, the Blade Runner look returned in 2019. Suzuki took its GSX-S1000, gave it Muth-style makeover, and called it the new Katana. The WeBike Tanto kit costs roughly $1,000 USD, although overseas shipping may be tricky. Suzuki only offers that 1000cc version, though, unlike the 1980s, where it had several models with the Katana name and styling, including 550cc, 650cc and 750cc models. Webike’s filling that gap, with this SV650 bodywork kit that looks considerably better than some of those ’80s-era machines did. It’s priced at 101,755 yen, which works out to roughly $1,000 US. You can see more details here, and maybe you can even figure out how to import a kit overseas. It looks fairly easy to install; if you’ve already got the SV650, this could be the cheapest and most practical way to get yourself a (kinda, sorta) Katana! Vezi sursa
  3. Want a Suzuki Katana 650?

    Wanna buy a Suzuki Katana 650? Some of you might say yes, but unless you’re talking about the shaft-driven model from the 1980s, good luck. Suzuki currently sells the 1000cc Katana, and it seems that’s it—the company isn’t exactly rushing new models to market these days. No worries, though! Japanese aftermarket outfit Webike realizes there’s a demand for smaller neo-retro bikes, and has put together a Katana lookalike kit for the SV650 (cheekily named the Tanto kit, after another famous Japanese cutting tool …). Neo-retro machines are Hot Stuff right now. In a world that seems hellbent on a dystopian future, motorcycle designers have dusted off the angular cyberpunk visuals of the early 1980s. Take a classic design like the Hans Muth Katana, mix in some LED lighting and smooth out the fairing a bit, and you’ve got something perfect for the post-modern present. Honda’s CB line pulls this off perfectly, and so do Husqvarna’s Svartpilen and Vitpilen lines. As for Suzuki, the company that arguably revolutionized superbike design with the original Katana design in 1981, the Blade Runner look returned in 2019. Suzuki took its GSX-S1000, gave it Muth-style makeover, and called it the new Katana. The WeBike Tanto kit costs roughly $1,000 USD, although overseas shipping may be tricky. Suzuki only offers that 1000cc version, though, unlike the 1980s, where it had several models with the Katana name and styling, including 550cc, 650cc and 750cc models. Webike’s filling that gap, with this SV650 bodywork kit that looks considerably better than some of those ’80s-era machines did. It’s priced at 101,755 yen, which works out to roughly $1,000 US. You can see more details here, and maybe you can even figure out how to import a kit overseas. It looks fairly easy to install; if you’ve already got the SV650, this could be the cheapest and most practical way to get yourself a (kinda, sorta) Katana! Vezi sursa
  4. Triumph Motorcycles says it is cutting back hundreds of employees, in locations around the world, because of COVID-19. In a statement, Triumph said there will be 240 workers laid off in the UK. Those staff only found out about the move this week. Triumph also says it will lay off employees in other countries, expecting total layoffs to be around 400 employees. That would work out to be roughly 16 per cent of Triumph’s global workforce, which amounts to roughly 2,500 employees. It’s likely news that will come especially hard for the UK workers, though, as the company had already announced cutbacks in its British-based production earlier this year. Triumph has been building most of its bikes in Thailand for years, and back in March, the company announced its Tiger 1200 and Speed Triple production would also leave England for Asian factories. However, Triumph is like most motorcycle manufacturers right now—it sees the writing on the wall. The coronavirus pandemic has wrecked large-capacity bike sales in western markets, with some countries seeing new-model sales drop by as much as 65 per cent. Triumph’s management knows it must become lean itself, to survive lean times. Triumph CEO John Bloor said the damage COVID-19 inflicted on the moto-industry was unpredictable, and that the company had to restructure to protect its long-term health, and the success of the Triumph brand and business. Triumph certainly isn’t the only business thinking along these lines; recently, Harley-Davidson announced massive restructuring plans for the rest of 2020, in order to recover from COVID-19’s effects and plan for its future. The question now is—who’s next? Vezi sursa
  5. Triumph announces layoffs for hundreds of workers

    Triumph Motorcycles says it is cutting back hundreds of employees, in locations around the world, because of COVID-19. In a statement, Triumph said there will be 240 workers laid off in the UK. Those staff only found out about the move this week. Triumph also says it will lay off employees in other countries, expecting total layoffs to be around 400 employees. That would work out to be roughly 16 per cent of Triumph’s global workforce, which amounts to roughly 2,500 employees. It’s likely news that will come especially hard for the UK workers, though, as the company had already announced cutbacks in its British-based production earlier this year. Triumph has been building most of its bikes in Thailand for years, and back in March, the company announced its Tiger 1200 and Speed Triple production would also leave England for Asian factories. However, Triumph is like most motorcycle manufacturers right now—it sees the writing on the wall. The coronavirus pandemic has wrecked large-capacity bike sales in western markets, with some countries seeing new-model sales drop by as much as 65 per cent. Triumph’s management knows it must become lean itself, to survive lean times. Triumph CEO John Bloor said the damage COVID-19 inflicted on the moto-industry was unpredictable, and that the company had to restructure to protect its long-term health, and the success of the Triumph brand and business. Triumph certainly isn’t the only business thinking along these lines; recently, Harley-Davidson announced massive restructuring plans for the rest of 2020, in order to recover from COVID-19’s effects and plan for its future. The question now is—who’s next? Vezi sursa
  6. We recently told you about Harley-Davidson’s new Rewire plan designed to resurrect the company’s financial situation. One of the key tenets of the new program is to limit production to drive desirability and exclusivity. Now, it seems like Harley has embarked on its first steps to implement its plan; with its limited-edition IRONe12 and IRONe16 electric balance bikes. Limited edition Harley is announcing two limited-edition electric balance bikes for kids limited to 550 units nationwide. The limited-edition electric balance bikes, the Limited Edition IRONe12, and IRONe16 feature custom graphic treatment and paint. Both are available in the same Yellow Fuse color that is also available on the Harley-Davidson LiveWire motorcycle. In its press release, Harley says: IRONe12 and IRONe16 electric balance bikes are electric-powered two-wheelers specifically designed for kids aged 3-7 years old and under 75 pounds, that can help catalyze the experience of riding for the first time. Balance bikes offer an early learning tool for hand-eye coordination and help children develop skills while having fun. Help your child learn to push, balance, coast and brake in the non-powered mode before graduating to the powered mode – and the throttle. The Limited Edition IRONe12 and IRONe16 electric balance bikes are geared toward instilling a lifetime love for riding on two wheels from an early age. Harley wants kids to start riding early, and that’s a good thing. All of those things sound great and bravo to Harley for recognizing that making new riders starts at an early age. Given that 3 to 7-year-old children don’t have the money to purchase the bikes, it’s clear that Harley is courting their parents. And that’s good as well. Exclusive But in my opinion, where the plot seemingly goes sideways is their approach to selling them. Jon Bekefy, Harley’s General Manager of Brand Marketing, had this to say about the bikes: The Limited Edition IRONe12 and IRONe16 are impressively custom and extremely limited. No other Harley-Davidson shares the Yellow Fuse color exclusive to LiveWire, which is the halo of the H-D EV portfolio.” Umm… OK. This seems to say that Harley thinks that they will increase exclusivity and desirability by painting it in the same color as a bike that is not selling well? I get the electric bike connection, but, is that what Harley thinks will drive desirability and exclusivity? Oh my. And to make them more exclusive and desirable, both the IRONe12 and IRONe16 come with a $50 price increase over their standard versions. Perhaps I am missing something. I hope I am. Harley-Davidson, I wish you the best. I really do. But frankly, I think you’ve lost the plot. Vezi sursa
  7. We recently told you about Harley-Davidson’s new Rewire plan designed to resurrect the company’s financial situation. One of the key tenets of the new program is to limit production to drive desirability and exclusivity. Now, it seems like Harley has embarked on its first steps to implement its plan; with its limited-edition IRONe12 and IRONe16 electric balance bikes. Limited edition Harley is announcing two limited-edition electric balance bikes for kids limited to 550 units nationwide. The limited-edition electric balance bikes, the Limited Edition IRONe12, and IRONe16 feature custom graphic treatment and paint. Both are available in the same Yellow Fuse color that is also available on the Harley-Davidson LiveWire motorcycle. In its press release, Harley says: IRONe12 and IRONe16 electric balance bikes are electric-powered two-wheelers specifically designed for kids aged 3-7 years old and under 75 pounds, that can help catalyze the experience of riding for the first time. Balance bikes offer an early learning tool for hand-eye coordination and help children develop skills while having fun. Help your child learn to push, balance, coast and brake in the non-powered mode before graduating to the powered mode – and the throttle. The Limited Edition IRONe12 and IRONe16 electric balance bikes are geared toward instilling a lifetime love for riding on two wheels from an early age. Harley wants kids to start riding early, and that’s a good thing. All of those things sound great and bravo to Harley for recognizing that making new riders starts at an early age. Given that 3 to 7-year-old children don’t have the money to purchase the bikes, it’s clear that Harley is courting their parents. And that’s good as well. Exclusive But in my opinion, where the plot seemingly goes sideways is their approach to selling them. Jon Bekefy, Harley’s General Manager of Brand Marketing, had this to say about the bikes: The Limited Edition IRONe12 and IRONe16 are impressively custom and extremely limited. No other Harley-Davidson shares the Yellow Fuse color exclusive to LiveWire, which is the halo of the H-D EV portfolio.” Umm… OK. This seems to say that Harley thinks that they will increase exclusivity and desirability by painting it in the same color as a bike that is not selling well? I get the electric bike connection, but, is that what Harley thinks will drive desirability and exclusivity? Oh my. And to make them more exclusive and desirable, both the IRONe12 and IRONe16 come with a $50 price increase over their standard versions. Perhaps I am missing something. I hope I am. Harley-Davidson, I wish you the best. I really do. But frankly, I think you’ve lost the plot. Vezi sursa
  8. Indian Motorcycles’ parent company Polaris will restart some product production. It’s a good news/bad news situation for both the company and employees. Good news / Restarting production Polaris had halted production on March 23 but has now decided to restart select manufacturing product lines. They will open production lines “…for products with adequate demand and supply chain coverage.” In other words, if there’s a demand for the product and they have the necessary parts, they will once again begin production. Polaris went on to say that it continues to ship finished vehicles to dealers and will produce products that are consistent with governing federal, state, and local directives. Polaris did not identify which products it was manufacturing. But an article in the Star Tribune said that the vehicles still being produced are being made for the government such as its four-wheel-drive Ranger military vehicle. It’s unclear which, if any, other products will resume production. Indian hasn’t said whether it is restarting the production of Indian motorcycles. Not so good news / Cost-cutting measures While the production of some vehicles is good news for some Polaris employees, there’s not so good news for other employees. Polaris also announced several cost-cutting measures that affect employees significantly. Saying that the cost-cutting measures are temporary, Polaris will implement the following actions: Furloughing most exempt and nonexempt Polaris employees for two weeks in the second quarter. Employees will not be paid but will maintain their health care benefits. They may be eligible for unemployment benefits, subject to federal, state, and local regulations; Nonfurloughed exempt and nonexempt employees, including Polaris’ Executive Leadership Team, will have their pay reduced by approximately 20 percent. The cuts will begin on April 13 and continue through the end of the second quarter; Implementing a hiring freeze on exempt and nonexempt positions; Delaying merit increases for exempt and nonexempt employees through the end of the year; In line with the above cost-cutting measures, Polaris’ Chairman and CEO, Scott Wine, will forgo his salary for the remainder of 2020. Vezi sursa
  9. Indian Motorcycles’ parent company Polaris will restart some product production. It’s a good news/bad news situation for both the company and employees. Good news / Restarting production Polaris had halted production on March 23 but has now decided to restart select manufacturing product lines. They will open production lines “…for products with adequate demand and supply chain coverage.” In other words, if there’s a demand for the product and they have the necessary parts, they will once again begin production. Polaris went on to say that it continues to ship finished vehicles to dealers and will produce products that are consistent with governing federal, state, and local directives. Polaris did not identify which products it was manufacturing. But an article in the Star Tribune said that the vehicles still being produced are being made for the government such as its four-wheel-drive Ranger military vehicle. It’s unclear which, if any, other products will resume production. Indian hasn’t said whether it is restarting the production of Indian motorcycles. Not so good news / Cost-cutting measures While the production of some vehicles is good news for some Polaris employees, there’s not so good news for other employees. Polaris also announced several cost-cutting measures that affect employees significantly. Saying that the cost-cutting measures are temporary, Polaris will implement the following actions: Furloughing most exempt and nonexempt Polaris employees for two weeks in the second quarter. Employees will not be paid but will maintain their health care benefits. They may be eligible for unemployment benefits, subject to federal, state, and local regulations; Nonfurloughed exempt and nonexempt employees, including Polaris’ Executive Leadership Team, will have their pay reduced by approximately 20 percent. The cuts will begin on April 13 and continue through the end of the second quarter; Implementing a hiring freeze on exempt and nonexempt positions; Delaying merit increases for exempt and nonexempt employees through the end of the year; In line with the above cost-cutting measures, Polaris’ Chairman and CEO, Scott Wine, will forgo his salary for the remainder of 2020. Vezi sursa
  10. Royal Enfield Announces New Bike Every Quarter

    Royal Enfield is on the move and they mean business. The Indian motorcycle manufacturer is about to unveil at least one new model every quarter for the next two to three years. According to Royal Enfield’s CEO, Vinod Dasari, the brand is hard at work developing new platforms and models. In an online interaction on Freewheeling with SVP, Dasari was quoted by retailnews.asia as saying: One of the things that we’ve done over the last 3-4 years is to significantly accelerate new product plans. We will remain a mid-sized company, that’s somewhere between 250 and 750 cc. In this range, there are five levels that we’re looking at. The first is a platform. We have a new platform coming up. We would have launched it by now, we will launch it some time, as soon as the lockdown is over. So we have the platforms, and under the platforms, we have the models, within each model we have variants, within each variant we have several color trims and graphics, and then we have the limited editions. “So five levels, we’re so excited that, to a point, every quarter, for the next three to four years, every quarter, we have a new model. It’s not just changing the colors or something, it will be almost a new model, or a variant, coming for the next three to four years,” Dasari said. That certainly is a big plan and it will be interesting to see what Royal Enfield has up its sleeve for the next two to three years. Royal Enfield’s CEO, Vinod Dasari says new bikes every quarter for the next two to three years. Photo credit: Royal Enfield New 350cc model and platform It is widely expected that the Royal Enfield Meteor 350 will be the first new bike out of the gate. It will likely employ a new 350cc platform with a new engine and a new double-cradle frame. The new 350cc engine will likely replace Royal Enfield’s traditional pushrod configuration with overhead cams and will also use counterbalancers. Retailnews.asia says that the new powerplant will likely be a downsized version of Royal Enfield’s 650cc parallel-twin engine. Next up is the rumored Royal Enfield Hunter. It will likely also use the new 350cc platform although there are scant other details on the machine. At this point, there’s no news about whether the new bikes will make it to US shores. Regardless, it’s clear that Royal Enfield wants more of the light to middleweight motorcycle markets. Vezi sursa
  11. Royal Enfield is on the move and they mean business. The Indian motorcycle manufacturer is about to unveil at least one new model every quarter for the next two to three years. According to Royal Enfield’s CEO, Vinod Dasari, the brand is hard at work developing new platforms and models. In an online interaction on Freewheeling with SVP, Dasari was quoted by retailnews.asia as saying: One of the things that we’ve done over the last 3-4 years is to significantly accelerate new product plans. We will remain a mid-sized company, that’s somewhere between 250 and 750 cc. In this range, there are five levels that we’re looking at. The first is a platform. We have a new platform coming up. We would have launched it by now, we will launch it some time, as soon as the lockdown is over. So we have the platforms, and under the platforms, we have the models, within each model we have variants, within each variant we have several color trims and graphics, and then we have the limited editions. “So five levels, we’re so excited that, to a point, every quarter, for the next three to four years, every quarter, we have a new model. It’s not just changing the colors or something, it will be almost a new model, or a variant, coming for the next three to four years,” Dasari said. That certainly is a big plan and it will be interesting to see what Royal Enfield has up its sleeve for the next two to three years. Royal Enfield’s CEO, Vinod Dasari says new bikes every quarter for the next two to three years. Photo credit: Royal Enfield New 350cc model and platform It is widely expected that the Royal Enfield Meteor 350 will be the first new bike out of the gate. It will likely employ a new 350cc platform with a new engine and a new double-cradle frame. The new 350cc engine will likely replace Royal Enfield’s traditional pushrod configuration with overhead cams and will also use counterbalancers. Retailnews.asia says that the new powerplant will likely be a downsized version of Royal Enfield’s 650cc parallel-twin engine. Next up is the rumored Royal Enfield Hunter. It will likely also use the new 350cc platform although there are scant other details on the machine. At this point, there’s no news about whether the new bikes will make it to US shores. Regardless, it’s clear that Royal Enfield wants more of the light to middleweight motorcycle markets. Vezi sursa
  12. COVID-19 Impact Costs Triumph 400 Workers

    As a byproduct of the COVID-19 pandemic, Triumph Motorcycles finds itself in the position of having to layoff approximately 400 of its 2,500 workers. The Hinkley, Leicestershire based company says 240 of these workers are based in the U.K. According to the company, sales in the 500cc plus motorcycle segment in France, Italy, Germany, the USA, and the U.K. have fallen between 40 percent and 65 percent. This during a portion of its peak selling season. The Triumph Rocket 3 GT in the Canary Islands. Photo credit: Kevin Wing According to the BBC, Triumph’s CEO, Nick Bloor, said the pandemic has caused “significant damage” to the global motorcycle market. He also noted that it was a “challenging time” for the U.K. based motorcycle company. The BBC quoted Bloor as saying: “These are not easy decisions to make, especially when individuals’ livelihoods are affected. However, regrettably the scale of impact of Covid-19 necessitates us to restructure now in order to protect the long term health and success of the Triumph brand and business.” Recently, Triumph rolled out its revised Rocket 3 R and Rocket 3 GT and a new Scrambler 1200 James Bond Edition. The revised Rocket 3 has met with generally very positive reviews and sales. With the Scrambler 1200 James Bond Edition, the company is hoping to have similar success. Triumph released the Scrambler 1200 James Bond Edition in late May, 2020. Photo credit: Triumph Hopefully, these job cuts are only short term impacts and not a precursor to financial difficulty for the brand. We’ll keep you updated as more news emerges. Vezi sursa
  13. As a byproduct of the COVID-19 pandemic, Triumph Motorcycles finds itself in the position of having to layoff approximately 400 of its 2,500 workers. The Hinkley, Leicestershire based company says 240 of these workers are based in the U.K. According to the company, sales in the 500cc plus motorcycle segment in France, Italy, Germany, the USA, and the U.K. have fallen between 40 percent and 65 percent. This during a portion of its peak selling season. The Triumph Rocket 3 GT in the Canary Islands. Photo credit: Kevin Wing According to the BBC, Triumph’s CEO, Nick Bloor, said the pandemic has caused “significant damage” to the global motorcycle market. He also noted that it was a “challenging time” for the U.K. based motorcycle company. The BBC quoted Bloor as saying: “These are not easy decisions to make, especially when individuals’ livelihoods are affected. However, regrettably the scale of impact of Covid-19 necessitates us to restructure now in order to protect the long term health and success of the Triumph brand and business.” Recently, Triumph rolled out its revised Rocket 3 R and Rocket 3 GT and a new Scrambler 1200 James Bond Edition. The revised Rocket 3 has met with generally very positive reviews and sales. With the Scrambler 1200 James Bond Edition, the company is hoping to have similar success. Triumph released the Scrambler 1200 James Bond Edition in late May, 2020. Photo credit: Triumph Hopefully, these job cuts are only short term impacts and not a precursor to financial difficulty for the brand. We’ll keep you updated as more news emerges. Vezi sursa
  14. Touratech now offering KTM 790 ADV skid plate

    Looking for more protection for the engine and gas tank on your KTM 790 Adventure? Touretech has finally come out with a wraparound design, which could make a big difference in a crash situation. Like all adventure bikes, it’s a good idea to invest in a skid plate for your KTM 790 Adventure, because one boulder in the wrong place can ruin your day—and your engine. Poke a hole in your engine case, and you’re looking at an expensive bill (or at least a lot of frustration while you wait for the JB Weld SteelStik to dry … plus a walk out of the woods, most likely). A skid plate protects your engine. The difference here is the 790 Adventure’s low-mounted fuel tank, which wraps around the engine. Normally, you’d have a pair of crash bars here, more than enough to protect your engine in a tipover, but the 790’s plastic fuel tank presents more of a concern. Although KTM asserts the fuel tank can handle quite a beating, some owners are less sure, and want to protect it. Plus, there’s the farkle factor—some riders just want to bolt stuff onto their bike, whether they need it or not. The Touratech RallyeForm skid plate is a two-part assembly, with a lower guard that protects the bottom of the engine and upper guard that’s form-fitted to the fuel tank. It’s made of 4mm-thick aluminum on the bottom plate, and 3mm-thick aluminum on the upper plate, and it’s compatible with Touratech crash bars. Either part of the assembly is available in silver or black. It matches the tank’s contours nicely, and should provide some welcome peace of mind to 790 riders who’ve been worried about tipover damage. MSRP is $429.95; find more details at the Touratech website. Vezi sursa
  15. Looking for more protection for the engine and gas tank on your KTM 790 Adventure? Touretech has finally come out with a wraparound design, which could make a big difference in a crash situation. Like all adventure bikes, it’s a good idea to invest in a skid plate for your KTM 790 Adventure, because one boulder in the wrong place can ruin your day—and your engine. Poke a hole in your engine case, and you’re looking at an expensive bill (or at least a lot of frustration while you wait for the JB Weld SteelStik to dry … plus a walk out of the woods, most likely). A skid plate protects your engine. The difference here is the 790 Adventure’s low-mounted fuel tank, which wraps around the engine. Normally, you’d have a pair of crash bars here, more than enough to protect your engine in a tipover, but the 790’s plastic fuel tank presents more of a concern. Although KTM asserts the fuel tank can handle quite a beating, some owners are less sure, and want to protect it. Plus, there’s the farkle factor—some riders just want to bolt stuff onto their bike, whether they need it or not. The Touratech RallyeForm skid plate is a two-part assembly, with a lower guard that protects the bottom of the engine and upper guard that’s form-fitted to the fuel tank. It’s made of 4mm-thick aluminum on the bottom plate, and 3mm-thick aluminum on the upper plate, and it’s compatible with Touratech crash bars. Either part of the assembly is available in silver or black. It matches the tank’s contours nicely, and should provide some welcome peace of mind to 790 riders who’ve been worried about tipover damage. MSRP is $429.95; find more details at the Touratech website. Vezi sursa
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