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  1. The self-driving automobile, or autonomous vehicle (AV), is slowly but surely creeping towards reality, with Honda releasing the first publicly available Level 3 AV in 2021. With only 100 made available to select customers in Japan only, the Honda Legend will allow drivers to take their eyes off the road in certain situations, with Honda’s Traffic Jam Pilot system taking over. Recent patent applications show that Honda’s motorcycle division may be working towards a similar goal of allowing the motorcycle to at least partially take control of steering duties. Honda’s Steering Assist Patent Drawing. Credit: CycleWorld.com Honda’s patent application drawings show a fairly standard GoldWing that is equipped with a servo setup that can actuate the steering via rods and Heim joints. Using information gleaned from the various sensors on the bike, such as the inertial measurement unit (IMU) and wheel speed sensors, the system could in theory work as a power steering assist (similar to one of Honda’s previous patent filings), but also has the ability to apply steering inputs independently. The system has sensors integrated into it to measure steering angle and force, adding more useful data input that the computers can use to decide what steering actions to take. Fully developed, a computer-controlled steering system could prevent or control speed wobbles, keep the bike upright in situations where the wheels are sliding, or take full control of steering duties completely. Motorcycle technology has, like it or not, followed fairly closely to automotive trends, adopting fuel-injection, ABS, traction control, and radar cruise control, once those advancements were widespread in the car market. With autonomous cars seemingly close to being a reality in the marketplace, how long will it be before the motorcycle follows suit? As the first car company to reach Level 3 AV status, Honda would be a safe bet as the first to bring the technology to two wheels, and their latest patent filings bring them one step closer. Vezi sursa
  2. Nelson-Rigg just added another pair of useful ADV accessories to its lineup—a tool roll and an exhaust shield. The new Rigg Gear Exhaust Heat Shield is nothing flashy, just a strap-on spacer that fits on your motorcycle muffler to keep soft luggage or your plastic side panels from touching, and melting or burning. Riders have been jury-rigging crushed aluminum pop cans into this role for years, which is perfectly functional until it falls out along the trail because it’s tough to secure properly. Also, it looks a bit hobo-ish. Most companies that offer soft luggage offer a tidy heat shield that attaches with a long hose clamp, and this is the Nelson-Rigg solution for those too fussy or tidy or lazy to do it the ghetto way. See it at the Nelson-Rigg website for $24.95. [embedded content] Then, there’s the Trail’s End Tool Roll. Again, this is something you can jury-rig yourself, or even pick up a cheap Chinese-made solution from Harbor Freight or Princess Auto (depending which side of the 54-40 line you’re living on). However, having had a properly made moto tool roll for several years (from a Rigg competitor), I will say that a purpose-built roll is much more pleasant to use in the long run. It costs $39.95 at the Nelson-Rigg website; you can see it demoed below, as part of the demo for the Trail’s End Tool Bag set. The whole Tool Bag kit includes the Tool Roll, and is intended for UTV usage. No doubt some clever ADVers will see other potential uses for the product, so I’ve included the video of the whole set below. [embedded content] Nelson-Rigg also has new Road Trip Saddlebags this year (intended for the cruiser market, at $249.99) and Commuter Tank Bag (priced at $104.95-$124.95). With the addition of the new tool roll and heat shield, the Rigg Gear line continues to expand, with gear aimed at both the enduro/dual sport scene and the ADV scene. Check it out here. Vezi sursa
  3. Honda is recalling certain 2021 CBR 1000 RR-R motorcycles. The Japanese manufacturer says that there may be a problem with the bike’s suspension. According to the recall notice, the CBR 1000 RR-R, Honda’s “highest performing” version of its street-legal superbike may have a suspension component incorrectly installed. As per Honda’s notification to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA): During the assembly process, the rear cushion connecting plate may have been installed incorrectly with the counterbore side facing the wrong direction (reverse), improperly securing the plate to the chassis of the vehicle. With continued use of a vehicle in which the rear cushion connecting plate was incorrectly installed, the plate may break suddenly, causing a drop to the vehicle height, and increasing the risk of a crash or injury. What this really means is that one of the rear suspension links may be oriented incorrectly. A bolt head may be attached in reverse. This could cause the link to break and the suspension to collapse increasing the risk of a crash or injury. An illustration of the affected parts and potential improper part orientation. Honda is not certain how many motorcycles may be affected. However, the total number of bikes subject to this recall is 89 units or less. Honda is also issuing a stop-sale notice. Dealers must perform a visual inspection of the affected parts and correct the defect when appropriate. Honda will notify owners and dealers will inspect and as necessary, replace the affected parts free of charge. The recall will begin on June 7, 2021. In the interim, owners may contact Honda Powersports customer service at 1-866-784-1870 and cite recall KL9. Owners may also contact NHTSA at 1-800-424-9153 and cite NHTSA Campaign Number 21V249000. Vezi sursa
  4. It’s here! After months of tinkering with background work, selecting a video platform, finding appropriate movies and acquiring the streaming rights, the Toronto Motorcycle Movie Festival has now launched its video-on-demand service. The new “Netflix of motorcycles” is here. Wait—why it a movie festival building an online streaming service? In case you missed our previous articles on the TMFF’s plans, this is basically happening because of COVID-19, at least indirectly. Festival director Caius Tenche has been contemplating the idea of a video-on-demand service for a while, but had other things keeping him busy—including the festival itself, which ran at Toronto’s Revue Cinema. When the coronavirus pandemic meant the festival couldn’t run at the theatre, the organizers moved the films online for the 2020 event, allowing viewers to tune in from all over the world. Using the expertise gained with those online screenings, Tenche and his cohorts have now launched a video-on-demand service. What can you watch? Many of these movies were screened at previous festivals, and there’s a wide range of work here, including features and shorts from all over the world. There are several ADV-focused films, including Austin Vince’s Mondo Sahara, which is well worth the rental. [embedded content] The TMFF also has ADV classic Somewhere Else Tomorrow up for screening: [embedded content] And 1 Map for 2, and Blue Mountains in the Arctic, and lots, lots more. You can see a list of films currently available here, but more will be added in the weeks to come. Almost all these films are not geo-restricted, so you can watch them from anywhere in the world; in Canada, pricing is $6.99 for a feature, $3.99 for a short, plus applicable taxes. Once you pay, you have five days to start watching, and once you start, you have 48 hours to finish the film; you can watch the film as many times as you want during those 48 hours. If you want to watch something, but you’re broke because you put all your money into new tires, there are some free-to-watch options on there now, and on April 21, the TMFF will screen comedy film How to Be Deadly for free, to celebrate National Canadian Film Day. Vezi sursa
  5. It’s here! After months of tinkering with background work, selecting a video platform, finding appropriate movies and acquiring the streaming rights, the Toronto Motorcycle Movie Festival has now launched its video-on-demand service. The new “Netflix of motorcycles” is here. Wait—why it a movie festival building an online streaming service? In case you missed our previous articles on the TMFF’s plans, this is basically happening because of COVID-19, at least indirectly. Festival director Caius Tenche has been contemplating the idea of a video-on-demand service for a while, but had other things keeping him busy—including the festival itself, which ran at Toronto’s Revue Cinema. When the coronavirus pandemic meant the festival couldn’t run at the theatre, the organizers moved the films online for the 2020 event, allowing viewers to tune in from all over the world. Using the expertise gained with those online screenings, Tenche and his cohorts have now launched a video-on-demand service. What can you watch? Many of these movies were screened at previous festivals, and there’s a wide range of work here, including features and shorts from all over the world. There are several ADV-focused films, including Austin Vince’s Mondo Sahara, which is well worth the rental. [embedded content] The TMFF also has ADV classic Somewhere Else Tomorrow up for screening: [embedded content] And 1 Map for 2, and Blue Mountains in the Arctic, and lots, lots more. You can see a list of films currently available here, but more will be added in the weeks to come. Almost all these films are not geo-restricted, so you can watch them from anywhere in the world; in Canada, pricing is $6.99 for a feature, $3.99 for a short, plus applicable taxes. Once you pay, you have five days to start watching, and once you start, you have 48 hours to finish the film; you can watch the film as many times as you want during those 48 hours. If you want to watch something, but you’re broke because you put all your money into new tires, there are some free-to-watch options on there now, and on April 21, the TMFF will screen comedy film How to Be Deadly for free, to celebrate National Canadian Film Day. Vezi sursa
  6. Triumph has released a new mobile app that provides crash detection for motorcyclists, alerting emergency services if that happens. How does it work? The Triumph SOS app uses your smartphone’s built-in accelerometers to determine when a crash happens. Then, you have a 30-second window to cancel the crash alert. After that, the app will notify emergency services that you’ve crashed your bike, prompting the authorities to call your phone. If you don’t answer the phone, then (in theory) emergency services will send an ambulance to your location to check and make sure you’re OK. At least, that’s how it will work in the UK and Europe. Supposedly, the system is very foolproof, and rarely sends out false alarms to emergency services. At least you have a call from the ambulance dispatchers before they actually send the meat wagon to check up on you. Note that Triumph isn’t the first company to offer an app like this. EatSleepRide first offered an app like this more than five years ago; BikerSOS and REALRIDER and other apps also have similar functionality. Go through the Google Play Store, or the iOS App Store, and you’ll see options. Obviously, the app is dependent on cell phone data; if you’re riding in the woods, far away from 4G reception, you’ll be on your own. The Triumph SOS app is free for Triumph owners for three months; then, it costs per month. US riders pay $4.99 monthly, Canadian riders pay $5.99, UK riders pay £3.99. It’s not restricted to Triumph owners; anyone can download the app and try it, and you can cancel at any time. Vezi sursa
  7. Triumph has released a new mobile app that provides crash detection for motorcyclists, alerting emergency services if that happens. How does it work? The Triumph SOS app uses your smartphone’s built-in accelerometers to determine when a crash happens. Then, you have a 30-second window to cancel the crash alert. After that, the app will notify emergency services that you’ve crashed your bike, prompting the authorities to call your phone. If you don’t answer the phone, then (in theory) emergency services will send an ambulance to your location to check and make sure you’re OK. At least, that’s how it will work in the UK and Europe. Supposedly, the system is very foolproof, and rarely sends out false alarms to emergency services. At least you have a call from the ambulance dispatchers before they actually send the meat wagon to check up on you. Note that Triumph isn’t the first company to offer an app like this. EatSleepRide first offered an app like this more than five years ago; BikerSOS and REALRIDER and other apps also have similar functionality. Go through the Google Play Store, or the iOS App Store, and you’ll see options. Obviously, the app is dependent on cell phone data; if you’re riding in the woods, far away from 4G reception, you’ll be on your own. The Triumph SOS app is free for Triumph owners for three months; then, it costs per month. US riders pay $4.99 monthly, Canadian riders pay $5.99, UK riders pay £3.99. It’s not restricted to Triumph owners; anyone can download the app and try it, and you can cancel at any time. Vezi sursa
  8. Harley Patent: Automatic Emergency Braking (AEB)

    A recent patent application shows that Harley-Davidson (Harley) is working on an automated emergency braking system (AEB). It’s not like the adaptive cruise control that other manufacturers are bringing to market. It’s more like the AEB systems found in many cars and works automatically only in emergencies where a crash is imminent. Harley’s AEB system uses multiple sensors, which could potentially “talk” to an adaptive cruise control system. But it’s the type and number of sensors that are significant. A drawing from Harley-Davidson’s AEB patent application. Not only is the bike sensing forward, but it is also sensing backward. For example, a camera on the dash looks back at the rider keeping tabs on him/her. There are also sensors in the handlebar, grips, and seat. A helmet-mounted camera will track the rider’s eye to assess which direction the rider is looking. The idea is to ensure that the rider is focusing on the road ahead. If you’re wondering how the system will interact with the rider, it will use a series of warning lights, haptic (vibrating), and audible warnings to alert the rider. If the rider does not respond, the system will apply the bike’s brakes until it stops. Your bike is looking at a lot of things, including you! Finally, some sensors track braking force and add more if it deems that the rider is not applying enough. Should a system like the one Harley is working on come to market, would you be interested in having it on your bike? Or is it just too much “Big Brother” like for your taste. Let us know in the comments below. Vezi sursa
  9. A recent patent application shows that Harley-Davidson (Harley) is working on an automated emergency braking system (AEB). It’s not like the adaptive cruise control that other manufacturers are bringing to market. It’s more like the AEB systems found in many cars and works automatically only in emergencies where a crash is imminent. Harley’s AEB system uses multiple sensors, which could potentially “talk” to an adaptive cruise control system. But it’s the type and number of sensors that are significant. A drawing from Harley-Davidson’s AEB patent application. Not only is the bike sensing forward, but it is also sensing backward. For example, a camera on the dash looks back at the rider keeping tabs on him/her. There are also sensors in the handlebar, grips, and seat. A helmet-mounted camera will track the rider’s eye to assess which direction the rider is looking. The idea is to ensure that the rider is focusing on the road ahead. If you’re wondering how the system will interact with the rider, it will use a series of warning lights, haptic (vibrating), and audible warnings to alert the rider. If the rider does not respond, the system will apply the bike’s brakes until it stops. Your bike is looking at a lot of things, including you! Finally, some sensors track braking force and add more if it deems that the rider is not applying enough. Should a system like the one Harley is working on come to market, would you be interested in having it on your bike? Or is it just too much “Big Brother” like for your taste. Let us know in the comments below. Vezi sursa
  10. A spokesperson is walking back some of Northumbria Police & Crime Commissioner (PCC) Kim McGuinness‘s earlier statements. In an email response to ADVRider.com, the Commissioner’s representative said: “The PCC was suggesting some thought should be given by the government to ways in which people who commit anti-social behaviour on certain bikes, or use them illegally, can be deterred. There have been many cases recently of people using motorbikes in an irresponsible way in some neighbourhoods. “One option would be trackers fitted by manufacturers on certain bikes, or bikers encouraged to use one voluntarily, to help with recovery of any stolen bikes and deter their use. This was not a suggestion for all bikes. This talking point was in the very early stages – it’s about exploring the idea, consulting with experts and opening up conversation, which has certainly been done. “Hopefully the biking community has other suggestions, which the office would be happy to hear. For information, we’re also looking at trialling drones to track the small minority of people using motorbikes dangerously on pavements in residential areas and are exploring the idea of a dedicated off-road riding area to give people a specific course to use instead.” McGuinness’s green light for trackers However, according to the Northumberland Gazette, the Commissioner was urging Policing Minister Kit Malthouse to give them the green light to allow for tracker devices to be fitted to all motorcycles so their whereabouts and speed can be monitored. Even the Northumbria PCC’s own website previously indicated that trackers should be fitted to all motorbikes. This webpage has now been taken down. A screengrab of the now removed Northumbria Police & Crime Commissioner’s website stated, “Kim is urging Policing Minister Kit Malthouse to give the green light to allow for tracker devices to be fitted to all motorbikes so their whereabouts and speed can be monitored.” New backdated webpage Replacing the now removed webpage is a new statement on the Northumbria PCC’s website. It is dated 25th March 2021, although it was not posted until 15th April 2021. New webpage content Previously, the Northumbria PCC’s website clearly stated that Ms. McGuinness wanted trackers on all motorbikes. But that position now seems to have changed drastically, although the new one is still quite troubling. The new webpage now says: The Commissioner recently issued a press release calling on the Government to explore the idea of trackers being fitted to off-road motorbikes. This would help certain high risk bikes be recovered if stolen and deter misuse. This move could help tackle growing motorbike misuse and anti-social behaviour throughout the region, and beyond. The problem is putting people in danger and is causing great concern within many communities. These proposals caused concern to some law-abiding bikers, and we’d like to make clear that we are now working with motorcycle groups to look at more acceptable proposals. The Commissioner is pleased that this has opened up conversation with the relevant parties and is now looking forward to working with them in finding solutions to tackle bike related ASB caused by a very small minority of bike users. Anyone with ideas and suggestions that will help cut this crime and keep people safe is encouraged to contact the office. A screengrab of the new webpage on Northumbria Police & Crime Commissioner’s website is still dated 25th March 2021 and is a drastic departure from the page taken down by the PCC. Change of position The new webpage is drastically different from the page it replaces, and many might argue quite misleading. It is quite concerning that a governmental agency charged with policing would backdate a position that is so drastically different than what was previously posted. That the date was not updated is very suspicious. Northumbria PCC Kim McGuinness and Northumbria Chief Constable Winton Keenan. Looking at the changes With that being said, it does seem that there has been significant movement in the Commissioner’s stance on “trackers.” Several things have changed, so let’s take a look at them, starting with the email provided by Commissioner McGuinness’s representative. The Commissioner recently issued a press release calling on the Government to explore the idea of trackers being fitted to off-road motorbikes. Unfortunately, it’s clear that Commissioner McGuinness was not “exploring” the idea of trackers being fitted to only off-road motorbikes. Their own website and many news outlets reported that Commissioner McGuinness directly urged “…Policing Commissioner Kit Malthouse to give them the green light to allow for tracker devices to be fitted to all motorbikes so their whereabouts and speed can be monitored.” That’s in no way an exploration of an idea to fit trackers, it’s a direct request to a higher-level official who could be in the position to influence legislators. “…explore the idea of trackers being fitted to off-road motorbikes.” This would help certain high risk bikes be recovered if stolen and deter misuse. Off-road bikes only? Based on this new PCC position, it appears that the Commissioner now only wants to fit trackers to off-road motorbikes. And their main use would be to help “high-risk bikes be recovered if stolen.” Well, that’s quite interesting. The Commissioner’s original position was that the use of trackers was warranted because of: “…resident concerns of bike-related anti-social behavior.” Now it appears that her first concern is with the return of stolen motorbikes and the anti-social behavior is only secondary. Hmm… ADVRider.com’s questions answered? As for the list of questions we submitted to the Commissioner, we received a “non-answer” reply. Although cordial, the response provided no answers to our questions. The Commissioner’s representative said: Thanks for the email. Your questions seem to be based on the tracking suggestion becoming a law. These are not firm proposals, just talking points, and I can’t give you a line by line answer I’m afraid. Some of the coverage I’ve seen so far seems to be speculating that the PCC is about to introduce these measures. This is not the case, the PCC has no power to do this. McGuinness can’t make law According to the Commissioner’s representative, the Commissioner’s statements are merely talking points. And, he states that the PCC does not have the power to create law. Yes, we understand that she does not. But we also understand that Commissioner McGuiness asked the Minister for Crime and Policing for authorization to install trackers. When that happens the Minister for Crime and Policing has the opportunity to influence the legislative process. And that’s quite concerning. Any good news? If there’s any good news coming from the Northumbria PCC, it’s that they now say they are working with motorcycle groups. “…we are now working with motorcycle groups to look at more acceptable proposals.” Frankly, consulting motorbike groups is something they should have done before making their tracking request. The political grandstanding taken by Commissioner McGuinness should never have occurred. But at least for now, the Northumbria CPP may have heard us. If we take them at their word, they say that potentially only off-road bikes will be tracked. Still, it’s an unacceptable “solution” for the stated problem. They need better solutions and we should help them arrive at them. Because it’s clear, the Northumbria PCC does not understand the motorbike community. Followup We’ve once again reached out to Commissioner McGuinness and the Northumbria PCC to clarify their new position. We will let you know what they say if they respond. In the interim, it’s important to carefully monitor what the Northumbria PCC plans to do going forward. Vezi sursa
  11. A spokesperson is walking back some of Northumbria Police & Crime Commissioner (PCC) Kim McGuinness‘s earlier statements. In an email response to ADVRider.com, the Commissioner’s representative said: “The PCC was suggesting some thought should be given by the government to ways in which people who commit anti-social behaviour on certain bikes, or use them illegally, can be deterred. There have been many cases recently of people using motorbikes in an irresponsible way in some neighbourhoods. “One option would be trackers fitted by manufacturers on certain bikes, or bikers encouraged to use one voluntarily, to help with recovery of any stolen bikes and deter their use. This was not a suggestion for all bikes. This talking point was in the very early stages – it’s about exploring the idea, consulting with experts and opening up conversation, which has certainly been done. “Hopefully the biking community has other suggestions, which the office would be happy to hear. For information, we’re also looking at trialling drones to track the small minority of people using motorbikes dangerously on pavements in residential areas and are exploring the idea of a dedicated off-road riding area to give people a specific course to use instead.” McGuinness’s green light for trackers However, according to the Northumberland Gazette, the Commissioner was urging Policing Minister Kit Malthouse to give them the green light to allow for tracker devices to be fitted to all motorcycles so their whereabouts and speed can be monitored. Even the Northumbria PCC’s own website previously indicated that trackers should be fitted to all motorbikes. This webpage has now been taken down. A screengrab of the now removed Northumbria Police & Crime Commissioner’s website stated, “Kim is urging Policing Minister Kit Malthouse to give the green light to allow for tracker devices to be fitted to all motorbikes so their whereabouts and speed can be monitored.” New backdated webpage Replacing the now removed webpage is a new statement on the Northumbria PCC’s website. It is dated 25th March 2021, although it was not posted until 15th April 2021. New webpage content Previously, the Northumbria PCC’s website clearly stated that Ms. McGuinness wanted trackers on all motorbikes. But that position now seems to have changed drastically, although the new one is still quite troubling. The new webpage now says: The Commissioner recently issued a press release calling on the Government to explore the idea of trackers being fitted to off-road motorbikes. This would help certain high risk bikes be recovered if stolen and deter misuse. This move could help tackle growing motorbike misuse and anti-social behaviour throughout the region, and beyond. The problem is putting people in danger and is causing great concern within many communities. These proposals caused concern to some law-abiding bikers, and we’d like to make clear that we are now working with motorcycle groups to look at more acceptable proposals. The Commissioner is pleased that this has opened up conversation with the relevant parties and is now looking forward to working with them in finding solutions to tackle bike related ASB caused by a very small minority of bike users. Anyone with ideas and suggestions that will help cut this crime and keep people safe is encouraged to contact the office. A screengrab of the new webpage on Northumbria Police & Crime Commissioner’s website is still dated 25th March 2021 and is a drastic departure from the page taken down by the PCC. Change of position The new webpage is drastically different from the page it replaces, and many might argue quite misleading. It is quite concerning that a governmental agency charged with policing would backdate a position that is so drastically different than what was previously posted. That the date was not updated is very suspicious. Northumbria PCC Kim McGuinness and Northumbria Chief Constable Winton Keenan. Looking at the changes With that being said, it does seem that there has been significant movement in the Commissioner’s stance on “trackers.” Several things have changed, so let’s take a look at them, starting with the email provided by Commissioner McGuinness’s representative. The Commissioner recently issued a press release calling on the Government to explore the idea of trackers being fitted to off-road motorbikes. Unfortunately, it’s clear that Commissioner McGuinness was not “exploring” the idea of trackers being fitted to only off-road motorbikes. Their own website and many news outlets reported that Commissioner McGuinness directly urged “…Policing Commissioner Kit Malthouse to give them the green light to allow for tracker devices to be fitted to all motorbikes so their whereabouts and speed can be monitored.” That’s in no way an exploration of an idea to fit trackers, it’s a direct request to a higher-level official who could be in the position to influence legislators. “…explore the idea of trackers being fitted to off-road motorbikes.” This would help certain high risk bikes be recovered if stolen and deter misuse. Off-road bikes only? Based on this new PCC position, it appears that the Commissioner now only wants to fit trackers to off-road motorbikes. And their main use would be to help “high-risk bikes be recovered if stolen.” Well, that’s quite interesting. The Commissioner’s original position was that the use of trackers was warranted because of: “…resident concerns of bike-related anti-social behavior.” Now it appears that her first concern is with the return of stolen motorbikes and the anti-social behavior is only secondary. Hmm… ADVRider.com’s questions answered? As for the list of questions we submitted to the Commissioner, we received a “non-answer” reply. Although cordial, the response provided no answers to our questions. The Commissioner’s representative said: Thanks for the email. Your questions seem to be based on the tracking suggestion becoming a law. These are not firm proposals, just talking points, and I can’t give you a line by line answer I’m afraid. Some of the coverage I’ve seen so far seems to be speculating that the PCC is about to introduce these measures. This is not the case, the PCC has no power to do this. McGuinness can’t make law According to the Commissioner’s representative, the Commissioner’s statements are merely talking points. And, he states that the PCC does not have the power to create law. Yes, we understand that she does not. But we also understand that Commissioner McGuiness asked the Minister for Crime and Policing for authorization to install trackers. When that happens the Minister for Crime and Policing has the opportunity to influence the legislative process. And that’s quite concerning. Any good news? If there’s any good news coming from the Northumbria PCC, it’s that they now say they are working with motorcycle groups. “…we are now working with motorcycle groups to look at more acceptable proposals.” Frankly, consulting motorbike groups is something they should have done before making their tracking request. The political grandstanding taken by Commissioner McGuinness should never have occurred. But at least for now, the Northumbria CPP may have heard us. If we take them at their word, they say that potentially only off-road bikes will be tracked. Still, it’s an unacceptable “solution” for the stated problem. They need better solutions and we should help them arrive at them. Because it’s clear, the Northumbria PCC does not understand the motorbike community. Followup We’ve once again reached out to Commissioner McGuinness and the Northumbria PCC to clarify their new position. We will let you know what they say if they respond. In the interim, it’s important to carefully monitor what the Northumbria PCC plans to do going forward. Vezi sursa
  12. Kawasaki Patents New Quick-shifter

    According to patent filings, Kawasaki is working on a new type of quick-shifter for street bikes. Traditionally, quick-shifters were designed for racers looking to eke every fraction of a second from lap times without the potential damage from clutchless shifts. Designed to work at the upper reaches of the rev range, they worked by momentarily cutting the ignition during the shift. Kawasaki’s system is designed to work similarly at high revs, but can also automatically actuate the clutch for smoother shifts and lower engine speeds. As such, the new system will be very well suited to normal street riding, and not just high revving track work. The patent drawings feature a modified Ninja 1000 SX, proof that the system is meant more for street duty. A separate computer (distinct from the ECU) decides when to use the clutch and when to use the ignition cutout by taking into account engine speed, throttle opening, gear selection, gear lever pressure, vehicle speed, and other external factors. The patent also describes a hybrid electric version, with an all-electric mode, electric and internal combustion mode, and internal combustion only mode, with different shift strategies for each. How is this different than other motorcycles with computer controlled clutches, like the Yamaha FJR1300? The fact that the system still uses a more conventional “ignition cut” paradigm for shifts at high revs appears to be the biggest differentiator. It is not a dual-clutch system like Honda’s, either. But the Kawasaki patent drawings show a lack of a clutch lever, which might indicate that the system operates similarly to the automatics in the Yamaha and Honda stables. Source: CycleWorld.com Vezi sursa
  13. According to patent filings, Kawasaki is working on a new type of quick-shifter for street bikes. Traditionally, quick-shifters were designed for racers looking to eke every fraction of a second from lap times without the potential damage from clutchless shifts. Designed to work at the upper reaches of the rev range, they worked by momentarily cutting the ignition during the shift. Kawasaki’s system is designed to work similarly at high revs, but can also automatically actuate the clutch for smoother shifts and lower engine speeds. As such, the new system will be very well suited to normal street riding, and not just high revving track work. The patent drawings feature a modified Ninja 1000 SX, proof that the system is meant more for street duty. A separate computer (distinct from the ECU) decides when to use the clutch and when to use the ignition cutout by taking into account engine speed, throttle opening, gear selection, gear lever pressure, vehicle speed, and other external factors. The patent also describes a hybrid electric version, with an all-electric mode, electric and internal combustion mode, and internal combustion only mode, with different shift strategies for each. How is this different than other motorcycles with computer controlled clutches, like the Yamaha FJR1300? The fact that the system still uses a more conventional “ignition cut” paradigm for shifts at high revs appears to be the biggest differentiator. It is not a dual-clutch system like Honda’s, either. But the Kawasaki patent drawings show a lack of a clutch lever, which might indicate that the system operates similarly to the automatics in the Yamaha and Honda stables. Source: CycleWorld.com Vezi sursa
  14. Segway’s Apex H2 Hydrogen Powered Motorcycle

    Back in 2015, a Chinese company called Ninebot purchased Segway. Yes, that Segway. The one that produced the self-balancing mall conveyances. And they are now working on other personal mobility vehicles. One of those vehicles is causing a bit of a stir. It’s a hydrogen-powered concept motorcycle called the Segway-Ninebot (Segway) Apex H2. It is Segway’s latest vision for two-wheel transportation solutions. What sets the Segway Apex H2 apart from other electrically powered motorcycles are its hydrogen fuel cells. Is the Segway Apex H2 more than just a drawing? Segway first introduced the Apex concept in 2019. Meeting some skepticism, Segway later showed off the bike riding around on a closed circuit. And it was still met with skepticism, particularly for the way it was ridden around the track. And now, it seems that the Apex H2 concept is a follow-on to the original Apex. Apex H2 different The Apex H2 concept is significantly different than the original Apex. The Apex didn’t use hydrogen. In addition, the original Apex sported a conventional suspension configuration. The new H2 brings a completely different setup. The Segway Apex H2 uses hydrogen-filled fuel cells. Instead of a twin fork tube and conventional swingarm, the Apex H2 uses twin single-sided swingarms. The new concept is quite “Tron” looking. Segway says that the bike’s motor will provide about 80 hp. It will is able to go from 0-60 MPH in less than four seconds and has a top speed of 93 MPH (150 km/h). Unfortunately, they say nothing about its range or the time it will take to swap out the hydrogen fuel cells. The details on how the hydrogen powers the machines are quite slim. Some reports say that the bike will be a hybrid with an internal combustion engine supplying power to the batteries. Other reports say that the hydrogen inside the fuel cells is somehow converted into electrical power. Let’s just say that the power details are “sketchy”. Interestingly, Segway says that the Apex H2 will be ready for production in 2023. They even go so far as to set pricing. In the U.S., the Apex H2 will be priced at $10,700. With the available data, my BS meter is just about pinging off the upper end of its range. What do you think about hydrogen power for motorcycles? Let us know in the comments below. All image credit: Segway-Ninebot Vezi sursa
  15. Back in 2015, a Chinese company called Ninebot purchased Segway. Yes, that Segway. The one that produced the self-balancing mall conveyances. And they are now working on other personal mobility vehicles. One of those vehicles is causing a bit of a stir. It’s a hydrogen-powered concept motorcycle called the Segway-Ninebot (Segway) Apex H2. It is Segway’s latest vision for two-wheel transportation solutions. What sets the Segway Apex H2 apart from other electrically powered motorcycles are its hydrogen fuel cells. Is the Segway Apex H2 more than just a drawing? Segway first introduced the Apex concept in 2019. Meeting some skepticism, Segway later showed off the bike riding around on a closed circuit. And it was still met with skepticism, particularly for the way it was ridden around the track. And now, it seems that the Apex H2 concept is a follow-on to the original Apex. Apex H2 different The Apex H2 concept is significantly different than the original Apex. The Apex didn’t use hydrogen. In addition, the original Apex sported a conventional suspension configuration. The new H2 brings a completely different setup. The Segway Apex H2 uses hydrogen-filled fuel cells. Instead of a twin fork tube and conventional swingarm, the Apex H2 uses twin single-sided swingarms. The new concept is quite “Tron” looking. Segway says that the bike’s motor will provide about 80 hp. It will is able to go from 0-60 MPH in less than four seconds and has a top speed of 93 MPH (150 km/h). Unfortunately, they say nothing about its range or the time it will take to swap out the hydrogen fuel cells. The details on how the hydrogen powers the machines are quite slim. Some reports say that the bike will be a hybrid with an internal combustion engine supplying power to the batteries. Other reports say that the hydrogen inside the fuel cells is somehow converted into electrical power. Let’s just say that the power details are “sketchy”. Interestingly, Segway says that the Apex H2 will be ready for production in 2023. They even go so far as to set pricing. In the U.S., the Apex H2 will be priced at $10,700. With the available data, my BS meter is just about pinging off the upper end of its range. What do you think about hydrogen power for motorcycles? Let us know in the comments below. All image credit: Segway-Ninebot Vezi sursa
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