Jump to content

advrider

Membri
  • Posts

    6,039
  • Joined

  • Last visited

    Never

Contact Methods

  • Pagina Web
    advrider.com

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

advrider's Achievements

Newbie

Newbie (1/14)

0

Reputation

  1. The government of the state of New South Wales (NSW), Australia, has been using high-definition camera systems to catch drivers illegally using cell phones while they drive. The same cameras will also be used to catch seatbelt offences in the future as part of a road safety plan outlined by the state. The laws for cell phone use in NSW mirror many other jurisdictions, where phone use is only allowed while driving if the phone can be operated hands-free, or fixed to a cradle attached to the vehicle, and only for calls, music, or for navigation. Other phone functions are not allowed unless the vehicle is stationary, such as texting, emailing, video calls, web browsing, etc. The camera system used to catch offenders is said to work day or night, and in all weather conditions, and captures images of the front seat area, as seen below. [embedded content] NSW is Australia’s most populous state, and home to its largest city, Sydney. The state’s 2026 Safety Action Plan aims to reduce deaths by 50%, and serious injuries by 30%, by the year 2030. Part of the plan is to use the cameras already in use to enforce cell phone use for catching seatbelt offences as well. The government plans to inform the public about the use of the cameras for seatbelt enforcement prior to beginning that aspect of the program. Cell phone use while driving has become a major issue on roadways around the world, and studies have shown that simply texting while driving is six times more likely to cause an accident than driving drunk. This is especially dangerous for motorcyclists, who are far more vulnerable than cars and trucks when involved in an accident. While driver aid technology and self-driving cars are expected to significantly reduce accidents and injuries on the roadways, the technology is currently not yet advanced or widespread enough to offset the dangerous use of cell phones at this time. Hopefully, programs such as the camera systems in use in NSW will help to keep road users safe in the meantime. Vezi sursa
  2. What’s the best cheap offroad race bike? According to Torture Test Magazine, it might be the Kawasaki KDX200, and man, they’ve probably got us convinced. See below: [embedded content] After seeing this video, I was immediately filled with envy, at the lucky bugger who managed to score one of these classic enduro bikes for the low, low price of $220, to purchase and get it running. Someone call the Robbery Homicide Division, because it’s killing me that someone stole a KDX for that price. Why can’t I ever find those deals? As always, Torture Test Magazine lives up to its name and absolutely flogs this thing through a series of endurance races, because ya know, that’s the sensible thing to do with an ancient dirt bike. It shed a few parts along the way, but as the video points out, it’s a machine that will get you 90 percent of the results of a modern bike for 20 percent of the money, while delivering 100 percent of the fun. That’s the kind of math we can get behind! And since Torture Test has a long history of flogging many older Japanese dirt bikes, here’s an older video showing its review of another KDX200, from about three years back. You get the idea; Torture Test loves these machines, and for good reason. Trouble is, they’re buying them all up and beating them to pieces, and leaving none for the rest of us! [embedded content] By the way, if you’re curious how that KDX held up, here’s a look into the engine: [embedded content] Vezi sursa
  3. On the heels of its European play bike product launch, Honda has announced its trail bike and play bike lineup for American customers for 2023. To nobody’s surprise, these machines get the exact same treatment their Euro counterparts did: Bold New Graphics. Huzzah! However, at least for some of those machines, the graphics kit is indeed pretty rad. So is it a bad thing that the bikes aren’t updated? Not if you’re a fan of reliability. These bikes are not made for performance, they’re made for affordable and trouble-free introduction of kids and adults alike into the world of off-road. The current lineup sees EFI included on many models, which makes life a lot easier for parents who don’t have to deal with clogged carburetors with this tech. Hot new paint for the CRF50F next year! Photo: Honda The CRF110F also gets a cool option for those who don’t want the usual red. Photo: Honda As per Honda: The CRF Trail range of motorcycles suits riders of all sizes and abilities. The easy-to-ride CRF50F is the smallest in the lineup, built for the next generation of riders, with an automatic clutch, low seat height and reliable 49cc four-stroke engine. Thanks in part to its approachable nature, clean-running fuel injection system and push-button electric start, the CRF110F is the industry’s top-selling dirt bike. In addition to the iconic Honda red, the CRF50F and CRF110F are also available in new colors designed to appeal to a wider variety of young riders. Praised for its reliable performance—and available in two sizes—the CRF125F is the midpoint of the lineup, ideal for new and young riders thanks to its smooth, linear power. Also returning for 2023, the capable and versatile CRF250F inspires confidence on the trail, making it a great option for riders of all skill levels. MSRPs start at $1,699 for the CRF50F; $2,599 for the CRF110F; $3,399 for the CRF125F ($3,799 for the Big Wheel model); and $4,899 for the CRF250F. More info at Honda’s US website! Vezi sursa
  4. Can-Am took to a virtual showcase this afternoon to put its new electric motorcycles on display (see the original story here). Now we know what Can-Am is building, we know what they’re called, we know what they look like—and, uh, that’s about it. [embedded content] Two bikes for different roles Can-Am showed off two separate machines, the Pulse and the Origin. The intro to this marketeering spiel was full of reference to Can-Am’s dirt bike history, so it makes sense that the Origin is a sort of scrambler/rally bike. Officially, Can-Am says “Designed to bring new exhilaration to the street and the trail, this dual sport model is a tribute to our motocross heritage.” It sure looks like it has a 21-inch front wheel and 18-inch rear, with an enclosed belt drive, but Can-Am wasn’t sharing many details. Same for the new Can-Am Pulse. Can-Am said this bike would be street-capable; in other words, it’s not a chintzy ebike. It’s a sort of naked machine, and from what we understand, comes with a twist-and-go throttle, with no gearbox. Most electric motorcycles work this way, with only a single speed, so this was no shock. Both bikes have an enclosed final drive, which is very likely a belt drive—it doesn’t look much like a shaft drive, and why enclose a chain drive? That’s speculation, though, because Can-Am would not confirm any technical specs. More details … next year If you like the look of these machines, you’ll have to wait for mid-2023 for more details, said Can-Am’s reps. Sigh. The bikes themselves are supposed to be released mid-2024. No doubt that timeline is tied to developments that will come out of BRP’s recent acquisition of an Austrian/Chinese EV development company. The electrification of our two-wheeled world is happening quickly! Vezi sursa
  5. Can-Am took to a virtual showcase this afternoon to put its new electric motorcycles on display (see the original story here). Now we know what Can-Am is building, we know what they’re called, we know what they look like—and, uh, that’s about it. [embedded content] Two bikes for different roles Can-Am showed off two separate machines, the Pulse and the Origin. The intro to this marketeering spiel was full of reference to Can-Am’s dirt bike history, so it makes sense that the Origin is a sort of scrambler/rally bike. Officially, Can-Am says “Designed to bring new exhilaration to the street and the trail, this dual sport model is a tribute to our motocross heritage.” It sure looks like it has a 21-inch front wheel and 18-inch rear, with an enclosed belt drive, but Can-Am wasn’t sharing many details. Same for the new Can-Am Pulse. Can-Am said this bike would be street-capable; in other words, it’s not a chintzy ebike. It’s a sort of naked machine, and from what we understand, comes with a twist-and-go throttle, with no gearbox. Most electric motorcycles work this way, with only a single speed, so this was no shock. Both bikes have an enclosed final drive, which is very likely a belt drive—it doesn’t look much like a shaft drive, and why enclose a chain drive? That’s speculation, though, because Can-Am would not confirm any technical specs. More details … next year If you like the look of these machines, you’ll have to wait for mid-2023 for more details, said Can-Am’s reps. Sigh. The bikes themselves are supposed to be released mid-2024. No doubt that timeline is tied to developments that will come out of BRP’s recent acquisition of an Austrian/Chinese EV development company. The electrification of our two-wheeled world is happening quickly! Vezi sursa
  6. On July 30, 2022, South Yorkshire Police stopped a motorcycle pursuit before it began, by terminating it with… extreme prejudice. As you’ll see in the video below, unmarked cars rammed two motorcyclists at a gas station as they tried to escape. Their crime? Three riders had allegedly been riding on sidewalks and pedestrian walkways. Police charged one rider with driving while disqualified and with no insurance. The third suspect escaped. Police have impounded the motorcycle he was riding and have encouraged the owner to contact them. “With motorcycle-based criminality increasing, officers are using tactical contact to stop and apprehend those who are committing crime,” says a post on the South Yorkshire Police Facebook page. “Off road bikes are one of the biggest concerns to our communities,” said Roads Policing Inspector Clifton in that Facebook post. “We hear time and time again from our communities that the riders are ‘not causing any harm’ or ‘just having fun.’ But this isn’t the case. These riders have the capability to cause serious or fatal harm to pedestrians, and other road users, as well as damaging infrastructure and farmers’ livelihoods.” Excessive Force? These tactics did avoid a potentially dangerous high-speed chase as the riders prepared to flee. But was this level of force really necessary? Riding on the sidewalk does not seem like a serious enough crime to justify using unmarked police cars as potentially lethal weapons. Yet the Facebook post calls this “pre-authorized tactics.” That means police planned to do this before the riders even had a chance to flee. Riding on pedestrian walkways is wrong. We’re not going to defend that. But if two unmarked cars came swooping in on you at a gas station, you might have the urge to flee as well. You wouldn’t know they were police. They might be trying to rob you or steal your bike, for all you know. It would be a different story with plainly marked police cars. At least then the suspects would clearly be choosing to run from the police. Not In My Jurisdiction These kinds of tactics wouldn’t fly in the United States. American police usually have to witness the traffic violation to take action on it. In this case, all they had was reports of the infractions and descriptions of the motorcycles and riders. Also, many American police departments have policies specifically against ramming motorcycles. We’ve all seen videos of PIT maneuvers against cars. This is not usually allowed against bikes because of the danger to the rider. “As always we continue to clamp down on those who use the road network, in whatever vehicle that may be in to commit criminality,” said Inspector Clifton. “We will be firm, we will be strong, as this type of behavior will not be tolerated.” Being tough on actual crime is all well and good. But is endangering a couple of alleged hooligans’ lives a bit too aggressive? As always, sound off below… Vezi sursa
  7. On July 30, 2022, South Yorkshire Police stopped a motorcycle pursuit before it began, by terminating it with… extreme prejudice. As you’ll see in the video below, unmarked cars rammed two motorcyclists at a gas station as they tried to escape. Their crime? Three riders had allegedly been riding on sidewalks and pedestrian walkways. Police charged one rider with driving while disqualified and with no insurance. The third suspect escaped. Police have impounded the motorcycle he was riding and have encouraged the owner to contact them. “With motorcycle-based criminality increasing, officers are using tactical contact to stop and apprehend those who are committing crime,” says a post on the South Yorkshire Police Facebook page. “Off road bikes are one of the biggest concerns to our communities,” said Roads Policing Inspector Clifton in that Facebook post. “We hear time and time again from our communities that the riders are ‘not causing any harm’ or ‘just having fun.’ But this isn’t the case. These riders have the capability to cause serious or fatal harm to pedestrians, and other road users, as well as damaging infrastructure and farmers’ livelihoods.” Excessive Force? These tactics did avoid a potentially dangerous high-speed chase as the riders prepared to flee. But was this level of force really necessary? Riding on the sidewalk does not seem like a serious enough crime to justify using unmarked police cars as potentially lethal weapons. Yet the Facebook post calls this “pre-authorized tactics.” That means police planned to do this before the riders even had a chance to flee. Riding on pedestrian walkways is wrong. We’re not going to defend that. But if two unmarked cars came swooping in on you at a gas station, you might have the urge to flee as well. You wouldn’t know they were police. They might be trying to rob you or steal your bike, for all you know. It would be a different story with plainly marked police cars. At least then the suspects would clearly be choosing to run from the police. Not In My Jurisdiction These kinds of tactics wouldn’t fly in the United States. American police usually have to witness the traffic violation to take action on it. In this case, all they had was reports of the infractions and descriptions of the motorcycles and riders. Also, many American police departments have policies specifically against ramming motorcycles. We’ve all seen videos of PIT maneuvers against cars. This is not usually allowed against bikes because of the danger to the rider. “As always we continue to clamp down on those who use the road network, in whatever vehicle that may be in to commit criminality,” said Inspector Clifton. “We will be firm, we will be strong, as this type of behavior will not be tolerated.” Being tough on actual crime is all well and good. But is endangering a couple of alleged hooligans’ lives a bit too aggressive? As always, sound off below… Vezi sursa
  8. Ducati’s World Première of new products for 2023 will once again be done online, as it has been for the last two years. Our friends at Motorcycle.com report that the presentations will occur over the span of seven online episodes, beginning September 2nd and finishing November 7th. The first episode comes just before the San Marino round of the MotoGP Championship, and the last is just before EICMA show in Milan. Each episode comes with an enigmatic title that hints at the possible subject matter of each, with the dates and titles as follows: Sept. 2, 2022: Ducati World Première – Episode 1 | The Unexpected Sept. 15, 2022: Ducati World Première – Episode 2 | Ready for More? Sept. 29, 2022: Ducati World Première – Episode 3 | Unlock Earth Oct. 7, 2022: Ducati World Première – Episode 4 | This is Racing Oct. 20, 2022: Ducati World Première – Episode 5 | Push Forward Oct. 28, 2022: Ducati World Première – Episode 6 | Dare to be Bold Nov. 7, 2022: Ducati World Première – Episode 7 | Next Gen Freedom Ducati has disclosed very little about what is to be revealed, except to say that the final episode will cover a model that was previewed at World Ducati Week this past July. Ducati has been able to keep any photos from that event from going public, but the sleuths at Motorcycle.com have uncovered a report from Moto.it that confirms that it is the next generation of Scrambler. But Motorcycle.com did not stop there, finding clues to some of the other reveals, including a new Panigale V4 R and Ducati Monster SP. Other potential new models or variants may be the Diavel, Streetfighter, Multistrada, a production version of the V21L MotoE racer, and Ducati ebikes. The Ducati’s World Première episodes will be available on Ducati.com, Ducati’s YouTube channel, and on Ducati’s various social media networks. Vezi sursa
  9. Ducati’s World Première of new products for 2023 will once again be done online, as it has been for the last two years. Our friends at Motorcycle.com report that the presentations will occur over the span of seven online episodes, beginning September 2nd and finishing November 7th. The first episode comes just before the San Marino round of the MotoGP Championship, and the last is just before EICMA show in Milan. Each episode comes with an enigmatic title that hints at the possible subject matter of each, with the dates and titles as follows: Sept. 2, 2022: Ducati World Première – Episode 1 | The Unexpected Sept. 15, 2022: Ducati World Première – Episode 2 | Ready for More? Sept. 29, 2022: Ducati World Première – Episode 3 | Unlock Earth Oct. 7, 2022: Ducati World Première – Episode 4 | This is Racing Oct. 20, 2022: Ducati World Première – Episode 5 | Push Forward Oct. 28, 2022: Ducati World Première – Episode 6 | Dare to be Bold Nov. 7, 2022: Ducati World Première – Episode 7 | Next Gen Freedom Ducati has disclosed very little about what is to be revealed, except to say that the final episode will cover a model that was previewed at World Ducati Week this past July. Ducati has been able to keep any photos from that event from going public, but the sleuths at Motorcycle.com have uncovered a report from Moto.it that confirms that it is the next generation of Scrambler. But Motorcycle.com did not stop there, finding clues to some of the other reveals, including a new Panigale V4 R and Ducati Monster SP. Other potential new models or variants may be the Diavel, Streetfighter, Multistrada, a production version of the V21L MotoE racer, and Ducati ebikes. The Ducati’s World Première episodes will be available on Ducati.com, Ducati’s YouTube channel, and on Ducati’s various social media networks. Vezi sursa
  10. Just like their gas-powered counterparts, electric motorcycles come in all manner of shapes, sizes, and prices. At the upper end of the food chain, the Harley-Davidson Livewire, a $40,000 bike meant to bring H-D back to relevance and ensure future profitability. At the other end of the spectrum, and a world away, is the new Roam Air, an electric motorcycle designed and built in Africa, for the tidy sum of $1,500, and meant to get the masses rolling with efficiency and versatility. The only things the Livewire and Roam Air seem to have in common are two wheels and electric propulsion, but both have an eye on the future for motorcycling. ADVrider wrote about the earlier exploits of Roam, back when they were called Opibus, and, yes, one of their projects was an electric bus. However, electric mobility, including motorcycles, has always been their focus, and the Roam Air is their latest product. Roam Air in action. Photo: Roam The design of the Roam Air was based on their African rider demographic (both urban and rural), with affordability, functionality, and performance as their focus. The basics of the design have not changed much since we last wrote about it, but it has certainly been refined since the rebranding. The steel frame, twin-shock layout remain, but with a smoother shape to the “tank” – it is actually a storage compartment – and a bikini fairing and side panels added that give it a bit of an 80’s Yamaha RD/RZ feel to it. The dual battery setup that was optional on the original appears to be standard fare on the new Air (2x 3.24 kWh), which allows for increased range, and the batteries are easily swappable, so additional batteries can be charged while the rider is out burning electrons, decreasing downtime. A portable 240V AC charger included with the bike, and Roam claims “the charge time to 100% is 4 hours per battery with a 600W charger”. Range is listed as 180 km (112 miles). The motor is mid-mounted, concentric with the swingarm pivot, and the bike does not have a gearbox. Torque is listed as 185 Nm (136 ft lbs.), top speed 90 km/h (56 mph), and the bike is said to weigh 135 kg (297 lbs.). According to an article on Opibus by CNN, over 90% of Kenya’s electricity comes from renewable sources, and Roam touts the cost of running the Air at 68% less expensive to run than a gas motorcycle, 33% cheaper to maintain, and puts out 97% fewer CO2 emissions. Roam started out as a university project in Sweden that identified the regions of the world where electric mobility would have the greatest impact. Based in Nairobi, Kenya, the company began with converting existing gas-powered vehicles to electric, including buses, and drew the attention of Uber, which in turn drew investment from around the world. With more motorcycles than cars in Kenya (1.2 million cars compared to 1.8 million motorcycles, according to CNN), Roam has selected a region primed for the expansion of electric mobility on two wheels. If the Roam Air is a success, Harley-Davidson might want to look at a budget (really budget) version of the Livewire. Vezi sursa
  11. Just like their gas-powered counterparts, electric motorcycles come in all manner of shapes, sizes, and prices. At the upper end of the food chain, the Harley-Davidson Livewire, a $40,000 bike meant to bring H-D back to relevance and ensure future profitability. At the other end of the spectrum, and a world away, is the new Roam Air, an electric motorcycle designed and built in Africa, for the tidy sum of $1,500, and meant to get the masses rolling with efficiency and versatility. The only things the Livewire and Roam Air seem to have in common are two wheels and electric propulsion, but both have an eye on the future for motorcycling. ADVrider wrote about the earlier exploits of Roam, back when they were called Opibus, and, yes, one of their projects was an electric bus. However, electric mobility, including motorcycles, has always been their focus, and the Roam Air is their latest product. Roam Air in action. Photo: Roam The design of the Roam Air was based on their African rider demographic (both urban and rural), with affordability, functionality, and performance as their focus. The basics of the design have not changed much since we last wrote about it, but it has certainly been refined since the rebranding. The steel frame, twin-shock layout remain, but with a smoother shape to the “tank” – it is actually a storage compartment – and a bikini fairing and side panels added that give it a bit of an 80’s Yamaha RD/RZ feel to it. The dual battery setup that was optional on the original appears to be standard fare on the new Air (2x 3.24 kWh), which allows for increased range, and the batteries are easily swappable, so additional batteries can be charged while the rider is out burning electrons, decreasing downtime. A portable 240V AC charger included with the bike, and Roam claims “the charge time to 100% is 4 hours per battery with a 600W charger”. Range is listed as 180 km (112 miles). The motor is mid-mounted, concentric with the swingarm pivot, and the bike does not have a gearbox. Torque is listed as 185 Nm (136 ft lbs.), top speed 90 km/h (56 mph), and the bike is said to weigh 135 kg (297 lbs.). According to an article on Opibus by CNN, over 90% of Kenya’s electricity comes from renewable sources, and Roam touts the cost of running the Air at 68% less expensive to run than a gas motorcycle, 33% cheaper to maintain, and puts out 97% fewer CO2 emissions. Roam started out as a university project in Sweden that identified the regions of the world where electric mobility would have the greatest impact. Based in Nairobi, Kenya, the company began with converting existing gas-powered vehicles to electric, including buses, and drew the attention of Uber, which in turn drew investment from around the world. With more motorcycles than cars in Kenya (1.2 million cars compared to 1.8 million motorcycles, according to CNN), Roam has selected a region primed for the expansion of electric mobility on two wheels. If the Roam Air is a success, Harley-Davidson might want to look at a budget (really budget) version of the Livewire. Vezi sursa
  12. If you’ve never heard of Swiss motorcycle gear manufacturer iXS, let me offer you a quick primer: it’s well made, good quality stuff, and relatively inexpensive. I own several pieces of iXS gear. I live in the US, though, and it can be difficult to source. What’s New The new Gerona Air from iXS, a men’s summer jacket, is super sharp looking. It has full mesh panels where it counts: front and back of torso, and front and back of arms. The rising popularity of mesh summer jackets is a boon to the sport, as more people realize that you can wear protective gear even in the height of summer without roasting. Lots of Adjustability This new Gerona Air jacket has a bunch of adjustability that belies its price point. There are snap adjustment tabs on the upper arm and just below the elbow as well as a cinch at the cuff, to fit the jacket to you. This way, if you experience an unplanned off-bike excursion, the armor stays where it should. Armor Standards The jacket comes with shoulder and elbow armor, and has a pocket for additional back armor. All of the fitted armor makes the jacket EN17092-3:2020 compliant. If you need more information about that standard, FEMA (no, not that FEMA, but the Federation of European Motorcyclist Associations) has you covered. The elbow armor is height-adjustable. Features The jacket features four outside pockets and two inside pockets, as well as a smaller “Napoleon” pocket. I had never heard that term before, but if you’ve ever seen a portrait of the erstwhile French military leader, you’ll know exactly where that pocket is. The hem of the jacket also has a 360-degree zipper built in. Impressive Size Range This summer jacket is unfortunately only available in the above black/white/grey color scheme. Anyone who’s ever done a bunch of hot summertime riding knows: the lighter your gear the cooler it stays. Air movement helps, but a lighter color would be preferable. What is awesome, though, is the size range: it’s available in men’s Medium though 9XL. If you’ve been struggling to find a jacket big enough, this one might be your ticket. Great Price Point We so often give you a heads-up when new gear is available; most of the time it’s top-of-the-line ADV-specific gear and has a price point to match. This jacket, though, is an excellent all-rounder. It’s in iXS’s “Tour” collection and would be exactly as at home on a sport tourer as it would on an adventure bike. And at $229 USD it’s a refreshing change from some of the fancy gear that costs more than your first motorcycle did. Ordering gear internationally without knowing how it will fit can be difficult, but at that price it might be worth a return trip or two. The jacket is so new it’s not quite on the iXS website yet, but keep your eyes peeled (and look at their other offerings too). Vezi sursa
  13. If you’ve never heard of Swiss motorcycle gear manufacturer iXS, let me offer you a quick primer: it’s well made, good quality stuff, and relatively inexpensive. I own several pieces of iXS gear. I live in the US, though, and it can be difficult to source. What’s New The new Gerona Air from iXS, a men’s summer jacket, is super sharp looking. It has full mesh panels where it counts: front and back of torso, and front and back of arms. The rising popularity of mesh summer jackets is a boon to the sport, as more people realize that you can wear protective gear even in the height of summer without roasting. Lots of Adjustability This new Gerona Air jacket has a bunch of adjustability that belies its price point. There are snap adjustment tabs on the upper arm and just below the elbow as well as a cinch at the cuff, to fit the jacket to you. This way, if you experience an unplanned off-bike excursion, the armor stays where it should. Armor Standards The jacket comes with shoulder and elbow armor, and has a pocket for additional back armor. All of the fitted armor makes the jacket EN17092-3:2020 compliant. If you need more information about that standard, FEMA (no, not that FEMA, but the Federation of European Motorcyclist Associations) has you covered. The elbow armor is height-adjustable. Features The jacket features four outside pockets and two inside pockets, as well as a smaller “Napoleon” pocket. I had never heard that term before, but if you’ve ever seen a portrait of the erstwhile French military leader, you’ll know exactly where that pocket is. The hem of the jacket also has a 360-degree zipper built in. Impressive Size Range This summer jacket is unfortunately only available in the above black/white/grey color scheme. Anyone who’s ever done a bunch of hot summertime riding knows: the lighter your gear the cooler it stays. Air movement helps, but a lighter color would be preferable. What is awesome, though, is the size range: it’s available in men’s Medium though 9XL. If you’ve been struggling to find a jacket big enough, this one might be your ticket. Great Price Point We so often give you a heads-up when new gear is available; most of the time it’s top-of-the-line ADV-specific gear and has a price point to match. This jacket, though, is an excellent all-rounder. It’s in iXS’s “Tour” collection and would be exactly as at home on a sport tourer as it would on an adventure bike. And at $229 USD it’s a refreshing change from some of the fancy gear that costs more than your first motorcycle did. Ordering gear internationally without knowing how it will fit can be difficult, but at that price it might be worth a return trip or two. The jacket is so new it’s not quite on the iXS website yet, but keep your eyes peeled (and look at their other offerings too). Vezi sursa
  14. Mosko Moto’s website has a bunch of new kit listed right now, all available on the Pre-order section. The new lineup includes new backpacks, tank bags and other useful-looking gear, in a variety of colors. You can see some more info on some of the equipment below; the terms and conditions of the Pre-order gear is here. Wildcat Backpack Available in both 8-liter and 12-liter configurations, the Wildcat is made to be worn over anything from an MX jersey with or without external armor, all the way up to a large ADV jacket. It’s ergonomically designed to avoid pressure points and sore shoulders, with an adjustable/removal sternum strap and a waist strap to keep everything in place while you move around the bike. The shoulder straps are five-way adjustable to get your fit dialed in, and there’s a molded back panel as well. The backpacks come with 3-liter Hydrapak water bladders, with insulated hoses, for staying hydrated as you ride. Color options are Black, Woodland and Stargazer. Pricing is $199 ($270 CAD) for the 8-liter pack here, $219 ($295 CAD) for the 12-liter pack here. The Gnome is a different-styled tankbag, meant to bring along just the bare necessities. Photo: Mosko Moto Gnome Tank Bag This 5-liter tank bag includes a 1.5-liter Hydrapack water reservoir for drinks on the road. The Gnome has an interesting “side-to-side” configuration; Mosko Moto says it’s a “landscape” configuration instead of the usual front-to-back orientation of most tank bags. Color choices are the same as the new backpacks: Black, Woodland, Stargazer. MSRP is $149 ($200 CAD). More deets here! The minimalistic Nomini tankbag. Even barer necessities than the Gnome! Photo: Mosko Moto Nomini Tank Bag The Nomini tank bag is very similar to the Gnome, but it only has 2-liter capacity. Like the Gnome, it’s intended to just carry your wallet, sunglasses or other essentials you want handy as you ride, and to be easily removable at gas stops, etc., so you’ve got your stuff handy where you need it, instead of tempting light-fingered passersby. It’s available in the same colors; pricing is $65 ($87 CAD). The new Workhorse jersey is just one of several new pieces of rider kit available at Mosko Moto’s pre-order page. Photo: Mosko Moto Riding gear Along with gear for your bike, Mosko Moto has also expanded its lineup of gear for you—jerseys, jackets, etc. See the Workhorse jersey here; the Jackaloft puffer here; the Graph ultralight baselayer here; the Surveyor soft shell overjacket here. Generally speaking, they all follow Mosko Moto’s pattern of using trick material and experience-driven design to provide equipment that’s by riders and for riders, keeping you comfortable in the saddle. Vezi sursa
  15. Mosko Moto’s website has a bunch of new kit listed right now, all available on the Pre-order section. The new lineup includes new backpacks, tank bags and other useful-looking gear, in a variety of colors. You can see some more info on some of the equipment below; the terms and conditions of the Pre-order gear is here. Wildcat Backpack Available in both 8-liter and 12-liter configurations, the Wildcat is made to be worn over anything from an MX jersey with or without external armor, all the way up to a large ADV jacket. It’s ergonomically designed to avoid pressure points and sore shoulders, with an adjustable/removal sternum strap and a waist strap to keep everything in place while you move around the bike. The shoulder straps are five-way adjustable to get your fit dialed in, and there’s a molded back panel as well. The backpacks come with 3-liter Hydrapak water bladders, with insulated hoses, for staying hydrated as you ride. Color options are Black, Woodland and Stargazer. Pricing is $199 ($270 CAD) for the 8-liter pack here, $219 ($295 CAD) for the 12-liter pack here. The Gnome is a different-styled tankbag, meant to bring along just the bare necessities. Photo: Mosko Moto Gnome Tank Bag This 5-liter tank bag includes a 1.5-liter Hydrapack water reservoir for drinks on the road. The Gnome has an interesting “side-to-side” configuration; Mosko Moto says it’s a “landscape” configuration instead of the usual front-to-back orientation of most tank bags. Color choices are the same as the new backpacks: Black, Woodland, Stargazer. MSRP is $149 ($200 CAD). More deets here! The minimalistic Nomini tankbag. Even barer necessities than the Gnome! Photo: Mosko Moto Nomini Tank Bag The Nomini tank bag is very similar to the Gnome, but it only has 2-liter capacity. Like the Gnome, it’s intended to just carry your wallet, sunglasses or other essentials you want handy as you ride, and to be easily removable at gas stops, etc., so you’ve got your stuff handy where you need it, instead of tempting light-fingered passersby. It’s available in the same colors; pricing is $65 ($87 CAD). The new Workhorse jersey is just one of several new pieces of rider kit available at Mosko Moto’s pre-order page. Photo: Mosko Moto Riding gear Along with gear for your bike, Mosko Moto has also expanded its lineup of gear for you—jerseys, jackets, etc. See the Workhorse jersey here; the Jackaloft puffer here; the Graph ultralight baselayer here; the Surveyor soft shell overjacket here. Generally speaking, they all follow Mosko Moto’s pattern of using trick material and experience-driven design to provide equipment that’s by riders and for riders, keeping you comfortable in the saddle. Vezi sursa
×
×
  • Create New...