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  1. We recently told you about the Touratech DirtDaze event held at the Suicide Six Resort in Pomfret, Vermont. The event has come and gone, was very well attended and appears to have been a success. Too much for a tiny town and Suicide Six? Some had worried that an event like this was too much for the tiny town of Pomfret. But those notions have dispelled. It seems that the ADV community made an excellent impression on the Pomfret townspeople and surrounding communities. A recent article in the Vermont Standard newspaper shed some light on how well the ADV community acted and was received during their stay. A large welcoming gate greeted arriving riders. Photo credit: Mike Botan Time Reither, the Suicide Six Resort Manager said the Touratech DirtDaze event was one of the smoothest they ever had. “We had 200-plus campers and the next morning [after the event closed] there were eight of us expecting to pick up a lot of trash. There was literally not one piece of trash left behind. When the Vermont Symphony Orchestra came, it looked like a bomb went off.” KTM came with a large part of their lineup including the new 790 Adventure machines. Photo credit: Mike Botan Politicians happy Local politicians chimed in with their thoughts. Select Board Chair Emily Grube said that the DirtDaze attendees were free to travel Vermont roads. She noted that the bikes she heard were relatively quiet and the riders complied with laws. Planning Commissioner John Moore agreed with Grube. “People were saying that [Suicide Six] was very fortunate to get the event and people from far away as Canada and New York. If Vermont is going to hang out its shingle that this is going to be a tourist economy, there were a lot of businesses that benefit. I think people can live with a four-day event.” Manufacturers from many brands attended the event. Photo credit: Mike Botan Local resident’s thoughts Not everyone was happy about the event though. One resident, Pamela Pickett said she supported the event but that it was too large for the Suicide Six Resort. “I was concerned with the camping [at the base area] and the noise. I think the riders were respectful but the constant barrage of motorcycles at 6:30 AM was an annoyance. The event was too big for Suicide Six” Pickett may have thought that the resort area was not the proper venue. But another Pomfret resident thought the venue was appropriate for this kind of event. Pomfret resident Christina Chamberlain had this to say: “It was nice to see the venue in use. It’s a beautiful space. It brings more people into town and more business. It’s not like the cops were being called. The more events we have, the better.” Welcome in Vermont Right now, there’s no news about where the next Touratech DirtDaze will be held. But it seems that if ADV community members want to ride in Vermont, they will be welcomed by the community. Featured image credit: Touratech DirtDaze Vezi sursa
  2. Most of us have a desire to see a decent chunk of the world while we’re alive, but what comes after death? A rider from Canada has figured out a way to keep traveling the world and meeting new people, years after he passed away. And, he’s even managed to become the star of a short film. The rider is Hugh Robert Nesbitt from the province of British Columbia, a.k.a. “Biker Bob.” Biker Bob was based on Vancouver Island but rode all over North America, attending rallies and making new friends. It seems Biker Bob was a cruiser rider, not an adventure biker, but most two-wheeled enthusiasts can agree that no matter what sort of bike you’re riding, exploration and meeting interesting people are some of the best things about riding motorcycles. Biker Bob died in a motorcycle accident in 2015, but his adventures haven’t ended. After Bob’s death, his widow put his ashes in a bottle with a note reading “Biker Bob. If you find me, turn me loose.” She put the bottle in the ocean, and so began Bob’s final journey. In the years since, Bob’s ashes have been recovered by at least three people along the coast, and his last adventure ended up catching the attention of Canadian filmmaker Cat Mills. Intrigued, she dug deeper, eventually producing the short film Biker Bob’s Posthumous Adventure. You can watch it below, if you’ve got 18 minutes to spare. [embedded content] Where’s Bob off to next? Hopefully he’ll end up getting another motorcycle ride in, as it only seems fitting. But if he keeps on floating ashore, that’s a pretty good final adventure as well. Vezi sursa
  3. There’s some “good” news about motorcycle theft in the US. Well as much as there can be good news about motorcycle thefts. According to the National Insurance Crime Bureau (NICB), total motorcycle thefts were down approximately 6%. Total theft Ultimately, a total of 41,674 motorcycles were reported stolen. This compares to 44,268 motorcycles reported stolen in 2017. US motorcycle thefts have been steadily dropping since 2016 and 2018 continues that trend. Theft breakdown by state The NICB also published data about which states and cities had the highest incidence of thefts. The state of California led the way with 7,035, followed by Florida, Texas, New York and South Carolina. Unfortunately, the NICB didn’t adjust the figures for total registrations, so it’s difficult to determine the actual theft rate each state has. Motorcycle thefts by state. Breakdown by city The cities that had the highest theft rate are, as you might expect, larger urban areas. New York City had the most, followed by Los Angeles, Miami, Las Vegas and, San Diego. Once again, the NICB only provided the total number of thefts so we can’t tell what the theft rate is. New York City with the most thefts saw thefts increase by 34%. But the next highest theft city, Los Angeles, actually saw thefts decrease by 25%. Motorcycle thefts by city. Breakdown by make If you are wondering what types of bikes were stolen most, the NICB identified the most stolen bikes by their make. Unfortunately, they didn’t break out their stats by model. The most stolen make of motorcycle was Honda, followed by Yamaha, Suzuki, Kawasaki, and Harley-Davidson. Motorcycle theft by their make. Motorcycle recoveries Recovery of stolen motorcycles was down in 2018. The NICB used an 18-month window from January 1, 2018, to June 13, 2019, and determined that 44% of stolen motorcycles had been recovered during that period. California had the most recoveries of all, followed by Florida, Texas South Carolina, and Colorado. So while the NICB’s stats may not have the detail that we might like, the takeaway is that thefts are down and that is good news. All images credit: NICB Vezi sursa
  4. Motorcycle Theft Drops In The US

    There’s some “good” news about motorcycle theft in the US. Well as much as there can be good news about motorcycle thefts. According to the National Insurance Crime Bureau (NICB), total motorcycle thefts were down approximately 6%. Total theft Ultimately, a total of 41,674 motorcycles were reported stolen. This compares to 44,268 motorcycles reported stolen in 2017. US motorcycle thefts have been steadily dropping since 2016 and 2018 continues that trend. Theft breakdown by state The NICB also published data about which states and cities had the highest incidence of thefts. The state of California led the way with 7,035, followed by Florida, Texas, New York and South Carolina. Unfortunately, the NICB didn’t adjust the figures for total registrations, so it’s difficult to determine the actual theft rate each state has. Motorcycle thefts by state. Breakdown by city The cities that had the highest theft rate are, as you might expect, larger urban areas. New York City had the most, followed by Los Angeles, Miami, Las Vegas and, San Diego. Once again, the NICB only provided the total number of thefts so we can’t tell what the theft rate is. New York City with the most thefts saw thefts increase by 34%. But the next highest theft city, Los Angeles, actually saw thefts decrease by 25%. Motorcycle thefts by city. Breakdown by make If you are wondering what types of bikes were stolen most, the NICB identified the most stolen bikes by their make. Unfortunately, they didn’t break out their stats by model. The most stolen make of motorcycle was Honda, followed by Yamaha, Suzuki, Kawasaki, and Harley-Davidson. Motorcycle theft by their make. Motorcycle recoveries Recovery of stolen motorcycles was down in 2018. The NICB used an 18-month window from January 1, 2018, to June 13, 2019, and determined that 44% of stolen motorcycles had been recovered during that period. California had the most recoveries of all, followed by Florida, Texas South Carolina, and Colorado. So while the NICB’s stats may not have the detail that we might like, the takeaway is that thefts are down and that is good news. All images credit: NICB Vezi sursa
  5. Motorcycle History Preserved by Suzuki

    Three more of Barry Sheene’s race bikes have arrived at Suzuki GB from the family home in Australia, and two of them will be restored at this year’s Motorcycle Live, which takes place at Birmingham’s NEC from 16-24 November. Sheene’s last Grand Prix bike – a DAF Trucks-sponsored 1984 Harris-framed XR45 RG500 – arrived alongside a 1978 XR27 RG500 and a special XR23A 652cc big bore RG500, raced in the Trans Atlantic series and F1 Championship in 1979. In conjunction with Suzuki’s Vintage Parts Programme, both the XR45 and XR23A will be refurbished and fired into life once again at Motorcycle Live, while the XR27 will be displayed alongside Sheene’s 1976 and 1977 world championship-winning XR14s, both of which were also restored thanks to the Vintage Parts Programme in 2017. Suzuki GB aftersales marketing coordinator, Tim Davies, said, “This is another special moment for us. These bikes haven’t been back in the UK since Barry and his family emigrated to Australia, so it’s quite something to get them out of the crates and see them here again. But it’s going to be even more of a special occasion when they live again, thanks to the restoration process which will be carried out by former ‘70s and ‘80s Grand Prix technician Nigel Everett and former mechanic for Barry Sheene, Martyn Ogborne. And it’s a great opportunity for fans to again see, hear, and smell them as they would have existed at the time. We can’t wait.” Launched in 2013, Suzuki’s Vintage Parts Programme exists to help owners of older Suzukis keep their machines maintained or help with restoration projects, with a host of parts available from cylinders, pistons, and conrods, to a range of bearings and seals, and everything in between. For more information visit https://bikes.suzuki.co.uk/vintage-parts-programme/ Information and photos provided by Suzuki. Vezi sursa
  6. Three more of Barry Sheene’s race bikes have arrived at Suzuki GB from the family home in Australia, and two of them will be restored at this year’s Motorcycle Live, which takes place at Birmingham’s NEC from 16-24 November. Sheene’s last Grand Prix bike – a DAF Trucks-sponsored 1984 Harris-framed XR45 RG500 – arrived alongside a 1978 XR27 RG500 and a special XR23A 652cc big bore RG500, raced in the Trans Atlantic series and F1 Championship in 1979. In conjunction with Suzuki’s Vintage Parts Programme, both the XR45 and XR23A will be refurbished and fired into life once again at Motorcycle Live, while the XR27 will be displayed alongside Sheene’s 1976 and 1977 world championship-winning XR14s, both of which were also restored thanks to the Vintage Parts Programme in 2017. Suzuki GB aftersales marketing coordinator, Tim Davies, said, “This is another special moment for us. These bikes haven’t been back in the UK since Barry and his family emigrated to Australia, so it’s quite something to get them out of the crates and see them here again. But it’s going to be even more of a special occasion when they live again, thanks to the restoration process which will be carried out by former ‘70s and ‘80s Grand Prix technician Nigel Everett and former mechanic for Barry Sheene, Martyn Ogborne. And it’s a great opportunity for fans to again see, hear, and smell them as they would have existed at the time. We can’t wait.” Launched in 2013, Suzuki’s Vintage Parts Programme exists to help owners of older Suzukis keep their machines maintained or help with restoration projects, with a host of parts available from cylinders, pistons, and conrods, to a range of bearings and seals, and everything in between. For more information visit https://bikes.suzuki.co.uk/vintage-parts-programme/ Information and photos provided by Suzuki. Vezi sursa
  7. This is an interesting story about internal combustion and electric motorcycles. Internal combustion has ruled the motorcycle roost for decades, but perhaps electric motors have found a chink in internal combustion’s armor. Sur-Ron Electric Motorcycle A Sur-Ron electric motorcycle entered a hare scramble recently and the happenings were recorded by the Sur Ron rider Tucker Neary. The race was held in Naturita Colorado on a rocky and sandy route. The Sur-Ron electric motorcycle Neary used for the hare-scramble. The Sur-Ron bike would be racing in the Sportsman Class against a slew of internal combustion-engined machines. Near chose the Sportsman Class because it allows any size motorcycle with any displacement. Neary was quoted as saying: “The race was a Hare Scramble format and I entered into the Sportsman Class with a 2019 Sur-Ron X. The Sportsman Class is an Unclassified Class and allows racers to race any motorcycle size and displacement, which was a good fit for my untraditional entry. I had only ridden the bike once before the race so although I knew I could be competitive on it, I was not sure where it would stack up against traditional gas race bikes.” Dead engine start Unfortunately for the Sur-Ron machine, the race required a “dead engine” start. While all the internal combustion-engined machines could start with a swift kick, the Sur-Ron was required to start with the key in the off position. The problem with that is that the Sur-Ron requires about 4 – 5 seconds for all the electronics to become ready to race. So right from the start, the Neary would watch his fellow competitors ride away with a significant head start. Performance not up to snuff? But this is where things really get really interesting. Traditional dirt bikes have lots of suspension travel and enough fuel to finish the race easily. Not so for the Sur-Ron. The Sur-Ron has far less suspension travel and it was unclear whether the machine had enough battery to finish the race. But Neary was not daunted. He entered nonetheless. He knew that he would have to choose his lines carefully and use the bikes lighter weight to his advantage. Results When all was said and done, Neary brought the Sur-Ron ahead of everyone else in his class and won. But the race did show the current foibles of electric motorcycles. In the end, the Sur-Ron battery was not up to the task of going the entire distance. Low remaining charge meant the bike went into limp mode. Near the conclusion of the race, Neary was forced to walk across the finish line not under electric power, but his own human power. Still, he won his class and perhaps that says something for electric motorcycles’ future. Photo credit: Electrek Vezi sursa
  8. This is an interesting story about internal combustion and electric motorcycles. Internal combustion has ruled the motorcycle roost for decades, but perhaps electric motors have found a chink in internal combustion’s armor. Sur-Ron Electric Motorcycle A Sur-Ron electric motorcycle entered a hare scramble recently and the happenings were recorded by the Sur Ron rider Tucker Neary. The race was held in Naturita Colorado on a rocky and sandy route. The Sur-Ron electric motorcycle Neary used for the hare-scramble. The Sur-Ron bike would be racing in the Sportsman Class against a slew of internal combustion-engined machines. Near chose the Sportsman Class because it allows any size motorcycle with any displacement. Neary was quoted as saying: “The race was a Hare Scramble format and I entered into the Sportsman Class with a 2019 Sur-Ron X. The Sportsman Class is an Unclassified Class and allows racers to race any motorcycle size and displacement, which was a good fit for my untraditional entry. I had only ridden the bike once before the race so although I knew I could be competitive on it, I was not sure where it would stack up against traditional gas race bikes.” Dead engine start Unfortunately for the Sur-Ron machine, the race required a “dead engine” start. While all the internal combustion-engined machines could start with a swift kick, the Sur-Ron was required to start with the key in the off position. The problem with that is that the Sur-Ron requires about 4 – 5 seconds for all the electronics to become ready to race. So right from the start, the Neary would watch his fellow competitors ride away with a significant head start. Performance not up to snuff? But this is where things really get really interesting. Traditional dirt bikes have lots of suspension travel and enough fuel to finish the race easily. Not so for the Sur-Ron. The Sur-Ron has far less suspension travel and it was unclear whether the machine had enough battery to finish the race. But Neary was not daunted. He entered nonetheless. He knew that he would have to choose his lines carefully and use the bikes lighter weight to his advantage. Results When all was said and done, Neary brought the Sur-Ron ahead of everyone else in his class and won. But the race did show the current foibles of electric motorcycles. In the end, the Sur-Ron battery was not up to the task of going the entire distance. Low remaining charge meant the bike went into limp mode. Near the conclusion of the race, Neary was forced to walk across the finish line not under electric power, but his own human power. Still, he won his class and perhaps that says something for electric motorcycles’ future. Photo credit: Electrek Vezi sursa
  9. When you think about motorcycle safety, you probably don’t think about Peter Fonda or Evel Knievel. Fonda played a major role in the counter-culture biker film Easy Rider. Riding a stretched chopper helmetless and with no front brake, it’s surprising that he would participate in a film about motorcycle safety. Peter Fonda riding the “Captain America” chopper in Easy Rider. Photo credit: Twitter Also interesting is that Evel Knievel appears in the film preaching motorcycle safety. The man who it was said “broke every bone in his body” and reportedly a total of 443 bones plays a major role in the film as well. Produced in 1973, the film reflects its age. If you are looking for detailed information on motorcycle safety, there are plenty of other venues to get your information. But for a film that is more than 45 years old, it at least raises awareness about riding safely. The Montana Standard published this picture of Evel Knievel depicting the bones he had broken during his jumping career. Photo credit: Montana Standard There are some good tidbits in the film, including discussion on riding with ATGATT. There are also warnings about inattentive drivers. Both pieces of advice that are still good today. Ultimately, the film may provide you with some entertainment and laughs. It’s not MSF safety material, but it is evidence that at least a few people were thinking about promoting motorcycle safety. Vezi sursa
  10. When you think about motorcycle safety, you probably don’t think about Peter Fonda or Evel Knievel. Fonda played a major role in the counter-culture biker film Easy Rider. Riding a stretched chopper helmetless and with no front brake, it’s surprising that he would participate in a film about motorcycle safety. Peter Fonda riding the “Captain America” chopper in Easy Rider. Photo credit: Twitter Also interesting is that Evel Knievel appears in the film preaching motorcycle safety. The man who it was said “broke every bone in his body” and reportedly a total of 443 bones plays a major role in the film as well. Produced in 1973, the film reflects its age. If you are looking for detailed information on motorcycle safety, there are plenty of other venues to get your information. But for a film that is more than 45 years old, it at least raises awareness about riding safely. The Montana Standard published this picture of Evel Knievel depicting the bones he had broken during his jumping career. Photo credit: Montana Standard There are some good tidbits in the film, including discussion on riding with ATGATT. There are also warnings about inattentive drivers. Both pieces of advice that are still good today. Ultimately, the film may provide you with some entertainment and laughs. It’s not MSF safety material, but it is evidence that at least a few people were thinking about promoting motorcycle safety. Vezi sursa
  11. A set of government paperwork filed in Australia has confirmed the new Honda Africa Twin will be called the CRF1100L, and gives us some other details on the upcoming bike. For a few weeks, we’ve known Honda has plans to introduce a new Africa Twin for 2020. The gossip said Honda would built a slightly bigger engine, with an increase in horsepower. Honda addressed the rumors by releasing a teaser video in July, indicating a new machine was coming, but giving up not much else. Now, Motorcycle.com has dug up some bureaucratic paperwork from Down Under that says the new machine will be called the CRF1100L, with a 1084 cc parallel twin engine. It will make 101 hp at 7,500 rpm (the current model makes 94 hp), and that leads us to believe the earlier rumor of a 78 lb-ft torque rating is likely also correct. The new engine will be available with DCT or six-speed transmission, like the current model. What else is new? The photos published by Motorcycle.com show a new frame and bolt-on subframe, cross-spoke wheels, new dash, and some changes to the bodywork. The Adventure Sports version isn’t pictured with crash bars, although they may be added later. The tail rack appears to be larger, and the skid plate appears to be more rugged. The windshield also appears to be different for 2020. You can see some low-res photos of the new Honda at Motorcycle.com. We’d expect to see this machine launched at November’s EICMA show, with availability sometime next spring for North American customers. Vezi sursa
  12. A set of government paperwork filed in Australia has confirmed the new Honda Africa Twin will be called the CRF1100L, and gives us some other details on the upcoming bike. For a few weeks, we’ve known Honda has plans to introduce a new Africa Twin for 2020. The gossip said Honda would built a slightly bigger engine, with an increase in horsepower. Honda addressed the rumors by releasing a teaser video in July, indicating a new machine was coming, but giving up not much else. Now, Motorcycle.com has dug up some bureaucratic paperwork from Down Under that says the new machine will be called the CRF1100L, with a 1084 cc parallel twin engine. It will make 101 hp at 7,500 rpm (the current model makes 94 hp), and that leads us to believe the earlier rumor of a 78 lb-ft torque rating is likely also correct. The new engine will be available with DCT or six-speed transmission, like the current model. What else is new? The photos published by Motorcycle.com show a new frame and bolt-on subframe, cross-spoke wheels, new dash, and some changes to the bodywork. The Adventure Sports version isn’t pictured with crash bars, although they may be added later. The tail rack appears to be larger, and the skid plate appears to be more rugged. The windshield also appears to be different for 2020. You can see some low-res photos of the new Honda at Motorcycle.com. We’d expect to see this machine launched at November’s EICMA show, with availability sometime next spring for North American customers. Vezi sursa
  13. Want to buy an MV Agusta superbike? Soon, you’ll be able to do so by shopping online, sort of. MV Agusta has been a company in the middle of tremendous upheaval in recent years, especially since the early 2000s. For a few years, MV Agusta passed between several hands, including ownership by Harley-Davidson at one point. After the Castiglioni family re-acquired the company in 2010, the money troubles continued. Mercedes-AMG purchased a 25 per cent stake in the business in 2014. That didn’t end the problems, and other more mysterious investors started pumping money into the company. Right now, MV Agusta appears to mostly be controlled by a financial consortium called the Black Ocean Group, which is said to represent Russian billionaires. As well as big-picture money problems, MV Agusta has also seen some upheaval with its distributors; currently, North America sees MV Agusta distributed by the same company that originally handled it in Australia, the Urban Moto Group. The financial instability has leveled off now, but MV Agusta is in a jam. It’s not got the resources to launch a broad range of new motorcycles, and it’s already developed its three-cylinder and four-cylinder lines to the end of the road, basically. So, the company’s leaders have said they’re working on plans for new machines, but in the meantime, they’ve got to find other ways to keep in business. One of those tactics is a team-up with Loncin, announced a few weeks back. This will see MV Agusta-designed bikes manufactured in China, building the brand’s sales and reputation in other markets. Another tactic that was recently announced is a move to online pre-ordering for all its models. MV Agusta isn’t the first manufacturer to try selling bikes online; Beta has a similar website in some markets, and other OEMs have tinkered with this formula over the years. MV Agusta has had pre-ordering available for some of its models before, but only special-edition bikes available in limited numbers. Now, all MV Agustas will be available for pre-order, with sales finalized at a local dealership. It might not sound like a huge leap, but it helps MV Agusta bystep one of its biggest problems: production numbers. This will allow MV Agusta to more accurately match the number of motorcycles built and shipped, instead of having unsold stock languishing in dealerships. This is especially important as the gap between MV Agusta’s payment of its suppliers and the receipt of its payment for its motorcycles has been a major problem in recent months. And considering how many MV Agustas are sold solely on looks, an online sales plan does make sense. You can bet the rest of the industry is watching closely, to see how they can adapt this plan for themselves. Vezi sursa
  14. MV Agusta moves to online ordering

    Want to buy an MV Agusta superbike? Soon, you’ll be able to do so by shopping online, sort of. MV Agusta has been a company in the middle of tremendous upheaval in recent years, especially since the early 2000s. For a few years, MV Agusta passed between several hands, including ownership by Harley-Davidson at one point. After the Castiglioni family re-acquired the company in 2010, the money troubles continued. Mercedes-AMG purchased a 25 per cent stake in the business in 2014. That didn’t end the problems, and other more mysterious investors started pumping money into the company. Right now, MV Agusta appears to mostly be controlled by a financial consortium called the Black Ocean Group, which is said to represent Russian billionaires. As well as big-picture money problems, MV Agusta has also seen some upheaval with its distributors; currently, North America sees MV Agusta distributed by the same company that originally handled it in Australia, the Urban Moto Group. The financial instability has leveled off now, but MV Agusta is in a jam. It’s not got the resources to launch a broad range of new motorcycles, and it’s already developed its three-cylinder and four-cylinder lines to the end of the road, basically. So, the company’s leaders have said they’re working on plans for new machines, but in the meantime, they’ve got to find other ways to keep in business. One of those tactics is a team-up with Loncin, announced a few weeks back. This will see MV Agusta-designed bikes manufactured in China, building the brand’s sales and reputation in other markets. Another tactic that was recently announced is a move to online pre-ordering for all its models. MV Agusta isn’t the first manufacturer to try selling bikes online; Beta has a similar website in some markets, and other OEMs have tinkered with this formula over the years. MV Agusta has had pre-ordering available for some of its models before, but only special-edition bikes available in limited numbers. Now, all MV Agustas will be available for pre-order, with sales finalized at a local dealership. It might not sound like a huge leap, but it helps MV Agusta bystep one of its biggest problems: production numbers. This will allow MV Agusta to more accurately match the number of motorcycles built and shipped, instead of having unsold stock languishing in dealerships. This is especially important as the gap between MV Agusta’s payment of its suppliers and the receipt of its payment for its motorcycles has been a major problem in recent months. And considering how many MV Agustas are sold solely on looks, an online sales plan does make sense. You can bet the rest of the industry is watching closely, to see how they can adapt this plan for themselves. Vezi sursa
  15. We recently told you about a rumor that Honda may be bringing the CBR300RR to North America. Now, Honda has seemingly poured new fuel on the fire. Honda issued a press release saying that it would be attending this year’s AIMExpo in Columbus, OH. Buried in the release were these words: For consumers, Honda will make the North American debut of a new model and will offer demo rides with models including the Gold Wing, Africa Twin, CB1000R, CB650R, NC750X, CBR650F, CB500F, CB500X, Rebel 500 and CRF450L. Well, that’s a tasty tidbit. But Honda isn’t saying what that new model is. Could it be the rumored CBR300RR, or might it be something else? There are other rumors out there saying a different bike is on Honda’s unveiling agenda. Honda will unveil a new bike at the 2019 AIMExpo. Image credit: AIMExpo The rumors vary widely with little information to back up the rumored claim. Online outlet Rideapart provides a host of potential unveiling candidates. Included in their guesses is the CBR300RR. But they also speculate that the new model could be Honda’s X-ADV 300 scooter, the NT Tourer and, even a revised CB500F. But no-one has any concrete information at this point. So it looks like we’ll have to wait until the AIMExpo starts on September 26th. We’re covering the event and let you know as soon as we know what Honda reveals. Featured image credit: AIMExpo Vezi sursa
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