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  1. Recently, Erik Buell announced that he was returning to the motorcycle industry. Best known for a line of motorcycles that bore his name, Buell was able to make a name for himself in the motorcycle industry. But things started turning sour and Buell ended up in a partnership with Harley-Davidson. The results were not as either Buell or Harley planned and ultimately Buell entered bankruptcy. New partners Now Buell is back and this time he is partnered with Frederic Vasseur and Francios-Xavier Terny. Together they have formed a company called Fuell and intend to manufacture urban electric bicycles as well as complete electric motorcycles. The Fuell Flow-1S has a rear wheel hub motor. Photo credit: Fuell Each of the men has a history with high technology and motorcycles. Casseur is the team principal and CEO of the Sauber Formula 1 Team as well as the founder of Spark Racing Technology. Spark develops and builds Formula E (i.e. electric race cars). Terny is the CEO and Co-Founder of Vanguard Motorcycles and has been a consultant and investor for other motorcycle ventures. Buell, of course, is known for developing the motorcycle brand that bears his name. With the motor in the hub, the center of the bike leaves plenty of space for batteries. Photo credit: Fuell Together, the three partners have created the electric motorcycle startup Fuell. Its first motorcycle offering is called the Fuell Flow. Fuell claims that the Flow will come in two versions; the 11 Kw Flow-1 and the 35 Kw Flow 1S. Both feature a rear wheel integrated motor. Fuel also has an electric bicycle in the works using a more conventional setup. The Fuell Flow-1S features twin stacked headlights. Photo credit: Fuell Top level specifications Specifications are still sketchy, but Fuell makes several top-level claims. Using a removeable two battery system, the range is claimed to be approximately 125 miles. Charge times are claimed to be approximately 30 minutes using CCS-2 DC. The stated starting price is $10,995 which we assume is for the 11 Kw Flow-1. The Fuell Flow-1S. Photo credit: Fuell Fuell is having a full reveal on April 23. You can also make an appointment to inspect the bikes more closely at the New York City reveal. Appointments are for potential investors only though. We’ll have more info for you after the reveal. Vezi sursa
  2. Air Canada is renewing its Fly Your Bike program for 2019, with service across North America and into select overseas destinations. The Fly Your Bike program is a summer-long discount deal run through Air Canada Cargo, offering special rates for riders who ship their motorcycles through Air Canada and book passenger tickets at the same time. Departures and destinations are limited to airports where Air Canada flies its widebody jets. That means you’re going to most likely leave from Toronto, Montreal, Vancouver or Calgary, although there have been reports of occasional availability from Halifax as well. Destinations usually include several European cities, including airports in the UK, France, Germany, Italy, Greece, and Switzerland. Morocco is also available, as the only African destination. In the past, there were also South American destinations, but due to problems with the import process, Air Canada has discontinued flights from Canada to those countries. For 2019, Air Canada is supposed to be looking at adding destinations to the list. However, the announcement of any new routes is still a few days off, and that’s true for pricing, too. Air Canada hasn’t officially announced the finer details of its 2019 program, but we should know them by early April. However, we can say that in the past, it cost about $1,000 CAD to ship your motorcycle across the country (plus the cost of getting your bike’s dangerous goods certification, required for the process, and plus your passenger airfare). Overseas, pricing started around $1,500 CAD, and once again, cost of the dangerous goods certification and your passenger airfare were extra. And of course, those are one-way prices; return prices may be different. So who might find this deal attractive? Obviously, Canadians who want to transport their bike by air will want to check the deal out. Given the relative proximity of Montreal, Toronto, Vancouver and Calgary to many Americans, these flight offers are also appealing to US riders who might want to ship their bike by air, as it’s much easier to ship your bike by air via Canada than it is in the US. Same goes for Euro or UK riders who want to visit North America—it may be much cheaper or simpler to fly your bike to a Canadian city and ride from there, even if your actual destination is elsewhere. For more details, visit the Air Canada website, or call an Air Canada Cargo agent, and if you’re interested, stay tuned. More details on this year’s program should be coming soon. Vezi sursa FlyYourBike_brochure_en.pdf
  3. Triumph has recalled 5 different model motorcycles for the potential loss of electrical power. 12,654 model year 2016 through 2019 motorcycles are affected. The affected models and years are as follows: MAKE MODEL MODEL YEAR(S) TRIUMPH BONNEVILLE T100 2017 – 2019 TRIUMPH BONNEVILLE T120 2016 – 2019 TRIUMPH SCRAMBLER 2017 – 2018 TRIUMPH STREET CUP 2017 – 2018 TRIUMPH STREET TWIN 2016 – 2018 Affected motorcycles may have a manufacturing defect that results in the clutch cable contacting the main wiring harness cover. This may cause damage to the wiring within the main wiring harness. The resulting damage could lead to loss of electrical power to various circuits. This loss could lead to engine stalling or lighting failures. Triumph will notify owners of the affected units and direct dealers to replace the original securing guide for the clutch cable and main wiring harness with an updated one. All work will be performed free of charge. Owners may contact Triumph customer service at 1-678-854-2010 or can contact the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Vehicle Safety Hotline at 1-888-327-4236. Information may also be found on NHTSA’s website. Vezi sursa
  4. Ducati To Build More V-4 Bikes

    UK publication MCN recently had the opportunity to interview Ducati’s CEO, Claudio Domenicali. MCN has quoted Domenicali as saying: “We will release 29 new bikes over the next five years. We will continue to develop new versions of existing products but will also be entering segments that we are not currently in. As part of that, we will exploit the V4 engine in different platforms.” So with 29 new bikes in the pipeline over the next five years, what’s next? What platforms does Ducati have in mind for its compact V4 Stradale engine? 200+ HP in any platform is a whole lot of horsepower. Other than their supersport bikes, what other categories of bikes would really benefit from that much power? Where Will Ducati Put The V-4’s? MCN says that insiders suggest that Ducati is looking to add the V-4 engine to its touring, adventure and naked machines. 200 HP adventure, touring and naked bikes might be very impressive, but frankly is this what most people are looking for and where the industry is headed? E-bikes In The Picture? With many manufacturers looking at electric motorcycles, does building a 200+ HP gas powered street bike fit firmly into the future? Apparently so according to Domenicali. MCN quoted him as saying: “Electric bikes are fascinating but the technology is what it is; you cannot cheat chemicals. Right now, you remove 15kg of petrol but replace it with 150kg of battery. If there is a regulation to make electric bikes in five years, we will make it, but it will be a worse bike than we can make now.” That’s a pretty long-legged statement. Even if battery technology does not advance rapidly, should a company like Ducati be looking to use its capabilities to get into the e-bike segment? 5 years from now, Ducati’s competitors will have a significant leg up. It seems like Domenicali thinks the future is horsepower and gasoline. What do you think? Vezi sursa
  5. Ducati To Build More V-4 Bikes

    UK publication MCN recently had the opportunity to interview Ducati’s CEO, Claudio Domenicali. MCN has quoted Domenicali as saying: “We will release 29 new bikes over the next five years. We will continue to develop new versions of existing products but will also be entering segments that we are not currently in. As part of that, we will exploit the V4 engine in different platforms.” So with 29 new bikes in the pipeline over the next five years, what’s next? What platforms does Ducati have in mind for its compact V4 Stradale engine? 200+ HP in any platform is a whole lot of horsepower. Other than their supersport bikes, what other categories of bikes would really benefit from that much power? Where Will Ducati Put The V-4’s? MCN says that insiders suggest that Ducati is looking to add the V-4 engine to its touring, adventure and naked machines. 200 HP adventure, touring and naked bikes might be very impressive, but frankly is this what most people are looking for and where the industry is headed? E-bikes In The Picture? With many manufacturers looking at electric motorcycles, does building a 200+ HP gas powered street bike fit firmly into the future? Apparently so according to Domenicali. MCN quoted him as saying: “Electric bikes are fascinating but the technology is what it is; you cannot cheat chemicals. Right now, you remove 15kg of petrol but replace it with 150kg of battery. If there is a regulation to make electric bikes in five years, we will make it, but it will be a worse bike than we can make now.” That’s a pretty long-legged statement. Even if battery technology does not advance rapidly, should a company like Ducati be looking to use its capabilities to get into the e-bike segment? 5 years from now, Ducati’s competitors will have a significant leg up. It seems like Domenicali thinks the future is horsepower and gasoline. What do you think? Vezi sursa
  6. The Royal Enfield Himalayan adventure bike is getting ABS as a 2019 upgrade in North America. ABS has already been available in other markets, but was not available in North America until now. It will be standard on 2019 Royal Enfield models, including the Himalayan. According to reports from India, the ABS circuit can not be able to be disabled or reconfigured for off-road riding. Some sort of off-road ABS mode is fairly standard on European adventure bikes. Sometimes, the front wheel retains its antilock system while the rear is disabled, allowing rear wheel lock-up. On other bikes, both front and rear wheels see ABS disabled, or at least restricted to less interference. Not all adventure machines have this feature though. Japanese adventure machines often have no way to disable ABS, outside of pulling fuses. The Himalayan will follow that pattern, making riders have to be especially cautious when braking offroad, as loose terrain may result in drastic loss of braking power. This is on top of a braking system that is often considered to be on the weak side. The Royal Enfield Himalayan uses a dual-channel ABS system, and we’ve seen no word on whether it’s an in-house design, or put together by some third-party manufacturer like Bosch or Nissin. Otherwise, the Himalayan mostly remains the same for North America in 2019, with a new paint choice (Sleet) joining the Snow and Granite colour options. The engine, running gear, and everything else is unchanged. Pricing is set at $4,749 USD, or $5,625 CAD for Canadian customers. The new bike is supposed to be in showrooms in April, although Royal Enfield’s dealer network is still weak in some areas, and it may be hard to actually see one of the new machines. Vezi sursa
  7. The Royal Enfield Himalayan adventure bike is getting ABS as a 2019 upgrade in North America. ABS has already been available in other markets, but was not available in North America until now. It will be standard on 2019 Royal Enfield models, including the Himalayan. According to reports from India, the ABS circuit can not be able to be disabled or reconfigured for off-road riding. Some sort of off-road ABS mode is fairly standard on European adventure bikes. Sometimes, the front wheel retains its antilock system while the rear is disabled, allowing rear wheel lock-up. On other bikes, both front and rear wheels see ABS disabled, or at least restricted to less interference. Not all adventure machines have this feature though. Japanese adventure machines often have no way to disable ABS, outside of pulling fuses. The Himalayan will follow that pattern, making riders have to be especially cautious when braking offroad, as loose terrain may result in drastic loss of braking power. This is on top of a braking system that is often considered to be on the weak side. The Royal Enfield Himalayan uses a dual-channel ABS system, and we’ve seen no word on whether it’s an in-house design, or put together by some third-party manufacturer like Bosch or Nissin. Otherwise, the Himalayan mostly remains the same for North America in 2019, with a new paint choice (Sleet) joining the Snow and Granite colour options. The engine, running gear, and everything else is unchanged. Pricing is set at $4,749 USD, or $5,625 CAD for Canadian customers. The new bike is supposed to be in showrooms in April, although Royal Enfield’s dealer network is still weak in some areas, and it may be hard to actually see one of the new machines. Vezi sursa
  8. Harley-Davidson Looking At The Rideshare Market?

    Harley-Davidson (Harley) continues to look for ways to bring new riders to their brand. In early March, Harley demonstrated their commitment to the youngest of riders with their purchase of StaCyc, Inc. StaCyc sells electric scooters made for kids 3 to 7 years old. A StaCyc 16eDrive electric scooter. Photo credit: StaCyc. Changing Marketplace But now Harley is looking at other avenues to ensure that it stays relevant to a younger generation. In January, Harley showed off a prototype electric motorcycle. Slimmer and smaller than a “traditional” motorcycle, the prototype looks like a cross between a mountain bike and a dirt bike. Marc McAllister, Harley’s Harley Vice President of Product Portfolio said the prototype was well received. “That product has been extremely well-received. We were swamped all weekend with 18-to-24-year-olds, a segment that we’re eager to engage with the Harley-Davidson brand in a new way, in terms that they can get their mind around. That’s what EV opens for us as a potential opportunity for the business.” Harley-Davidson’s prototype urban mobility “scooter”. Photo credit: Harley Davidson Urban mobility It’s clear that Harley wants to attract younger consumers. McAllister said that Harley was continuing to look at where their market (i.e. urban mobility) was going. “We have to make sure that we understand where the consumer market is going,” McAllister said. “The sharing economy in general is influencing people’s choices when it comes to transportation.” “As a company that’s building our future, we have to be cognizant of how people are consuming products,” he said. “We have to make sure that we’re engaged in that and make sure we maintain a position for Harley-Davidson to compete in.” Moving to rideshare market? With a younger generation moving towards urban areas and ridesharing becoming very acceptable, did Harley see an opportunity for their slimmed down electric prototype to be used for ridesharing? McAllister declined to comment but it’s not a reach to see them doing it. “Of course, there’s opportunities that we’re going to continue to look at. Building the next generation of Harley-Davidson owners is going to take us exploring all avenues and making sure that we can deliver Harley-Davidson on their terms.” Although McAllister has been not been forthcoming about Harley entering the rideshare market, perhaps there’s another indicator of Harley’s intent. In an interview with CNN, McAllister was discussing rentable electric scooter transportation companies such as Bird and Lime. “It’s a huge opportunity. For people who are using Bird and Lime today, how do we give them a much better experience with a Harley-Davidson brand and lifestyle?” Hmm… That sounds like Harley is interested in ridesharing. So while Harley’s decision to enter the rideshare market is not clear, there are indicators that they are looking at it closely. Vezi sursa
  9. Harley-Davidson (Harley) continues to look for ways to bring new riders to their brand. In early March, Harley demonstrated their commitment to the youngest of riders with their purchase of StaCyc, Inc. StaCyc sells electric scooters made for kids 3 to 7 years old. A StaCyc 16eDrive electric scooter. Photo credit: StaCyc. Changing Marketplace But now Harley is looking at other avenues to ensure that it stays relevant to a younger generation. In January, Harley showed off a prototype electric motorcycle. Slimmer and smaller than a “traditional” motorcycle, the prototype looks like a cross between a mountain bike and a dirt bike. Marc McAllister, Harley’s Harley Vice President of Product Portfolio said the prototype was well received. “That product has been extremely well-received. We were swamped all weekend with 18-to-24-year-olds, a segment that we’re eager to engage with the Harley-Davidson brand in a new way, in terms that they can get their mind around. That’s what EV opens for us as a potential opportunity for the business.” Harley-Davidson’s prototype urban mobility “scooter”. Photo credit: Harley Davidson Urban mobility It’s clear that Harley wants to attract younger consumers. McAllister said that Harley was continuing to look at where their market (i.e. urban mobility) was going. “We have to make sure that we understand where the consumer market is going,” McAllister said. “The sharing economy in general is influencing people’s choices when it comes to transportation.” “As a company that’s building our future, we have to be cognizant of how people are consuming products,” he said. “We have to make sure that we’re engaged in that and make sure we maintain a position for Harley-Davidson to compete in.” Moving to rideshare market? With a younger generation moving towards urban areas and ridesharing becoming very acceptable, did Harley see an opportunity for their slimmed down electric prototype to be used for ridesharing? McAllister declined to comment but it’s not a reach to see them doing it. “Of course, there’s opportunities that we’re going to continue to look at. Building the next generation of Harley-Davidson owners is going to take us exploring all avenues and making sure that we can deliver Harley-Davidson on their terms.” Although McAllister has been not been forthcoming about Harley entering the rideshare market, perhaps there’s another indicator of Harley’s intent. In an interview with CNN, McAllister was discussing rentable electric scooter transportation companies such as Bird and Lime. “It’s a huge opportunity. For people who are using Bird and Lime today, how do we give them a much better experience with a Harley-Davidson brand and lifestyle?” Hmm… That sounds like Harley is interested in ridesharing. So while Harley’s decision to enter the rideshare market is not clear, there are indicators that they are looking at it closely. Vezi sursa
  10. Suzuki working on radar-reflective safety tech

    Suzuki is working on inter-vehicle safety systems by developing a design for bike-mounted radar reflectors. While manufacturers are still developing on-bike safety tech, stuff like leaning ABS, some OEMs are also working on vehicle-to-vehicle safety systems. These sorts of designs are already common in the car world; modern automobiles come loaded with blind spot warning buzzers and other systems to stop cars from inadvertent collisions. Some manufacturers, especially the ones who make both cars and motorcycles, are working on systems that are specifically designed to prevent motorcycle-car collisions. Using cameras or radar, they warn of impending crashes and intervene to prevent the the collision. Of course, systems like this are essential to self-driving car systems. It’s important that companies work on these designs, as bike-car crashes make up a huge part of motorcycle fatality statistics. The “Sorry Mate, I Didn’t See You” line isn’t just an urban legend. When you consider the move towards automated vehicles, the need for devices that enhance visibility is even greater. So what exactly is Suzuki working on here? What we’ve got is a newly unearthed patent drawing showing Suzuki’s design for radar reflectors, designed to interact with a car’s onboard detection system. These reflectors would be mounted on the motorcycle, or possible even on the rider, to alert a nearby car of the bike’s presence. Sure, the bike should show up on radar systems anyway, but a cleverly designed reflector will encourage visibility, by aggressively disrupting radar waves. Radar reflectors are common in other vehicles, but not really seen in the motorcycle world. This isn’t breaking-edge technology. Several companies are working on designs like this, and radar reflectors are common on other types of vehicles, like boats. However, it is encouraging to see Suzuki thinking ahead, as its technical developments haven’t exactly set the motorcycle world on fire in recent years. Although we see designs like the turbocharged Recursion concept bike at trade shows, it’s re-warmed SV650s and GSX-S1000s that show up on showroom floors. But with Suzuki’s all-new plant now producing bikes, maybe we’re about to see a shift towards the future from the company. Vezi sursa
  11. Suzuki is working on inter-vehicle safety systems by developing a design for bike-mounted radar reflectors. While manufacturers are still developing on-bike safety tech, stuff like leaning ABS, some OEMs are also working on vehicle-to-vehicle safety systems. These sorts of designs are already common in the car world; modern automobiles come loaded with blind spot warning buzzers and other systems to stop cars from inadvertent collisions. Some manufacturers, especially the ones who make both cars and motorcycles, are working on systems that are specifically designed to prevent motorcycle-car collisions. Using cameras or radar, they warn of impending crashes and intervene to prevent the the collision. Of course, systems like this are essential to self-driving car systems. It’s important that companies work on these designs, as bike-car crashes make up a huge part of motorcycle fatality statistics. The “Sorry Mate, I Didn’t See You” line isn’t just an urban legend. When you consider the move towards automated vehicles, the need for devices that enhance visibility is even greater. So what exactly is Suzuki working on here? What we’ve got is a newly unearthed patent drawing showing Suzuki’s design for radar reflectors, designed to interact with a car’s onboard detection system. These reflectors would be mounted on the motorcycle, or possible even on the rider, to alert a nearby car of the bike’s presence. Sure, the bike should show up on radar systems anyway, but a cleverly designed reflector will encourage visibility, by aggressively disrupting radar waves. Radar reflectors are common in other vehicles, but not really seen in the motorcycle world. This isn’t breaking-edge technology. Several companies are working on designs like this, and radar reflectors are common on other types of vehicles, like boats. However, it is encouraging to see Suzuki thinking ahead, as its technical developments haven’t exactly set the motorcycle world on fire in recent years. Although we see designs like the turbocharged Recursion concept bike at trade shows, it’s re-warmed SV650s and GSX-S1000s that show up on showroom floors. But with Suzuki’s all-new plant now producing bikes, maybe we’re about to see a shift towards the future from the company. Vezi sursa
  12. Kibo Unveils K250 “Adventure” Bike in Africa

    There is a growing movement in the “adventure bike” community that believe that smaller adventure bikes are the way to go. But it seems that a lot of the current manufacturers are concentrating on “larger” and more powerful machines. Even the newest middleweight adventure bikes are coming in at over 400 pounds. Enter Kibo. Kibo is a company that is concentrating on small displacement adventure bikes and you’ve probably never heard of them. That’s because they are located in Nairobi, Kenya. European roots, African sales Kibo was founded in 2011 in Holland. But Kibo motorcycles are built and sold in Africa. Kibo currently has just two motorcycles in their line. The K150 was launched in 2017 and uses a 150 cc single cylinder engine. The newly released K250 also uses a single cylinder engine but with 250 cc displacement. Kibo says that they have designed and developed motorcycles specifically for use in Africa. While the machines can be used for pleasure riding, Kibo has built the bikes using a tag line “Go do”. To them, that means using their machines for a purpose. Their website shows this corporate culture with videos and pictures of a doctor and a courier using their machines to traverse cities and remote locations. [embedded content] They claim that their motorcycles are designed in collaboration with those who use them. Both the Kibo 150 and 250 are simple, reliable utilitarian transports that are made to live up to conditions found in rural Africa. Kibo specifications Neither the Kibo K150 or K250 are powerful machines as you might expect out of a small displacement single. The engines are sourced from a Japanese manufacturer that Kibo declined to identify. [embedded content] The Kibo K250 sports some decent specs. Perhaps the least inspiring of the specs is the air and oil cooled engine. The engine has a claimed 17 HP at 6,500 RPM and 15 ft-lb of torque. A balance shaft helps smooth things out. A 5-speed transmission provides the drive. Both electric and kick start are standard. The K150. Photo credit: Kibo But other specs show the intent of the machine. The frame is tubular steel and results in a bike with a seat height of 800 mm (31.5 inches). Wheelbase is 1450 mm ( 57.1 inches). Brakes feature a twin piston 260 mm front and 220 mm rear setup. Ground clearance is a claimed 200 mm (7.85 inches). Front fork travel is a claimed 215 mm (~8.5 inches). The rear provides a somewhat lower 140 mm (5.5 inches) of travel. The wheelset also displays its utilitarian design with a 21″ front and 18″ rear. The K250. Photo credit: Kibo Fuel capacity is 10.8 liters (2.85 gallons) and with a claimed mileage of 29 km/ltr, you should be able to get 310+ km (~195 miles) per tank. The K250 is quite narrow. Pricing Kibo’s machines represent a premium over other small motorcycles available in Africa. But they say that those machines wear out in a year or so and there is little in support to repair them. The K150’s price is approximately $3,400. The larger K250 costs approximately $5,250. For Africa, these prices are certainly premium. But if the machines perform as Kibo claims, the extra investment will allow riders to use the machines well into the future. With its brief history, it will be interesting to see how well they perform in the future. Vezi sursa
  13. There is a growing movement in the “adventure bike” community that believe that smaller adventure bikes are the way to go. But it seems that a lot of the current manufacturers are concentrating on “larger” and more powerful machines. Even the newest middleweight adventure bikes are coming in at over 400 pounds. Enter Kibo. Kibo is a company that is concentrating on small displacement adventure bikes and you’ve probably never heard of them. That’s because they are located in Nairobi, Kenya. European roots, African sales Kibo was founded in 2011 in Holland. But Kibo motorcycles are built and sold in Africa. Kibo currently has just two motorcycles in their line. The K150 was launched in 2017 and uses a 150 cc single cylinder engine. The newly released K250 also uses a single cylinder engine but with 250 cc displacement. Kibo says that they have designed and developed motorcycles specifically for use in Africa. While the machines can be used for pleasure riding, Kibo has built the bikes using a tag line “Go do”. To them, that means using their machines for a purpose. Their website shows this corporate culture with videos and pictures of a doctor and a courier using their machines to traverse cities and remote locations. [embedded content] They claim that their motorcycles are designed in collaboration with those who use them. Both the Kibo 150 and 250 are simple, reliable utilitarian transports that are made to live up to conditions found in rural Africa. Kibo specifications Neither the Kibo K150 or K250 are powerful machines as you might expect out of a small displacement single. The engines are sourced from a Japanese manufacturer that Kibo declined to identify. [embedded content] The Kibo K250 sports some decent specs. Perhaps the least inspiring of the specs is the air and oil cooled engine. The engine has a claimed 17 HP at 6,500 RPM and 15 ft-lb of torque. A balance shaft helps smooth things out. A 5-speed transmission provides the drive. Both electric and kick start are standard. The K150. Photo credit: Kibo But other specs show the intent of the machine. The frame is tubular steel and results in a bike with a seat height of 800 mm (31.5 inches). Wheelbase is 1450 mm ( 57.1 inches). Brakes feature a twin piston 260 mm front and 220 mm rear setup. Ground clearance is a claimed 200 mm (7.85 inches). Front fork travel is a claimed 215 mm (~8.5 inches). The rear provides a somewhat lower 140 mm (5.5 inches) of travel. The wheelset also displays its utilitarian design with a 21″ front and 18″ rear. The K250. Photo credit: Kibo Fuel capacity is 10.8 liters (2.85 gallons) and with a claimed mileage of 29 km/ltr, you should be able to get 310+ km (~195 miles) per tank. The K250 is quite narrow. Pricing Kibo’s machines represent a premium over other small motorcycles available in Africa. But they say that those machines wear out in a year or so and there is little in support to repair them. The K150’s price is approximately $3,400. The larger K250 costs approximately $5,250. For Africa, these prices are certainly premium. But if the machines perform as Kibo claims, the extra investment will allow riders to use the machines well into the future. With its brief history, it will be interesting to see how well they perform in the future. Vezi sursa
  14. The Dakar Rally has a new director

    The Dakar Rally has a new man in charge. Etienne Lavigne, who’s been the Dakar Rally’s director for the past 15 years, is stepping into a different job at the company, and David Castera is going to take over. Castera is a very experienced rally raid veteran, with years of racing under his belt, including some decent finishes at the Dakar in the motorcycle category. Like many riders, he eventually switched over to the car category, and spent some time racing as Cyril Despres’ co-driver, winning the Silk Way Rally with him twice. In 2019, Castera was teamed up with the legendary Stephane Peterhansel, narrowly escaping serious injury when their car crashed at this year’s Dakar. His racing savvy isn’t the only reason he’s a good fit for this role, though. Along with his years of racing, Castera also has years of experience in the organizational side of rally raid. He worked as sporting director for Dakar for years, and was instrumental in re-shaping the Morocco Rally when it was sold at the end of 2017. He served as director there; combine that with his previous experience inside the ASO organization (promoters of Dakar), and he’s a natural choice to replace Lavigne. Castera’s new job won’t be easy, as there is considerable questioning about the Dakar Rally’s future. In 2019, the race ran entirely in the country of Peru. The pattern in the past few years has been to visit three or four South American countries, and before that, the race ran from France to Senegal, until threats of terrorism forced the organizers to change continents. Since the race moved to South America, it’s changed considerably. In recent years, fans and even some racers complained the race had evolved from a navigation challenge into a more wide-open blast through easier tracks, like a World Rally Championship event. As a result, there have been consistent calls for change, and with the loss of all but one host country for 2019, change is indeed inevitable. No wonder Lavigne is changing his position, and Castera is certainly going to have his work cut out, as some onlookers are wondering if the Dakar will even move back to North Africa in the near future. Vezi sursa
  15. The Dakar Rally has a new man in charge. Etienne Lavigne, who’s been the Dakar Rally’s director for the past 15 years, is stepping into a different job at the company, and David Castera is going to take over. Castera is a very experienced rally raid veteran, with years of racing under his belt, including some decent finishes at the Dakar in the motorcycle category. Like many riders, he eventually switched over to the car category, and spent some time racing as Cyril Despres’ co-driver, winning the Silk Way Rally with him twice. In 2019, Castera was teamed up with the legendary Stephane Peterhansel, narrowly escaping serious injury when their car crashed at this year’s Dakar. His racing savvy isn’t the only reason he’s a good fit for this role, though. Along with his years of racing, Castera also has years of experience in the organizational side of rally raid. He worked as sporting director for Dakar for years, and was instrumental in re-shaping the Morocco Rally when it was sold at the end of 2017. He served as director there; combine that with his previous experience inside the ASO organization (promoters of Dakar), and he’s a natural choice to replace Lavigne. Castera’s new job won’t be easy, as there is considerable questioning about the Dakar Rally’s future. In 2019, the race ran entirely in the country of Peru. The pattern in the past few years has been to visit three or four South American countries, and before that, the race ran from France to Senegal, until threats of terrorism forced the organizers to change continents. Since the race moved to South America, it’s changed considerably. In recent years, fans and even some racers complained the race had evolved from a navigation challenge into a more wide-open blast through easier tracks, like a World Rally Championship event. As a result, there have been consistent calls for change, and with the loss of all but one host country for 2019, change is indeed inevitable. No wonder Lavigne is changing his position, and Castera is certainly going to have his work cut out, as some onlookers are wondering if the Dakar will even move back to North Africa in the near future. Vezi sursa
  16. Is Royal Enfield working on a Scrambler?

    Think the motosphere is already polluted with too many scrambler models? Maybe, maybe not, but word on the street is that we’re about to get a couple more, thanks to Royal Enfield. In the not-too-distant past, some markets saw scrambler accessory packages available for Royal Enfield’s single-cylinder models, but there hasn’t been an scrambler available from the factory as a production model in many, many years. Decades ago, the British arm of the company built off-road competition bikes, but it’s been a long time since we’ve seen anything equivalent, unless you count the Himalayan 401 adventure bike. You could arguably call that bike a scrambler, but if you want to get really picky, that would probably be inaccurate, at least in the modern usage of the term. Modern scramblers are mostly retro-styled bikes with a few off-road friendly components, but overall, they’re mostly street-biased, with an emphasis on form over function, and the Himalayan is just the opposite. However, Royal Enfield has been teasing images of a new bike along those lines, a chromed-out retro machine snapped in the middle of a water crossing. And, that’s it. No specs, no details on the engine, not even a clear photo of the motorcycle, just a promise of more details on March 26. The Indian motor press is always abuzz with spy shots and rumours, though, and they’ve decided this machine will be based on Royal Enfield’s air-cooled 350 cc and 500 cc engines, as already found in the Classic, the Thunderbird and so many other models over the years. And, they claim the machine will be called the Trials, or something like that. Stay tuned—we’ll know whether or not they’re right by the end of the month! Vezi sursa
  17. Think the motosphere is already polluted with too many scrambler models? Maybe, maybe not, but word on the street is that we’re about to get a couple more, thanks to Royal Enfield. In the not-too-distant past, some markets saw scrambler accessory packages available for Royal Enfield’s single-cylinder models, but there hasn’t been an scrambler available from the factory as a production model in many, many years. Decades ago, the British arm of the company built off-road competition bikes, but it’s been a long time since we’ve seen anything equivalent, unless you count the Himalayan 401 adventure bike. You could arguably call that bike a scrambler, but if you want to get really picky, that would probably be inaccurate, at least in the modern usage of the term. Modern scramblers are mostly retro-styled bikes with a few off-road friendly components, but overall, they’re mostly street-biased, with an emphasis on form over function, and the Himalayan is just the opposite. However, Royal Enfield has been teasing images of a new bike along those lines, a chromed-out retro machine snapped in the middle of a water crossing. And, that’s it. No specs, no details on the engine, not even a clear photo of the motorcycle, just a promise of more details on March 26. The Indian motor press is always abuzz with spy shots and rumours, though, and they’ve decided this machine will be based on Royal Enfield’s air-cooled 350 cc and 500 cc engines, as already found in the Classic, the Thunderbird and so many other models over the years. And, they claim the machine will be called the Trials, or something like that. Stay tuned—we’ll know whether or not they’re right by the end of the month! Vezi sursa
  18. Upside Down Engined Nembo 32 Ready For Production

    Do you think you are ready for something quite different than your normal run of the mill motorcycle choices? Then Nebmo Motociclette may have what you are looking for. Nembo is Italian for a thunder cloud and this bike will be quite electrifying for some. Nembo recently announced that after years of testing, its radical Nembo 32 is ready for production. OK, so what’s so radical about the Nembo 32 you may ask? The answer is a lot. The Nembo 32 gets its name from its engine configuration. The number 32 represents its 3 cylinder engine with 2 liters of displacement. This combination reportedly gets you about 200 claimed horsepower with 159 lb/ft of torque in a 350-pound dry weight package. Well, that’s a pretty interesting combination in itself, but really doesn’t seem all that radical. So what makes the Nembo 32 more radical? Once again its the bike’s engine. The Nembo 32 mounts its engine upside down with the cylinders at the bottom of the bike. Nembo claims that this configuration allows them to exploit the engine block as part of the chassis without involving the cylinder block. Nembo claims that this configuration centralizes mass as much as possible around its center of gravity. They believe the center of gravity is not as important as condensing the mass in the smallest possible area. Interesting. SONY DSC If Nembo has piqued your interest, you will have to wait to get your own bike. While Nembo says the Nembo 32 is ready for production, they do not presently have the funds to start up the line. As such, they have created an Indiegogo campaign to help them raise starting capital. Ultimately, if their campaign is successful, Nembo says that the retail price of the Nembo 32 will be approximately $68,000. So if you have the interest and the cash, you can probably be the only person on your block to own an upside down engined 200 HP motorcycle. Vezi sursa
  19. Do you think you are ready for something quite different than your normal run of the mill motorcycle choices? Then Nebmo Motociclette may have what you are looking for. Nembo is Italian for a thunder cloud and this bike will be quite electrifying for some. Nembo recently announced that after years of testing, its radical Nembo 32 is ready for production. OK, so what’s so radical about the Nembo 32 you may ask? The answer is a lot. The Nembo 32 gets its name from its engine configuration. The number 32 represents its 3 cylinder engine with 2 liters of displacement. This combination reportedly gets you about 200 claimed horsepower with 159 lb/ft of torque in a 350-pound dry weight package. Well, that’s a pretty interesting combination in itself, but really doesn’t seem all that radical. So what makes the Nembo 32 more radical? Once again its the bike’s engine. The Nembo 32 mounts its engine upside down with the cylinders at the bottom of the bike. Nembo claims that this configuration allows them to exploit the engine block as part of the chassis without involving the cylinder block. Nembo claims that this configuration centralizes mass as much as possible around its center of gravity. They believe the center of gravity is not as important as condensing the mass in the smallest possible area. Interesting. SONY DSC If Nembo has piqued your interest, you will have to wait to get your own bike. While Nembo says the Nembo 32 is ready for production, they do not presently have the funds to start up the line. As such, they have created an Indiegogo campaign to help them raise starting capital. Ultimately, if their campaign is successful, Nembo says that the retail price of the Nembo 32 will be approximately $68,000. So if you have the interest and the cash, you can probably be the only person on your block to own an upside down engined 200 HP motorcycle. Vezi sursa
  20. Honda Africa Four – A Custom Super Enduro

    Have you ever heard of a Honda Africa Four? Me neither. That’s because it’s a custom super enduro made by Swiss dealer Brivemo Motos. It’s like they are a group of people that just can’t get enough of a good thing. Similar in style to KTM’s 950 Super Enduro made from 2006 to 2008, Brivemo’s Africa Four is a beast of machine made for serious open throttle dual sport riding. Using a wide variety of components from other machines, Brivemo calls its creation the Africa Four CRF1000R. Photo credit: Brivemo Motos The name is derived from the original base bike and its engine. This gave the Africa Four a claimed 145 HP. Brivemo retained the single-sided swingarm to continue with a more custom look. Photo credit: Brivemo Motos They then grafted on a Honda CRF450R front fork which resulted in an increase in wheelbase. A large single front disk with a four-piston caliper was added to the front. The CB1000Rs original wheels were retained, but the tires were changed to Continental TKC-80s for some off-road grip. Photo credit: Brivemo Motos The cat was removed and a shortened carbon fiber exhaust was added. This gives the bike a far more aggressive look and may have even added some performance. Rounding out the changes are projector beam headlights, a single saddle, a high front mudguard, wider aluminum handlebars, toothed footpegs, and an engine protection guard. Photo credit: Brivemo Motos All of these changes result in a unique and aggressive looking dual sport machine. Brivemo claims that the Africa Four CB1000R comes in at 200 KG. They do not say whether that is dry or wet weight. Nonetheless, they have created a machine that looks like it would be a hoot to ride. Vezi sursa
  21. Have you ever heard of a Honda Africa Four? Me neither. That’s because it’s a custom super enduro made by Swiss dealer Brivemo Motos. It’s like they are a group of people that just can’t get enough of a good thing. Similar in style to KTM’s 950 Super Enduro made from 2006 to 2008, Brivemo’s Africa Four is a beast of machine made for serious open throttle dual sport riding. Using a wide variety of components from other machines, Brivemo calls its creation the Africa Four CRF1000R. Photo credit: Brivemo Motos The name is derived from the original base bike and its engine. This gave the Africa Four a claimed 145 HP. Brivemo retained the single-sided swingarm to continue with a more custom look. Photo credit: Brivemo Motos They then grafted on a Honda CRF450R front fork which resulted in an increase in wheelbase. A large single front disk with a four-piston caliper was added to the front. The CB1000Rs original wheels were retained, but the tires were changed to Continental TKC-80s for some off-road grip. Photo credit: Brivemo Motos The cat was removed and a shortened carbon fiber exhaust was added. This gives the bike a far more aggressive look and may have even added some performance. Rounding out the changes are projector beam headlights, a single saddle, a high front mudguard, wider aluminum handlebars, toothed footpegs, and an engine protection guard. Photo credit: Brivemo Motos All of these changes result in a unique and aggressive looking dual sport machine. Brivemo claims that the Africa Four CB1000R comes in at 200 KG. They do not say whether that is dry or wet weight. Nonetheless, they have created a machine that looks like it would be a hoot to ride. Vezi sursa
  22. BDR working on New England route

    We knew it was coming soon, and now it’s confirmed: Backcountry Discovery Routes (BDR) has confirmed it will expand its eastern map range, by developing a route for New England. In case you don’t know who Backcountry Discovery Routes is, or what they do, their website says it’s a “non-profit organization whose mission is to establish and preserve off-highway routes for dual-sport and adventure motorcycles.” BDR works at this mission several ways (“education, advocacy, and promotion of responsible motorcycle travel“), but is probably best-known in the ADV community for its excellent collaboration with Butler Maps, resulting in detailed offroad riding routes in the continental US. Until fairly recently, BDR’s routes were all out west, through places like Arizona, New Mexico, Nevada, and so on. It made sense, as the area has a huge adventure riding community and is arguably some of the best motorcycling terrain on the continent. But that was a bummer for eastern-based riders, until BDR debuted its Mid Atlantic route last year. Taking riders through the back corners of Virginia, West Virginia, Pennsylvania and Maryland, it gave riders living in the I95 jungle their own chance to try a proper BDR route without having to cross the continent. That route fell a bit short, though, as it cut out New England, particularly the state of Maine, which is probably the easiest eastern state to get truly, properly lost in the wilderness, and eaten by a bear. Maine has vast amounts of empty space in the Great North Woods, and although many roads are private and require permission to ride, the roads through the woods are there, if you can get access. According to BDR, the new route will connect to the existing Mid Atlantic route to add another 1,000 miles through six states, ending at the Canadian border. The BDR crew is going to be working on the route in coming months, and will be detailing their adventures on social media, so you can follow along. When it’s done, as always, there will be a Butler Motorcycle Map featuring the route, free GPS tracks of the route, and a documentary film about the new route. We can’t wait! Vezi sursa
  23. We knew it was coming soon, and now it’s confirmed: Backcountry Discovery Routes (BDR) has confirmed it will expand its eastern map range, by developing a route for New England. In case you don’t know who Backcountry Discovery Routes is, or what they do, their website says it’s a “non-profit organization whose mission is to establish and preserve off-highway routes for dual-sport and adventure motorcycles.” BDR works at this mission several ways (“education, advocacy, and promotion of responsible motorcycle travel“), but is probably best-known in the ADV community for its excellent collaboration with Butler Maps, resulting in detailed offroad riding routes in the continental US. Until fairly recently, BDR’s routes were all out west, through places like Arizona, New Mexico, Nevada, and so on. It made sense, as the area has a huge adventure riding community and is arguably some of the best motorcycling terrain on the continent. But that was a bummer for eastern-based riders, until BDR debuted its Mid Atlantic route last year. Taking riders through the back corners of Virginia, West Virginia, Pennsylvania and Maryland, it gave riders living in the I95 jungle their own chance to try a proper BDR route without having to cross the continent. That route fell a bit short, though, as it cut out New England, particularly the state of Maine, which is probably the easiest eastern state to get truly, properly lost in the wilderness, and eaten by a bear. Maine has vast amounts of empty space in the Great North Woods, and although many roads are private and require permission to ride, the roads through the woods are there, if you can get access. According to BDR, the new route will connect to the existing Mid Atlantic route to add another 1,000 miles through six states, ending at the Canadian border. The BDR crew is going to be working on the route in coming months, and will be detailing their adventures on social media, so you can follow along. When it’s done, as always, there will be a Butler Motorcycle Map featuring the route, free GPS tracks of the route, and a documentary film about the new route. We can’t wait! Vezi sursa
  24. Is KTM Bringing The 990 Back in 2020?

    Yeah, nah, kinda, sorta, not really …but they did sell the rights to the motor though…to China, to a company called CFMoto, according to automotive news outlet zigwheels CFMoto has ties with a certain Austrian manufacturer. continuing – Yes, CFMoto is one of the production partners of KTM. The Chinese company will solely be making the 799cc parallel-twin LC8 motor that will power the 790 Duke from 2020. …but what about the 990? CRMoto just bought the rights to build its own motorcycle which will house KTM’s 999cc 75-degree V-twin motor – the same engine powers KTM’s 990 series of motorcycles. Interestingly, this engine too will solely be produced at CFMoto’s Hangzhou factory from 2020. CFMoto is presently constructing an all-new manufacturing plant opposite its existing facility. When running at full capacity, producing its own range of 990/1080 V-twin models as well as KTM’s new range of 799cc parallel-twin machines, the plant is expected to produce 50,000 new models annually. Vezi sursa
  25. Yeah, nah, kinda, sorta, not really …but they did sell the rights to the motor though…to China, to a company called CFMoto, according to automotive news outlet zigwheels CFMoto has ties with a certain Austrian manufacturer. continuing – Yes, CFMoto is one of the production partners of KTM. The Chinese company will solely be making the 799cc parallel-twin LC8 motor that will power the 790 Duke from 2020. …but what about the 990? CRMoto just bought the rights to build its own motorcycle which will house KTM’s 999cc 75-degree V-twin motor – the same engine powers KTM’s 990 series of motorcycles. Interestingly, this engine too will solely be produced at CFMoto’s Hangzhou factory from 2020. CFMoto is presently constructing an all-new manufacturing plant opposite its existing facility. When running at full capacity, producing its own range of 990/1080 V-twin models as well as KTM’s new range of 799cc parallel-twin machines, the plant is expected to produce 50,000 new models annually. Vezi sursa
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