Mergi la conţinut

Caută în comunitate

Se afișează rezultate pentru cuvintele cheie 'ktm'.

  • Caută După Etichete

    Scrie cuvinte cheie separate de virgulă.
  • Caută După Autor

Tip Conținut


Forumuri

  • Motociclism în România
    • Pasionati si pasionate
    • Experiente, Calatorii si Poze
    • Evenimente si Motorsport
    • Stiri si articole
    • Crema motociclismului
    • Echipamentul motociclistului
    • Dealeri, Servicii si Oportunitati
    • Comunitati Moto Regionale
    • Clubul Motoveteranilor
    • Intreaba aici, orice!
    • Despre motociclete / pareri si impresii
    • ATV-ul meu
    • Scuterul meu
    • Discutii generale
    • Accidente si Furturi
  • Alte pasiuni
    • Pasiunea pentru ciclism
    • Mașinile - frumoase sau puternice sau amandoua
  • Bursa de Motociclete, Scutere, ATV, Echipamente si Accesorii
    • Anunturi cu motociclete, echipamente, piese si accesorii
  • Clubul Motoveteranilor's Discutii
  • Adventure Club - Big bikes's Discutii

Categorii

  • Noutăți & Îmbunătățiri

Bloguri

Niciun rezultat de afișat.

Niciun rezultat de afișat.

Calendare

  • Evenimente Motociclism
  • Evenimente Ciclism
  • Zile de nastere
  • Clubul Motoveteranilor's Evenimente

Categorii

  • Cataloage de Echipamente, piese si accesorii
  • Tutoriale, Ghiduri, Articole Utile
  • Reviste de profil
  • Manuale de Service si Intretinere
  • Clubul Motoveteranilor's Fişiere

Marker Groups

  • Members
  • Biker Friendly

Categorii

  • Motociclete
  • Biciclete

Categories

  • Trasee Motocicleta

Categorii

  • Permis A / A1 / A2

698 rezultate găsite

  1. Interview of the Month: Toby Price – Bouncing back from injury and his journey to the 2018 Rally World Championship 2016 Dakar Rally winner Toby Price is no stranger to hardship. Before his rally career had even begun the Australian suffered three broken vertebrae during a Hare and Hounds crash in America. Then, when defending his Dakar title in 2017, another fall resulted in a badly broken leg that resulted in his immediate retirement from the event. But through a positive mental, dogged determination and a never give up attitude, Price fought back to claim a hard-fought Dakar podium finish in early 2018. Price then went on to win the FIM Cross-Country Rallies World Championship making him a firm favorite for Dakar 2019. However, once again the KTM ace is experiencing the rollercoaster ride of the sport, as he faces a race back to fitness to make it to the start of the Dakar in January, after sustaining a wrist injury this week. Toby Price (AUS) 2018 © Sebas Romero Toby’s Dakar journey started back in 2015. Riding for KTM as a support rider to the notably more experienced duo of Marc Coma and Jordi Viladoms, the Australian finished on the podium to surprise not only many of the Dakar regulars but also himself. “I was shocked to be honest, I certainly didn’t expect to finish on the podium. Going into the event, I knew it was going to be tough – my goal was to finish top 20, but I was definitely hoping to go a little better and maybe even crack the top 10. As the rally went on, my results improved, even taking a win on the penultimate stage. I just kept my head down and kept charging. Finishing third was amazing and I was hooked from then on.” Toby Price (AUS) KTM 450 RALLY Dakar Rally 2015 © Marcin Kin One year later, Price was standing on the top step of the Dakar podium. In what was only his sixth ever rally, the multiple Australian Offroad Champion won five of the 13 stages and his winning margin at the end of the 9,237 km race was close to 40 minutes. “It’s hard to put into words how tough the Dakar is, if you haven’t experienced it for yourself it’s not easy to understand. Just finishing the event is a triumph – winning it feels truly amazing.” Toby Price (AUS) KTM 450 RALLY Dakar Rally 2016 © Marcin Kin Not surprisingly, following his Dakar success his focus was 100% on cross-country rallying. Claiming third place in his first full season in the FIM Cross-Country Rallies World Championship, Price went into Dakar 2017 full of confidence. A strong start was followed by a win on stage two as it started to look like Price could claim a second consecutive victory at the event. A navigational error cost him a lot of time on stage three and the Aussie went in to the fourth stage looking to claw back valuable minutes. Disastrously, a crash when pushing hard just a few kilometers from the stage finish resulted in a broken femur and the end to his Dakar Rally for that year. To say 2017 was ‘a challenge’ for Price is a huge understatement. Needing time to recover properly and rebuild his strength and fitness, a planned return to competition at the OiLibya Rally of Morocco ended up with Price needing to go under the surgeon’s knife with Dakar 2018 just around the corner. A serious question mark hung over Price’s participation in the following January’s 2018 Dakar. “I was worried. I had to have my injury cleaned up and because of the extra surgery it meant I had very little time to prepare for what is one of the toughest races in the world. I’d been off the bike for close to nine months and to come back from that and be on the pace was going to be a huge ask. The team were great though, they did an incredible job on the bike and in supporting me and I went into that first stage in Peru feeling as good as I possibly could have considering the year I’d had.” Toby Price (AUS) KTM 450 RALLY Dakar Rally 2017 © Marcin Kin After a solid start to the rally, Price went from strength to strength, finding pace when other riders were beginning to tire. With two consecutive stage wins and a second place on the 14th and final stage, the 2016 Dakar winner successfully completed the rally in an impressive third place. “I was so happy to get to the finish line in Argentina – that was always my main goal right from the start. To finish the Dakar Rally is an achievement in itself, to come away at the end of the race with a podium was unbelievable, especially after such a difficult year. The whole team came together and worked so hard, our results simply wouldn’t be possible without all the great people around us.” Toby Price (AUS) KTM 450 RALLY Dakar Rally 2018 © PhotosDakar.com The start of the 2018 world championship season wasn’t so successful for Price. At the first race in Abu Dhabi things started off well with a win on stage one, with Red Bull KTM Factory Racing riders claiming the top three positions on the day. Going into stage two, and despite another strong start, a sizeable crash caused damage to a fuel line on his KTM 450 RALLY, which ultimately cost close to 30 minutes. Price crossed the line in 11th position. The Australian was able to fight his way back to seventh overall, but with his main championship rival Pablo Quintanilla taking the win, it would be a huge challenge to make up enough points over the remaining rounds to claim the overall championship title. “Seventh at the end of the rally was not where I had planned to finish. Having said that, after the crash I had I was glad to complete the rally in one piece. I didn’t give up and pushed right to the end, although it was always going to be tough to try and make up for so much lost time.” Toby Price (AUS) Abu Dhabi Desert Challenge 2018 © Marcin Kin With the major teams deciding not to contest round two in Doha, it wasn’t until the Atacama Rally in Chile and round three that Price could regroup and fight once more for the title. Riding consistently and never finishing outside of the top five, the 31-year-old claimed the runner-up position on the podium and went a little way to putting his world championship campaign back on track. “I set out at the beginning of the Atacama to ride consistently and get back up to speed with the bike and navigation after the break over the summer. To take second after such a tricky race was really encouraging and helped to build my confidence for the last two rounds.” Toby Price (AUS) KTM 450 RALLY Atacama Rally 2018 © Rally Zone Another strong ride in Argentina at the Desafio Ruta 40 took Price to another second place, a mere six seconds from the win after 17 hours of riding. Most importantly however, Quintanilla was again one place behind giving Price an extra few points in the championship battle with just one round left to race – the Rally du Maroc. The rankings were close heading into the final round with Price trailing the leading Quintanilla by just eight points. Any one of the top six riders in the standings had a chance to take the championship title however, and it would all be played out in the sand of Morocco. Despite the pressure of the championship chase there was only one option for Price and that was to come out swinging, and that is exactly what he did. A win on the opening prologue stage threw down the gauntlet to his competitors. He backed it up with a win on stage one. Despite opening the route on stage two, Price led most the timed special and was only narrowly beaten on time by teammate Matthias Walkner. Holding the overall rally lead heading into stage three – the first of the rally’s marathon stage – Toby rode a safe 280 kilometers, conserving himself and his machine, to arrive sixth at the bivouac. With just the final two stages left to complete, Price gave it his all – posting the fastest time on the long stage four, finishing one place ahead of Quintanilla to secure his overall lead at the event with just the one day remaining. The fifth and final stage of the rally, and indeed the 2018 world championship, could not have gone much better. A close fight with Honda’s Kevin Benavides took Price to second place, just 12 seconds behind. The result was enough for the KTM rider to claim overall victory at the rally and in turn, the 2018 FIM Cross-Country Rallies crown. “It was such an amazing season – I still can’t believe it. It was seriously tough and after a slow start in Abu Dhabi I never dreamed I would be champion at the end of it all. Despite injuries and setbacks during my career, I have never given up, I have always looked ahead and tried to take some kind of positivity from it all. I was really nervous going into that last day in Morocco, despite my lead you can never take anything for granted in rallying. This is my first ever world championship and after such a positive Dakar at the beginning of the year, 2018 has been incredible. It’s all credit to my team and everyone at Red Bull KTM, without them behind me I wouldn’t be in the position to do the things I do. To stand on top of the world is the best feeling ever.” Toby Price (AUS) KTM 450 RALLY Rally du Maroc 2018 © Rally Zone Toby now looks to Peru and the 2019 Dakar Rally. The Australian has another injury-battle to overcome, having fractured his right scaphoid in training for the event, which is a definite reminder of the elation and challenges involved in racing offroad. Toby is a determined man though, and he fully expects to be racing in the new year – with his comback history, who knows what he might be able to achieve in the 10-day event. What is clear is that his goal will remain the same as every year; a good safe ride and a strong finish. We wish you a fast recovery Toby and look forward to seeing you at the Dakar! Toby Price (AUS) KTM 450 RALLY 2018 © Sebas Romero Photos: Sebas Romero | Marcin Kin | PhotosDakar.com | Rally Zone
  2. Interview of the Month: Toby Price – Bouncing back from injury and his journey to the 2018 Rally World Championship 2016 Dakar Rally winner Toby Price is no stranger to hardship. Before his rally career had even begun the Australian suffered three broken vertebrae during a Hare and Hounds crash in America. Then, when defending his Dakar title in 2017, another fall resulted in a badly broken leg that resulted in his immediate retirement from the event. But through a positive mental, dogged determination and a never give up attitude, Price fought back to claim a hard-fought Dakar podium finish in early 2018. Price then went on to win the FIM Cross-Country Rallies World Championship making him a firm favorite for Dakar 2019. However, once again the KTM ace is experiencing the rollercoaster ride of the sport, as he faces a race back to fitness to make it to the start of the Dakar in January, after sustaining a wrist injury this week. Toby Price (AUS) 2018 © Sebas Romero Toby’s Dakar journey started back in 2015. Riding for KTM as a support rider to the notably more experienced duo of Marc Coma and Jordi Viladoms, the Australian finished on the podium to surprise not only many of the Dakar regulars but also himself. “I was shocked to be honest, I certainly didn’t expect to finish on the podium. Going into the event, I knew it was going to be tough – my goal was to finish top 20, but I was definitely hoping to go a little better and maybe even crack the top 10. As the rally went on, my results improved, even taking a win on the penultimate stage. I just kept my head down and kept charging. Finishing third was amazing and I was hooked from then on.” Toby Price (AUS) KTM 450 RALLY Dakar Rally 2015 © Marcin Kin One year later, Price was standing on the top step of the Dakar podium. In what was only his sixth ever rally, the multiple Australian Offroad Champion won five of the 13 stages and his winning margin at the end of the 9,237 km race was close to 40 minutes. “It’s hard to put into words how tough the Dakar is, if you haven’t experienced it for yourself it’s not easy to understand. Just finishing the event is a triumph – winning it feels truly amazing.” Toby Price (AUS) KTM 450 RALLY Dakar Rally 2016 © Marcin Kin Not surprisingly, following his Dakar success his focus was 100% on cross-country rallying. Claiming third place in his first full season in the FIM Cross-Country Rallies World Championship, Price went into Dakar 2017 full of confidence. A strong start was followed by a win on stage two as it started to look like Price could claim a second consecutive victory at the event. A navigational error cost him a lot of time on stage three and the Aussie went in to the fourth stage looking to claw back valuable minutes. Disastrously, a crash when pushing hard just a few kilometers from the stage finish resulted in a broken femur and the end to his Dakar Rally for that year. To say 2017 was ‘a challenge’ for Price is a huge understatement. Needing time to recover properly and rebuild his strength and fitness, a planned return to competition at the OiLibya Rally of Morocco ended up with Price needing to go under the surgeon’s knife with Dakar 2018 just around the corner. A serious question mark hung over Price’s participation in the following January’s 2018 Dakar. “I was worried. I had to have my injury cleaned up and because of the extra surgery it meant I had very little time to prepare for what is one of the toughest races in the world. I’d been off the bike for close to nine months and to come back from that and be on the pace was going to be a huge ask. The team were great though, they did an incredible job on the bike and in supporting me and I went into that first stage in Peru feeling as good as I possibly could have considering the year I’d had.” Toby Price (AUS) KTM 450 RALLY Dakar Rally 2017 © Marcin Kin After a solid start to the rally, Price went from strength to strength, finding pace when other riders were beginning to tire. With two consecutive stage wins and a second place on the 14th and final stage, the 2016 Dakar winner successfully completed the rally in an impressive third place. “I was so happy to get to the finish line in Argentina – that was always my main goal right from the start. To finish the Dakar Rally is an achievement in itself, to come away at the end of the race with a podium was unbelievable, especially after such a difficult year. The whole team came together and worked so hard, our results simply wouldn’t be possible without all the great people around us.” Toby Price (AUS) KTM 450 RALLY Dakar Rally 2018 © PhotosDakar.com The start of the 2018 world championship season wasn’t so successful for Price. At the first race in Abu Dhabi things started off well with a win on stage one, with Red Bull KTM Factory Racing riders claiming the top three positions on the day. Going into stage two, and despite another strong start, a sizeable crash caused damage to a fuel line on his KTM 450 RALLY, which ultimately cost close to 30 minutes. Price crossed the line in 11th position. The Australian was able to fight his way back to seventh overall, but with his main championship rival Pablo Quintanilla taking the win, it would be a huge challenge to make up enough points over the remaining rounds to claim the overall championship title. “Seventh at the end of the rally was not where I had planned to finish. Having said that, after the crash I had I was glad to complete the rally in one piece. I didn’t give up and pushed right to the end, although it was always going to be tough to try and make up for so much lost time.” Toby Price (AUS) Abu Dhabi Desert Challenge 2018 © Marcin Kin With the major teams deciding not to contest round two in Doha, it wasn’t until the Atacama Rally in Chile and round three that Price could regroup and fight once more for the title. Riding consistently and never finishing outside of the top five, the 31-year-old claimed the runner-up position on the podium and went a little way to putting his world championship campaign back on track. “I set out at the beginning of the Atacama to ride consistently and get back up to speed with the bike and navigation after the break over the summer. To take second after such a tricky race was really encouraging and helped to build my confidence for the last two rounds.” Toby Price (AUS) KTM 450 RALLY Atacama Rally 2018 © Rally Zone Another strong ride in Argentina at the Desafio Ruta 40 took Price to another second place, a mere six seconds from the win after 17 hours of riding. Most importantly however, Quintanilla was again one place behind giving Price an extra few points in the championship battle with just one round left to race – the Rally du Maroc. The rankings were close heading into the final round with Price trailing the leading Quintanilla by just eight points. Any one of the top six riders in the standings had a chance to take the championship title however, and it would all be played out in the sand of Morocco. Despite the pressure of the championship chase there was only one option for Price and that was to come out swinging, and that is exactly what he did. A win on the opening prologue stage threw down the gauntlet to his competitors. He backed it up with a win on stage one. Despite opening the route on stage two, Price led most the timed special and was only narrowly beaten on time by teammate Matthias Walkner. Holding the overall rally lead heading into stage three – the first of the rally’s marathon stage – Toby rode a safe 280 kilometers, conserving himself and his machine, to arrive sixth at the bivouac. With just the final two stages left to complete, Price gave it his all – posting the fastest time on the long stage four, finishing one place ahead of Quintanilla to secure his overall lead at the event with just the one day remaining. The fifth and final stage of the rally, and indeed the 2018 world championship, could not have gone much better. A close fight with Honda’s Kevin Benavides took Price to second place, just 12 seconds behind. The result was enough for the KTM rider to claim overall victory at the rally and in turn, the 2018 FIM Cross-Country Rallies crown. “It was such an amazing season – I still can’t believe it. It was seriously tough and after a slow start in Abu Dhabi I never dreamed I would be champion at the end of it all. Despite injuries and setbacks during my career, I have never given up, I have always looked ahead and tried to take some kind of positivity from it all. I was really nervous going into that last day in Morocco, despite my lead you can never take anything for granted in rallying. This is my first ever world championship and after such a positive Dakar at the beginning of the year, 2018 has been incredible. It’s all credit to my team and everyone at Red Bull KTM, without them behind me I wouldn’t be in the position to do the things I do. To stand on top of the world is the best feeling ever.” Toby Price (AUS) KTM 450 RALLY Rally du Maroc 2018 © Rally Zone Toby now looks to Peru and the 2019 Dakar Rally. The Australian has another injury-battle to overcome, having fractured his right scaphoid in training for the event, which is a definite reminder of the elation and challenges involved in racing offroad. Toby is a determined man though, and he fully expects to be racing in the new year – with his comback history, who knows what he might be able to achieve in the 10-day event. What is clear is that his goal will remain the same as every year; a good safe ride and a strong finish. We wish you a fast recovery Toby and look forward to seeing you at the Dakar! Toby Price (AUS) KTM 450 RALLY 2018 © Sebas Romero Photos: Sebas Romero | Marcin Kin | PhotosDakar.com | Rally Zone
  3. Under the skin of the rally team: Sam Sunderland and Toby Price talking about their ink Their wins are the result of their riding skills and inner strength. Their scars are a sign that their motivation to win outweighs their fears. Their tattoos are reminders of their teenage rebellions and deepest passions. Their body art is the ultimate proof that pain is nothing to endure when you decide to bleed for love. Translated into words, their ink says Life is fragile, we are not. Warriors have always used them, long before they became mainstream, to identify themselves, to commemorate loss and mark triumphs. Sam Sunderland and Toby Price have fulfilled the two former things of the tattoo list, while the latter, the ink that would represent their wins, is still on hold. On January 7 they will again put on their armor, and go chasing glory. The number of Dakar trophies to document on their skin is still far from final. Sam’s story Sam Sunderland (GBR) 2018 © Sebas Romero A stupid one to start Not every tattoo has a story, yet there is a story behind everything. Like many significant things in the life of Sam Sunderland, his love affair with ink began at the edge of Rub’ al Khali desert as well. “I got a stupid one when I was 17,” recalls Sam when asked about his first tattoo. “It seemed like a cool idea at the time, to have my name written on the back of my arm. I went on holiday to Dubai to see my cousins, we were best friends and pretty much the same age, and we got our names translated to Arabic. At the time, people in England would have their names written in Chinese, so to be different we chose Arabic. Actually, it wasn’t that cool because now this thing will be on my arm for the rest of my life. I can’t see it, which is good, and I can say to people that it means something like `Seize the moment` or `Never give up`, which is funny.” Love, death and sugar skulls After a couple of years, when the pain was already well forgotten, Sam had another – much more brilliant – idea, and got his second and third tattoo on the backs of his calves. “I’ve always loved sugar skulls. I don’t know why, just have. They are linked to Mexican culture, to the Día de los Muertos celebrations, as a way to honor the deceased. Mine are here for the same reason, to remember my friends who died. One skull is female, one is male, with a mustache, though it doesn’t mean that one is for a girl and one for a boy. If you look closer, there is some interesting stuff inside: bicycles across both the eyes, guns, a sprocket, a spider web, a compass and of course, the flowers,” explains Sam, and adds: “Looking at them now it really seems a bit strange to have two skulls on the back of my calves.” Sam Sunderland (GBR) 2018 © Sebas Romero Sharing scars with a koi carp “For me free-diving is the only time when I can really zone out. My life is pretty chaotic, but under the surface I somehow manage to control my thoughts. I go free diving because I spearfish,” says Sam. The big koi carp tattoo, masterly done in Thailand by a local tattoo artist, tells a story of a big passion. “To be honest, this one is also a bit strange. The reason I wanted it so big is that I wanted it to seem like it’s flowing around my knee. As result of a broken femur the fish now has two big scars,” says the winner of the Dakar 2017, and adds: “The ones on my calf muscles took three hours each, while I had to lie down for six hours for the fish. I don’t know which is harder: a really long day at the Dakar or a painful adventure like this.” Sam Sunderland (GBR) 2018 © Sebas Romero Time to roar Thinking of his next one, the idea is to get something super delicate, detailed, with fine lines and stuff. In other words: on a warrior’s skin there is always some place for a lion’s head. “I like what the lion represents and I think it just looks bad ass with his mane.” Toby’s story Toby Price (AUS) 2018 © Sebas Romero A chubby kid, riding for national titles with number 287 “My first tattoo goes back to when I was 17, about to turn 18. I was racing motocross at that stage and never thought I would change my number. As all motorcycle riders do – they put their motorcycle number somewhere, I decided to do the same, and put number 287 on my lower back. Even now when I don’t run that number any more it still holds significance for what I did in the past,” Toby opens up about his first inked adventure. “87 is the year I was born and basically my riding number, but as a junior, every time I took part in Australian nationals we had to add the first number of our postcode. When you saw number 2 on the plate you knew the kid was representing New South Wales. Well, a little short chubby fat kid running for nationals with number 287 was me,” laughs the current World Champion in Cross-Country Rallies, the winner of the Dakar 2016 and proud guardian of two smaller tuaregs. Painting the Price Another thing motocross riders do is put their last name on themselves. So, Toby got PRICE written down his spine, the exact place where the riders can pay the highest price. “I got the outline done and then basically left it as that for a year or so. When I decided it wouldn’t be that bad I went back to the chair and had it colored in. Well, not entirely. After the P, it started to feel really uncomfortable so I skipped R and went straight to I, because it didn’t take as much coloring in. After an hour I got fed up again and left. The plan was to come back again in a couple of days, as at that point I still had three letters to do. Unfortunately, it took me another year to finish it. My mates made fun of me whenever they saw it. It’s all under my shirt, no one knows of it, unless I run a racetrack and take my shirt off. I always like to keep them covered, I want people to approach me without being put off, even if now I am sitting here with a dodgy mullet. What does that say about me?”, he smiles. Toby Price (AUS) 2018 © Sebas Romero For a girl he would still carry in his arms if he could “And then I also got one tattoo on my chest, a cross and two birds holding a ribbon,” he goes on. “This one is for my older sister Amanda that passed away in 2011. She had a big impact on my life and now I carry her on my heart. I know she is keeping me safe while doing all this wild, crazy and wonderful stuff. She was disabled from birth and also blind, so already as a kid I was looking out for her. I was her legs and her eyes, I really enjoyed being around her. I always thought to myself that could have been me. She taught me about how precious life is. Because of her and for her I live my life to the fullest. You never know when your numbers are up and you’ll get cold. Therefore, when the moment arrives, I will be sure that I did everything I could, pushed hard and gave 100 percent. I never say no to anything, I grab every moment with both hands and run with it. This is why this tattoo means so much to me. I knew what I wanted to do, and strangely enough, although the two tattoos on my back were extremely painful, the one on my chest, I knew it was for a reason and I don’t even remember it happening.” Toby Price (AUS) 2018 © Sebas Romero Time to race Speaking of expanding his tattoo collection, Toby says he’ll wait and see how many Dakar trophies he is able to get, and then he will act. Also, his next tattoo will be meaningful to him. It will talk about something he’s achieved and done. “What I know for sure is that I don’t want to get anything random, and I also have to accept the fact that there is no more space on my back,” laughs the wild Aussie. The road to a new tattoo will obviously be dusty, fast and utterly adventurous. Photos: Sebas Romero
  4. Under the skin of the rally team: Sam Sunderland and Toby Price talking about their ink Their wins are the result of their riding skills and inner strength. Their scars are a sign that their motivation to win outweighs their fears. Their tattoos are reminders of their teenage rebellions and deepest passions. Their body art is the ultimate proof that pain is nothing to endure when you decide to bleed for love. Translated into words, their ink says Life is fragile, we are not. Warriors have always used them, long before they became mainstream, to identify themselves, to commemorate loss and mark triumphs. Sam Sunderland and Toby Price have fulfilled the two former things of the tattoo list, while the latter, the ink that would represent their wins, is still on hold. On January 7 they will again put on their armor, and go chasing glory. The number of Dakar trophies to document on their skin is still far from final. Sam’s story Sam Sunderland (GBR) 2018 © Sebas Romero A stupid one to start Not every tattoo has a story, yet there is a story behind everything. Like many significant things in the life of Sam Sunderland, his love affair with ink began at the edge of Rub’ al Khali desert as well. “I got a stupid one when I was 17,” recalls Sam when asked about his first tattoo. “It seemed like a cool idea at the time, to have my name written on the back of my arm. I went on holiday to Dubai to see my cousins, we were best friends and pretty much the same age, and we got our names translated to Arabic. At the time, people in England would have their names written in Chinese, so to be different we chose Arabic. Actually, it wasn’t that cool because now this thing will be on my arm for the rest of my life. I can’t see it, which is good, and I can say to people that it means something like `Seize the moment` or `Never give up`, which is funny.” Love, death and sugar skulls After a couple of years, when the pain was already well forgotten, Sam had another – much more brilliant – idea, and got his second and third tattoo on the backs of his calves. “I’ve always loved sugar skulls. I don’t know why, just have. They are linked to Mexican culture, to the Día de los Muertos celebrations, as a way to honor the deceased. Mine are here for the same reason, to remember my friends who died. One skull is female, one is male, with a mustache, though it doesn’t mean that one is for a girl and one for a boy. If you look closer, there is some interesting stuff inside: bicycles across both the eyes, guns, a sprocket, a spider web, a compass and of course, the flowers,” explains Sam, and adds: “Looking at them now it really seems a bit strange to have two skulls on the back of my calves.” Sam Sunderland (GBR) 2018 © Sebas Romero Sharing scars with a koi carp “For me free-diving is the only time when I can really zone out. My life is pretty chaotic, but under the surface I somehow manage to control my thoughts. I go free diving because I spearfish,” says Sam. The big koi carp tattoo, masterly done in Thailand by a local tattoo artist, tells a story of a big passion. “To be honest, this one is also a bit strange. The reason I wanted it so big is that I wanted it to seem like it’s flowing around my knee. As result of a broken femur the fish now has two big scars,” says the winner of the Dakar 2017, and adds: “The ones on my calf muscles took three hours each, while I had to lie down for six hours for the fish. I don’t know which is harder: a really long day at the Dakar or a painful adventure like this.” Sam Sunderland (GBR) 2018 © Sebas Romero Time to roar Thinking of his next one, the idea is to get something super delicate, detailed, with fine lines and stuff. In other words: on a warrior’s skin there is always some place for a lion’s head. “I like what the lion represents and I think it just looks bad ass with his mane.” Toby’s story Toby Price (AUS) 2018 © Sebas Romero A chubby kid, riding for national titles with number 287 “My first tattoo goes back to when I was 17, about to turn 18. I was racing motocross at that stage and never thought I would change my number. As all motorcycle riders do – they put their motorcycle number somewhere, I decided to do the same, and put number 287 on my lower back. Even now when I don’t run that number any more it still holds significance for what I did in the past,” Toby opens up about his first inked adventure. “87 is the year I was born and basically my riding number, but as a junior, every time I took part in Australian nationals we had to add the first number of our postcode. When you saw number 2 on the plate you knew the kid was representing New South Wales. Well, a little short chubby fat kid running for nationals with number 287 was me,” laughs the current World Champion in Cross-Country Rallies, the winner of the Dakar 2016 and proud guardian of two smaller tuaregs. Painting the Price Another thing motocross riders do is put their last name on themselves. So, Toby got PRICE written down his spine, the exact place where the riders can pay the highest price. “I got the outline done and then basically left it as that for a year or so. When I decided it wouldn’t be that bad I went back to the chair and had it colored in. Well, not entirely. After the P, it started to feel really uncomfortable so I skipped R and went straight to I, because it didn’t take as much coloring in. After an hour I got fed up again and left. The plan was to come back again in a couple of days, as at that point I still had three letters to do. Unfortunately, it took me another year to finish it. My mates made fun of me whenever they saw it. It’s all under my shirt, no one knows of it, unless I run a racetrack and take my shirt off. I always like to keep them covered, I want people to approach me without being put off, even if now I am sitting here with a dodgy mullet. What does that say about me?”, he smiles. Toby Price (AUS) 2018 © Sebas Romero For a girl he would still carry in his arms if he could “And then I also got one tattoo on my chest, a cross and two birds holding a ribbon,” he goes on. “This one is for my older sister Amanda that passed away in 2011. She had a big impact on my life and now I carry her on my heart. I know she is keeping me safe while doing all this wild, crazy and wonderful stuff. She was disabled from birth and also blind, so already as a kid I was looking out for her. I was her legs and her eyes, I really enjoyed being around her. I always thought to myself that could have been me. She taught me about how precious life is. Because of her and for her I live my life to the fullest. You never know when your numbers are up and you’ll get cold. Therefore, when the moment arrives, I will be sure that I did everything I could, pushed hard and gave 100 percent. I never say no to anything, I grab every moment with both hands and run with it. This is why this tattoo means so much to me. I knew what I wanted to do, and strangely enough, although the two tattoos on my back were extremely painful, the one on my chest, I knew it was for a reason and I don’t even remember it happening.” Toby Price (AUS) 2018 © Sebas Romero Time to race Speaking of expanding his tattoo collection, Toby says he’ll wait and see how many Dakar trophies he is able to get, and then he will act. Also, his next tattoo will be meaningful to him. It will talk about something he’s achieved and done. “What I know for sure is that I don’t want to get anything random, and I also have to accept the fact that there is no more space on my back,” laughs the wild Aussie. The road to a new tattoo will obviously be dusty, fast and utterly adventurous. Photos: Sebas Romero
  5. #inthisyear1998: Technology and Design Offensive Full-speed ahead in every respect – that’s what KTM is all about. This also means keeping on top of what’s going on in the world of motorcycling, be it touring bikers or owners of powerful single-cylinder beasts. The KTM 790 ADVENTURE in particular, presented in two versions at the EICMA, and the return of the completely overhauled KTM 690 SMC R caught the attention of KTM’s army of enthusiasts. Two decades ago, as the global market leader in the offroad sector, KTM also successfully gained a foothold in the sporty street and touring bike segment with a successful technology and design offensive. Even from first glance, KTM bikes have boasted an unmistakable KTM design pedigree for years – we don’t need our logo to stand out! KTM has been READY TO RACE for more than six decades. In the mid-1950s, Erwin Lechner went from victory to victory on the “Apfelbeck-KTM”, and in the late 1960s, the start of series production of offroad bikes marked the beginning of KTM’s journey into becoming the global market leader in offroad models for years to come. As early as 1974, KTM bagged its first international title win. Gennady Moiseev from the then Soviet Union won the first motocross world championship for the Mattighofen-based manufacturer, and Imerio Testori from Italy became European Enduro champion in the 500cc class – the Enduro world championship having not yet been launched. These were two titles that would be followed by countless others over the years. In 1992, KTM was under new management following the insolvency of the former KTM Motorfahrzeugbau AG, meaning that the R&D department was devising new concepts for the future. Just two years later, the range of offroad bikes was expanded to include the KTM 620 DUKE – a street version with a powerful LC4 single-cylinder Enduro engine. KTM has manufactured both offroad and onroad machines ever since. However, the KTM 620 DUKE, which was designed as a “fun bike”, was not produced in high volumes in order to close the gap with major industry players. As long-distance touring was the fashion of the time, it made perfect sense that Wolfgang Felber, who was head of R&D at the time, entitled the next project “All Terrain Enduro” – a twin-cylinder machine for long-distance touring bikers that could be used both offroad and onroad. In fact, there had already been some talk of getting ready for the future some years previously. A V2 engine with two 553cc LC4 cylinders was produced in collaboration with Jens Polte from Darmstadt, who is known for his racing achievements at the “Battle of the Twins”. This monster promised power in abundance. Those responsible for the “All Terrain Enduro” project also opted for a slim twin-cylinder V-engine, which offered considerably more possibilities than the tried-and-tested LC4 single-cylinder motor. The 60 mm short-stroke design provided for a low construction h, while the cylinder angle of 75° ensured compact dimensions. Called the LC8, the V2 engine delivered a good 100 hp from 950cc by the time the KTM 950 ADVENTURE concept bike was presented in 2000 at Intermot in Munich. At the 2002 Dakar Rally, Fabrizio Meoni was the first to cross the Lac Rosé finish line in the Senegalese capital on the rally version of the KTM 950 ADVENTURE. This was the second KTM victory at what is probably the most popular motorbike rally in the world – a distinction unmatched by any other manufacturer to date. The introduction of the KTM 950 ADVENTURE onto the market followed in 2003, the year of KTM’s 50th anniversary. By the time KTM introduced the KTM 990 DUKE concept bike at the EICMA in autumn, it was clear that KTM did not wish to surrender the large-volume street bike segment to its competitors. KTM 950 ADVENTURE © KTM However, the developments did not represent a departure from the offroad sector – quite the opposite in fact. With the LC4 Super Competition having previously raised the bar for 4-stroke engines in Enduro and motocross races, a second range of 4-stroke racing engines (starting from 400cc and 520cc) then went into series production. Alongside the move to the new factory building in autumn 1999, production of the EXC-Racing and SX-Racing models – which were intended exclusively for competition use – began. The LC4 motor was also further engineered – with an increased displacement and now called the 640 LC4, it was most powerful single-cylinder series engine in the world. It was used in various Enduro and Supermoto models and also in the KTM 640 DUKE 2, which is still hailed as a “design masterpiece” by some journalists today. KTM 640 DUKE 2 © KTM For KTM, the days of only being able to identify a motorbike by the brand logo on the fuel tank were long gone. The legendary Mint & Pepper models from the early 1990s are still remembered by many owing to their extravagant colors, but somehow they did not succeed. Great success only came several years later when KTM turned orange. At the time, Gerald Kiska, a young designer to whom the KTM design contract was awarded, and who has been responsible for the distinctive KTM design ever since, was in agreement with KTM CEO Stefan Pierer that all future models should be recognizable at first glance. The original orange color was refined further, and in the world of motorcycles, “KTM Orange” soon became the equivalent of “Ferrari Red” for cars. This not only applied to the paintwork on the motorbikes, but also to the entire brand image – from letter paper and trade show stands through to dealer showrooms. In the late 1990s, Kiska perfected the topic of “Edge Design” for KTM, which had become popular in the automotive sector. To this day, all KTM motorcycles bear the hallmark of Kiska’s unique handwriting style. And long before anyone ever thought of LED signatures, the KTM DUKE 2 was immediately recognizable as a unique KTM model even from the rearview mirror. The reason for this was the two ellipsoid headlights one above the other; a unique styling element in the motorcycle sector. Over the years, KTM did not produce any more bikes with two adjacent headlights, let alone one above the other. Even today, a DUKE or ADVENTURE is still recognizable at just glance thanks to its typical “face”. Twenty years later and things have come full circle at the EICMA – two decades after the first multi-cylinder concepts, the KTM 790 ADVENTURE (in two versions) with the compact LC8c motor complements the mid-range class in the Travel segment. And just like the one-time “All Terrain Enduro” project, the bike is well suited to adventure tours and offroad voyages of discovery on tough terrain. KTM 790 ADVENTURE R MY2019 © KISKA/F. Lackner Photos: KTM | KISKA/F. Lackner
  6. #inthisyear1998: Technology and Design Offensive

    #inthisyear1998: Technology and Design Offensive Full-speed ahead in every respect – that’s what KTM is all about. This also means keeping on top of what’s going on in the world of motorcycling, be it touring bikers or owners of powerful single-cylinder beasts. The KTM 790 ADVENTURE in particular, presented in two versions at the EICMA, and the return of the completely overhauled KTM 690 SMC R caught the attention of KTM’s army of enthusiasts. Two decades ago, as the global market leader in the offroad sector, KTM also successfully gained a foothold in the sporty street and touring bike segment with a successful technology and design offensive. Even from first glance, KTM bikes have boasted an unmistakable KTM design pedigree for years – we don’t need our logo to stand out! KTM has been READY TO RACE for more than six decades. In the mid-1950s, Erwin Lechner went from victory to victory on the “Apfelbeck-KTM”, and in the late 1960s, the start of series production of offroad bikes marked the beginning of KTM’s journey into becoming the global market leader in offroad models for years to come. As early as 1974, KTM bagged its first international title win. Gennady Moiseev from the then Soviet Union won the first motocross world championship for the Mattighofen-based manufacturer, and Imerio Testori from Italy became European Enduro champion in the 500cc class – the Enduro world championship having not yet been launched. These were two titles that would be followed by countless others over the years. In 1992, KTM was under new management following the insolvency of the former KTM Motorfahrzeugbau AG, meaning that the R&D department was devising new concepts for the future. Just two years later, the range of offroad bikes was expanded to include the KTM 620 DUKE – a street version with a powerful LC4 single-cylinder Enduro engine. KTM has manufactured both offroad and onroad machines ever since. However, the KTM 620 DUKE, which was designed as a “fun bike”, was not produced in high volumes in order to close the gap with major industry players. As long-distance touring was the fashion of the time, it made perfect sense that Wolfgang Felber, who was head of R&D at the time, entitled the next project “All Terrain Enduro” – a twin-cylinder machine for long-distance touring bikers that could be used both offroad and onroad. In fact, there had already been some talk of getting ready for the future some years previously. A V2 engine with two 553cc LC4 cylinders was produced in collaboration with Jens Polte from Darmstadt, who is known for his racing achievements at the “Battle of the Twins”. This monster promised power in abundance. Those responsible for the “All Terrain Enduro” project also opted for a slim twin-cylinder V-engine, which offered considerably more possibilities than the tried-and-tested LC4 single-cylinder motor. The 60 mm short-stroke design provided for a low construction h, while the cylinder angle of 75° ensured compact dimensions. Called the LC8, the V2 engine delivered a good 100 hp from 950cc by the time the KTM 950 ADVENTURE concept bike was presented in 2000 at Intermot in Munich. At the 2002 Dakar Rally, Fabrizio Meoni was the first to cross the Lac Rosé finish line in the Senegalese capital on the rally version of the KTM 950 ADVENTURE. This was the second KTM victory at what is probably the most popular motorbike rally in the world – a distinction unmatched by any other manufacturer to date. The introduction of the KTM 950 ADVENTURE onto the market followed in 2003, the year of KTM’s 50th anniversary. By the time KTM introduced the KTM 990 DUKE concept bike at the EICMA in autumn, it was clear that KTM did not wish to surrender the large-volume street bike segment to its competitors. KTM 950 ADVENTURE © KTM However, the developments did not represent a departure from the offroad sector – quite the opposite in fact. With the LC4 Super Competition having previously raised the bar for 4-stroke engines in Enduro and motocross races, a second range of 4-stroke racing engines (starting from 400cc and 520cc) then went into series production. Alongside the move to the new factory building in autumn 1999, production of the EXC-Racing and SX-Racing models – which were intended exclusively for competition use – began. The LC4 motor was also further engineered – with an increased displacement and now called the 640 LC4, it was most powerful single-cylinder series engine in the world. It was used in various Enduro and Supermoto models and also in the KTM 640 DUKE 2, which is still hailed as a “design masterpiece” by some journalists today. KTM 640 DUKE 2 © KTM For KTM, the days of only being able to identify a motorbike by the brand logo on the fuel tank were long gone. The legendary Mint & Pepper models from the early 1990s are still remembered by many owing to their extravagant colors, but somehow they did not succeed. Great success only came several years later when KTM turned orange. At the time, Gerald Kiska, a young designer to whom the KTM design contract was awarded, and who has been responsible for the distinctive KTM design ever since, was in agreement with KTM CEO Stefan Pierer that all future models should be recognizable at first glance. The original orange color was refined further, and in the world of motorcycles, “KTM Orange” soon became the equivalent of “Ferrari Red” for cars. This not only applied to the paintwork on the motorbikes, but also to the entire brand image – from letter paper and trade show stands through to dealer showrooms. In the late 1990s, Kiska perfected the topic of “Edge Design” for KTM, which had become popular in the automotive sector. To this day, all KTM motorcycles bear the hallmark of Kiska’s unique handwriting style. And long before anyone ever thought of LED signatures, the KTM DUKE 2 was immediately recognizable as a unique KTM model even from the rearview mirror. The reason for this was the two ellipsoid headlights one above the other; a unique styling element in the motorcycle sector. Over the years, KTM did not produce any more bikes with two adjacent headlights, let alone one above the other. Even today, a DUKE or ADVENTURE is still recognizable at just glance thanks to its typical “face”. Twenty years later and things have come full circle at the EICMA – two decades after the first multi-cylinder concepts, the KTM 790 ADVENTURE (in two versions) with the compact LC8c motor complements the mid-range class in the Travel segment. And just like the one-time “All Terrain Enduro” project, the bike is well suited to adventure tours and offroad voyages of discovery on tough terrain. KTM 790 ADVENTURE R MY2019 © KISKA/F. Lackner Photos: KTM | KISKA/F. Lackner
  7. The KTM Factory Racing Team is prepared for Dakar Posted in Bikes, Racing The Dakar Rally is not a race where you can be complacent. Despite 17 consecutive wins for the KTM Factory Racing Team, each member of staff involved in the rally program is meticulous in the preparation for one of the toughest and most famous races in the world. Toby Price (AUS, #3), Luciano Benavides (ARG, #77), Matthias Walkner (AUT, #1), Sam Sunderland (GBR, #14) & KTM 450 RALLY © Sebas Romero The countdown has begun for the 2019 edition, which will be solely hosted in Peru, and with a vast majority of the 10 challenging stages being held on sandy terrain. It will not be easy. The Red Bull KTM Factory Racing Team includes three Dakar champions; Toby Price (2016), who recently won the Cross-Country Rallies World Championship, Sam Sunderland (2017), Matthias Walkner (2018). They will be joined by Red Bull KTM Factory Racing young-gun Luciano Benavides, and KTM Factory Racing’s Laia Sanz – the fastest female rally racer in the world – as well as Mario Patrao. It’s a strong line-up that will definitely be a force to be reckoned with in January, as they begin the journey for one of the most difficult races on the planet aboard their KTM 450 RALLY factory machines. With 5,000 brutal kilometers, sleepless nights, difficult navigation, marathon stages and the test of endurance for both rider and machine, anything really can happen. With the team’s final test ahead of Dakar complete, we wanted to share with you a cool video of the KTM factory racers in action just before their race machines were loaded onto the boat at Le Havre last week. With the bike and support vehicles’ journey overseas started, the final preparations are being made and in a month’s time we look forward to the start of Dakar 2019. [embedded content] Photo: Sebas Romero Video: Luca Piffaretti
  8. The KTM Factory Racing Team is prepared for Dakar

    The KTM Factory Racing Team is prepared for Dakar Posted in Bikes, Racing The Dakar Rally is not a race where you can be complacent. Despite 17 consecutive wins for the KTM Factory Racing Team, each member of staff involved in the rally program is meticulous in the preparation for one of the toughest and most famous races in the world. Toby Price (AUS, #3), Luciano Benavides (ARG, #77), Matthias Walkner (AUT, #1), Sam Sunderland (GBR, #14) & KTM 450 RALLY © Sebas Romero The countdown has begun for the 2019 edition, which will be solely hosted in Peru, and with a vast majority of the 10 challenging stages being held on sandy terrain. It will not be easy. The Red Bull KTM Factory Racing Team includes three Dakar champions; Toby Price (2016), who recently won the Cross-Country Rallies World Championship, Sam Sunderland (2017), Matthias Walkner (2018). They will be joined by Red Bull KTM Factory Racing young-gun Luciano Benavides, and KTM Factory Racing’s Laia Sanz – the fastest female rally racer in the world – as well as Mario Patrao. It’s a strong line-up that will definitely be a force to be reckoned with in January, as they begin the journey for one of the most difficult races on the planet aboard their KTM 450 RALLY factory machines. With 5,000 brutal kilometers, sleepless nights, difficult navigation, marathon stages and the test of endurance for both rider and machine, anything really can happen. With the team’s final test ahead of Dakar complete, we wanted to share with you a cool video of the KTM factory racers in action just before their race machines were loaded onto the boat at Le Havre last week. With the bike and support vehicles’ journey overseas started, the final preparations are being made and in a month’s time we look forward to the start of Dakar 2019. [embedded content] Photo: Sebas Romero Video: Luca Piffaretti
  9. Interview of the Month: I worked really hard – Laia Sanz and the Dakar determination Posted in People, Racing Incredible talent, an incredible mindset, and incredible determination; that’s what we found when we talked to Laia Sanz. A Dakar hero in her own right, the Spanish ace has defied the stereotypes to become one of the most-respected rally racers in the world. Laia Sanz (ESP) KTM 450 RALLY 2018 © Marcin Kin Dakar is tough, it’s grueling, it’s demanding – it requires excellent bike skills, and physical endurance whilst negotiating some of the most dangerous terrain in a motorcycle race. With wild extremes and navigation over 1000’s of kilometers from a piece of rolled up paper during the two weeks of the event, Dakar is the ultimate test for offroad riding skills. KTM Factory Racing’s Laia Sanz is one of the only people to have finished every Dakar they’ve raced, that’s eight so far, and whilst being the top female competitor, she has enjoyed a number of top finishes within the top 10 and 15 in the overall standings. An outstanding result for any competitor. The five-time Enduro World Champion is always working hard, and is coming into the most important preparation time of the year for Dakar 2019 (the race highlight of the year), having raced some rallies and enduro events in recent months to keep her ticking over. “Last year I did a hard training, I lost some weight. I was working hard in the gym, cycling, training a lot on the enduro bike and rally bike. I think in Dakar it’s not only one thing, you need to be really complete. Your head needs to be fine, you need to be in a good physical condition,” began Laia when asked what makes a good Dakar racer. “Last year I had a trainer to work with me in every day training in the gym, but also to help me with the bikes and the van at home, so I can be more focused on training and rest a bit more. This means after training I don’t need to wash and maintain the bike – before I was doing all of this as well, which meant everything was always busy.” “In the gym I’m doing strength, endurance, everything, some cycling, some skiing – I worked really hard last year and in June it’s time to start with the hard work again. I’ve kept training, but it’s time to step it up again. Between June and Dakar I have time to work hard, to lose a little weight and to be ready for Dakar – I cannot be at my best level during the whole season, because you become really tired. Dakar is the main race and I just want to be prepared for that.” Laia Sanz (ESP) KTM 450 RALLY Desafio Ruta 40 (ARG) 2018 © Marcin Kin Last year Sanz was battling for another Enduro World Championship title, but it was difficult to switch between the heavier rally bike and her KTM 350 EXC-F when racing at such a competitive level. Now the KTM racer competes in national Spanish enduro events for fitness, especially as it provides around eight hours on the bike racing in Enduro2, which supports her training program for the rally events. She feels more focused and relaxed with this setup. So, what gets a young woman into bikes and then into rally racing – one of the most difficult racing disciplines of them all, with such high-risk factors and such a need for physical greatness? The answer is simple: A sheer love of bikes, and a passion for being the best she can be. “I was four years old and in my first race I was six. Nobody in the family raced before me – my dad is really passionate about cars and bikes; he had trials bikes at home and my brother and I started with a small bike. I saw them all around and on the weekends they were going riding, and I wanted to go with them, but I was too young. Finally, I started riding at four and could go with them.” “I think I arrived at this level because I worked really hard, but also because of my physicality. I’m not a small woman, I’m quite tall and strong and I’m lucky because of this as I have long legs and a big body. For me this helped a lot, for sure if I was a small girl on a rally bike it would be quite tough – this is a help, but I need to work hard. To be on a similar level as them (the men) I need to work more, I try to be fit, work hard and I think I have a lot of mental strength. I think that side of it comes with your personality and of course things in life make you learn can make you stronger – (the determination) it’s in my character, it’s something I was born with. I’m persistent, maybe even stubborn when it comes to my goals.” Laia Sanz (ESP) Desafio Ruta 40 (ARG) 2018 © Marcin Kin It is well documented that women don’t have the same strength, endurance or even lung capacity as men, but Laia’s technical skills that she honed on a trials bike previously (she was a world champion at this too) gave her a fantastic technique that ensures energy is not lost in difficult places on the rally bike. Sanz is also excellent at navigating with her calm, precise approach, which gives her an advantage over many of her competitors. However, with the extreme cold, followed by the extreme heat, the altitude, the terrain, the long days, the lack of sleep, fatigue, it’s not easy for any Dakar racer. The mental challenge to get up at 3am and race those conditions day-in, day-out is one that every rider has to battle, whilst not losing concentration after hours on the bike – a moments lapse can be catastrophic. We asked the question: Do you ever wonder why you’re doing it? “Sure, many days in Dakar you ask yourself what you are doing there, why. I could be at home doing a normal job that’s safer, where I don’t risk my life, but of course I also enjoy what I’m doing a lot. It’s a really good feeling when you get to the end, especially if the result is good, because all of the work you’re doing through the year and in your life is paying off, and it’s a really good feeling. In Dakar the months before are so intense with work, also with the logistics, preparing everything. I’m lucky I’m in the KTM Factory Racing Team as before I had to prepare everything myself, the tires, loading the crate, just with people that can help me. I appreciate everything and the work that goes into it.” Laia Sanz (ESP) KTM 450 RALLY Desafio Ruta 40 (ARG) 2018 © Marcin Kin She’s an incredible woman, an ambassador for sport in general with a strong allegiance of fans and while it’s a cliché thing to say she’s a woman succeeding in a man’s world, Laia demonstrates and represents what can be achieved despite any physical disadvantages with enough grit and determination – I’m sure many of the hundreds of men she’s beaten in races would agree. All focus and intensity is on the Dakar 2019 race, which begins on January 6 where Laia will aim for a great result aboard her KTM 450 RALLY factory machine. Photos: Marcin Kin
  10. Keep cool, calm and casual: The new KTM PowerWear Casual & Accessories range Posted in Lifestyle When you want the world to know you’re powered by orange juice … We pick out our favorite items from the 2019 KTM PowerWear Casual & Accessories range. KTM 2019 PowerWear Casual & Accessories © KTM Comfortable and cool or fully leathered and protected? Dressed for the sunshine or wrapped up for inclement weather … It’s hard to know what to wear while riding, but for times off the bike, KTM has more than delivered with a huge range of casual wear and accessories from its 2019 KTM PowerWear range. For those ‘orange bleeders’ who need to let people know they are cut from the READY TO RACE cloth at all times (even when not riding their bike), there is something for everyone – literally. Boys, girls, adults, children – the choice is as eccentric and eclectic as ever! The latest KTM PowerWear Casual & Accessories range features everything from bikes to bags, hoodies to hats, mugs to mats, shades to shoes and watches to wallets, made specifically to meet the demands of die-hard KTM fans who live life in the fast lane. With over 160 items for riders, racers and fans of all ages, the range is broken into nine distinctive collections to suit the attitude and ambition of its intended user: Radical, Pure, Unbound, Emphasis, Replica, Orange, Mechanic, X-BOW and Kini-Red Bull. We picked out some of our favorites (below), but you can see, feel and try on the KTM 2019 PowerWear Casual & Accessories range at your local authorized KTM dealer. The full range can also be viewed online at www.ktm.com. Our favorites RADICAL EMPHATIC TEE (Radical Collection) The Radical Collection features designs as loud as the KTM motorcycles they represent. Made from 100% cotton and 100% power, the Radical Emphatic Tee features a razor-sharp design to make a high-octane statement when supporting trackside. Radical Emphatic Tee © KTM PURE JACKET (Pure Collection) Subtle isn’t a word usually associated with KTM. That said, the Pure Collection features clean, authoritative designs but still shouts KTM attitude. The Pure Jacket strikes the perfect balance between form and function; waterproof, wind resistant and full of orange style 24/7. Pure Jacket © KTM UNBOUND VEST (Unbound Collection) The Unbound Collection encourages exploring the limits of everyday convention and beyond. KTM’s goal when designing the Unbound Vest was to follow the same winning formula as that of its motorcycles – keep the performance and function high and the weight low. Reversible with a sporty cut, this vest is also water and wind repellent. Available for men and women. Unbound Vest © KTM EMPHASIS HOODIE (Emphasis Collection) The Emphasis Collection has been made with the hardcore training requirements of a champion in mind. Leading that charge is the Emphasis Hoodie; fast drying, elastic and breathable. Available for guys and girls with a READY TO RACE attitude in a wide range of sizes. Emphasis Hoodie © KTM REPLICA TEAM SOFTSHELL (Replica Collection) From the pit lanes of MotoGP™ to Supercross, the Replica Collection allows fans and aspiring champions to look just as READY TO RACE as the pros do. The Replica Team Softshell lets guys and girls show their support and colors on or off the track or simply feel like a KTM factory rider. Replica Team Softshell © KTM ORANGE JACKET (Orange Collection) The Orange Collection stands alone with its unique blend of orange, black and white contrasts. Multi-functional, durable and undeniably KTM, the Orange Jacket is the perfect trackside companion – whatever the weather! Available for him or her in a wide range of sizes. Orange Jacket © KTM MECHANIC SHIRT (Mechanic Collection) The Mechanic Collection embodies everything a KTM specialist demands from their work clothes; robust and made to work. Gone are the days of oil-stained overalls and old tee-shirts, the Mechanic Shirt is a must-have item for every master technician’s workshop. Mechanic Shirt © KTM Photos: KTM
  11. A Kid’s game? Talking Junior SX bikes and the ground-breaking arrival of the KTM SX-E 5 It’s not all 4-strokes, 450s and flying horses: KTM have also kept a sharp eye on their Junior bikes and the progress of the KTM SX-E 5 electric bike means a special step forward for the kids and the SX range. We asked how, why and when … Among all the hype and homage to flagship motocrossers like the KTM 450 SX-F, the 2019 launch of the SX range had some surprises when it came to the Junior models. The recent EICMA show in Milan also upped the stakes with arguably one of the most important bikes in the offroad range being unveiled for the first time. In a way the small SX´s – 50, 65 and 85 – are some of KTM’s purest expressions of riding and especially racing. The factory has equipped the machines with similar or the same components as their ‘bigger brothers’ with WP suspension, chromium molybdenum steel frames and a list of other features while the racing pedigree is obvious through the attention to competitiveness. If in doubt then simply look at the amount of KTMs in the top ten of the 2018 EMX 65 and 85 European Championships in the Czech Republic (6 in both classes respectively) last July. A potent line-up of offerings for kids is basic marketing and sales sense. The machines may be mini but they should not be undervalued or underestimated. After all they could well be carrying KTM riders and customers of the future. “The kids are important to us and to get them on KTMs you need to get them early; you can see that even with our factory riders,” opines KTM Product Manager Offroad Joachim Sauer. “We have a very ambitious team for the minicycles.” KTM 85 SX MY2019 © KTM/R. Schedl The essential toy & tool KTM looked at ease of use for the 50 with an adjustable multidisc automatic clutch, lightweight WP AER air fork, PDS shock and a priority for easy handling. The 65 went a little more toward ‘race mode’ with the frame and high-performance cylinder equipped with pressure controlled exhaust valve (providing lots of torque for the competitive 65 class). To accommodate the step-up in experience and the needs of kids to continue learning meant a demand for the SX´s to keep setting standards on the track. This was especially relevant with the KTM 85 SX. “The 85 was taken very seriously because it is a completely new bike and we adopted the same strategy of development as the big bikes but perhaps with a little less intensity,” says Head of Motocross Platform R&D Manfred Edlinger. “A strategy usually means moving step-by-step and area-by-area to make improvements. We looked at this very closely on the 85 and we took one of our best – and smallest! – test riders to do the concept work because with kids it is always really difficult to get good feedback. We did the main comparison tests with him and for the next stage of feedback we checked with a Junior racer at a high level and in this case it was [2018 EMX 125 race winner] Rene Hofer. That collaboration in 2016 fitted really well with our schedule of development because it was the last year for him on the 85 and he used the prototype in almost all the races and won the championship with that bike. It was great, and we did the whole process together. We looked at new topics, implemented them on the test rider’s bike and then Rene was immediately riding and racing with that.” KTM 85 SX MY2019 © KTM/R. Schedl The 50 and 65s were not left behind. “We are always working to improve these models,” Edlinger adds. “The ergonomic development is a lot simpler because we use the same principals and surfaces but on a smaller scale. There are some small details that we improve frequently, such as smaller grips.” If there is one regular observation when it comes to the Junior SX´s then it involves the bikes’ sheer strength and power. They really are READY TO RACE. Perhaps they are slightly overwhelming for the total beginner who has missed the 50 or 65 stages. “We have a restriction kit for the KTM 50 SX MINI and this works pretty well but the bikes are race-orientated and even the KTM 50 SX is quite powerful but it is difficult to find that balance between racing and slower riding with such a small engine,” Edlinger admits. It is at this stage where KTM’s next project for the little SX´s comes to the fore. “The kit works well … but to be honest with the KTM SX-E 5 we’ll solve that problem and we can make different engine settings quite easily,” Edlinger says. Flick the Switch KTM have dabbled with e-mobility before. The Freeride concept for Enduro and Street have been explored and represented a benchmark of more than a decade of R&D and heavy investment. CEO of the KTM AG, Stefan Pierer, also underlined how important e-bikes will be to next generations of the company in a press presentation for the latest KTM FREERIDE E-XC model at the end of 2017. It was in October of the same year that KTM first talked about the KTM SX-E 5 and with a tentative date of 2020 for the technology to sit alongside the KTM 50 SX. The EICMA show pushed that date much closer to the present with the fetching 5kW low voltage battery powered already in finished form. The motivation with the KTM SX-E 5 is not only to explore alternative power. It is a significant first rung on the ladder for motorcycle riders and KTM customers generally. “[This] is a great way to get more kids on two-wheels,” says Sauer. “This bike will be super-user friendly. Our 50s currently are almost race bikes and for beginners they are too strong. With electric you can make any type of power or power-delivery that is much more controllable. This will open the field and for the minicycles I’m confident that 50 is just the start.” “We have quite a bit of experience with electric drive and batteries from the FREERIDE E but for concepts like the KTM SX-E 5 then you need a completely different development even if the department is the same,” he adds on the longer delivery time for what is one of KTM’s simpler but remarkably progressive motorcycles. “From year to year we gain more experience with e-mobility.” “We are very confident,” says Edlinger by way of an update. The engineer also admits that he’d used his own kids as unofficial test riders for the various stages of evolution! “The performance of the prototype was already on a very satisfying level, even better than what we expected. We worked on different settings for the power delivery but even with the fastest setting we saw that unexperienced kids could handle it well.” The KTM SX-E 5 also ended up having a few more appealing traits. “We are happy with our plans to make a ‘growing’ system, so you can change the h of the bike; this is a really nice feature and provides a bridge between the mini and the larger wheel SX.” KTM have worked to keep their Junior offerings as (arguably) the number one choice for kids and parents. KTM SX-E 5 is just an example of how seriously they view this compartment of their motorcycle portfolio. KTM SX-E 5 MY2020 © KTM Photos: KTM/R. Schedl | KTM
  12. A Kid’s game? Talking Junior SX bikes and the ground-breaking arrival of the KTM SX-E 5 It’s not all 4-strokes, 450s and flying horses: KTM have also kept a sharp eye on their Junior bikes and the progress of the KTM SX-E 5 electric bike means a special step forward for the kids and the SX range. We asked how, why and when … Among all the hype and homage to flagship motocrossers like the KTM 450 SX-F, the 2019 launch of the SX range had some surprises when it came to the Junior models. The recent EICMA show in Milan also upped the stakes with arguably one of the most important bikes in the offroad range being unveiled for the first time. In a way the small SX´s – 50, 65 and 85 – are some of KTM’s purest expressions of riding and especially racing. The factory has equipped the machines with similar or the same components as their ‘bigger brothers’ with WP suspension, chromium molybdenum steel frames and a list of other features while the racing pedigree is obvious through the attention to competitiveness. If in doubt then simply look at the amount of KTMs in the top ten of the 2018 EMX 65 and 85 European Championships in the Czech Republic (6 in both classes respectively) last July. A potent line-up of offerings for kids is basic marketing and sales sense. The machines may be mini but they should not be undervalued or underestimated. After all they could well be carrying KTM riders and customers of the future. “The kids are important to us and to get them on KTMs you need to get them early; you can see that even with our factory riders,” opines KTM Product Manager Offroad Joachim Sauer. “We have a very ambitious team for the minicycles.” KTM 85 SX MY2019 © KTM/R. Schedl The essential toy & tool KTM looked at ease of use for the 50 with an adjustable multidisc automatic clutch, lightweight WP AER air fork, PDS shock and a priority for easy handling. The 65 went a little more toward ‘race mode’ with the frame and high-performance cylinder equipped with pressure controlled exhaust valve (providing lots of torque for the competitive 65 class). To accommodate the step-up in experience and the needs of kids to continue learning meant a demand for the SX´s to keep setting standards on the track. This was especially relevant with the KTM 85 SX. “The 85 was taken very seriously because it is a completely new bike and we adopted the same strategy of development as the big bikes but perhaps with a little less intensity,” says Head of Motocross Platform R&D Manfred Edlinger. “A strategy usually means moving step-by-step and area-by-area to make improvements. We looked at this very closely on the 85 and we took one of our best – and smallest! – test riders to do the concept work because with kids it is always really difficult to get good feedback. We did the main comparison tests with him and for the next stage of feedback we checked with a Junior racer at a high level and in this case it was [2018 EMX 125 race winner] Rene Hofer. That collaboration in 2016 fitted really well with our schedule of development because it was the last year for him on the 85 and he used the prototype in almost all the races and won the championship with that bike. It was great, and we did the whole process together. We looked at new topics, implemented them on the test rider’s bike and then Rene was immediately riding and racing with that.” KTM 85 SX MY2019 © KTM/R. Schedl The 50 and 65s were not left behind. “We are always working to improve these models,” Edlinger adds. “The ergonomic development is a lot simpler because we use the same principals and surfaces but on a smaller scale. There are some small details that we improve frequently, such as smaller grips.” If there is one regular observation when it comes to the Junior SX´s then it involves the bikes’ sheer strength and power. They really are READY TO RACE. Perhaps they are slightly overwhelming for the total beginner who has missed the 50 or 65 stages. “We have a restriction kit for the KTM 50 SX MINI and this works pretty well but the bikes are race-orientated and even the KTM 50 SX is quite powerful but it is difficult to find that balance between racing and slower riding with such a small engine,” Edlinger admits. It is at this stage where KTM’s next project for the little SX´s comes to the fore. “The kit works well … but to be honest with the KTM SX-E 5 we’ll solve that problem and we can make different engine settings quite easily,” Edlinger says. Flick the Switch KTM have dabbled with e-mobility before. The Freeride concept for Enduro and Street have been explored and represented a benchmark of more than a decade of R&D and heavy investment. CEO of the KTM AG, Stefan Pierer, also underlined how important e-bikes will be to next generations of the company in a press presentation for the latest KTM FREERIDE E-XC model at the end of 2017. It was in October of the same year that KTM first talked about the KTM SX-E 5 and with a tentative date of 2020 for the technology to sit alongside the KTM 50 SX. The EICMA show pushed that date much closer to the present with the fetching 5kW low voltage battery powered already in finished form. The motivation with the KTM SX-E 5 is not only to explore alternative power. It is a significant first rung on the ladder for motorcycle riders and KTM customers generally. “[This] is a great way to get more kids on two-wheels,” says Sauer. “This bike will be super-user friendly. Our 50s currently are almost race bikes and for beginners they are too strong. With electric you can make any type of power or power-delivery that is much more controllable. This will open the field and for the minicycles I’m confident that 50 is just the start.” “We have quite a bit of experience with electric drive and batteries from the FREERIDE E but for concepts like the KTM SX-E 5 then you need a completely different development even if the department is the same,” he adds on the longer delivery time for what is one of KTM’s simpler but remarkably progressive motorcycles. “From year to year we gain more experience with e-mobility.” “We are very confident,” says Edlinger by way of an update. The engineer also admits that he’d used his own kids as unofficial test riders for the various stages of evolution! “The performance of the prototype was already on a very satisfying level, even better than what we expected. We worked on different settings for the power delivery but even with the fastest setting we saw that unexperienced kids could handle it well.” The KTM SX-E 5 also ended up having a few more appealing traits. “We are happy with our plans to make a ‘growing’ system, so you can change the h of the bike; this is a really nice feature and provides a bridge between the mini and the larger wheel SX.” KTM have worked to keep their Junior offerings as (arguably) the number one choice for kids and parents. KTM SX-E 5 is just an example of how seriously they view this compartment of their motorcycle portfolio. KTM SX-E 5 MY2020 © KTM Photos: KTM/R. Schedl | KTM
  13. Collecting Moments #9: Finally READY TO RACE again! I may have dialed things down a notch over the past year while I got over my injury, but only in preparation for the new adventures to come. After 238 days I was back on the bike and after 363 days I was full of energy, commitment, and READY TO RACE again! Over the past few months it has been the little steps forward that have slowly brought me back to my KTM 300 EXC. The first few steps without crutches, the first weights in the gym, the first mountain bike ride with my Jekyll, the first time back on skis, the first ride out on the bike, and finally the last – and probably biggest – step: back on the race track. It was important to me not to allow an entire year to pass between the accident and my next competitive appearance. © Anna-Larissa Redinger I was staring at the calendar for the Austrian Cross-Country series throughout the entire season, with the same thought constantly rattling around my mind: “Will I be able to come back? When will I get back on the starting grid?” In my last blog entry I spoke of my first ride after my crash in October 2017. It was a special moment, even if I was more cautious, a little slower, and somewhat clumsier than before the accident. I used the summer to try to rediscover my old form, which admittedly took longer than I had expected. A few times in training I simply expected too much of myself and became disappointed with the slow rate of progress. It was only when I set myself a goal – to compete in the final race of the Austrian Cross-Country season in Mattighofen – that my training started to kick off. And how! Suddenly it was back: that indescribable sense of freedom as you fly from one bend to the next. This was when I decided that I was definitely going to be there lining up for the start of my home race. The anticipation was huge – but with a hint of nerves too. It had been a long time since I’d had that wondrous feeling of putting on new tires, adjusting the chassis to the perfect setup, and getting my bike ready to race. Loading the trailer, working through my race checklist, and finally getting prepared for race day. A truly special feeling. It was only once I’d got everything loaded up that I realized just how much I’d missed these moments over the previous year. © Anna-Larissa Redinger Race day for me started at 1 pm in the guest class for male competitors. Why not in the women’s class, I hear you ask? Well, considering that I hadn’t raced for a single minute of the year’s championship and I really was only a guest, I felt it was more appropriate to compete in the guest class. My start was nothing spectacular, but after deciding that I wanted to pursue an intelligent and careful strategy out on the track, I didn’t want to risk everything right at the start of the race. There were 90 guest riders in total and I lined up at number 78 on the grid. Amazingly, I quickly found a great rhythm and felt better with each corner mastered. As the race progressed I trusted myself more and overtook 20 or more riders. One part of the course in particular asked a lot of my mental resolve. It was pretty much identical to the situation where I had injured my knee before. A steep downhill section with a rut as the track. During the warm-up lap I had noticed how my heart rate shot up when I reached this point. I was nervous. My memories of the fall played back in my mind and I could hear the sound of tearing ligaments. “Think of the Romanian forest, Larissa, you’ve already mastered far more difficult sections! You can do it!” – I had to build up my courage! But it worked: with each passing lap I completed this downhill section with more and more authority. KTM 300 EXC © Anna-Larissa Redinger I also stood up to the physical demands better than I had expected. While training at home I had never ridden this sort of distance, so I was really jumping in at the deep end – I couldn’t be sure if I could hold out for the full two hours or not. But as I never overcommitted or pushed myself to my absolute limit during the race, I was able to conserve my energy through to the end. I didn’t feel anything from my knee at all. It was as though nothing had ever happened. My goal was to complete the race without an accident or injury in order to gain some confidence, but also to enjoy myself. In that respect, I definitely succeeded and I am incredibly proud of that! I am grateful and so happy that it didn’t take a whole year to get back on the race track after my injury – and that the experience was so overwhelmingly positive. The motivation to train hard through the winter and get ready for the 2019 season is indescribable! I am once again ready for many new moments on my KTM, including on the race track! © Anna-Larissa Redinger Get to know more about Larissa on the KTM BLOG – Collecting Moments #8: 238 days and I´m back in the saddle! – or check out her website! Photos: Anna-Larissa Redinger
  14. Collecting Moments #9: Finally READY TO RACE again!

    Collecting Moments #9: Finally READY TO RACE again! I may have dialed things down a notch over the past year while I got over my injury, but only in preparation for the new adventures to come. After 238 days I was back on the bike and after 363 days I was full of energy, commitment, and READY TO RACE again! Over the past few months it has been the little steps forward that have slowly brought me back to my KTM 300 EXC. The first few steps without crutches, the first weights in the gym, the first mountain bike ride with my Jekyll, the first time back on skis, the first ride out on the bike, and finally the last – and probably biggest – step: back on the race track. It was important to me not to allow an entire year to pass between the accident and my next competitive appearance. © Anna-Larissa Redinger I was staring at the calendar for the Austrian Cross-Country series throughout the entire season, with the same thought constantly rattling around my mind: “Will I be able to come back? When will I get back on the starting grid?” In my last blog entry I spoke of my first ride after my crash in October 2017. It was a special moment, even if I was more cautious, a little slower, and somewhat clumsier than before the accident. I used the summer to try to rediscover my old form, which admittedly took longer than I had expected. A few times in training I simply expected too much of myself and became disappointed with the slow rate of progress. It was only when I set myself a goal – to compete in the final race of the Austrian Cross-Country season in Mattighofen – that my training started to kick off. And how! Suddenly it was back: that indescribable sense of freedom as you fly from one bend to the next. This was when I decided that I was definitely going to be there lining up for the start of my home race. The anticipation was huge – but with a hint of nerves too. It had been a long time since I’d had that wondrous feeling of putting on new tires, adjusting the chassis to the perfect setup, and getting my bike ready to race. Loading the trailer, working through my race checklist, and finally getting prepared for race day. A truly special feeling. It was only once I’d got everything loaded up that I realized just how much I’d missed these moments over the previous year. © Anna-Larissa Redinger Race day for me started at 1 pm in the guest class for male competitors. Why not in the women’s class, I hear you ask? Well, considering that I hadn’t raced for a single minute of the year’s championship and I really was only a guest, I felt it was more appropriate to compete in the guest class. My start was nothing spectacular, but after deciding that I wanted to pursue an intelligent and careful strategy out on the track, I didn’t want to risk everything right at the start of the race. There were 90 guest riders in total and I lined up at number 78 on the grid. Amazingly, I quickly found a great rhythm and felt better with each corner mastered. As the race progressed I trusted myself more and overtook 20 or more riders. One part of the course in particular asked a lot of my mental resolve. It was pretty much identical to the situation where I had injured my knee before. A steep downhill section with a rut as the track. During the warm-up lap I had noticed how my heart rate shot up when I reached this point. I was nervous. My memories of the fall played back in my mind and I could hear the sound of tearing ligaments. “Think of the Romanian forest, Larissa, you’ve already mastered far more difficult sections! You can do it!” – I had to build up my courage! But it worked: with each passing lap I completed this downhill section with more and more authority. KTM 300 EXC © Anna-Larissa Redinger I also stood up to the physical demands better than I had expected. While training at home I had never ridden this sort of distance, so I was really jumping in at the deep end – I couldn’t be sure if I could hold out for the full two hours or not. But as I never overcommitted or pushed myself to my absolute limit during the race, I was able to conserve my energy through to the end. I didn’t feel anything from my knee at all. It was as though nothing had ever happened. My goal was to complete the race without an accident or injury in order to gain some confidence, but also to enjoy myself. In that respect, I definitely succeeded and I am incredibly proud of that! I am grateful and so happy that it didn’t take a whole year to get back on the race track after my injury – and that the experience was so overwhelmingly positive. The motivation to train hard through the winter and get ready for the 2019 season is indescribable! I am once again ready for many new moments on my KTM, including on the race track! © Anna-Larissa Redinger Get to know more about Larissa on the KTM BLOG – Collecting Moments #8: 238 days and I´m back in the saddle! – or check out her website! Photos: Anna-Larissa Redinger
  15. A new 690 roar with the 2019 LC4 Posted in Bikes, Riding It can be great to be ‘Single’ – plenty of people will tell you – and KTM’s feelings are the same when it comes to one of their most effective and innovative engine concepts. What new 690 delights await? 2018 EICMA and the reference for motorcycling exhibitions saw KTM unveil several models that caught the eye. Among the 790s, E-bikes and other updates for 2019 was the augmentation of the wide KTM catalog with the renovation of the LC4 single-cylinder engine. The revised ‘mono’ – first created back in 1987 and a mainstay in the KTM R&D halls since – sits at the heart of the new KTM 690 SMC R and KTM 690 ENDURO R: two curious bikes that satisfy the specific tastes of supermoto and offroad riders but are also configured for sturdy road and everyday use. KTM 690 ENDURO R MY2019 © KTM The SMC R harks back to KTM’s street origins when the company transitioned their punchy and exciting offroad technology directly to the tarmac and became the Supermoto rider/racer’s bike of choice. Towards the end of the second decade of this century the firm have now embellished what was once a raw and rugged motorcycle into one that still delivers thrills but boasts the type of specs demanded by users young, old, experienced and fresh to the potential of the ‘slide’. Standing out on the KTM 690 SMC R is that engine, and with 74hp at 8000 rpm it is renowned as the world’s most powerful production single. KTM have sculpted the slimmer but more voluminous (13.5 l) fuel tank as a load bearing component for extra rigidity and precision and, together with more compact bodywork, the chassis houses an LC4 that is smoother and more sophisticated than ever. The SMC R comes with two ride modes and has cornering ABS, lean angle-sensitive motorcycle traction control, motor slip regulation (MSR) and Quickshifter+, and the familiar Supermoto ABS mode aiding rear slides with front-end confidence. [embedded content] Four years ago, the KTM 690 ENDURO R was a revelatory trail bike: brutish power delivery on-tap but – somehow – as docile as a cat and with the handling of a KTM 350 SX-F. ABS braking was new fangled on such a hard enduro offering. For model year 2019 the ENDURO R has received a hard shot to the vein with the LC4 promising yet more connection between throttle hand and power play, an even smoother pull and increased efficiency. The ENDURO R also fastens a 13.5 l tank into the brand-new chassis, WP XPLOR suspension and split damping. Electronics might seem arbitrary on such a motorcycle but the provision of lean angle sensitivity to braking and traction functions, two different ride modes, offroad ABS, Quickshifter+ and motor slip regulation (MSR) to prevent rear wheel lock means this is a state-of-the-art and versatile dirt-cum-all-purpose bike. As the promo material packaged and sent with the KTM 690 ENDURO R states: ‘No road or route is impossible’. KTM 690 ENDURO R MY2019 © KTM/F. Lackner The LC4 continues to prosper … and means KTM are still prioritizing diversity of choice in their motorcycle line-up. Just what will EICMA 2019 bring? Photos: KTM | KTM/F.Lackner Video: KTM/KISKA
  16. A new 690 roar with the 2019 LC4

    A new 690 roar with the 2019 LC4 Posted in Bikes, Riding It can be great to be ‘Single’ – plenty of people will tell you – and KTM’s feelings are the same when it comes to one of their most effective and innovative engine concepts. What new 690 delights await? 2018 EICMA and the reference for motorcycling exhibitions saw KTM unveil several models that caught the eye. Among the 790s, E-bikes and other updates for 2019 was the augmentation of the wide KTM catalog with the renovation of the LC4 single-cylinder engine. The revised ‘mono’ – first created back in 1987 and a mainstay in the KTM R&D halls since – sits at the heart of the new KTM 690 SMC R and KTM 690 ENDURO R: two curious bikes that satisfy the specific tastes of supermoto and offroad riders but are also configured for sturdy road and everyday use. KTM 690 ENDURO R MY2019 © KTM The SMC R harks back to KTM’s street origins when the company transitioned their punchy and exciting offroad technology directly to the tarmac and became the Supermoto rider/racer’s bike of choice. Towards the end of the second decade of this century the firm have now embellished what was once a raw and rugged motorcycle into one that still delivers thrills but boasts the type of specs demanded by users young, old, experienced and fresh to the potential of the ‘slide’. Standing out on the KTM 690 SMC R is that engine, and with 74hp at 8000 rpm it is renowned as the world’s most powerful production single. KTM have sculpted the slimmer but more voluminous (13.5 l) fuel tank as a load bearing component for extra rigidity and precision and, together with more compact bodywork, the chassis houses an LC4 that is smoother and more sophisticated than ever. The SMC R comes with two ride modes and has cornering ABS, lean angle-sensitive motorcycle traction control, motor slip regulation (MSR) and Quickshifter+, and the familiar Supermoto ABS mode aiding rear slides with front-end confidence. [embedded content] Four years ago, the KTM 690 ENDURO R was a revelatory trail bike: brutish power delivery on-tap but – somehow – as docile as a cat and with the handling of a KTM 350 SX-F. ABS braking was new fangled on such a hard enduro offering. For model year 2019 the ENDURO R has received a hard shot to the vein with the LC4 promising yet more connection between throttle hand and power play, an even smoother pull and increased efficiency. The ENDURO R also fastens a 13.5 l tank into the brand-new chassis, WP XPLOR suspension and split damping. Electronics might seem arbitrary on such a motorcycle but the provision of lean angle sensitivity to braking and traction functions, two different ride modes, offroad ABS, Quickshifter+ and motor slip regulation (MSR) to prevent rear wheel lock means this is a state-of-the-art and versatile dirt-cum-all-purpose bike. As the promo material packaged and sent with the KTM 690 ENDURO R states: ‘No road or route is impossible’. KTM 690 ENDURO R MY2019 © KTM/F. Lackner The LC4 continues to prosper … and means KTM are still prioritizing diversity of choice in their motorcycle line-up. Just what will EICMA 2019 bring? Photos: KTM | KTM/F.Lackner Video: KTM/KISKA
  17. Let’s get 790 happy

    Let’s get 790 happy Posted in Bikes, Riding The annual Milan spectacle saw KTM unveil two new bikes that will excite riders of the travel enduro category. What was under the wrappers at EICMA? Seven years of continual growth for KTM and a burgeoning street division meant that the company were not rocking on their heels for 2019. A packed presentation area in Italy saw the unveiling of the KTM 790 ADVENTURE and an accompanying R model to further extend the family around the 799cc LC8c twin-cylinder engine concept. KTM 790 ADVENTURE R MY2019 © KTM The travel enduro models are the ‘orange’ highlights of the massive show that will last the rest of the week at the Fiera in Milan. The KTM 790 ADVENTURE is a unique offering in the segment with the LC8c tweaked to offer more torque lower in a powerband that will spit out 95hp. The motorcycle has been chiseled to be smooth but also light and very nimble: the exact characteristics that a rider demands from a bike that will produce the goods offroad but then also be apt for a street cruise that will test the extent of the 450 km fuel tank capacity. Some aspects of the popular ADVENTURE ‘siblings’ at 1290 and 1090 make it onto the 790, such as the three mode electronics (with optional ‘Rally’ setting), WP APEX suspension, 5” TFT display dash and integrated KTM MY RIDE app. The rally and enduro DNA of these bikes comes through the ergonomics, and traits such as the low ride h, the slim tank and the use of the LC8c as a stressed member of the chassis to assist with the dropped centralization. This motorcycle isn’t a road bike with some offroad AVON tires slapped on; KTM have mined their competitive roots and unparalleled success on tracks and trails to make sure that the KTM 790 ADVENTURE handles as it should on the loose stuff, and is then a powerful and practical prospect for the tarmac. KTM 790 ADVENTURE MY2019 © KTM/F. Lackner The R version takes the offroad emphasis to another level and with the focus squarely on ‘performance’. Apparently the KTM 450 RALLY was a strong touchstone for the R with a number of tweaks over the standard KTM 790 ADVENTURE accentuating the ability for this bike to give experienced trail fans a satisfying kick. The street element is not found wanting. Again the electronics stand out: MTC (motorcycle traction control), cornering ABS and four ride modes to tailor the output of the throaty LC8c. Alternate WP technology and Metzeler tires are just some of the other specs.  Media and guests that were lucky to get the first views of the KTM 790 ADVENTURE and the R were struck by a slightly different look. The bikes clearly pack some of that rally and ‘enduroesque’ styling thanks to the narrow front end and straight, functional seat unit that only enhance the travel enduro sensation. There were a few other surprises at the 2018 EICMA, click on our future stories to feel ‘the buzz’. Photos: KTM | KTM/F. Lackner Video: KTM/KISKA
  18. High Five: A closer look at KTM´s big news in Milan Posted in Bikes, Riding The KTM BLOG takes a deeper looking into the five new machines the READY TO RACE company presented at EICMA. EICMA. To some that means Esposizione Internazionale del Ciclo, Motociclo, Accessori but to most bike freaks, the Milan-based show is the time when most manufacturers present their new production machines and tease the future with incredible prototypes. KTM, in particular, likes to make a big impact at this event; remember ´The Beast´ and ´The Scalpel´? These were presented at the Italian show … This year’s show was no less important to the READY TO RACE company. Presenting the conference on Tuesday November 6 was former MotoGPTM rider, KTM test rider and now commentator, Alex Hofmann. The German was assisted unveiling the new bikes on stage with KTM CEO, Stefan Pierer, KTM CSO, Hubert Trunkenpolz, Red Bull KTM MotoGP Factory Racing rider, Pol Espargaró and former multiple Dakar winner, Marc Coma. KTM 790 ADVENTURE / KTM 790 ADVENTURE R MY2019 EICMA 2018 © Marco Campelli So, what exactly was revealed? The most comprehensive, dynamic and innovative range ever from KTM with machines available that will allow riders of every age and ability to choose and best their own path in 2019. Sounds exciting, eh? Let’s take a closer look at them … KTM 790 ADVENTURE and KTM 790 ADVENTURE R Arguably the most eagerly anticipated bikes to be revealed by the orange company was the KTM 790 ADVENTURE and KTM 790 ADVENTURE R. “You spoke, we listened,” they said, and boy they did not disappoint. KTM is always proud to call itself a riders’ company and these all-new models are a direct result of customer feedback, mixed with the brand’s experience and expertise. The KTM 790 ADVENTURE is for travel enduro fans of every ambition and ability, ready to discover new roads whichever way it’s pointed at – no matter surface. The KTM 790 ADVENTURE R is a lightweight, agile and technically advanced machine for adventurers that endeavor to challenge themselves while challenging tricky terrain. So, two models. Which bike to choose? It all depends just how extreme and regular your offroad riding is. In a nutshell, the KTM 790 ADVENTURE is the most offroad capable travel bike and the KTM 790 ADVENTURE R is the most travel capable offroad bike. KTM 790 ADVENTURE R MY2019 © KTM/F. Lackner KTM 690 SMC R MotoGPTM rider, Pol Espargaró, talked on stage about his love for riding supermoto as an excellent training tool and just for fun, which was a fitting what to introduce the return of the KTM 690 SMC R in 2019. Rebooting supermoto for the road this model takes KTM´s READY TO RACE approach to its purest incarnation on the street; lightweight, agile, addictive single-cylinder punch, premium chassis components and now backed up by leading performance-enhancing electronics. Did anyone say wheelies? KTM 690 SMC R MY2019 © KTM/R. Schedl KTM 690 ENDURO R Someone who knows KTM’s enduro successes better than most and the legacy of the LC4 engine to the brand, is Mr. Hubert Trunkenpolz. Introducing the bike on stage at EICMA was KTM’s CSO, who also happens to be the grandson of the founder of KTM, after all (and that’s what the ‘T’ in KTM stands for …). Versatility is what the new KTM 690 ENDURO R is all about; even more perfectly positioned to connect the tarmac and trails. The massively updated bike also benefitting from the same engine, electronics and chassis improvements made to its sliding Supermoto sibling, but in a platform completely focused on offroad. Endless enduro without the need to ever trailer to the trails. Or take the van … KTM 690 ENDURO R MY2019 © KTM/F. Lackner KTM SX-E 5 It isn’t’ all about the ‘grown-ups’ in 2019 as KTM also showed off its newly developed KTM SX-E 5. The next step in KTM’s innovative line-up. Combining class-leading knowledge in youth motorcycling with years of development work in the e-sector, the KTM SX-E 5 is based on the incredibly popular 2-stroke KTM 50 SX with a high-end chassis powered by an electric motor. KTM’s mission was clear: to create an ultra-competitive machine that is also easy to ride, even for pure beginners. The KTM SX-E 5 enjoys the advantage of zero emissions, low noise and minimal maintenance, which makes it ideal for youngsters looking to make the first step into the world of motorcycling and thanks to its dynamic design, it is ideal for the growing rider with its adjustable seat h. Ah … to be young again! The kids have never had it so good. KTM SX-E 5 MY2020 © KTM/H. Mitterbauer Stay tuned for further information on the KTM 2019 model range and visit www.ktm.com or your nearest official KTM dealer. Photos: Marco Campelli | KTM/F. Lackner | KTM/R. Schedl | KTM/H. Mitterbauer
  19. High Five: A closer look at KTM´s big news in Milan

    High Five: A closer look at KTM´s big news in Milan Posted in Bikes, Riding The KTM BLOG takes a deeper looking into the five new machines the READY TO RACE company presented at EICMA. EICMA. To some that means Esposizione Internazionale del Ciclo, Motociclo, Accessori but to most bike freaks, the Milan-based show is the time when most manufacturers present their new production machines and tease the future with incredible prototypes. KTM, in particular, likes to make a big impact at this event; remember ´The Beast´ and ´The Scalpel´? These were presented at the Italian show … This year’s show was no less important to the READY TO RACE company. Presenting the conference on Tuesday November 6 was former MotoGPTM rider, KTM test rider and now commentator, Alex Hofmann. The German was assisted unveiling the new bikes on stage with KTM CEO, Stefan Pierer, KTM CSO, Hubert Trunkenpolz, Red Bull KTM MotoGP Factory Racing rider, Pol Espargaró and former multiple Dakar winner, Marc Coma. KTM 790 ADVENTURE / KTM 790 ADVENTURE R MY2019 EICMA 2018 © Marco Campelli So, what exactly was revealed? The most comprehensive, dynamic and innovative range ever from KTM with machines available that will allow riders of every age and ability to choose and best their own path in 2019. Sounds exciting, eh? Let’s take a closer look at them … KTM 790 ADVENTURE and KTM 790 ADVENTURE R Arguably the most eagerly anticipated bikes to be revealed by the orange company was the KTM 790 ADVENTURE and KTM 790 ADVENTURE R. “You spoke, we listened,” they said, and boy they did not disappoint. KTM is always proud to call itself a riders’ company and these all-new models are a direct result of customer feedback, mixed with the brand’s experience and expertise. The KTM 790 ADVENTURE is for travel enduro fans of every ambition and ability, ready to discover new roads whichever way it’s pointed at – no matter surface. The KTM 790 ADVENTURE R is a lightweight, agile and technically advanced machine for adventurers that endeavor to challenge themselves while challenging tricky terrain. So, two models. Which bike to choose? It all depends just how extreme and regular your offroad riding is. In a nutshell, the KTM 790 ADVENTURE is the most offroad capable travel bike and the KTM 790 ADVENTURE R is the most travel capable offroad bike. KTM 790 ADVENTURE R MY2019 © KTM/F. Lackner KTM 690 SMC R MotoGPTM rider, Pol Espargaró, talked on stage about his love for riding supermoto as an excellent training tool and just for fun, which was a fitting what to introduce the return of the KTM 690 SMC R in 2019. Rebooting supermoto for the road this model takes KTM´s READY TO RACE approach to its purest incarnation on the street; lightweight, agile, addictive single-cylinder punch, premium chassis components and now backed up by leading performance-enhancing electronics. Did anyone say wheelies? KTM 690 SMC R MY2019 © KTM/R. Schedl KTM 690 ENDURO R Someone who knows KTM’s enduro successes better than most and the legacy of the LC4 engine to the brand, is Mr. Hubert Trunkenpolz. Introducing the bike on stage at EICMA was KTM’s CSO, who also happens to be the grandson of the founder of KTM, after all (and that’s what the ‘T’ in KTM stands for …). Versatility is what the new KTM 690 ENDURO R is all about; even more perfectly positioned to connect the tarmac and trails. The massively updated bike also benefitting from the same engine, electronics and chassis improvements made to its sliding Supermoto sibling, but in a platform completely focused on offroad. Endless enduro without the need to ever trailer to the trails. Or take the van … KTM 690 ENDURO R MY2019 © KTM/F. Lackner KTM SX-E 5 It isn’t’ all about the ‘grown-ups’ in 2019 as KTM also showed off its newly developed KTM SX-E 5. The next step in KTM’s innovative line-up. Combining class-leading knowledge in youth motorcycling with years of development work in the e-sector, the KTM SX-E 5 is based on the incredibly popular 2-stroke KTM 50 SX with a high-end chassis powered by an electric motor. KTM’s mission was clear: to create an ultra-competitive machine that is also easy to ride, even for pure beginners. The KTM SX-E 5 enjoys the advantage of zero emissions, low noise and minimal maintenance, which makes it ideal for youngsters looking to make the first step into the world of motorcycling and thanks to its dynamic design, it is ideal for the growing rider with its adjustable seat h. Ah … to be young again! The kids have never had it so good. KTM SX-E 5 MY2020 © KTM/H. Mitterbauer Stay tuned for further information on the KTM 2019 model range and visit www.ktm.com or your nearest official KTM dealer. Photos: Marco Campelli | KTM/F. Lackner | KTM/R. Schedl | KTM/H. Mitterbauer
  20. How did Herlings make 2018 possible? Posted in People, Racing 17 wins from 19 and a first MXGP title means 2018 was a magnificent motocross season for Jeffrey Herlings. How did he make it happen? We asked Team Manager Dirk Gruebel for some insight. Dirk Gruebel (GER) Valkenswaard (NED) 2018 © Ray Archer The dust from the roost of 2018 MXGP is beginning to settle and besides the knowledge that he is World Champion (and Red Bull KTM are #1 for the seventh time this decade with two different riders) Jeffrey Herlings might soon begin to appreciate the numbers of the year with greater awe. The 24-year-old Dutchman routinely crushed his rivals through a variety of conditions and across different terrain but his phenomenal numbers tell just as much of the story. Herlings has famously said he lived like a “monk” to achieve a 100% podium appearance record, 17 Grand Prix wins from the 19 he contested, 33 motos from 38, 14 1-1 shutouts and only dropped 17 points from the maximum all year (discounting the 50 missed from the Grand Prix of Lombardia, when he was injured). “I’m not sure if he was dedicated more than before because he has always been that way,” opines KTM Group VP of Offroad Robert Jonas. “He started this year in top shape. I still think Jeffrey is ‘growing’ and hasn’t reached his full potential.” Jeffrey Herlings (NED) Red Bud (USA) 2018 © Ray Archer Behind Herlings was his loyal team and the Red Bull KTM staff that had helped and nurtured this fantastic talent since his GP debut as a 15-year-old in 2010. The technical crew refined the #84 KTM 450 SX-F especially in the early rounds of the series and by Portugal and the fifth race of 2018 Herlings had the whole package of pace, connection, reliability, confidence and starts. He was also winning the battle in a ‘toe-to-toe’ with defending champion and teammate Tony Cairoli. To gain some more perspective on how Herlings blossomed from his emphatic opening success of the season in Argentina, returned swiftly and decisively from a training crash and broken collarbone and went on to set more records in the sport we ask German Team Manager Dirk Gruebel for an inside line … Jeffrey Herlings (NED) KTM 450 SX-F Imola (ITA) 2018 © Ray Archer Ok, how did Jeffrey make the difference over the others in 2018? Rival teams are no longer talking about winning in MXGP, rather “catching Herlings” … “You know, Jeffrey made some big mistakes in 2017 and coming into his first season of MXGP. Maybe he was a little bit wrong from the off because guys who moved up before him from MX2 were champion right away [Romain Febvre in 2015 and Tim Gajser in 2016] so for him it was a ‘done deal’ and he ‘had’ to be world champion. I think there were riders who were keen to make it tough for him because he’d smoked them in MX2. I think it was payback time in the 2017 pre-season internationals already and people were closing the door on him and being a bit harder than normal in my opinion … but it was to be expected because he was the greenhorn and there were people who wanted to show him the way, at least that’s how it looked from the outside. For sure he was not on the same fitness level as this year and it took a while to find his lines and his way. He learned. The starts were a big problem and we developed those with him. He’s a maniac now with those, especially during the week. I doubt anybody puts in as much practice as him and he’s improved a lot; top five lately and mostly top two. Within a couple of corners he is first and then it is all about the incredible pace he sets from the first lap until the last which is not possible for most of these riders. Tony tries his best and does really good but it is such a high level that even he struggles to stay with him. If they battle each other then there is usually a gap of thirty-forty seconds to the next guy in third and that’s not normal for this sport.” He seems to run the same speed no matter the track … “Yeah, it doesn’t matter for him anymore. In MX2 you could see he was the fastest in the sand but there was also Tommy Searle or Dylan Ferrandis who could show him a front wheel on the hard-pack once in a while. But now in MXGP this is not really happening. It is a rare thing to see: that he is excelling no matter the ground or even if it’s a new track. It’s impressive.” There are not many motorcycle racers in any FIM World Championship with a similar rate of success … “Last year our message to him was ‘just aim for the top five or top three and you’ll be world champion’ but, to him, it was like the message was still read as ‘be first every weekend’! It ran like this into 2018 and he was a bit down when someone else won but it was good to remove that [notion of] the perfect season because that is another kind of pressure. He was going in a good way this year and the broken collarbone and missing one round didn’t help but coming back to start winning again straight away was something nobody expected.” Jeffrey Herlings (NED) KTM 450 SX-F Assen (NED) 2018 © Ray Archer Was there a time when you thought he was over the limit? “We had it in Indonesia [round twelve of twenty]. For the first event back after injury I thought he took a little too much risk. Ok, he saw the win was possible but he could have paid a high price for it. He took a risk, but so did Tony and he got the short end of the stick when he hurt his thumb and in the end it worked out for Jeffrey. In my opinion it was not necessary to put that pressure on himself to again be winning so soon after surgery.” Can you give a rough estimation of how much Jeffrey is riding during the week? Do you see other riders doing the same mileage? “No. Glenn [Coldenhoff] tried to keep up with him a bit more since last year but it’s tough. He normally rides three times a week between races. If there is no race then on Saturday or Sunday there will be another practice.” Jeffrey has talked about the cost and toll of 2018. Is there the chance of burnout? “It is hard to say. It’s not predictable. He is the strongest out there now but overnight things can change. The human body can be a strange element and can play tricks on you. He really trains a lot but then other people did before him as well and they were Ok in their particular sport. It is hard to say.” Jeffrey Herlings (NED) KTM 450 SX-F Afyon (TUR) 2018 © Ray Archer From the outside he looks like the perfect motocrosser and there are not many weaknesses. In person what’s he like? Is there that same veneer of strength? “In my opinion he puts up a shell, which you also need to protect yourself when you are as famous as him at such a young age already. Even now when he is older the shell is still there. He likes a bit of privacy and distance from people. He puts that ‘armor’ up, and that’s his decision. He is not the most talkative or outspoken person in the paddock, that’s for sure, but if you get to know him then he’s a really good guy.” Did the team make a breakthrough in the period before Portugal and find the solution for his starts? “Hmm, it was a constant process. All through spring we worked on the starts and they got better and better but we also had some stuff coming from the technical side that helped him as well to stay in the same RPM and then he found his procedure, which he didn’t have last year. This is the key now for a good start and he repeats it week by week.” Repeating this season: is that going to be possible? “I think next year we can expect the same Jeffrey again. He is still hungry and eager to win. Some guys do have that ‘big goal’ and then they take a step back or fall into that hole [of motivation] but I don’t think that will happen with him. He is keen to have another title and I think we’ll continue to see the best of him in 2019.” Jeffrey Herlings (NED) Red Bud (USA) 2018 © Ray Archer Photos: Ray Archer
  21. How did Herlings make 2018 possible?

    How did Herlings make 2018 possible? Posted in People, Racing 17 wins from 19 and a first MXGP title means 2018 was a magnificent motocross season for Jeffrey Herlings. How did he make it happen? We asked Team Manager Dirk Gruebel for some insight. Dirk Gruebel (GER) Valkenswaard (NED) 2018 © Ray Archer The dust from the roost of 2018 MXGP is beginning to settle and besides the knowledge that he is World Champion (and Red Bull KTM are #1 for the seventh time this decade with two different riders) Jeffrey Herlings might soon begin to appreciate the numbers of the year with greater awe. The 24-year-old Dutchman routinely crushed his rivals through a variety of conditions and across different terrain but his phenomenal numbers tell just as much of the story. Herlings has famously said he lived like a “monk” to achieve a 100% podium appearance record, 17 Grand Prix wins from the 19 he contested, 33 motos from 38, 14 1-1 shutouts and only dropped 17 points from the maximum all year (discounting the 50 missed from the Grand Prix of Lombardia, when he was injured). “I’m not sure if he was dedicated more than before because he has always been that way,” opines KTM Group VP of Offroad Robert Jonas. “He started this year in top shape. I still think Jeffrey is ‘growing’ and hasn’t reached his full potential.” Jeffrey Herlings (NED) Red Bud (USA) 2018 © Ray Archer Behind Herlings was his loyal team and the Red Bull KTM staff that had helped and nurtured this fantastic talent since his GP debut as a 15-year-old in 2010. The technical crew refined the #84 KTM 450 SX-F especially in the early rounds of the series and by Portugal and the fifth race of 2018 Herlings had the whole package of pace, connection, reliability, confidence and starts. He was also winning the battle in a ‘toe-to-toe’ with defending champion and teammate Tony Cairoli. To gain some more perspective on how Herlings blossomed from his emphatic opening success of the season in Argentina, returned swiftly and decisively from a training crash and broken collarbone and went on to set more records in the sport we ask German Team Manager Dirk Gruebel for an inside line … Jeffrey Herlings (NED) KTM 450 SX-F Imola (ITA) 2018 © Ray Archer Ok, how did Jeffrey make the difference over the others in 2018? Rival teams are no longer talking about winning in MXGP, rather “catching Herlings” … “You know, Jeffrey made some big mistakes in 2017 and coming into his first season of MXGP. Maybe he was a little bit wrong from the off because guys who moved up before him from MX2 were champion right away [Romain Febvre in 2015 and Tim Gajser in 2016] so for him it was a ‘done deal’ and he ‘had’ to be world champion. I think there were riders who were keen to make it tough for him because he’d smoked them in MX2. I think it was payback time in the 2017 pre-season internationals already and people were closing the door on him and being a bit harder than normal in my opinion … but it was to be expected because he was the greenhorn and there were people who wanted to show him the way, at least that’s how it looked from the outside. For sure he was not on the same fitness level as this year and it took a while to find his lines and his way. He learned. The starts were a big problem and we developed those with him. He’s a maniac now with those, especially during the week. I doubt anybody puts in as much practice as him and he’s improved a lot; top five lately and mostly top two. Within a couple of corners he is first and then it is all about the incredible pace he sets from the first lap until the last which is not possible for most of these riders. Tony tries his best and does really good but it is such a high level that even he struggles to stay with him. If they battle each other then there is usually a gap of thirty-forty seconds to the next guy in third and that’s not normal for this sport.” He seems to run the same speed no matter the track … “Yeah, it doesn’t matter for him anymore. In MX2 you could see he was the fastest in the sand but there was also Tommy Searle or Dylan Ferrandis who could show him a front wheel on the hard-pack once in a while. But now in MXGP this is not really happening. It is a rare thing to see: that he is excelling no matter the ground or even if it’s a new track. It’s impressive.” There are not many motorcycle racers in any FIM World Championship with a similar rate of success … “Last year our message to him was ‘just aim for the top five or top three and you’ll be world champion’ but, to him, it was like the message was still read as ‘be first every weekend’! It ran like this into 2018 and he was a bit down when someone else won but it was good to remove that [notion of] the perfect season because that is another kind of pressure. He was going in a good way this year and the broken collarbone and missing one round didn’t help but coming back to start winning again straight away was something nobody expected.” Jeffrey Herlings (NED) KTM 450 SX-F Assen (NED) 2018 © Ray Archer Was there a time when you thought he was over the limit? “We had it in Indonesia [round twelve of twenty]. For the first event back after injury I thought he took a little too much risk. Ok, he saw the win was possible but he could have paid a high price for it. He took a risk, but so did Tony and he got the short end of the stick when he hurt his thumb and in the end it worked out for Jeffrey. In my opinion it was not necessary to put that pressure on himself to again be winning so soon after surgery.” Can you give a rough estimation of how much Jeffrey is riding during the week? Do you see other riders doing the same mileage? “No. Glenn [Coldenhoff] tried to keep up with him a bit more since last year but it’s tough. He normally rides three times a week between races. If there is no race then on Saturday or Sunday there will be another practice.” Jeffrey has talked about the cost and toll of 2018. Is there the chance of burnout? “It is hard to say. It’s not predictable. He is the strongest out there now but overnight things can change. The human body can be a strange element and can play tricks on you. He really trains a lot but then other people did before him as well and they were Ok in their particular sport. It is hard to say.” Jeffrey Herlings (NED) KTM 450 SX-F Afyon (TUR) 2018 © Ray Archer From the outside he looks like the perfect motocrosser and there are not many weaknesses. In person what’s he like? Is there that same veneer of strength? “In my opinion he puts up a shell, which you also need to protect yourself when you are as famous as him at such a young age already. Even now when he is older the shell is still there. He likes a bit of privacy and distance from people. He puts that ‘armor’ up, and that’s his decision. He is not the most talkative or outspoken person in the paddock, that’s for sure, but if you get to know him then he’s a really good guy.” Did the team make a breakthrough in the period before Portugal and find the solution for his starts? “Hmm, it was a constant process. All through spring we worked on the starts and they got better and better but we also had some stuff coming from the technical side that helped him as well to stay in the same RPM and then he found his procedure, which he didn’t have last year. This is the key now for a good start and he repeats it week by week.” Repeating this season: is that going to be possible? “I think next year we can expect the same Jeffrey again. He is still hungry and eager to win. Some guys do have that ‘big goal’ and then they take a step back or fall into that hole [of motivation] but I don’t think that will happen with him. He is keen to have another title and I think we’ll continue to see the best of him in 2019.” Jeffrey Herlings (NED) Red Bud (USA) 2018 © Ray Archer Photos: Ray Archer
  22. #inthisyear1978: Six Days Karlskoga – KTM wins Manufacturers Award Posted in History, Racing 2018 marks the first-ever World Enduro Super Series, the first competition to combine the Hard, Classic, Beach, and Cross-Country disciplines – including the Red Bull Hare Scramble on the Erzberg. According to Winfried Kerschhaggl, manager of the WESS Series: “The sport has grown tremendously in recent years, now it’s time for a championship that brings the key events together.” With one round to go, six KTM riders number among the top ten, with Manuel Lettenbichler one of those snapping at the heels of the leaders. The racers from Mattighofen are considered hot favorites for the WESS title. Manuel Lettenbichler (GER) Hawkstone Park (GBR) 2018 © Future7Media On the other hand, the shine has to some extent come off the International Six Days Enduro in recent years, once likened to the Olympics of motorcycling. Ever since John Penton set the ball rolling at the end of the 1960s with his call for the series manufacture of offroad machines, KTM has been heavily involved in classic enduro sports, both in national championships as well as in the European and later world championships. However, the Six Days Enduro, the annual highlight of the season in autumn, was not initially an event for individual riders. Instead it was a team competition similar to the MX of Nations in motocross. In addition to the World Trophy for national teams that until recently were made up of six riders, the “Silver Vase” was for teams of four. The “Manufacturers Award” was of particular interest to manufacturers involved in offroad racing. In this competition a team of three riders aimed to cross the finish line without picking up any penalties with the aim of demonstrating the speed and reliability of their brand. Delivery of the first Penton offroad machines was taken in the USA in 1968, and a week later they got the opportunity to show just what they could do at the Stone Mountain Enduro in Georgia. Six short months later at the end of September, the Penton squad and their machines made a return to Europe to enter the “43rd Sei Giorni Internazionale di Regolarita”, the International Six Days Enduro in San Pellegrino, Italy. There’s no doubt it was a big risk taking the four small machines, with just 475cc between them, to the Bergamasche Mountains for their first European competition. But, John Penton, straight from his Stone Mountain victory in the USA, was undaunted. Together with his son Tom Penton, Dave Mungenast, and Leroy Winters, the Penton Vase team ended in 10th place: more than a good result when one considers that a year earlier the machines were not even on the drawing board. Incidentally, the winners that year were the Italian Vase team that included Arnaldo Farioli, later to become a KTM importer. US Silver Vase team 1968 © Penton Ten years on and KTM won the Manufacturers Award for the first time. The Six Days took place between September 4 and 9, 1978 in the environs of Värnamo in Sweden and, at the end of six hard days racing, KTM led the board in a total of 45 brand teams. At that time, international enduro racing was in the hands of the various national importers; only the entry in the Motocross World Championship came directly from the factory in Mattighofen. Seven importers from Belgium to the USA started with KTM brand teams in Sweden. In Harald Strößenreuther, Reinhard Christel, and Paul Rottler, KTM Germany importer Toni Stöcklmeier, himself once a successful Six Days racer and 1974 German offroad champion in the 350cc category, put forward three reigning national champions all the same time. These three competed valiantly and by the end took 40 seconds and nearly a minute off the Zündapp and Jawa teams, who had started as favorites. Six Days 1978 © Teuchert Today, the International Six Days Enduro is the offroad event with the longest tradition. Originally called the International Six Days Reliability Trial, this was an endurance race for motorcycles and threewheeler that was held for the first time in 1913 in Carlisle (UK). Since then the International Six Days Enduro, or the “Olympics of Motorcycling” as it is often known, has taken place every year in autumn, with the exception of the two world wars. This year it is being held for the 93rd time in the Chilean city of Viña del Mar. Albeit, it has to be said that the “Six Days” has lost much of its appeal these days. There has even been talk of making the one-time highlight of every offroad year a bi-annual event. Having said that, there’s one thing that won’t change this year – when the 600 participants push their bikes up to the starting line on November 12, the color orange is set to dominate again. Like many professional racers, many private riders continue to put their trust in KTM – the service and lease package was completely booked out in next to no time. And, as in other years, a special “Six Days” version is available again, clearly identifiable by its special decal in honor of the host country. KTM 300 EXC TPI MY2019 © KTM Two days before the start of the Six Days, the first season of the WESS ended with the Red Bull Knock-Out Beach Race in the Dutch city of Scheveningen with the KTM stars Manuel Lettenbichler, Josep Garcia, Taddy Blazusiak, Jonny Walker, and Nathan Watson – the enduro season promises to be action-packed right to the end. Photos: Future7Media | Penton | Teuchert | KTM
  23. From A to B

    From A to B Posted in People, Racing The next time you turn on the TV to watch a MotoGPTM race, take time to appreciate the complex logistics operation that goes on behind the scenes. It’s more than just getting a few motorbikes from one circuit to the other. To find out the full story, we decided to dig a little deeper. Jeremy Wilson (GBR) 2018 © Guus van Goethem Meet Jeremy Wilson, logistics coordinator at Red Bull KTM Factory Racing. Originally from Driffield in England, Wilson is now a long-time resident of the MotoGPTM ‘village’, with no less than 23 seasons in the paddock. And although he has been a part of the promising Red Bull KTM MotoGP team ever since its inception, this is only his first season as logistics coordinator. In fact, Wilson was rather shocked when he was offered the job of logistics coordinator for the team. “I’ve got plenty of experience, including time with Red Bull Yamaha, WCM, and Rizla Suzuki. You could say I’m a jack of all trades, I can do all kinds of odd jobs. It started like that at KTM too. When I got here, I used to drive one of the trucks to the circuits and take care of the tires for Pol Espargaró. Then out of the blue, Mike Leitner (KTM’s MotoGP team manager), called me into his office. I thought to myself, “what have I done wrong now?” But to my surprise, without warning, he asked me if I wanted to be a logistics coordinator. I thought, “is he joking?” But no, he was dead serious. I was lost for words, because I really didn’t see it coming.” Wilson was surprised for two reasons: firstly, he’s not exactly great with computers, and secondly, he speaks English with a very strong accent. “English people are very lazy when it comes to learning other languages”, the 51-year-old Englishman readily admits. “I try to talk with less of an accent now, and I’ve been brushing up on my computer skills as well. I still type with two fingers, but I’m gradually getting better at using a laptop. Needless to say, I do much of my work the old-fashioned way … with a pen and paper. Basically, my notebook is my computer. I write down all my tasks, and then cross them off when they’re done.” Jeremy Wilson (GBR) 2018 © Guus van Goethem No worries Through a combination of Wilson’s experience and some outside help, there have been no logistical disasters for KTM this year. With his tireless commitment and willingness to learn, he tries to make the logistics operation as smooth as possible. Luckily, he has two other logistical coordinators to help him out. Wilson is mainly responsible for the trucks and the pit boxes, while his colleague Beatrice Garcia takes care of the people side of the operations. In other words, she makes sure all the team members have got a place to sleep and catch their planes on time. Then there is Thomas Rockenmeyer, who handles the logistics for the spare parts. Jeremy Wilson always gets to the circuit early because he still drives one of the three trucks. Despite being a coordinator, driving a MAN truck is still a part of the job. “On race weekends, to make sure the logistics go smoothly, I like to be the first one there. There might be urgent deliveries, for example, that need to be taken care of as soon as they come in. So, it makes sense to drive the truck as well. That way I know everything will get to the circuit on time.” Race weekends for Wilson start at 14.00 hours on Tuesday afternoon. “It’s a very strict rule of the organization. Everyone has to line up outside the circuit, and then they let us in one-by-one and escort us to our assigned location. We wash the trucks on Tuesday evening so that everything is ready when the pit boxes are built on Wednesday morning.” After the trucks have been unloaded, the whole team gets to work to transform the pit box into KTM’s command center for the weekend. The walls go up, the motorbikes are rolled in, and the tools are laid out in exactly the right place. Everything has to be perfect, so the mechanics and engineers can just walk in and start work straightaway. Thursday afternoon is when Wilson has to take out his laptop and touch base with everyone back at headquarters and make the final arrangements with partner companies like DHL, a key logistical partner of the team. This English member of the KTM MotoGP team has to make sure everything runs smoothly throughout the entire weekend. If anybody needs anything that involves logistics, then Wilson is ready to work out an effective plan. On top of that, he has to be on stand-by next to the track, on a scooter, during the MotoGPTM training sessions. He usually goes to a spot where the riders are most likely to fall off. “Then Pol or Bradley can just jump on and I can get them back to the pit box as quickly as possible.” © Guus van Goethem Shipping parts On Sunday evening, when all the racing is over, the team has to start loading everything back into the trucks. The trucks hardly ever go back to the headquarters in Munderfing, Austria. They go to a depot at a strategic location to save time and money. The logistical operation takes up a big chunk of a MotoGPTM team’s budget. Wilson: “I think something like 40% of the total expenditure goes on transportation for the team.” That is why Wilson tries to make sure all the gear is moved around as efficiently as possible. The key is to eliminate unnecessary travel. “It can take up to three days to drive from Barcelona back to our base in Austria. And by the time you get there, it’s already time to leave for the next GP. So, it doesn’t make any sense really. If we have an emergency and we need to get certain parts from head office, then we just call DHL. They will deliver it to the circuit for us.” This type of efficient planning means Wilson only has to drive around 35,000 km a year, even though he has to go to twelve different Grand Prix circuits spread out across the whole of Europe. “By taking the trucks to strategic locations, we have managed to reduce the amount of driving to an acceptable limit.” Races outside of Europe, on the other hand, bring a completely different set of challenges, because then everything has to be sent by air. For the current series of races (Thailand, Japan, Australia and Malaysia), everything had to be boxed up in crates after the GP in Aragon. In addition, all the import and export documents (so-called “carnets”) had to be labelled the right way, otherwise the crates wouldn’t be allowed through customs. Because DHL handles all of KTM’s transportation for overseas GPs, they help Wilson out with a lot of the paperwork. However, sending everything by air is very expensive, which is why Dorna helps the teams by paying towards some of the costs. “The Grand Prix in Argentina costs the most, because you have to pay € 9 per kilo for airfreight. Normally you only have to pay € 4 to € 5.5 per kilo. And when you have to send 15,700 kilos of gear to Argentina … then you’re talking about a considerable amount of money. To make it affordable for the teams, Dorna covers some of the costs. For the top-10 teams in the MotoGPTM championship, Dorna pays for the first 11,000 kg, and the team has to pay for anything over that. We are not in the top-10 right now, so they only pay for the first 9,000 kg.” In light of these enormous costs, KTM is currently exploring new ways to reduce the cost of Grand Prix weekends overseas. “For example, shipping by sea is a lot cheaper than shipping by air, but of course it takes a lot longer to get there … However, if you have two sets of all the gear, then you can rotate. That way you can use one set while the other set is being shipped to the next circuit. At the beginning of the season, for example, while one set is being used for testing in Malaysia, the other set can be shipped to Qatar. And while the Grand Prix in Qatar is taking place, the set in Malaysia can be shipped to Austin. It’s a strategy they use in Formula 1, and Suzuki do it in MotoGPTM as well. But the initial outlay is enormous: two of everything costs a lot of money. In the long term, though, it makes your logistics a lot cheaper. So, we might switch to this system at some time in the future.” © Guus van Goethem Extreme case The overseas races are a logistical challenge in other ways too as the team has less control over the logistics. “Say you need a certain part in a rush, then you just prey the company delivers on time. Luckily, we have very reliable partners. If they send me an email telling me the part is on its way, then it usually is. But if it doesn’t get there by race time, then I’m the one left with a problem. And it’s a lot harder to come up with an alternative solution at the last moment when you’re overseas. So all-in-all, it can be a real nightmare.” Luckily, up until now, there haven’t been any major transportation disasters for Wilson. But there are plenty of examples to show just how important logistics can be for the success of the Red Bull KTM MotoGP team. Last year, for example, after a successful test with KTM´s test rider Mika Kallio the latest version of the RC16 engine had to be sent to the next Grand Prix as quickly as possible. “We had two of these engines in Munderfing, but they had to be finished off first. That meant we only had a narrow window get them to Jerez in time for the first European Grand Prix of the season. However, we couldn’t use a normal air cargo service because of the fluids. So, we decided to send the whole lot by private jet. It was ultimately a great decision, because it turned our whole season around. That engine was a real difference-maker.” Jeremy Wilson obviously feels right at home being a logistics coordinator at KTM. Especially now he has found his dream job working in the MotoGPTM paddock. Although it’s not that surprising when you find out more about Wilson’s background. “My whole life has been about racing. My father started taking me to Grand Prix races when I was a little child, back in the day when Barry Sheene was the king of the road.” It wasn’t long before he became a part of the road race scene himself. He knows every bump and bend on the Isle of Man and the street circuits of Northern Ireland. Even today, Wilson still manages to find time for some road racing. “I’ve got a couple of two-fifties in the shed back home. 2-strokes of course, because they really burn. It’s the most beautiful thing there is. And now that racing has taken me all the way to the world of MotoGPTM Grand Prix, it’s a dream come true. My first job was with Clive Padgett’s team, when Jay Vincent was riding for them. And since then I’ve never left road racing. So, I’m very lucky that I can actually earn a living through racing as well. Although doing this job doesn’t feel like work at all. Quite the opposite, because I get a kick out of just being in the paddock and being able to play a part in the success of the Red Bull KTM MotoGP team.” Bradley Smith (GBR) & Pol Espargaró (ESP) KTM RC16 Motegi (JAP) 2018 © Gold and Goose Photos: Guus van Goethem | Gold and Goose
  24. ktm ISLE OF MAN GT

    ISLE OF MAN GT TT legend Michael Rutter discovers the real definition of sports touring with a unique tour of the famous island riding the new KTM 1290 SUPER DUKE GT in an incredible new video. Michael Rutter (GBR) KTM 1290 SUPER DUKE GT 2018 © Fabbegghy Studio The Isle of Man is steeped in motorcycling history, largely thanks to over 110 years of racing on its public roads with the uniquely challenging 60 km TT Mountain Circuit now producing laps with an insane average speed of over 217 km/h! But away from the famous fortnight that is the annual TT races, the small island situated in the Irish Sea also provides an incredible place to go touring on a motorcycle due to its stunning and undulating landscapes, winding roads and historic landmarks. For those who have a lust for speed, the infamous Mountain Section remains free from speed restrictions, however riders must treat it with the respect it deserves – the island far from encourages would-be racers to live out their own TT fantasies when the roads are open to normal traffic … One man who can’t resist the exclusive excitement that is the challenge of racing the TT is six-time winner, Michael Rutter. In a racing career spanning 30 years, as well as success on the roads, the 46-year old Englishman has also battled it out for 28 victories in British Superbikes and now combines his competition career by also testing motorcycles for Performance Bikes magazine. So, when it came to quantifying the credentials of the new KTM 1290 SUPER DUKE GT ahead of its release at the end of this year, KTM handed Michael the keys and put him on a ferry from mainland Britain to the Isle of Man. The result of the ride can be seen in this epic new video …  Setting off from the Ben-my-Chree Steam Packet Ferry at the port in Douglas, Rutter’s route toured the town and cruised the coastal road before heading to Fairy Bridge to wave to the fairies (as is tradition for luck). Back through Douglas, Michael and the GT took to the TT circuit until Ballaugh Bridge then headed to the Jurby Motordrome to remove the panniers and add some pace. The race circuit on the north coast of the island provided the possibility for full-throttle thrashing. With the ‘boxes’ back on, Michael and the GT headed to the town of Ramsey, where the road begins its climb of the Snaefell Mountain. Powering out of the Gooseneck, Rutter unleashed the KTM 1290 SUPER DUKE GT’s 175hp of LC8 power, all the way across the mountain before stopping at the Creg-ny-Baa public house. Michael Rutter: “The GT is a world away from what I usually ride, I was amazed by the performance – particularly the engine; the torque and drive is phenomenal. Very impressive. Comfort is a big factor; the seat and bar position were spot-on at speed on track and on the road. For a bike designed to tackle a variety of riding types – having a blast and all-day touring – it works fantastically in all situations, even ridden hard on the fast and bumpy Jurby circuit. Best of all, it has heated grips – a big thing for all year riders and even for summer in the UK!” Michael Rutter (GBR) KTM 1290 SUPER DUKE GT 2018 © Fabbegghy Studio Photos: Fabbegghy Studio Video: Fabbegghy Studio
  25. ISLE OF MAN GT

    ISLE OF MAN GT TT legend Michael Rutter discovers the real definition of sports touring with a unique tour of the famous island riding the new KTM 1290 SUPER DUKE GT in an incredible new video. Michael Rutter (GBR) KTM 1290 SUPER DUKE GT 2018 © Fabbegghy Studio The Isle of Man is steeped in motorcycling history, largely thanks to over 110 years of racing on its public roads with the uniquely challenging 60 km TT Mountain Circuit now producing laps with an insane average speed of over 217 km/h! But away from the famous fortnight that is the annual TT races, the small island situated in the Irish Sea also provides an incredible place to go touring on a motorcycle due to its stunning and undulating landscapes, winding roads and historic landmarks. For those who have a lust for speed, the infamous Mountain Section remains free from speed restrictions, however riders must treat it with the respect it deserves – the island far from encourages would-be racers to live out their own TT fantasies when the roads are open to normal traffic … One man who can’t resist the exclusive excitement that is the challenge of racing the TT is six-time winner, Michael Rutter. In a racing career spanning 30 years, as well as success on the roads, the 46-year old Englishman has also battled it out for 28 victories in British Superbikes and now combines his competition career by also testing motorcycles for Performance Bikes magazine. So, when it came to quantifying the credentials of the new KTM 1290 SUPER DUKE GT ahead of its release at the end of this year, KTM handed Michael the keys and put him on a ferry from mainland Britain to the Isle of Man. The result of the ride can be seen in this epic new video …  Setting off from the Ben-my-Chree Steam Packet Ferry at the port in Douglas, Rutter’s route toured the town and cruised the coastal road before heading to Fairy Bridge to wave to the fairies (as is tradition for luck). Back through Douglas, Michael and the GT took to the TT circuit until Ballaugh Bridge then headed to the Jurby Motordrome to remove the panniers and add some pace. The race circuit on the north coast of the island provided the possibility for full-throttle thrashing. With the ‘boxes’ back on, Michael and the GT headed to the town of Ramsey, where the road begins its climb of the Snaefell Mountain. Powering out of the Gooseneck, Rutter unleashed the KTM 1290 SUPER DUKE GT’s 175hp of LC8 power, all the way across the mountain before stopping at the Creg-ny-Baa public house. Michael Rutter: “The GT is a world away from what I usually ride, I was amazed by the performance – particularly the engine; the torque and drive is phenomenal. Very impressive. Comfort is a big factor; the seat and bar position were spot-on at speed on track and on the road. For a bike designed to tackle a variety of riding types – having a blast and all-day touring – it works fantastically in all situations, even ridden hard on the fast and bumpy Jurby circuit. Best of all, it has heated grips – a big thing for all year riders and even for summer in the UK!” Michael Rutter (GBR) KTM 1290 SUPER DUKE GT 2018 © Fabbegghy Studio Photos: Fabbegghy Studio Video: Fabbegghy Studio
×